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How Many People Are Affected By Diabetes In The World?

Eating Themselves To Death

Eating Themselves To Death

MEXICO has long been a country that derives extraordinary pleasure from eating and drinking—and it hasn’t minded the consequences much either. Gordo or gorda, meaning “chubby”, is used by both wives and husbands as a term of endearment. Pudgy kids bear proudly the nickname gordito, as they tuck into snacks after school slathered with beans, cheese, cream and salsa. Your correspondent, having just arrived to live in Mexico City after more than a decade away, finds the increase in waistlines even more staggering than the increase in traffic. Mexico has become one of the most overweight countries on earth, even more so than the United States; a quarter of its men and a third of its women are obese. Indecorously, the country has even come up with figures on figures: the Mexican Diabetes Federation says that among women between 20 and 49, the average waistline is 91.1cm (35.9 inches), more than 10cm above the “ideal” size. Stores are now full of large- and extra large-sized clothing. Time was, a prominent girth may have been enviable proof of relative prosperity. Now, it is a serious health risk. At a conference here on April 9th it was estimated that more than 10m Mexicans, or almost a sixth of the adult population, suffer from diabetes, largely because of over-eating and increasingly sedentary lifestyles. Mexico has the sixth most cases of diabetes in the world. Diabetes is one of the top two causes of death in the country, alongside (and occasionally overlapping with) heart disease. The diabetes federation says that the illness kills 70,000 people a year. However, it gets far less attention than much less deadly diseases such as HIV/AIDS, not to mention organised crime (which is responsible for roughly 60,000 deaths in the past six years). “It could get to t Continue reading >>

Conversations

Conversations

Nearly 12 percent of Chinese adults (about 113.9 million people) are suffering from diabetes, according to a new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) on Tuesday. Based on nearly 99,000 samples taken in 2010, the study estimates that 11.6 percent of Chinese adults are diabetic, making China’s rate of prevalence of the disease the highest in the world. “The prevalence of diabetes has increased significantly in recent decades and is now reaching epidemic proportions in China,” the researchers write. JAMA notes that diabetes rates in China have risen dramatically over the past decades. While less than one percent of the Chinese population was diabetic in 1980, that number rose to 5.5 percent in 2001, 9.7 percent in 2007 and 11.6 percent today. The JAMA study also indicates that the prevalence of the disease has increased as economic development has given way to overweight and obesity. “Diabetes is a societal and a health care challenge due to complex interplays among genetic, perinatal, lifestyle, and environmental factors, to name but a few. Rapid modernization has resulted in an obesogenic environment characterized by food abundance, physical inactivity, and psychosocial stress,” Dr. Juliana Chan of the Chinese University of Hong Kong writes in an editorial accompanying the report. Only one in three patients was aware of his or her condition, and a mere one in four received treatment. “Even when the individual becomes aware of his or her risk conditions, the health care systems in many developing areas are not designed to manage and support a person’s multiple health needs for 30 to 40 years or more,” Chan added. According to the International Diabetes Federation, more than 371 million suffer from diabetes worldwide, an Continue reading >>

Percentage Of Diabetics In The Global Adult Population In 2017 And 2045

Percentage Of Diabetics In The Global Adult Population In 2017 And 2045

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World Health Day 2016: Facts, Figures And Statistics About Diabetes

World Health Day 2016: Facts, Figures And Statistics About Diabetes

The number of adults worldwide affected by diabetes has quadrupled since 1980 to 422 million, the World Health Organisation has warned in a report on World Health Day. Nearly one in 11 people are now affected by the disease, with obesity and unhealthy eating included in the factors driving the rise. What is diabetes? Why advertise with us Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high, which if left untreated, can lead to severe complications such as heart disease, stroke, sight damage and kidney failure. The amount of sugar in the blood is controlled by insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas which plays a key role in regulating blood glucose levels. When food is digested and enters the bloodstream, insulin moves glucose out of the blood and into cells, where it is broken down to produce energy. In people with diabetes, the body is unable to break down glucose into energy - either because there is not enough insulin, or the insulin in the body does not work efficiently. There are two main types of diabetes - type 1 and type 2. What is type 1 diabetes? In type 1 diabetes, also known as insulin-dependent diabetes, the pancreas does not produce insulin because the body's immune system attacks and destroys cells that produce it. This type of diabetes can develop at any age, but it typically appears before the age of 40 and it is the most prevalent type of diabetes in children. This has led to type 1 diabetes sometimes being referred to as juvenile diabetes or early-onset diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is commonly treated with insulin injections. What is type 2 diabetes? In type 2 diabetes, the body does not produce enough insulin, or the cells in the body do not react to the insulin produced the way they should. This type of dia Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevalence

