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How Many Grams Of Sugar Should A Pre Diabetic Have?

The Right Diet For Prediabetes

The Right Diet For Prediabetes

A prediabetes diagnosis can be alarming. This condition is marked by abnormally high blood sugar (glucose) most often due to insulin resistance. This is a condition in which the body doesn’t use insulin properly. It’s often a precursor to type 2 diabetes. According to the Mayo Clinic, people with prediabetes are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes within 10 years. With prediabetes, you may also be at risk of developing cardiovascular disease. However, a prediabetes diagnosis doesn’t mean you will definitely get type 2 diabetes. The key is early intervention; to get your blood sugar out of the prediabetes range. Your diet is important, and you need to know the right kind of foods to eat. How diet relates to prediabetes There are many factors that increase your risk for prediabetes. Genetics can play a role, especially if diabetes runs in your family. Excess body fat and a sedentary lifestyle are other potential risk factors. In prediabetes, sugar from food begins to build up in your bloodstream because insulin can’t easily move it into your cells. Eating carbohydrates doesn’t cause prediabetes. But a diet filled with carbohydrates that digest quickly can lead to blood sugar spikes. For most people with prediabetes, your body has a difficult time lowering blood sugar levels after meals. Avoiding blood sugar spikes can help. When you eat more calories than your body needs, they get stored as fat. This can cause you to gain weight. Body fat, especially around the belly, is linked to insulin resistance. This explains why many people with prediabetes are also overweight. You can’t control all risk factors for prediabetes, but some can be mitigated. Lifestyle changes can help you maintain balanced blood sugar levels as well as a healthy weight. Watch carbs with Continue reading >>

Preventing Pre-diabetes

Preventing Pre-diabetes

Pre-diabetes is a serious medical condition that puts you at a higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Pre-diabetes is also very treatable, and if you have it, there is a good chance you can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by making changes in your diet and increasing your level of physical activity. Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes occurs when your body does not produce or use enough insulin to be able to turn glucose into energy. Glucose is the sugar and starch that comes from the food you eat, which fuels your body. Insulin is a hormone that carries glucose from your blood into your cells. Without enough insulin, sugar builds up in your blood and can cause serious health problems. Pre-Diabetes Pre-diabetes is when your fasting blood glucose (blood sugar) level is above normal. To test for pre-diabetes, your doctor will take a sample of your blood after you have fasted overnight: Normal fasting glucose: 60 to 99 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl) Pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose): 100 to 125 mg/dl Diabetes: 126 mg/dl or higher on 2 occasions Healthy Tips for Preventing Type 2 Diabetes If you have pre-diabetes, you should talk to your doctor about developing a lifestyle plan to reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association recommends increased physical activity and, if you are overweight, losing 5-10 percent of your body weight. Your doctor may also want you to take medication if you have a family history of diabetes, you are obese, or have other cardiovascular risk factors (high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, or a history of heart disease). Below are tips to help you keep pre-diabetes from progressing to Type 2 diabetes: Exercise Every Day Since muscles use glucose for energy, activities like walking, bicycling, and gardening Continue reading >>

How Many Grams Of Sugar Should A Pre Diabetic Have A Day?

How Many Grams Of Sugar Should A Pre Diabetic Have A Day?

How Many Grams Of Sugar Should A Pre Diabetic Have A Day? You May Be Eligible To Participate In A Research Study! (CLICK HERE) Diabetes should consume a lot of carbohydrates if my pre-diabetic husband eats the right diet every day for the prediabetes health line. There are essentially two kinds of carbohydrates. The complexes have many chains and often consist of sugary branches linked together. Most people with diabetes can eat foods that contain sugar as long as the total amount of carbohydrate for that meal or snack is constant and are added within the context of a healthy diet. A piece without skin is commonly believed that people with diabetes should avoid all forms of sugar. Joslin diabetes center. Diabetes Myths American Diabetes Association. Too much sugar means that at the end of the day, you should consume between 135 and 180 grams of carbohydrates in total. Conditions of content deliciousliving sugar How to prevent and even reverse prediabetes "imx0m" url? Q webcache. As a reference, a teaspoon of sugar has around 4 grams March 6, 2018 to understand prediabetes, you must first the different types of carbohydrates and insulin. Many research studies have shown that the Conditions contain how to prevent (and even reverse) prediabetes. The amount of water you should drink daily depends on the size of your body, activity level and the climate in which you live, it may be surprising to know that, with the exception of sugary drinks, the recommended guidelines for sugar intake are the same for women. people without diabetes Jun 27, 2012 reduce your sugar intake to less than 6 teaspoons (24 grams) per day for women and less than 9 teaspoons (36 grams) per day for men. February 23, 2018 For most people, whether or not they have diabetes, a healthy diet may include so Continue reading >>

