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How Many Kids Have Diabetes

Number Of Americans With Diabetes Projected To Double Or Triple By 2050

Number Of Americans With Diabetes Projected To Double Or Triple By 2050

This page is a historical archive and is no longer maintained. For current information, please visit Older, more diverse population and longer lifespans contribute to increase As many as 1 in 3 U.S. adults could have diabetes by 2050 if current trends continue, according to a new analysis from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. One in 10 U.S. adults has diabetes now. The prevalence is expected to rise sharply over the next 40 years due to an aging population more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, increases in minority groups that are at high risk for type 2 diabetes, and people with diabetes living longer, according to CDC projections published in the journal Population Health Metrics. Because the study factored in aging, minority populations and lifespan, the projections are higher than previous estimates. The report predicts that the number of new diabetes cases each year will increase from 8 per 1,000 people in 2008, to 15 per 1,000 in 2050. The report estimates that the number of Americans with diabetes will range from 1 in 3 to 1 in 5 by 2050. That range reflects differing assumptions about how many people will develop diabetes, and how long they will live after developing the disease. "These are alarming numbers that show how critical it is to change the course of type 2 diabetes," said Ann Albright, PhD, RD, director of CDC's Division of Diabetes Translation. "Successful programs to improve lifestyle choices on healthy eating and physical activity must be made more widely available, because the stakes are too high and the personal toll too devastating to fail." Proper diet and physical activity can reduce the risk of diabetes and help to control the condition in people with diabetes. Effective prevention programs directed at groups at high risk of t Continue reading >>

How Much Is Your Child's Diabetes Influencing His Behavior?

How Much Is Your Child's Diabetes Influencing His Behavior?

Your child is in the midst of a temper tantrum, which a kid will do no matter what his age, and before you discipline him, you stop yourself with these questions: “Maybe it’s his blood sugar. Maybe he’s low again. Maybe his BG readings are high. Then again, maybe he’s just plain acting out.” These questions plague most parents with children who have diabetes: How can you really know if a tantrum is just bad behavior or if it’s diabetes? Diabetes adds in a new level of complexity to parenting and specifically to reading and then managing a child’s behavior. Before a diabetes diagnosis, an all-out temper tantrum may have meant a trip to the Time-Out Corner. Or, if you’ve an older child, a fast trip to his room with all privileges revoked (and don’t forget to give me your phone and iPod on your way to room) Now, with diabetes in the picture, parents need to consider whether or not BG levels are impacting their kids’ behavior. Low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, is characterized by symptoms like mood changes, irritability, irrational behavior and even belligerence. Parents of Type 1 kids know these tell-tale signs all too well and often pull out the glucose tabs as their first line of defense. On the other hand, high BG levels or hyperglycemia can impact behavior too. Symptoms are wide ranging, and include general malaise, difficulty concentrating, nausea and headaches. My son likens prolonged high blood sugars to being poisoned. Who’s not going be a bit on the cantankerous side if he’s feeling like that? The ADA conducted a study with feedback from 42 parents with Type 1 kids aged 5 to 10. For the study, researchers measured a child’s BG levels twice during a 72-hour period and had his parents fill out a questionnaire with behavior-related questions Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is the type of diabetes that typically develops in children and in young adults. In type 1 diabetes the body stops making insulin and the blood sugar (glucose) level goes very high. Treatment to control the blood glucose level is with insulin injections and a healthy diet. Other treatments aim to reduce the risk of complications. They include reducing blood pressure if it is high and advice to lead a healthy lifestyle. What is type 1 diabetes? What is type 1 diabetes? Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. Diabetes mellitus (just called diabetes from now on) occurs when the level of sugar (glucose) in the blood becomes higher than normal. There are two main types of diabetes. These are called type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes usually first develops in children or young adults. In the UK about 1 in 300 people develop type 1 diabetes at some stage. With type 1 diabet Continue reading >>

Too Much Bad Food, Too Little Exercise Is Leading To Devastating Diabetes For Kids | Miami Herald

Too Much Bad Food, Too Little Exercise Is Leading To Devastating Diabetes For Kids | Miami Herald

