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How Many Mg Of Metformin Should I Take For Pcos?

Metformin, Weight Loss & Pcos – Does It Actually Work?

Metformin, Weight Loss & Pcos – Does It Actually Work?

Did you know that one of the main reasons you can't lose weight with PCOS is because of your hormones? It's true, and that's why many women (and physicians) turn to using Metformin to try and help with weight loss. But just because it works for some people doesn't mean it will necessarily work for YOU. Find out why metformin helps with weight loss, but more important what works better and how to finally lose weight if you have PCOS. ​ Insulin & PCOS: Why It's so Important One of the most common medications prescribed for PCOS is metformin. But, PCOS is a hormonal condition which results in weight gain, hair growth on the face, infertility, acne and estrogen/progesterone imbalances. So why is metformin, a medication used to lower blood sugar and treat insulin resistance, used to treat estrogen/progesterone imbalances in women? The logic is quite simple: Most of the symptoms of PCOS (all those listed above) stem from insulin resistanc e! In fact many physicians recommend that ALL women with PCOS should be treated for insulin resistance regardless of what their fasting insulin and fasting blood sugar levels are. This means that the root cause of PCOS (at least the majority of it) is insulin resistance, and this is why metformin is so commonly used to treat. Insulin resistance causes a block of glucose uptake in your skeletal muscles which results in a lower metabolism (and weight gain), insulin also directly acts on your ovaries and adrenals increasing androgens like testosterone and DHEA. It's also the action of insulin on your pituitary that results in increased LH production which over stimulates your ovaries resulting in the characteristic "cysts" of PCOS. ​ High levels of DHEA and testosterone lead to acne and hair growth (hirsutism). ​ But one simple question r Continue reading >>

Metformin Dose In Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (pcos)

Metformin Dose In Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (pcos)

A study examined different dose regimes in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS): A :500 mg twice a day (1000 mg); B :500 mg three times a day (1500 mg); C :850 mg twice a day (1700 mg). The study study comprehensively analysed the dose-response relationship of metformin on clinical, hormonal and metabolic aspects of PCOS. The authors concluded that "... results from our study seem to indicate that the effects of metformin treatment in PCOS are independent of the administered dose. Different anthropometrical and metabolic characteristics do not give grounds for an adjustment of the dose of the drug. Hence, since metformin efficacy in PCOS seems not to be dose related, while side effects are, low dosages should be preferred in the clinical practice." Titration of metformin An NHS source suggests a titration schedules for metformin (1) with women with side effects having a slower titration to a target dose of 1g twice daily of metformin. Slow route (in women with side effects) as: Week 1 - 250mg once a day Week 2 - 250mg twice a day Week 3 - 250mg three times a day Week 4 - 500mg twice a day Week 5 - 500mg three times a day Week 6 - 1g twice a day Reference: Continue reading >>

Original Article The Role Of Continuing Metformin Therapy During Pregnancy In The Reduction Of Gestational Diabetes And Improving Pregnancy Outcomes In Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Original Article The Role Of Continuing Metformin Therapy During Pregnancy In The Reduction Of Gestational Diabetes And Improving Pregnancy Outcomes In Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Abstract To evaluate the value of continuing metformin therapy in women with PCOS throughout pregnancy and its role in reducing the development of gestational diabetes and improving pregnancy outcome by reducing spontaneous miscarriage rate. Fifty-seven infertile cases with polycystic ovary syndrome who became pregnant were classified into two groups: group 1 included 31 cases who conceived while taking metformin therapy with or without other ovulation inducing agents and continued metformin during pregnancy in a dose of 1000–1500 mg daily and group 2 included 26 cases who conceived without taking metformin and did not take it during pregnancy. Maternal outcome measures including; assessment of insulin resistance, incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus, the need for insulin therapy and incidence of preeclampsia. Fetal outcome measures include incidence of, spontaneous miscarriage, preterm birth, fetal growth abnormalities, suspected fetal asphyxia at birth, fetal anomalies and neonatal mortality. The incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus was significantly lower in cases who received metformin than those who did not receive metformin during pregnancy (3.2% versus 23.08%, respectively), and spontaneous miscarriage occurred in one case (3.2%) in patients who continued metformin compared to 7 cases (26.9%) in patients who did not take metformin. No significant differences between both groups in other outcome measures. Continuous metformin therapy throughout pregnancy in women with PCOS improves pregnancy outcomes by decreasing spontaneous miscarriage rates and prevention of gestational diabetes mellitus with its co morbidity and mortality. Continue reading >>