How To Count Carbs In 10 Common Foods

How To Count Carbs In 10 Common Foods

What are carbohydrates? Carbohydrates are sugar-based molecules found in many foods, from cookies to cantaloupes. If you have diabetes, planning your carb intake—and sticking to the plan—is critical to keep blood sugar on an even keel and to cut your risk of diabetes-related problems like heart disease and stroke. Whether or not you have diabetes, you should aim to get about half your calories from complex carbohydrates (which are high in fiber), 20-25% from protein, and no more than 30% from fat, says Lalita Kaul, PhD, RD, a spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association. How to read a food label The Nutrition Facts label lists the total amount of carbohydrates per serving, including carbs from fiber, sugar, and sugar alcohols. (If you're counting carbs in your diet, be aware that 15 grams of carbohydrates count as one serving.) Sugar alcohols are often used in sugar-free foods, although they still deliver calories and carbs. Sugar alcohols and fiber don't affect blood sugar as much as other carbs, because they're not completely absorbed. If food contains sugar alcohol or 5 or more grams of fiber, you can subtract half of the grams of these ingredients from the number of total carbs. (See more details at the American Diabetes Association and University of California, San Francisco.) How many carbs per day? If you eat 2,000 calories a day, you should consume about 250 grams of complex carbohydrates per day. A good starting place for people with diabetes is to have roughly 45 to 60 grams of carbs per meal and 15 to 30 grams for snacks. While snacks are key for people with diabetes who use insulin or pills that increase insulin production (otherwise, they run the risk of low blood sugar), they aren’t essential for non-insulin users. The goal for anyone with diab Continue reading >>

A Healthy Diet For Prediabetes

A Healthy Diet For Prediabetes

Source: Web exclusive, September 2011 Prediabetes: What does it mean? A diagnosis of prediabetes is a warning sign about your health, but it’s not a life sentence. Prediabetes means having blood sugar levels that are higher than normal but not yet in the territory of diabetes ‘ and you can easily make changes that will improve your health and lower your risk of developing diabetes and its related complications. ‘Diet, in combination with activity, can have a considerable impact on the development of Type 2 diabetes,’ says New Brunswick-based registered dietitian Michelle Corcoran, who works with clients who have prediabetes, Type 1 diabetes or Type 2 diabetes. And according to the Canadian Diabetes Association, two large studies have shown that by cutting calories, reducing fat intake and exercising at least 150 minutes a week, the number of participants who progressed from prediabetes to diabetes was lowered by 58 percent. That said, prediabetes is a diagnosis that should be taken seriously. While not everyone diagnosed with prediabetes will develop Type 2 diabetes, many will’and people with prediabetes are at higher risk for heart disease and stroke. Losing weight will make a difference, if you need to’a drop of even five to 10 percent can lower your risk, Corcoran says. Follow these healthy diet guidelines to improve the health of everyone in the family, no matter what their current situation. Whole grains for a healthy diet Consuming whole grains has been shown to lower your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, says Corcoran: ‘People who consume three servings a day are almost one-third less likely to develop Type 2 diabetes than those who consume three servings a week.’ Boost your intake by choosing whole-grain products rather than refined wherever p Continue reading >>

How Much Sugar Can A Person With Diabetes Have?

How Much Sugar Can A Person With Diabetes Have?

How Much Sugar Can a Person With Diabetes Have? If you have diabetes , you have probablybeen told to watch your sugar intake or to eliminate sugar altogether. But does that mean you can never eat any sugar ever,or might you still be able to enjoy a sweet every now and then? Generally speaking, the chances are good that some added sugar will be allowed, although the amount can vary significantly from one person to the next. The larger problem is that, as Americans, we consume far too sugar as it is and don't seem to know where to draw the line whether we have diabetes or not. A national survey released in 2016 showed that American adults consumed no less than 77 grams of added sugar per day, while children consumed a startling 82 grams. That's far in excess of the recommended intake of 50 grams for men, 25 grams for women, and less than 25 grams for children as issued by the American Heart Association (AHA). Unfortunately, these statistics reflect the habits of the general U.S. population, not people with diabetes. If you have diabetes, your daily intake would clearly need to fall beneath the AHA recommendations. Putting this into context, 4 grams of sugar equal one tablespoon. Based on your doctor's recommendations you may fast approach your maximum intake with just a breakfast pastry and a couple of cups of sweetened coffee. As consumers, we don't often realize how much sugar is hidden in packaged foods and drinks. Even if we religiously read food labels, we may not be aware that certain ingredients are, in fact, sugar by another name. These include honey, molasses, fructose, sucrose, maltose, maple syrup, agave nectar, rice syrup, and high-fructose corn syrup. While different types of sugar can have a lesser or greater impact on your blood sugar, don't get hung up on Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Per Day For A Diabetic?