Diabetes Prevalence

Tweet Since 1996, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK has risen from 1.4 million to 3.5 million. Taking into account the number of people likely to be living with undiagnosed diabetes, the number of people living with diabetes in the UK is over 4 million. Diabetes prevalence in the UK is estimated to rise to 5 million by 2025. Type 2 diabetes in particular has been growing at the particularly high rate and is now one of the world’s most common long term health conditions. UK diabetes prevalence Currently, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK is estimated to be 3.5 million. [16] It is predicted that up to 549,000 people in the UK have diabetes that is yet to be diagnosed. This means that, including the number of undiagnosed people, there is estimated to be over 4 million people living with diabetes in the UK at present. This represents 6% of the UK population or 1 in every 16 people having diabetes (diagnosed and undiagnosed). The prevalence of diabetes in the UK (for adults) is broken down as follows: How many people have diabetes in the UK Country Number of People England 2,913,538 Northern Ireland 84,836 Scotland 271,312 Wales 183,348 The majority of these cases are of type 2 diabetes, which has been linked to increasing cases of obesity. Statistics suggest that a slightly higher proportion of adult men have diabetes. Men account for 56 per cent of UK adults with diabetes and women account for 44 per cent. World diabetes prevalence It is estimated that 415 million people are living with diabetes in the world, which is estimated to be 1 in 11 of the world’s adult population. 46% of people with diabetes are undiagnosed. The figure is expected to rise to 642 million people living with diabetes worldwide by 2040. Prevalence across Continue reading >>

World Health Day: India Among Top 3 Countries With High Diabetic Population

World Health Day: India Among Top 3 Countries With High Diabetic Population

After tightening laws on tobacco and alcohol, experts now want a high tax on sugary drinks as they cause a sugar high that leads to insulin resistance. Ahead of World Health Day (April 7), the Lancet study (to be published online late tonight) said there is a fourfold rise in the number of diabetics – from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014 and half of them live in India, China, USA, Brazil and Indonesia. According to the Lancet study, China, India and USA are among the top three countries with a high number of diabetic population. While the numbers climbed from 20.4 million in China in 1980 to 102.9 million in 2014, the rise has been equally dramatic in India from 11.9 million in 1980 to 64.5 million in India. Prevalence of diabetes has more than doubled for men in India and China (3.7 per cent to 9.1 per cent in India and 3.5 per cent to 9.9 per cent in China). It has also increased by 50 per cent among women in China (5.0 per cent to 7.6 per cent) and 80 per cent among women in India (4.6 per cent to 8.3 per cent). Dietary patterns must change, with more fibre and protein and less of sugar and starches in the diet. A high tax on sugary drinks is needed, as they cause a sugar high that leads to insulin resistance, Dr K Srinath Reddy, President of Public Health Foundation of India told The Indian Express. The government launched an adult screening programme for diabetes and hypertension in some districts, but it has had an inadequate response. Unless early detection and effective treatment become a part of routinely available primary health services, we will fail in protecting persons with diabetes from having serious complications. Urban planning must support safe and pleasurable physical activity, especially active commuting. Public education on the prevent Continue reading >>