Pcos Treatment: Metformin

Pcos Treatment: Metformin

We've been discussing Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) and its impact on the health of women of size. Today, let's discuss the use of metformin in the treatment of PCOS. So far we've talked about the definition and symptoms of PCOS, how it presents, its testing and diagnosis, and its possible causes. Now we are discussing common treatment protocols for the metabolic issues of PCOS, and the pros and cons of each treatment option. (Fertility treatment will be covered in a different set of posts.) Today, we discuss metformin (Glucophage). Disclaimer: While the following information is based on my best understanding of the research, I am not a medical health-care professional and no medical advice should be inferred. Always do your own research and consult your healthcare provider. Trigger Warning: Remember that the purpose of these posts is to provide a basic introduction to PCOS with a size acceptance approach that is rare on PCOS websites. However, there will be some occasional mention of weight loss in some posts because this is part of the traditional approach to treating PCOS and fair coverage demands exploring the pros and cons of all treatments. This approach has been approved by the fatosphere monitors. In this post, there is a brief mention of the weight loss properties associated with metformin in some people. Insulin-Sensitizing Agent Overview Because insulin resistance (IR) is a strong part of the PCOS profile, because IR may be an integral part of its mechanism, and because decompensation of glucose tolerance due to IR is a big part of the long-term health impact of PCOS, treatment with insulin-sensitizing agents is considered a vitally important part of PCOS treatment by most clinicians. Insulin-sensitizing agents help the body to use its own insulin more e Continue reading >>

Metformin And Weight Loss In Obese Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Comparison Of Doses

Metformin And Weight Loss In Obese Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Comparison Of Doses

Context: Metformin treatment of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is widespread, as determined by studies with diverse patient populations. No comparative examination of weight changes or metabolite responses to different doses has been reported. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine whether different doses of metformin (1500 or 2550 mg/ d) would have different effects on body weight, circulating hormones, markers of inflammation, and lipid profiles. Design: The study included prospective cohorts randomized to two doses of metformin. Setting: The study was performed at a university teaching hospital with patients from gynecology/endocrinology clinics. Patients: The patients studied were obese (body mass index, 30 to <37 kg/m2; n = 42) and morbidly obese (body mass index, ≥37 kg/m2; n = 41) women with PCOS. Intervention: Patients were randomized to two doses of metformin, and parameters were assessed after 4 and 8 months. Main Outcome Measures: The main outcome measures were changes in body mass, circulating hormones, markers of inflammation, and lipid profiles. Results: Intention to treat analyses showed significant weight loss in both dose groups. Only the obese subgroup showed a dose relationship (1.5 and 3.6 kg in 1500- and 2550-mg groups, respectively; P = 0.04). The morbidly obese group showed similar reductions (3.9 and 3.8 kg) in both groups. Suppression of androstenedione was significant with both metformin doses, but there was no clear dose relationship. Generally, beneficial changes in lipid profiles were not related to dose. Conclusion: Weight loss is a feature of protracted metformin therapy in obese women with PCOS, with greater weight reduction potentially achievable with higher doses. Additional studies are required to determine wh Continue reading >>