The term “adult-onset diabetes” is no longer relevant, as the numbers of kids and teens who are being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes continues to climb – at alarming rates. Doctors attribute poor diets and lack of exercise on the sharp rise of Type 2 diabetes in youth in the U.S., especially among certain ethnic and racial groups. “Unfortunately, this is all part of the obesity epidemic sweeping our country, which also affects younger kids,” says Dr. Pascual de Santis, an endocrinologist with Baptist Health Medical Group. “This has to do with increased consumption of processed, and rich-in-calorie foods, as well as the significant decrease of physical activity in this population — less sports and more video games.” Never miss a local story. Sign up today for a free 30 day free trial of unlimited digital access. SUBSCRIBE NOW De Santis says genetics and diet are “the two hits” that often determine if someone is at risk for developing Type 2 diabetes. “There are plenty of kids who are obese or overweight that do not develop diabetes,” he says. “This is true mostly in Caucasians. Most other ethnic groups are at higher risks of developing this disease.” In South Florida, the disease is particularly prevalent within African-American and Hispanic communities. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH), funded a decade-long study, which concluded in 2012, called SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth. It shows alarming figures in the rate of new diagnosed cases of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes in adolescents. New cases of Type 2 diabetes in people under 20 increased 4.8 percent per year, more than double the rate of new Type 1 diabetes cases, which increased 1.8 percent annually. They study also showed that i Continue reading >>

Medical Xpress: Type 1 Diabetes As Common In Adults As Children, But Many Adults Misdiagnosed

Medical Xpress: Type 1 Diabetes As Common In Adults As Children, But Many Adults Misdiagnosed

Type 1 diabetes as common in adults as children, but many adults misdiagnosed Type 1 diabetes is not predominantly a 'disease of childhood' as previously believed, but is similarly prevalent in adults, new research published in the Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology shows. Research by the University of Exeter Medical School using UK Biobank found that adults are as likely to develop type 1 diabetes as children, with more than 40 per cent of type 1 diabetes cases occurring after the age of 30. But many of those with type 1 diabetes after the age of 30 are thought to have type 2 diabetes at first, and not initially treated with insulin to control blood sugar levels . Previous published research by the University of Exeter Medical school found that, on average, it took a year for those with type 1 diabetes who had been misdiagnosed with type 2 to be put on insulin (1). Among the adults with type 1 diabetes to have been misdiagnosed is Theresa May, the Prime Minister, who was initially told by doctors she had type 2 diabetes and given tablets which did not control her blood sugar. Distinguishing between type 1 or type 2 diabetes matters as it affects the treatment needed. In type 1 diabetes immune cells destroy the body's insulin producing beta cells and people need to be injected insulin to control blood sugar levels. With Type 2 diabetes there is still insulin produced so it can be treated initially with diet and tablet therapy. Type 1 diabetes has been typically viewed as a disease of childhood and adolescence as it accounts for more than 85 per cent of diabetes in under 20s. (2) But type 1 cases are harder to recognise and correctly diagnose in adults because far more people develop type 2 diabetes in later life. Type 2 accounts for 96% of diabetes cases between the ages Continue reading >>

Too Much Junk Food - 10,000 Children With Diabetes

Too Much Junk Food - 10,000 Children With Diabetes

Junk food is having a deadly effect on Jamaica's children as approximately 10,000 of them under age 15 are said to be suffering from diabetes. According to University of Technology president, Professor Errol Morrison, surveys by government and non-governmental organisations indicate this startling figure. "If you'd asked me five years ago how many children there are with diabetes, I would tell you very few, maybe a couple hundreds," Morrison said to reporters attending the University Diabetes Outreach Programme (UDOP) at Sunset Jamaica Grande Resort in Ocho Rios. "I am startled myself, I haven't done the survey, but I'm being told that the data coming in as a result of the government and the non-governmental organisations (NGOs) surveys is that we may be having nearly 10,000 children under 15 and what is contributing to this is interesting - lifestyle," he added. According to Morrison, eating too much junk food and not exercising enough are the main reasons for the high rate of diabetes among this age group. Morrison is urging a proactive approach to stem the ballooning number of cases. Morrison said: "Too much eating of ... what you call fast food or junk food, too little exercise. This lack of physical activity, this eating of these fast foods which are energy-dense, the contribution is overweight. Overweight is the single most important cause for the development or the aggravating of diabetes, and so we're seeing a serious problem. It is escalating and we need to get to work proactively, and part and parcel of our outage here is to get the health team and educators and persons across the spectrum of Jamaican life to understand that we have a crisis on our hands and for them to help us to improve the quality of lifestyle, which can contain this pandemic." Morrison was Continue reading >>