Countries With The Lowest Rates Of Diabetes

Countries With The Lowest Rates Of Diabetes

Diabetes is a metabolic disorder diagnosed when someone has abnormally high levels of blood sugar (hyperglycemia). This is due to insufficient secretion of insulin, or insensitivity to this hormone, as insulin is the hormone that takes up and stores sugar from the blood into muscle . High levels of blood sugar can lead to consequences as severe as organ failure, blindness, paralysis, neuropathy, coma, and even death. Stress, inactivity, nutritionally-poor and energy-dense diets, and being obese are not only correlated with one another, but can also work either independently or interdependently to decrease the human body’s ability to secrete insulin and its sensitivity to its blood sugar-lowering actions. With increasingly sedentary lifestyles and global incidence of obesity, diabetes is a worldwide health problem now more than ever before. As you will see, despite having some of the lowest rates of the disease in the world, many of the countries listed below are still vulnerable to increased rates of the disease in the future. Furthermore, lack of diagnostic tools may mean that their actual rates are far higher still, and a lack of access to medical care and financial resources makes those who suffer from the disease in these countries susceptible to the very worst of diabetes' effects. Sub-Saharan African and former Soviet Socialist Republics dominate this list. 10. Angola (2.6%) Many nations in Africa are rapidly developing economically and socially and, as a result, medical services are often struggling to keep up. Diabetes in Angola, for example, remains relatively low, but changes in lifestyle will likely lead to an increase in the chronic disease over the next few years. People are more likely to have sedentary jobs and eat more processed food, which is often pa Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Key facts The number of people with diabetes has risen from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014 (1). The global prevalence of diabetes* among adults over 18 years of age has risen from 4.7% in 1980 to 8.5% in 2014 (1). Diabetes prevalence has been rising more rapidly in middle- and low-income countries. Diabetes is a major cause of blindness, kidney failure, heart attacks, stroke and lower limb amputation. In 2015, an estimated 1.6 million deaths were directly caused by diabetes. Another 2.2 million deaths were attributable to high blood glucose in 2012**. Almost half of all deaths attributable to high blood glucose occur before the age of 70 years. WHO projects that diabetes will be the seventh leading cause of death in 2030 (1). Healthy diet, regular physical activity, maintaining a normal body weight and avoiding tobacco use are ways to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. Diabetes can be treated and its consequences avoided or delayed with diet, physical activity, medication and regular screening and treatment for complications. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. Insulin is a hormone that regulates blood sugar. Hyperglycaemia, or raised blood sugar, is a common effect of uncontrolled diabetes and over time leads to serious damage to many of the body's systems, especially the nerves and blood vessels. In 2014, 8.5% of adults aged 18 years and older had diabetes. In 2015, diabetes was the direct cause of 1.6 million deaths and in 2012 high blood glucose was the cause of another 2.2 million deaths. Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes (previously known as insulin-dependent, juvenile or childhood-onset) is charact Continue reading >>

371 Million People Have Diabetes Globally, About Half Undiagnosed

371 Million People Have Diabetes Globally, About Half Undiagnosed

Diabetes is now a disease that affects 371 million people worldwide, and 187 million of them do not even know they have the disease, according to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). That represents an increase from last year's estimate, which showed 366 million people had the disease. While 4 million people died from the diabetes in 2011, estimates show that 4.8 million people will die this year from complications from the disease -- with people under 60 accounting for half the deaths. The results were released on Nov. 14, World Diabetes Day 2012, in order to bring awareness to the global problem. Researchers estimate that the diabetes dilemma will only increase. By 2030, they expect 552 million people will have the disease. "As millions of undiagnosed people develop diabetes complications, we can expect to see the mortality rate climb," Jean Claude Mbanya, President of the IDF, said in a press release. "On World Diabetes Day, we want to raise awareness that this disease can be controlled and in some cases prevented." The seventh leading cause of death in the U.S., diabetes is a problem that occurs when blood glucose levels are above normal, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports. Glucose is the sugar that is processed from the food we eat, and our pancreas is supposed to make a hormone called insulin which helps the glucose get into our cells to give them energy. Having diabetes indicates that your body is not making enough insulin or isn't utilizing insulin as it should be. There are many types of diabetes, but the most common are Type 1 diabetes (5 percent of diagnosed cases), Type 2 diabetes (about 90 to 95 percent of diagnosed cases) and gestational diabetes (about 2 to 10 percent of diagnosed cases). Type 2 diabetes risk factors include ag Continue reading >>