Role Of Metformin In The Management Of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Role Of Metformin In The Management Of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Go to: Background Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinological disorder affecting 4–12% of women [Diamanti-Kandarakis et al. 1999; Farah et al. 1999; Knochenhauer et al. 1998]. It has also been the most controversial medical condition and every aspect has received a lot of attention from the nomenclature to the management. Several descriptions of similar conditions took place in the 20th century and it was named Stein—Leventhal Syndrome in 1935 after the authors who described polycystic ovarian morphology in patients suffering from hirsutism, amenorrhoea and infertility [Leventhal, 1958; Stein and Leventhal, 1935]. PCOS was also called polycystic ‘ovarian’ syndrome implying that the primary pathology lies in or triggered by the ovary. Others have called it polycystic ovary disease (PCOD), which is the least used term for obvious reasons. Currently, PCOS refers to a disorder with a combination of reproductive and metabolic characteristics. This has evolved over time with controversy over the definition culminating in the latest consensus [ESHRE/ASRM, 2004] which instead of solving the issue created more controversy [Azziz et al. 2006]. In the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology/American Society of Reproductive Medicine (ESHRE/ASRM) consensus, at least two of the following features are needed to make the diagnosis; oligo/anovulation, hyperandrogenism, and polycystic features on ultrasound scan [ESHRE/ASRM, 2004]. The Androgen Excess Society, however, recommended that androgen excess should remain a constant feature of PCOS irrespective of the ovulatory status and morphological features of the ovaries [Azziz et al. 2006]. For almost three decades, PCOS has been regarded as a life course disease which besides its reproductiv Continue reading >>

Have Pcos Or Diabetes? Is Metformin (glucophage) Your Best Choice?

Have Pcos Or Diabetes? Is Metformin (glucophage) Your Best Choice?

Should you take metformin -- nor not? Is there a better alternative? This page will answer your questions. It's an anti-diabetic drug sometimes used to treat PCOS (polycystic ovary syndrome), although it is used chiefly to help control Type 2 diabetes. This drug offers both benefits and significant risks. Free PCOS Newsletter The FDA has approved it only for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes. Because of this limitation, some physicians don't have much clinical experience using Glucophage to treat PCOS and don't always feel comfortable using it unless you have diabetes. 13 Side Effects of Metformin Your Doctor Didn't Tell You About Did you know that metformin has at least 13 under-recognized side effects? Some of them can be serious. Read more about the side effects. Can't Tolerate It? Try This! Medical research is now showing that there are natural alternatives to this and other drugs for treating PCOS, diabetes or metabolic syndrome. So if you're uncomfortable with the idea of taking Glucophage for years to come, or you've tried it but can't tolerate its side effects, take a look at the natural alternatives that are just as effective as metformin. Does It Reduce PCOS Symptoms? Some medical guidelines say it is not the first thing you should try for controlling PCOS. However, it may be helpful IF you have insulin resistance. Read more... Take Supplemental Vitamin B12! Recent research is showing that you will develop a vitamin B12 deficiency if you take this drug for over a year or so. A deficiency in vitamin B12 could have undesirable consequences if for fetal development if you're pregnancy or trying to become pregnant. Read more... Is It Appropriate for Girls? As girls and teenagers start to have trouble with their weight, irregular periods, early appearance of public Continue reading >>

Metformin And Pcos: Everything You Need To Know

Metformin And Pcos: Everything You Need To Know

Metformin is a type of medication used to treat Type 2 Diabetes. Because there is a strong link between diabetes and PCOS, metformin is now commonly proscribed to treat PCOS. But should it be? What is the real relationship between metformin and PCOS? Can Metformin used for PCOS help lessen PCOS symptoms? Metformin used for PCOS: The Science PCOS is an infertility condition that often causes acne, facial hair growth, balding, low sex drive, weight gain, difficulty with weight loss, and mental health disturbances such as depression and anxiety in approximately 15% of women. It is also associated with a myriad of health conditions, spanning from diabetes to hypothyroidism and to heart disease. PCOS is, in short, not a condition to sneeze at. PCOS is a condition of hormone imbalance. With PCOS, male sex hormones such as testosterone and DHEA-S rise relative to the female sex hormones estrogen and progesterone. (…Roughly speaking – it’s complicated. For a full-blown account of the science of PCOS and how it affects you, see here.) Elevated testosterone is very often the primary culprit in causing PCOS. (But not always! For one of my most thorough accounts of other things that can cause PCOS, see here.) Insulin causes testosterone levels to rise because insulin tells the ovaries to produce testosterone. Basically, elevated insulin causes elevated testosterone, which causes PCOS. This is where metformin comes into play. Metformin lowers blood sugar levels below what they would otherwise be after a meal. This is because it intervenes with the liver’s interaction with and production of glucose. Insulin is the body’s way of dealing with blood sugar. If blood sugar is lower, then insulin will be lower, and thus testosterone will be lower. Metformin decreases blood sugar, Continue reading >>