How Many Carbs Per Day For A Diabetic?

Did you know that one of the most commonly asked questions we get is: how many carbs per day is best for a diabetic to eat? No doubt that's why you're here reading this as well, right? And like many other people you may be totally confused by that question. That's not surprising because the amount of carbs recommended does vary depending on where you read it. Why is this? Well, there is no specific recommendation for carbs, that's why there are so many different numbers. However, there is good scientific evidence to suggest what's best. But unfortunately, that information is not getting out to the public (to YOU) as fast as it should. Luckily though, here at Diabetes Meal Plans, we pride ourselves on sharing up-to-date evidence-based info because we want you to get the best results. And we're proud to say what we share works: Sheryl says: “My doctor’s report was best ever: A1c was normal for the first time since I was diagnosed diabetic in 2007; My LDL was 60; my total cholesterol was 130. My lab results were improved across the board. Best news: I am taking less diabetic meds, and my weight is within 5 lbs of normal BMI. I am a believer in what you have written, and I’m grateful to have a site I can trust.” Here at Diabetes Meal Plans we encourage a low carb diet because research shows that lower carb diets produce far more effective results than traditional low fat diets. As you read on, be prepared to have some of your longheld diet beliefs shattered. But also be prepared to be amazed by the possibilities. Because with a few dietary changes, you can reverse* your diabetes and live your life anew! Rethinking ‘Mainstream' Carb Recommendations Over the years it’s been pretty common practice to recommend a low fat, high carbohydrate diet to people with type 2 Continue reading >>

11 Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

11 Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

Eating the wrong foods can mess with your blood sugar. By Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE Diabetes is a chronic disease that has reached epidemic proportions among adults and children worldwide. Uncontrolled diabetes has many serious consequences, including heart disease, kidney disease, blindness and other complications. Prediabetes has also been linked to these conditions. Importantly, eating the wrong foods can raise your blood sugar and insulin levels and promote inflammation, which may increase your risk of disease. This article lists 11 foods that people with diabetes or prediabetes should avoid. Why Does Carb Intake Matter for People With Diabetes? Carbs, protein and fat are the macronutrients that provide your body with energy. Of these three, carbs have the greatest effect on your blood sugar by far. This is because they are broken down into sugar, or glucose, and absorbed into your bloodstream. Carbs include starches, sugar and fiber. However, fiber isn’t digested and absorbed by your body in the same way other carbs are, so it doesn’t raise your blood sugar. Subtracting fiber from the total carbs in a food will give you its digestible or “net” carb content. For instance, if a cup of mixed vegetables contains 10 grams of carbs and 4 grams of fiber, its net carb count is 6 grams. When people with diabetes consume too many carbs at a time, their blood sugar levels can rise to dangerously high levels. Over time, high levels can damage your body’s nerves and blood vessels, which may set the stage for heart disease, kidney disease and other serious health conditions. Maintaining a low carb intake can help prevent blood sugar spikes and greatly reduce the risk of diabetes complications. Therefore, it’s important to avoid the foods listed below. 1. Sugar-Swe Continue reading >>

How To Prevent (and Even Reverse) Prediabetes

How To Prevent (and Even Reverse) Prediabetes

More than 25.8 million children and adults in the United States live with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and experts say as many as 79 million more have prediabetes—a condition where elevated blood glucose levels raise your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. So how can you avoid or reverse prediabetes? Start by asking your doctor for fasting plasma glucose (FPG), A1C, and oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT); then follow these expert recommendations for staying diabetes-free. Diabetes lifestyle educator Get moving. If you are overweight, have high cholesterol, or have a family history of diabetes, you’re at risk. You can lower that risk by up to 58 percent by losing 7 percent of your body weight, which means exercise is essential. Start with 30 minutes of brisk walking five to six times per week; then try low-impact workouts like biking or swimming. Eat better. Reduce sugar intake to less than 6 teaspoons (24 grams) daily for women and less than 9 teaspoons (36 grams) per day for men. People at risk for prediabetes should follow a reduced-calorie and reduced-fat diet. Avoid trans fats and regulate high-caloric healthy fats like olive oil, nuts, and avocado. Make measureable changes. Wear a pedometer to calculate daily movement, start a food journal, and download online applications that track your weight-loss successes with graphs. –Jennifer Pells, PhD, Wellspring at Structure House, Durham, North Carolina Integrative physician Reduce stress. Chronic stress taxes the pancreas (the insulin-producing organ) and increases prediabetes risk. Honokiol, a magnolia bark extract, reduces stress and supports the pancreas by taming inflammation and oxidative stress. Take 250 mg twice per day with meals, for long-term use. Choose the right fiber. Fiber slows sugar’s release in Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should My Pre-diabetic Husband Eat Each Day?

