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How Many Grams Of Fiber Should A Diabetic Eat Per Day

Treating Diabetes With Fiber

Treating Diabetes With Fiber

I wrote last week about the amazing benefits of dietary fiber . But what is fiber? It comes in numerous forms. In this entry, well look at what type of fiber to eat, how much to have, and how to make it enjoyable and doable. Fiber is a catchall term for various kinds of plant matter. A common definition is this one from the Linus Pauling Institute: Dietary fiber is a diverse group of compounds, including lignin and complex carbohydrates, which cannot be digested by human enzymes in the small intestine. Because theyre not digested, they pass through into the large intestine. There they are colonized by bacteria and turned into short-chain fatty acids or SCFAs, which have wonderful effects on blood glucose, cholesterol, and the immune system. Scientists have classified fibers in several ways. One common classification is soluble versus insoluble. According to Amy Campbell, soluble fiber is the kind that turns into a gel in the intestines and slows down digestion. I think of it as being like cooked squash: a nice, soothing mush. Insoluble fiber doesnt break down as much. Its in things like carrots and oat bran. It helps to speed the passage of food through the digestive system and adds bulk to stool. If youre dealing with inflammatory bowel or irritable bowel , you want to maximize soluble and decrease insoluble fibers. But from a diabetes angle, it doesnt make much difference, because nearly all plant foods include both types, and both are good. Other terms used for soluble fibers are viscous and fermentable. All these terms are similar. They mean bacteria in the colon can ferment the fiber, and thats what we want. For the most part we can ignore these distinctions. The Institute of Medicine also classes fibers as dietary and functional. Dietary (or intact) fibers come f Continue reading >>

How Many Grams Of Carb Do You Eat Per Day And Why?

How Many Grams Of Carb Do You Eat Per Day And Why?

How many grams of carb do you eat per day and why? Currently, I eat between 55 and 70 grams of carbohydrate over a 24 hour period, and I do my best to get all carbs from vegetables though I do eat some rice or quinoa on occasion. Thirty two years ago, I ate 150 grams of carb in the same period, but I find myself feeling betterand taking less insulin (T1) on less. The naturopath Ive been seeing is recommending I go to even less carbs aka Paleo Im not sure how that would even work for T1. Would love to hear from others about how you manage carb intake and why. My current daily carb target is 30 grams/day. Ive evolved to that limit over a series of steps starting three years ago. My initial motivation was to shake things up following a diabetes complication diagnosis at the time. Id read about the low carb movement in the diabetes community but, like many others, was reluctant to make the commitment to cutting out foods that I liked. Foods like bagels, pasta, and potatoes, I just couldnt imagine cutting them out for life. My initial daily carb limit was 100 grams. Shortly after starting that and finding it easier than I imagined, I cut my limit to 75 grams per day. It subsequently fell to 50 grams and now 30. Ive told this story many times. I started with better blood glucose (BG) control as the target and soon discovered that I starting losing weight with little effort. I lost 25 pounds or about 13% of my body weight. I need 50% less insulin while my BG control amazed me. My BG average fell but more importantly the variability in my blood sugar improved, a lot. Im a firm believer in Dr. Bernsteins law of small number which says, fewer carbs equals less insulin which equals smaller mistakes. A low carb diet has improved my safety. I havent had a severe hypo in the 3+ year Continue reading >>