How To Take Metformin For Pcos

How To Take Metformin For Pcos

by eHow Health Editor; Updated September 30, 2017 How to Take Metformin for PCOS. Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is a disorder of the endocrine system and is a leading cause of infertility in women. With the numerous cysts it causes on the ovaries, PCOS affects much more than just the reproductive organs. It is closely linked with insulin resistance and type II diabetes, for unknown reasons. Prescribing metformin, a popular anti-diabetes drug, often helps control the symptoms of PCOS, even in women without insulin resistance. Consult with your doctor about the dosage of metformin that he's prescribed for you to take. Pills are available in 500mg, 850mg and 1000mg increments. Discuss the advantages of the extended release version of metformin to see if it is right for you. The slow release reduces the gastrointestinal upset associated with metformin. It also allows you to take your full daily dose at one time. Begin by taking a quarter of your full dose for the first week. Add another quarter for the second week, another quarter for the third week and then take the full dose starting at the fourth week. Ramping up to the full dose also lessens the severity of the gastrointestinal upset. Be prepared to suffer some diarrhea, nausea, cramps and vomiting for the first couple of weeks. These side effects should go away after two or three weeks with regular use of metformin. Take the metformin at the end of a meal or at bedtime to reduce the gastrointestinal side effects. Follow a low glycemic index diet and avoid alcohol. This will help with the side effects, and also increase the effectiveness of metformin. Continue taking the metformin for 6 months. The majority of PCOS patients will see improvements in insulin levels and ovulatory function within that time. Be aware t Continue reading >>

Ocs Plus Metformin For The Treatment Of Pcos

Ocs Plus Metformin For The Treatment Of Pcos

Oral Contraceptives Plus Metformin for the Treatment of the Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Would the combination of levonorgestrel ethinyl estradiol plus metformin be effective for the treatment of patients with the polycystic ovary syndrome? Response from Robert L. Barbieri, MD The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is defined as the presence of both ovulatory dysfunction and hyperandrogenism. In women with PCOS, oligo- or anovulation manifests itself as irregular cycles with oligo- or amenorrhea. Hyperandrogenism can be identified by physical examination, ie, the presence of hirsutism or by laboratory tests that demonstrate an elevated circulating concentration of a major androgen, ie, free testosterone, total testosterone, and/or androstenedione. A third criterion for the diagnosis of PCOS is to exclude other causes of hyperandrogenism, such as nonclassic adrenal hyperplasia resulting from a 21-hydroxylase defect or an androgen-producing adrenal or ovarian tumor. PCOS occurs in approximately 5% to 7% of women of reproductive age.[ 1 , 2 ] This makes PCOS the most common endocrinopathy of women. Women with PCOS have both abnormally elevated luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion[ 3 , 4 ] and hyperinsulinemia as a result of insulin resistance.[ 5 ] The combination of hypersecretion of LH and insulin causes ovarian androgen overproduction.[ 6 ] In turn, ovarian androgen overproduction causes hirsutism and prevents normal ovarian follicle growth, preventing regular ovulation. PCOS can be treated by lowering LH hypersecretion (oral contraceptive pills or GnRH agonist analogues) or by reversing the hyperinsulinemia that is caused by insulin resistance (weight loss or metformin). An intriguing idea is to use oral contraceptives plus metformin in combination to simultaneously attack t Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects For Pcos: 6 Things You Need To Know