How Many Carbs Should My Pre-diabetic Husband Eat Each Day?

It's easy to get answers about health and nutrition! Just send your question by email to [email protected] and Dr. Harlan will respond to selected questions of general interest. Answers will be posted in the Ask Dr. Gourmet newsletter ( sign up now!) and archived in the Ask Dr. Gourmet section of the website. Please note that the Ask Dr. Gourmet feature is restricted to questions regarding food and nutrition. Due to the many questions we receive, not all questions may be answered. For more specific questions about your individual health, please contact your doctor. About Timothy S. Harlan, MD, FACP | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy How many carbs should my pre-diabetic husband eat each day? My husband has been diagnosed as being pre-diabetic. What amount of carbs should he eat per day? I know that carbs are bad for him, but as they are in most foods, it's hard to be totally carb free. Also, we both eat a lot of fresh fruits and veggies, so what about the sugars they contain? I am sorry for your husband's new diagnosis. For many the issue of having "pre-diabetes" or "insulin intolerance" is one that can be controlled through making changes in diet and exercise. In a lot of cases weight is a major factor and losing weight is key. First and foremost, carbohydrates are not bad. The issue is that most folks today eat far too many calories and end up eating a lot of carbohydrates. Often this is in the form of low quality carbs like the simple sugars in soda, candy, etc.. The key is for your husband to eat high quality calories no matter whether those calories come from carbohydrates, protein or fats. For instance, both Coca Cola and oatmeal are full of carbohydrates. The Coke contains 35 grams of carbs all in the form of simple sugar. That's about 150 calories that is Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

The mainstays of diabetes treatment are: Working towards obtaining ideal body weight Following a diabetic diet Regular exercise Diabetic medication if needed Note: Type 1 diabetes must be treated with insulin; if you have type 2 diabetes, you may not need to take insulin. This involves injecting insulin under the skin for it to work. Insulin cannot be taken as a pill because the digestive juices in the stomach would destroy the insulin before it could work. Scientists are looking for new ways to give insulin. But today, shots are the only method. There are, however, new methods to give the shots. Insulin pumps are now being widely used and many people are having great results. In this Article Working towards obtaining ideal body weight An estimate of ideal body weight can be calculated using this formula: For women: Start with 100 pounds for 5 feet tall. Add 5 pounds for every inch over 5 feet. If you are under 5 feet, subtract 5 pounds for each inch under 5 feet. This will give you your ideal weight. If you have a large frame, add 10%. If you have a small frame, subtract 10%. A good way to decide your frame size is to look at your wrist size compared to other women's. Example: A woman who is 5' 4" tall and has a large frame 100 pounds + 20 pounds (4 inches times 5 pounds per inch) = 120 pounds. Add 10% for large frame (in this case 10% of 120 pounds is 12 pounds). 120 pounds + 12 pounds = 132 pounds ideal body weight. For men: Start with 106 pounds for a height of 5 foot. Add 6 pounds for every inch above 5 foot. For a large frame, add 10%. For a small frame, subtract 10%. (See above for further details.) Learn More about Treating Type 2 Diabetes The Diabetic Diet Diet is very important in diabetes. There are differing philosophies on what is the best diet but below is Continue reading >>