Fibre

Fibre

Fibre is the part of plants that our bodies cannot digest. There are two types of fibre: soluble and insoluble. Foods such as vegetables, fruits, legumes and whole grains contain fibre. Animal foods such as meats and eggs have no fibre. What is the difference between soluble and insoluble fibre? Soluble fibre is the soft fibre that helps control blood glucose (sugar) and reduces cholesterol. It also helps in managing diarrhea. Soluble fibre is present in oat bran, oatmeal, legumes (dried beans and lentils) and fruits such as apples and strawberries. Insoluble fibre is the bulky fibre that helps to prevent constipation. It also helps to prevent some types of cancers. It is present in wheat bran, whole grain breads and cereals, fruits and vegetables. Many foods contain both soluble and insoluble fibre. Why is fibre good for me? Fibre is important for your overall health. Some of its benefits include: Controlling blood glucose (sugar) Managing blood pressure Reducing blood cholesterol Increasing the feeling of being full Controling weight Regulating bowel movement Benefit for those with diabetes Soluble fibre in oat bran, legumes (dried beans of all kinds, peas and lentils), and pectin (from fruit, such as apples) and forms in root vegetables (such as carrots) is considered especially helpful for people with either form of diabetes. Soluble fibre may help control blood sugar by delaying gastric (stomach) emptying, retarding the entry of glucose into the bloodstream and lessening the postprandial (post-meal) rise in blood sugar. It may lessen insulin requirements in those with type 1 diabetes. Because fibre slows the digestion of foods, it can help blunt the sudden spikes in blood glucose (sugar) that may occur after a low-fibre meal. Such blood sugar peaks stimulate the pa Continue reading >>

Delicious Fiber-rich Foods To Help You Manage Diabetes

Delicious Fiber-rich Foods To Help You Manage Diabetes

As a group, Americans fall far short of the recommended amount of fiber people should eat every day. This deficiency can be especially harmful when you're trying to manage diabetes and possibly lose weight. “Fiber has a way of working magic in the body,” says Kelly Kennedy, RD, a nutritionist at Everyday Health. “It’s crucial for any healthy diet, but [fiber] can be especially helpful for those with diabetes. This is because fiber works in a number of ways. It can help to lower blood glucose levels — the main goal for those with diabetes.” According to a research review published in the January-February 2012 issue of the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, a diet that’s high in fiber may help lower your A1C test results, which measures your average blood sugar control over two to three months. RELATED: 5 Small Steps to Help You Lower Your A1C Fiber can also help lower LDL, or "bad," cholesterol levels, which is a contributing factor to heart disease, notes Kennedy. “Those with diabetes are 2 to 4 times [more] likely to die from heart disease as those who do not have diabetes, so this is an important number to manage. In addition, fiber leads to satiety, or a feeling of fullness, which can make it easier to manage a healthy weight — important for bringing down blood sugar levels and heart disease risk alike.” The National Academy of Sciences recommends daily fiber totals based on age and gender: Men younger than 50 years old should get 38 grams (g) per day Men older than 50 should get 30 g per day Women younger than 50 years old should get 25 g per day Women older than age 50 should get 21 g per day The American Diabetes Association recommends a similar goal of consuming at least 25 g for women and 38 g of fiber for men per day. Dietitia Continue reading >>

14 Foods That Could Change A Diabetic's Life

14 Foods That Could Change A Diabetic's Life

Print Font: When you think of managing blood sugar, odds are you obsess over everything you can't have. While it's certainly important to limit no-no ingredients (like white, refined breads and pastas and fried, fatty, processed foods), it's just as crucial to pay attention to what you should eat. We suggest you start here. Numerous nutrition and diabetes experts singled out these power foods because 1) they're packed with the 4 healthy nutrients (fiber, omega-3s, calcium, and vitamin D) that make up Prevention's Diabetes DTOUR Diet, and 2) they're exceptionally versatile, so you can use them in recipes, as add-ons to meals, or stand-alone snacks. 1. Beans Beans have more to boast about than being high in fiber (plant compounds that help you feel full, steady blood sugar, and even lower cholesterol; a half cup of black beans delivers more than 7 grams). They're a not-too-shabby source of calcium, a mineral that research shows can help burn body fat. In ½ cup of white beans, you'll get almost 100 mg of calcium—about 10% of your daily intake. Beans also make an excellent protein source; unlike other proteins Americans commonly eat (such as red meat), beans are low in saturated fat—the kind that gunks up arteries and can lead to heart disease. How to eat them: Add them to salads, soups, chili, and more. There are so many different kinds of beans, you could conceivably have them every day for a week and not eat the same kind twice. 2. Dairy You're not going to find a better source of calcium and vitamin D—a potent diabetes-quelling combination—than in dairy foods like milk, cottage cheese, and yogurt. One study found that women who consumed more than 1,200 mg of calcium and more than 800 IU of vitamin D a day were 33% less likely to develop diabetes than those taki Continue reading >>

How Do You Do Fiber?