Metformin Side Effects For Pcos: 6 Things You Need To Know

Insulin resistance is seen in the majority of women with PCOS. Doctors prescribe metformin for PCOS because it is an effective insulin sensitizer. However, the drug comes with its share of side effects. Let’s look at Metformin side effects for PCOS in detail. Metformin Side Effects For PCOS 1. Malaise Or Physical Discomfort As many as 1 in every 4 women on metformin just does not feel well. There is a feeling of fatigue even without much physical exertion. Sometimes, this fatigue is accompanied with aches that can last for a varying degree of time. While this may not sound too severe, it is one of the most common Metformin side effect for PCOS. 2. Gastrointestinal Distress Gastrointestinal problems is another common Metformin side effect for PCOS (experienced by nearly a third of women taking the drug.) These problems include abdominal pain, nausea, occasional vomiting, loose motions, irregular bowel movements or diarrhea. Bloating and flatulence can be a major source of embarrassment. Anorexia and a sharp metallic taste can play havoc with appetite, especially because eating a healthy diet at the right times is critical for PCOS patients. Heartburn and headaches add to the suffering caused by PCOS symptoms. 3. Anemia Another Metformin side effect for PCOS is a decrease in Vitamin B12 levels because the drug affects the absorption of this vitamin. Vitamin B12 is vital for red blood cell formation. When levels of vitamin B12 go down, you can suffer from anemia. Common symptoms of anemia include tiredness, lightheadedness, and dizziness. Vitamin B12 also plays an important role in many bodily processes. For example, there is evidence of a relationship between low levels of vitamin B12 and an increased risk of heart diseases. 4. Accumulation Of Homocysteine Long-term use Continue reading >>

How Long Does It Take For Metformin To Work For Conception?

How Long Does It Take For Metformin To Work For Conception?

Metformin, also known as Glucophage, is a medication that is used to regulate the levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Metformin accomplishes its task through three methods. First, it causes the liver to produce less glucose. Second, metformin helps your stomach to absorb less glucose from the food that you eat. Finally, metformin improves the efficiency of the insulin that the body produces, which reduces the amount of glucose that is in your blood. Metformin is often prescribed for people with Type II diabetes. How long it takes Metformin to work depends on the reason that a woman is taking metformin. If a woman is taking metformin to regulate her blood sugar, metformin typically will work within a few days or a few weeks at the most. For the woman with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) metformin can help to reduce the amount of insulin in the body. Once the insulin levels are under control, many women will then experience improved ovulation. If metformin is going to work for a woman who has experienced fertility problems because of her polycystic ovarian syndrome, it will typically help within three to six months. Unlike most fertility treatments, metformin does not cause a risk of having a multiple or twin pregnancy. If metformin alone does not help a woman with PCOS who is trying to conceive, a fertility doctor may prescribe Clomid, as well. If metformin is prescribed for a woman with PCOS to help restore a regular, normal menstrual cycle, metformin can work within 4 to 8 weeks. In addition, the stabilized levels of insulin may affect the other hormones in a woman’s body, and reduce other symptoms of PCOS. Some women, either with diabetes or PCOS, use metformin as a tool for weight loss. If this is the case, weight loss can occur somewhere between 1 and 5 wee Continue reading >>

Must I Increase My Dose Of Metformin To Lose Weight?

Must I Increase My Dose Of Metformin To Lose Weight?