Most Annoying Things People Say To You Or Your Children With Diabetes

Most Annoying Things People Say To You Or Your Children With Diabetes

We asked 100 people what the absolute strangest and most comical thing that someone has said to them about their child’s diabetes, and the responses… well most of us have heard many quite the odd ones as well. But please remember, not everyone is aware, and we should try to be patient with them and use this as an opportunity to help educate them. With all that said, it’s still fun to talk about it! You can also read our Top 10 Typical Responses People Give When You Tell Them You Have Diabetes great piece written by Elizabeth. Santanyia Rodabaugh: Are you allergic to a lot of foods? Is that the bad kind? Did you eat alot of sugar as a kid? Diana Burton: My brother told me once I was “Diabetic by design” Kelly Davis: Brown sugar is great for diabetics because it’s brown and therefor more natural. Tara Pfromm: My son is T1: An 80+ year old friend told me that her son had the “sugar” when he was little and she just gave him lots of love and it went away. Someone else said to give my son mega doses of green tea because in India they don’t have T1 because of all the green tea they drink. Another person couldn’t believe that we would give our child insulin because that will just make his pancreas lazy and not produce any on his own. It’s just the pharmaceutical companies pushing drugs. Anna Lee Buck Combs: My cousin once watched me draw up insulin in a syringe, got a queasy look on her face, and asked, “Doesn’t that hurt?” Because I hadn’t actually stabbed the pointy thing into my skin yet, I replied, “Well not yet!” And then another cousin and I laughed. Phoebe Nelson: “But you’re in such good shape!” Glenda Gilbert Strickland: A friend once asked who in my family had T1D. I told her that my maternal grandfather had it, my brother had i Continue reading >>

Cow Milk Formula Does Not Increase Diabetes Risk In Children: Study

Cow Milk Formula Does Not Increase Diabetes Risk In Children: Study

WASHINGTON, Jan. 2 (Xinhua) -- Drinking formula made with cow's milk did not increase the risk of developing Type 1 diabetes in children with genetic risk factors for the condition, a 15-year international study of more than 2,000 children said Tuesday. The findings, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, provided a long-awaited answer to the question of whether infant formula made with cow's milk plays a role in the development of Type 1 diabetes. Previous studies have indicated that early exposure to complex foreign proteins, such as the proteins in cow's milk, may increase the risk of Type 1 diabetes in people with genetic risk for the disease. Beginning in 2002, a team led by Dorothy Becker, a professor of pediatrics at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, examined 2,159 infants in 15 countries to find out whether delaying the exposure to complex foreign proteins would decrease the risk of diabetes. Each of the infants had a family member affected by Type 1 diabetes, as well as a genetic propensity for the disease that was determined with a blood test given at birth. After breastfeeding, the babies were either weaned to a conventional cow's-milk-based formula with the cow's-milk proteins intact or a special formula in which the cow's-milk proteins were split into small pieces known as peptides. That special formula -- called hydrolyzed-casein formula -- mimics the body's process of digestion, breaking down proteins into tiny parts. Infants were fed the study formula for at least two months until the age of six to eight months and at the same time were given no cow's milk proteins from any other food sources. Of the infants who consumed the conventional cow's-milk formula, 82, or 7.6 percent, developed diabetes during the 11.5-year Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Killing Hundreds Of Children Before Diagnosis Is Made

Type 1 Diabetes Killing Hundreds Of Children Before Diagnosis Is Made

It is estimated that over 300 million people in the World suffer from diabetes; about 20 million of these are in Africa. About 9 out of 10 of these have diabetes type 2, which often occurs in adulthood, from middle age onwards. Type 2 diabetes is more common among adults who are overweight or have an inactive lifestyle. In this case, the pancreas makes enough insulin but the body is not able to use it well. One out of 10 diabetics suffer from type 1 diabetes, mainly found in children. It is not clear what triggers it, but the immune systems of these children attack the cells that produce insulin in the pancreas. These children therefore cannot produce insulin. No amount of weight reduction or exercise can prevent the occurrence of type 1 diabetes as it appears to be a mal-functioning of the immune system that leads the body to attack itself. Scientists do not know why the immune system attacks the pancreas. Some think it could be an environmental trigger or perhaps a viral infection combined with genetic susceptibility. Carol Abidha is a final year Masters in Public Health student at Pwani University. She has lived with type 1 diabetes since she was in Class Five. For a year, she struggled undiagnosed. She was constantly drinking water, and as a result needed to use the toilet frequently. Due to the extreme thirst, she carried bottles of water to class and had to repeatedly dash to the toilet. She would also wake up several times at night to use the toilet, which left her feeling fatigued and constantly irritable. Although she was constantly hungry and eating, she got thinner and thinner. Her mother sought help from various hospitals, but it was only when she collapsed and was admitted in hospital that a diagnosis of diabetes was made. Her life changed. “When I was di Continue reading >>

Why Are So Many Kids Dying From Undiagnosed Type 1 Diabetes?