How Do You Do Fiber?

An article in the March/April 2009 issue of Diabetes Self-Management, entitled Counting Carbohydrates Like a Pro and written by Gary Scheiner, MS, CDE, has provoked a lot of comments and questions from readers. Many of the questions concern how to deal with fiber when counting the carbohydrate in a meal or snack. In the article, Scheiner recommends subtracting all the grams of fiber from the total carbohydrate before calculating the carbohydrate grams (or choices, if you prefer) in a meal. But many readers have heard different advice on this, and they want to know why. One reader, for example, said she thought the correct thing to do was to subtract half the grams of fiber. Another reader said that a dietitian had instructed him to subtract only the amount of fiber over 5 grams. I found that the 2007 edition of Choose Your Foods: Exchange Lists for Diabetes, published by the American Diabetes Association (ADA), recommends subtracting half the grams of fiber from the total carbohydrate when eating foods with more than 5 grams of fiber per serving. So if a serving of food contained 8 grams of fiber, you would subtract 4 grams. If the food contained fewer than 5 grams of fiber per serving, you would subtract none of them before calculating the carbohydrate grams or choices in your meal. Another consumer guide, the American Dietetic Association Guide to Eating Right When You Have Diabetes, published in 2003, says that you can subtract all the fiber from the total carbohydrate but that doing so may only be necessary if your meal contains 5 or more grams of fiber. It goes on to say, And it may only be necessary for those who are being precise with their carbohydrate intake and adjusting a rapid- or short-acting insulin based on how much carbohydrate they are eating. Similarl Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should A Diabetic Eat?

How Many Carbs Should A Diabetic Eat?

Figuring out how many carbs to eat when you have diabetes can seem confusing. Meal plans created by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) provide about 45% of calories from carbs. This includes 45–60 grams per meal and 10–25 grams per snack, totaling about 135–230 grams of carbs per day. However, a growing number of experts believe people with diabetes should be eating far fewer carbs than this. In fact, many recommend fewer carbs per day than what the ADA allows per meal. This article takes a look at the research supporting low-carb diets for diabetics and provides guidance for determining optimal carb intake. Glucose, or blood sugar, is the main source of fuel for your body's cells. In people with diabetes, the body's ability to process and use blood sugar is impaired. Although there are several types of diabetes, the two most common forms are type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 Diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is unable to produce insulin, a hormone that allows sugar from the bloodstream to enter the body's cells. Instead, insulin must be injected to ensure that sugar enters cells. Type 1 diabetes develops because of an autoimmune process in which the body attacks its own insulin-producing cells, which are called beta cells. This disease is usually diagnosed in children, but it can start at any age, even in late adulthood (1). Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is more common, accounting for about 90% of people with diabetes. Like type 1 diabetes, it can develop in both adults and children. However, it isn't as common in children and typically occurs in people who are overweight or obese. In this form of the disease, either the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or the body's cells are resistant to insulin's effects. Therefore, too much sugar stays Continue reading >>