Weight loss is an integral aspect of improving Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, or PCOS, in women who are overweight. Carrying extra weight can cause the condition’s symptoms to become more severe, and can even increase the level of Insulin Resistance (IR) that a woman experiences.1 IR occurs when the body’s cells become desensitized to insulin, preventing the hormone from turning glucose into energy. This results in high blood sugar and, in some cases, diabetes. For this reason, Metformin, a popular diabetes medication, is also used to improve PCOS. Aside from regulating blood sugar levels, this pharmaceutical, also known as Glucophage, contributes to weight loss. How Metformin Encourages PCOS Weight Loss Insulin is a hormone that triggers both hunger and the production of fat cells. Therefore, by reducing insulin, women can reduce the amount of food they eat as well as the amount of fat cells that their bodies produce.2 Metformin’s primary function is to reduce insulin, so it is only natural that this medication contributes to weight loss. How Much Medication Is Necessary? Dosage is determined by several factors; healthcare professionals consider medical history, body type, and severity of symptoms when coming to the proper dosage. Metformin comes in three different sized pills: 500 mg, 850 mg, and 1,000 mg.2 Generally, individuals are prescribed between 850 and 1,000 mg two times per day, with 850 mg three times per day being the maximum amount of the medication safe to consume.2 Typically, doctors will prescribe a low dose to gauge the body’s reaction to the medication.2 If the body needs more, physicians will alter the dosage until the right amount is achieved. Because so many factors contribute to the proper dosage, many women who are prescribed different amou Continue reading >>

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Fertility Treatment With Metformin (glucophage)

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Fertility Treatment With Metformin (glucophage)

How Metformin Is Used for Polycystic Ovaries Polycystic ovarian syndrome is a common cause of anovulation and infertility in women. These women do not ovulate (release eggs) regularly and therefore have irregular menstrual periods. The ovaries have many small cysts (2-7 mm diameter) called antral follicles, giving the ovaries a characteristic "polycystic" (many cysts) appearance on ultrasound. A relatively new method of treating ovulation problems in women with polycystic ovarian disease is to use an oral medication called metformin (brand name is Glucophage). Metformin has traditionally been used as an oral drug to help control diabetes. Then, some smart doctor figured out that polycystic ovarian syndrome treatment with metformin can be very effective. If Glucophage alone does not result in ovulation and pregnancy, we often use: If the combination therapy is not effective, we can try: Metformin Use with IVF Treatment We also use Glucophage in women going through in vitro fertilization for PCOS, and for those with very high antral follicle counts - if their ovaries are "polycystic" by ultrasound. We find that some women with polycystic ovaries respond with a "smoother" response to the injectable FSH medication if they have been taking Glucophage. Risks and Side Effects of Metformin / Glucophage In about 25% of women Glucophage causes side effects which may include abdominal discomfort, cramping, diarrhea and nausea. The side effects may be severe enough to make the woman stop the Glucophage medication. We are not aware of any serious complications resulting from Glucophage treatment. Another oral medication used for diabetes called Troglitazone has been associated with liver failure and death in rare cases. This has been publicized on television shows, in newspapers, et Continue reading >>

Pcos: Insulin And Metformin

Pcos: Insulin And Metformin

Young women with PCOS often have elevated insulin levels and are more likely to develop diabetes. Metformin is a medication often prescribed for women with PCOS to help prevent diabetes. A lifestyle that includes healthy nutrition and daily exercise is the most important part of a PCOS treatment plan. What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone made by an organ in the body called the pancreas. The food you eat is broken down into simple sugar (glucose) during digestion. Glucose is absorbed into the blood after you eat. Insulin helps glucose enter the cells of the body to be used as energy. If there’s not enough insulin in the body, or if the body can’t use the insulin, sugar levels in the blood become higher. What is insulin resistance? If your body is resistant to insulin, it means you need high levels of insulin to keep your blood sugar normal. Certain medical conditions such as being overweight or having PCOS can cause insulin resistance. Insulin resistance tends to run in families. What can insulin resistance do to me? High insulin levels can cause thickening and darkening of the skin (acanthosis nigricans) on the back of the neck, axilla (under the arms), and groin area. In young women with PCOS, high insulin levels can cause the ovaries to make more androgen hormones such as testosterone. This can cause increased body hair, acne, and irregular or few periods. Having insulin resistance can increase your risk of developing diabetes. How can I lower my insulin levels? You can help lower your insulin levels naturally by eating fewer starches and sugars, and more foods that are high in fiber and low in refined carbohydrates. Low glycemic foods, on the other hand, don’t raise your blood sugar or insulin levels as much as foods that are high in sugar or refined carbohydr Continue reading >>

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