Why Are So Many Kids Dying From Undiagnosed Type 1 Diabetes?

An Open Letter To The Non-Diabetes Medical Community At Large and All Parents With Kids of Every Age, Everywhere! Dear pediatricians, nurses, medical staff, medical office personnel, hospitals, hospital staff, school nurses, physicians, ER medical staff, urgent care facilities, and any other medical office/facility that treats sick kids: I have a question for you. Why are so many kids dying from undiagnosed Type 1 diabetes? Why are they not being tested for Type 1 diabetes when their parents bring them to you when they’re sick? I know that sometimes, Type 1 symptoms can be similar to the flu or a stomach bug, so as a matter of caution, why can’t a 5 second finger stick be done as a matter of protocol just to try to potentially rule out the chance that it could be Type 1 diabetes instead of the flu? Why? Yes, I know, I know. You’re extremely busy, understaffed, and buried in mountains of paperwork at your medical offices. I get it. You’re working twice as hard for half as much, (or less- I’m a woman, so I get that too, but I digress) and you have to carry outrageously expensive liability insurance, etc. Yes, I get that too, loud and clear. Welcome to the club. We are busy too and many of us experience similar situations in our businesses as well. But, that is a lousy excuse for not trying to rule out Type 1 diabetes in your little patients who are counting on you to help them when they are sick. It was you who chose a profession that is designed to take care of sick people. So, take care of sick people. I’m Trying To Figure This Out Countless healthcare professionals have told me that their patients (or parents of patients) are much more informed and that these patients often come into the office with health information printed from online resources. So, are Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Type 1

Diabetes Mellitus Type 1

Diabetes mellitus type 1 (also known as type 1 diabetes) is a form of diabetes mellitus in which not enough insulin is produced.[4] This results in high blood sugar levels in the body.[1] The classical symptoms are frequent urination, increased thirst, increased hunger, and weight loss.[4] Additional symptoms may include blurry vision, feeling tired, and poor healing.[2] Symptoms typically develop over a short period of time.[1] The cause of type 1 diabetes is unknown.[4] However, it is believed to involve a combination of genetic and environmental factors.[1] Risk factors include having a family member with the condition.[5] The underlying mechanism involves an autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas.[2] Diabetes is diagnosed by testing the level of sugar or A1C in the blood.[5][7] Type 1 diabetes can be distinguished from type 2 by testing for the presence of autoantibodies.[5] There is no known way to prevent type 1 diabetes.[4] Treatment with insulin is required for survival.[1] Insulin therapy is usually given by injection just under the skin but can also be delivered by an insulin pump.[9] A diabetic diet and exercise are an important part of management.[2] Untreated, diabetes can cause many complications.[4] Complications of relatively rapid onset include diabetic ketoacidosis and nonketotic hyperosmolar coma.[5] Long-term complications include heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, foot ulcers and damage to the eyes.[4] Furthermore, complications may arise from low blood sugar caused by excessive dosing of insulin.[5] Type 1 diabetes makes up an estimated 5–10% of all diabetes cases.[8] The number of people affected globally is unknown, although it is estimated that about 80,000 children develop the disease each year.[5] With Continue reading >>