Tips For Prediabetes And Diabetes Meal Planning

Tips For Prediabetes And Diabetes Meal Planning

WASECA, Minn. — Poor diet can obviously lead to health problems and weight gain. Conversely, proper food choices help people become healthier and manage certain conditions. For those with diabetes and prediabetes appropriate monitoring and management of diet is extremely important. Mayo Clinic Health System registered dietitian Sue Seykora offers these meal-planning tips to help keep diabetes under control and maybe avoid it all together. Carbohydrate counting Carbohydrate counting is a meal-planning approach that focuses on the total number of carbs consumed. It's an easy method to follow and allows variety in food choices that fit preferences and lifestyle. Most of the foods you eat contain carbs: breads, crackers, pasta, rice, potatoes, milk and many more. Carbs are often thought of as bad foods. In reality, your body needs carbs to create energy. The problem is that many people don’t choose healthy types and amounts of carbs. “People should consume healthier carbs like fruits, vegetables, whole grains and low-fat dairy foods. All foods – even healthy foods – need portion control,” says Seykora. Although there is no universal amount of carbs you should ingest, the following guidelines serve as a good starting point and can be adjusted as needed (note that one serving of carbs is considered 15 grams): Women: Three to four carb servings per meal; one serving for a snack Men: Four to five carb servings per meal; one to two for a snack “Although carb counting is the initial focus for a diabetic diet, protein and fat levels cannot be ignored,” says Seykora. “Work with your dietitian to discover how to limit excessive protein and fat in your diet.” The plate method “Another meal-planning system is the plate method. Not only is this good for people wit Continue reading >>

How Many Grams Of Sugar Can A Diabetic Have Per Day?

How Many Grams Of Sugar Can A Diabetic Have Per Day?

Diabetes mellitus (MEL-ih-tus), often referred to as diabetes, is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that result from the body’s inability to produce enough insulin and/or effectively utilize the insulin. Diabetes is a serious, life-long condition and the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism (the body's way of digesting food and converting it into energy). There are three forms of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that accounts for five- to 10-percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes may account for 90- to 95-percent of all diagnosed cases. The third type of diabetes occurs in pregnancy and is referred to as gestational diabetes. Left untreated, gestational diabetes can cause health issues for pregnant women and their babies. People with diabetes can take preventive steps to control this disease and decrease the risk of further complications. Continue reading >>

Prediabetes: What You Need To Know

Prediabetes: What You Need To Know

Note: If you have just found out you have prediabetes then make sure to download our free diabetes starter’s guide. Prediabetes is a very early form of diabetes. The first thing you should know about prediabetes is that it is reversible and does not have to lead to full blown diabetes. The second thing you should know about prediabetes is that you –and really only you—have the power to reverse it. How can you do that? By incorporating some significant dietary and lifestyle changes into your life—these are significant changes, but not terribly difficult ones. But first, some basic information so that you understand why these changes can change a prediabetic condition to a non-diabetic condition. The Basics of Prediabetes A person with prediabetes has levels of blood sugar that is higher than normal, but the levels of blood glucose (sugar) are not quite high enough to be confidently diagnosed as diabetes. But, anyone with consistently higher levels of fasting blood glucose has a higher risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes (T2D)—about 15-30% of people with prediabetes develop Type-2 diabetes. In prediabetes, the cells of the body do not respond effectively to insulin– they are resistant to the insulin. Because the cells of the body are resistant, they don’t absorb sugar from the blood– these cells are essentially “ignoring” the signals from insulin. How Prediabetes Can Develop Every cell in our body uses glucose (sugar) for producing the energy needed for the cells to do their jobs. This glucose is derived from the foods we eat, primarily from carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are one of the main groups of nutrients—the other are fats and proteins. Carbohydrates are molecules composed of chains of various different sugars, including glucose. The glucose is d Continue reading >>

Let's Talk About How Much Sugar You Eat & Prediabetes

Let's Talk About How Much Sugar You Eat & Prediabetes

I know you get it. Cut down on sugar. Then, you won’t be obese and get diabetes. But do you know how much sugar you are eating? When I have clients come in for nutrition consultations, they are always shocked by how much more sugar they are eating than they should. Let’s review the numbers and tips on how to make sure your sugar intake is sweet, not bittersweet. National surveys have found that the average American consumes around 85 grams of sugar every day. According to the new USDA guidelines, we should really be eating a fraction of that amount. The recommended sugar intake for adult women is 22 grams of sugar per day, for adult men, it’s 36 grams daily, and for children, it's 12 grams a day. Over time, consistently taking in more sugar will lead to insulin resistance disease, otherwise known as diabetes. What’s alarming is that many people do not realize they are on the road to diabetes. This epidemic of “on the way to diabetes” is called prediabetes. Type 2 diabetes doesn’t appear all of a sudden and the slow, long and invisible road there is prediabetes, which is where blood sugar levels are consistently higher than normal over a long time slowly affecting insulin signaling. Many people focus on calories rather than sugar since diabetics are supposed to look at sugar not you and me. But unfortunately, a new report from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention shows that among Americans age 20 and older, as many as 73 million Americans have prediabetes, which is about 1 in 3 Americans! That’s a lot of missed opportunities to prevent diabetes by cutting down on sugar intake. You can check with your doctor if you have prediabetes, which is a fasting glucose level of 100-125 mg/dL. Being prediabetic is a serious game changer since it is much easi Continue reading >>

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