Epidemiology Of Diabetes Mellitus

Epidemiology Of Diabetes Mellitus

Prevalence (per 1,000 inhabitants) of diabetes worldwide in 2000 - world average was 2.8%. no data ≤ 7.5 7.5–15 15–22.5 22.5–30 30–37.5 37.5–45 45–52.5 52.5–60 60–67.5 67.5–75 75–82.5 ≥ 82.5 Disability-adjusted life year for diabetes mellitus per 100,000 inhabitants in 2004 No data <100 100–200 200–300 300–400 400–500 500–600 600–700 700–800 800–900 900–1,000 1,000–1,500 >1,500 Globally, an estimated 422 million adults are living with diabetes mellitus, according to the latest 2016 data from the World Health Organization (WHO).[1] Diabetes prevalence is increasing rapidly; previous 2013 estimates from the International Diabetes Federation put the number at 381 million people having diabetes.[2] The number is projected to almost double by 2030.[3] Type 2 diabetes makes up about 85-90% of all cases.[4][5] Increases in the overall diabetes prevalence rates largely reflect an increase in risk factors for type 2, notably greater longevity and being overweight or obese.[1] Diabetes mellitus occurs throughout the world, but is more common (especially type 2) in the more developed countries. The greatest increase in prevalence is, however, occurring in low- and middle-income countries[1] including in Asia and Africa, where most patients will probably be found by 2030.[3] The increase in incidence in developing countries follows the trend of urbanization and lifestyle changes, including increasingly sedentary lifestyles, less physically demanding work and the global nutrition transition, marked by increased intake of foods that are high energy-dense but nutrient-poor (often high in sugar and saturated fats, sometimes referred to as the Western pattern diet).[1][3] The risk of getting type 2 diabetes has been widely found to be associat Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetes

What Is Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs when the pancreas is no longer able to make insulin, or when the body cannot make good use of the insulin it produces. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas, that acts like a key to let glucose from the food we eat pass from the blood stream into the cells in the body to produce energy. All carbohydrate foods are broken down into glucose in the blood. Insulin helps glucose get into the cells. Not being able to produce insulin or use it effectively leads to raised glucose levels in the blood (known as hyperglycaemia). Over the long-term high glucose levels are associated with damage to the body and failure of various organs and tissues. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Facts

Type 1 Diabetes Facts

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease that occurs when a person’s pancreas stops producing insulin, the hormone that controls blood-sugar levels. T1D develops when the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells are mistakenly destroyed by the body’s immune system. The cause of this attack is still being researched, however scientists believe the cause may have genetic and environmental components. There is nothing anyone can do to prevent T1D. Presently, there is no known cure. Who T1D affects Type 1 diabetes (sometimes known as juvenile diabetes) affects children and adults, though people can be diagnosed at any age. With a typically quick onset, T1D must be managed with the use of insulin—either via injection or insulin pump. Soon, people who are insulin dependent may also be able to use artificial pancreas systems to automatically administer their insulin. How T1D is managed Type 1 diabetes is a 24/7 disease that requires constant management. People with T1D continuously and carefully balance insulin intake with eating, exercise and other activities. They also measure blood-sugar levels through finger pricks, ideally at least six times a day, or by wearing a continuous glucose monitor. Even with a strict regimen, people with T1D may still experience dangerously high or low blood-glucose levels that can, in extreme cases, be life threatening. Every person with T1D becomes actively involved in managing his or her disease. Insulin is not a cure While insulin therapy keeps people with T1D alive and can help keep blood-glucose levels within recommended range, it is not a cure, nor does it prevent the possibility of T1D’s serious effects. The outlook for treatments and a cure Although T1D is a serious and challenging disease, long-term management options cont Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevalence (% Of Population Ages 20 To 79) - Country Ranking

Diabetes Prevalence (% Of Population Ages 20 To 79) - Country Ranking

Definition: Diabetes prevalence refers to the percentage of people ages 20-79 who have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Source: International Diabetes Federation, Diabetes Atlas. Rank Country Value Year 1 Mauritius 22.30 2015 2 Palau 20.90 2015 3 Saudi Arabia 20.00 2015 3 Qatar 20.00 2015 3 Kuwait 20.00 2015 6 New Caledonia 19.60 2015 6 Bahrain 19.60 2015 8 United Arab Emirates 19.30 2015 9 Kiribati 18.60 2015 10 Malaysia 17.90 2015 11 Seychelles 17.40 2015 12 Tuvalu 17.30 2015 13 Egypt 16.70 2015 14 Vanuatu 16.60 2015 15 Belize 16.50 2015 16 Solomon Islands 16.40 2015 17 Mexico 15.80 2015 18 Papua New Guinea 15.30 2015 19 Oman 14.80 2015 20 Fiji 13.80 2015 21 Brunei 13.70 2015 21 Tonga 13.70 2015 23 Trinidad and Tobago 13.60 2015 23 Antigua and Barbuda 13.60 2015 23 Barbados 13.60 2015 26 The Bahamas 13.20 2015 27 Cayman Islands 13.10 2015 28 Lebanon 13.00 2015 28 St. Kitts and Nevis 13.00 2015 30 Turkey 12.80 2015 31 Dominica 12.60 2015 32 Suriname 12.50 2015 33 Puerto Rico 12.10 2015 34 Venezuela 12.00 2015 35 St. Vincent and the Grenadines 11.90 2015 36 Jordan 11.70 2015 37 Jamaica 11.50 2015 38 Grenada 11.40 2015 39 Guyana 11.20 2015 40 Guatemala 11.10 2015 41 St. Lucia 10.90 2015 42 United States 10.80 2015 43 Singapore 10.50 2015 43 Montenegro 10.50 2015 45 Libya 10.40 2015 45 Brazil 10.40 2015 47 Serbia 10.30 2015 47 Albania 10.30 2015 47 Macedonia 10.30 2015 50 Iran 10.10 2015 51 Chile 10.00 2015 51 Cuba 10.00 2015 51 Colombia 10.00 2015 54 Bosnia and Herzegovina 9.90 2015 54 Comoros 9.90 2015 54 Malta 9.90 2015 54 Portugal 9.90 2015 58 Panama 9.80 2015 58 China 9.80 2015 60 Paraguay 9.70 2015 61 Cyprus 9.60 2015 61 Tunisia 9.60 2015 63 Iraq 9.30 2015 63 Bhutan 9.30 2015 63 India 9.30 2015 66 Honduras 9.20 2015 66 Nicaragua 9.20 2015 66 El Salvador 9.20 2015 66 Ecuad Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Facts And Figures