Watching Tv Three Hours A Day Linked To Type 2 Diabetes In Children

Watching Tv Three Hours A Day Linked To Type 2 Diabetes In Children

INDYPULSE Watching TV three hours a day linked to type 2 diabetes in children Children who spend more than three hours a day in front of the TV or a computer may be at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Increased levels of body fat and insulin resistance in children were linked to regular extended periods of screen time in a new study published in the journal Archives of Disease in Childhood. Diabetes risk factors including blood fat and glucose levels, blood pressure and resistance to insulin were measured in 4,495 children aged nine and ten from primary schools in London, Birmingham and Leicester. Children who said they spent the most time watching TV or using electronic devices each day were found to be more likely to exhibit physical risk factors for diabetes. “Our findings suggest that reducing screen time may be beneficial in reducing type 2 diabetes risk factors, in both boys and girls and in different ethnic groups from an early age,” wrote the researchers from St George’s, University of London. The scientists said their findings were of “considerable potential public health interest” but emphasised further research was needed to prove the link between diabetes risk and screen time. “This is particularly relevant, given rising levels of type 2 diabetes, the early emergence of type 2 diabetes risk, and recent trends suggesting that screen time related activities are increasing in childhood and may pattern screen-related behaviours in later life,” they said. Previous research has suggested a link between time spent on screens and heightened type 2 diabetes risk in adults, but little is yet known about the possible association in children. The overall number of prescriptions given to treat type 2 diabetes, a disease associated with obesity an Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Read on to learn some of the key facts and statistics about the people who have it and how to manage it. Risk factors Many risk factors for type 2 diabetes include lifestyle decisions that can be reduced or even cut out entirely with time and effort. Men are also at slightly higher risk of developing diabetes than women. This may be more associated with lifestyle factors, body weight, and where the weight is located (abdominally versus in the hip area) than with innate gender differences. Significant risk factors include: older age excess weight, particularly around the waist family history certain ethnicities physical inactivity poor diet Prevalence Type 2 diabetes is increasingly prevalent but also largely preventable. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes in adults. The CDC also gives us the following information: In general Research suggests that 1 out of 3 adults has prediabetes. Of this group, 9 out of 10 don't know they have it. 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes, but 8.1 million may be undiagnosed and unaware of their condition. About 1.4 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in United States every year. More than one in every 10 adults who are 20 years or older has diabetes. For seniors (65 years and older), that figure rises to more than one in four. Cases of diagnosed diabetes cost the United States an estimated $245 billion in 2012. This cost is expected to rise with the increasing diagnoses. In pregnancy and parentingAccording to the CDC, 4.6 to 9.2 percent of pregnancies may be affected by gestational diabetes. In up to 10 percent of them, the mother is diagnosed w Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: Children Living With The Disease - Exams And Tests

Type 1 Diabetes: Children Living With The Disease - Exams And Tests

A child with type 1 diabetes needs to visit his or her doctor at least every 3 to 6 months. During these visits, the doctor reviews your child's blood sugar level records and asks about any problems you and your child may have. Your child's blood pressure is checked, and growth and development is evaluated. The doctor examines your child for signs of infections, especially at injection sites. Your child usually has the following tests at office visits: A hemoglobin A1c or similar test (glycosylated hemoglobin or glycohemoglobin) to check your child's blood sugar control over the previous 3 months If your child has a family history of high cholesterol or heart disease and is over 2 years old, your child's doctor may do a cholesterol (LDL and HDL) test when type 1 diabetes is diagnosed or as soon as blood sugars are under control. If there is no family history of high cholesterol, your child may have a cholesterol test at puberty. If the LDL cholesterol is less than 100 mg/dL (2.60 mmol/L) and there is no family history of high cholesterol, the doctor may repeat this test every 5 years. Diabetes increases your child's risk for dental problems. Experts suggest dental checkups every 6 months. Once a year, you and your child may also see other members of the diabetes team, for example: A certified diabetes educator or registered dietitian, for your child's changing nutritional needs. A social worker, for questions about insurance. A psychologist, to help with any emotional or behavioral issues. Your child will have an initial dilated eye exam (ophthalmoscopy) by an ophthalmologist or an optometrist if your child has had diabetes for 3 to 5 years and has started puberty or has had diabetes for 3 to 5 years and is at least 10 years old. This eye exam checks for signs of diabet Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Print Overview Type 1 diabetes, once known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin. Insulin is a hormone needed to allow sugar (glucose) to enter cells to produce energy. Different factors, including genetics and some viruses, may contribute to type 1 diabetes. Although type 1 diabetes usually appears during childhood or adolescence, it can develop in adults. Despite active research, type 1 diabetes has no cure. Treatment focuses on managing blood sugar levels with insulin, diet and lifestyle to prevent complications. Symptoms Type 1 diabetes signs and symptoms can appear relatively suddenly and may include: Increased thirst Frequent urination Bed-wetting in children who previously didn't wet the bed during the night Extreme hunger Unintended weight loss Irritability and other mood changes Fatigue and weakness Blurred vision When to see a doctor Consult your doctor if you notice any of the above signs and symptoms in you or your child. Causes The exact cause of type 1 diabetes is unknown. Usually, the body's own immune system — which normally fights harmful bacteria and viruses — mistakenly destroys the insulin-producing (islet, or islets of Langerhans) cells in the pancreas. Other possible causes include: Genetics Exposure to viruses and other environmental factors The role of insulin Once a significant number of islet cells are destroyed, you'll produce little or no insulin. Insulin is a hormone that comes from a gland situated behind and below the stomach (pancreas). The pancreas secretes insulin into the bloodstream. Insulin circulates, allowing sugar to enter your cells. Insulin lowers the amount of sugar in your bloodstream. As your blood sugar level drops, so does the secre Continue reading >>

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