Type 1 Diabetes Facts And Figures

The incidence of type 1 diabetes is growing at an alarming rate. View the latest figures and links to national public information resources below. Quick facts Approximately 400,000 people are currently living with type 1 diabetes in the UK, with over 29,000 of them children Incidence is increasing by about four per cent each year, particularly in children under five, with a five percent increase each year in this age group over the last 20 years Type 1 diabetes affects 97 per cent of all children with diabetes in England 90 per cent of people diagnosed with type 1 diabetes have no family history of the condition Although it used to be referred to as ‘juvenile diabetes’, around half of newly diagnosed cases are in people over the age of 18 The UK has one of the highest rates of type 1 diabetes in the world, for reasons that are currently unknown A person with type 1 diabetes will have around 65,000 injections and measure their blood glucose over 80,000 times in their lifetime Public information resources National Diabetes Audit – One of the largest annual clinical audits in the world. It measures the effectiveness of diabetes care against National Institute of Clinical Excellence clinical guidelines and quality standards. Quality and Outcomes Framework – This is the annual programme that details GP practice achievement results and rewards practices for the achievement of quality care. The QOF awards practices achievement points for managing some of the most common chronic diseases, diabetes being one. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Rates May Double Worldwide By 2030

Diabetes Rates May Double Worldwide By 2030

April 26, 2004 -- The number of people with diabetes will double worldwide by 2030, according to new estimates from researchers at the World Health Organization (WHO) and several European universities. Although the U.S. is expected to experience a far more rapid increase in diabetes rates, the study suggests the greatest relative increases will be in the Middle East, sub-Saharan Africa, and India. That's because researchers say deaths due to infectious diseases as well as maternal and infant deaths in developing countries are expected to continue to drop in the next 30 years. Meanwhile, as diabetes rates climb in these areas, deaths due to related diseases, such as heart disease, will increase and account for a larger proportion of deaths in developing countries. According to the study, published in the May issue of Diabetes Care, the top 10 countries with the highest number of estimated diabetes cases for 2000 and 2030 are as follows: 2000 2030 Rank Country People with diabetes (millions) Country People with diabetes (millions) 1 India 31.7 India 79.4 2 China 20.8 China 42.3 3 U.S. 17.7 U.S. 30.3 4 Indonesia 8.4 Indonesia 21.3 5 Japan 6.8 Pakistan 13.9 6 Pakistan 5.2 Brazil 11.3 7 Russian Federation 4.6 Bangladesh 11.1 8 Brazil 4.6 Japan 8.9 9 Italy 4.3 Philippines 7.8 10 Bangladesh 3.2 Egypt 6.7 *CGM-based treatment requires fingersticks for calibration, if patient is taking acetaminophen, or if symptoms/expectations do not match CGM readings, and if not performed, may result in hypoglycemia. Please see important risk and safety information. The study shows that the three countries with the most people with diabetes are expected to remain India, China, and the U.S. But researchers predict an even higher increase than the CDC predicted in 2001. The CDC study projected Continue reading >>

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