Understanding Fiber

Understanding Fiber

Fiber does not affect your blood sugar levels. Fiber is a type of carbohydrate that your body can’t digest, so you should subtract the grams of fiber from the total carbohydrate. On Nutrition Facts food labels, the grams of dietary fiber are already included in the total carbohydrate count. But because fiber is a type of carbohydrate that your body can’t digest, it does not affect your blood sugar levels. You should subtract the grams of fiber from the total carbohydrate. Here’s the best advice about fiber: For people with diabetes that are treated with insulin, getting the most accurate carbohydrate count may help control blood sugars better. To summarize – you need to take the total amount of carbohydrate in a serving MINUS the carbohydrate in the fiber. Now, let’s practice using the sample food label: The dietary fiber is 5 grams per serving. Count this product as 5 grams of carbohydrate (10 grams total carbohydrate minus 5 grams dietary fiber equals 5 grams of carbohydrate). Self-assessment Quiz Self assessment quizzes are available for topics covered in this website. To find out how much you have learned about Understanding Carbohydrates, take our self assessment quiz when you have completed this section. The quiz is multiple choice. Please choose the single best answer to each question. At the end of the quiz, your score will display. If your score is over 70% correct, you are doing very well. If your score is less than 70%, you can return to this section and review the information. Continue reading >>

Carbohydrate Counting & Diabetes

Carbohydrate Counting & Diabetes

What is carbohydrate counting? Carbohydrate counting, also called carb counting, is a meal planning tool for people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Carbohydrate counting involves keeping track of the amount of carbohydrate in the foods you eat each day. Carbohydrates are one of the main nutrients found in food and drinks. Protein and fat are the other main nutrients. Carbohydrates include sugars, starches, and fiber. Carbohydrate counting can help you control your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, levels because carbohydrates affect your blood glucose more than other nutrients. Healthy carbohydrates, such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables, are an important part of a healthy eating plan because they can provide both energy and nutrients, such as vitamins and minerals, and fiber. Fiber can help you prevent constipation, lower your cholesterol levels, and control your weight. Unhealthy carbohydrates are often food and drinks with added sugars. Although unhealthy carbohydrates can also provide energy, they have little to no nutrients. More information about which carbohydrates provide nutrients for good health and which carbohydrates do not is provided in the NIDDK health topic, Diabetes Diet and Eating. The amount of carbohydrate in foods is measured in grams. To count grams of carbohydrate in foods you eat, you’ll need to know which foods contain carbohydrates learn to estimate the number of grams of carbohydrate in the foods you eat add up the number of grams of carbohydrate from each food you eat to get your total for the day Your doctor can refer you to a dietitian or diabetes educator who can help you develop a healthy eating plan based on carbohydrate counting. Which foods contain carbohydrates? Foods that contain carbohydrates include grains, such as b Continue reading >>

Reading Food Labels: Tips If You Have Diabetes

Reading Food Labels: Tips If You Have Diabetes

Food labels can be an essential tool for diabetes meal planning. Here's what to look for when comparing food labels. When you have diabetes, your diet is a vital part of your treatment plan. Of course you know what you're eating — a turkey sandwich, a glass of skim milk, a sugar-free fudge pop. But do you pay attention to the details, such as calories, total carbohydrates, fiber, fat, salt and sugar? Reading food labels can help you make the best choices. Start with the list of ingredients When you're looking at food labels, start with the list of ingredients. Keep an eye out for heart-healthy ingredients, such as whole-wheat flour, soy and oats. Monounsaturated fats — such as olive, canola or peanut oils — promote heart health, too. Avoid unhealthy ingredients, such as hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oil. Keep in mind that ingredients are listed in descending order by weight. The main (heaviest) ingredient is listed first, followed by other ingredients used in decreasing amounts. Consider carbs in context If your meal plan is based on carbohydrate counting, food labels become an essential tool. Look at total carbohydrates, not just sugar. Evaluate the grams of total carbohydrates — which includes sugar, complex carbohydrates and fiber — rather than only the grams of sugar. If you zero in on sugar content, you could miss out on nutritious foods naturally high in sugar, such as fruit and milk. And you might overdo foods with no natural or added sugar, but plenty of carbohydrates, such as certain cereals and grains. Don't miss out on high-fiber foods. Pay special attention to high-fiber foods. Look for foods with 3 or more grams of fiber. When counting carbohydrates, if a food has more than 5 grams of fiber, you can subtract half of the total grams of fib Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Rice If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Rice If I Have Diabetes?

Diet plays an important role in staying healthy, especially for people with diabetes. Many people wonder whether high-carbohydrate foods such as rice are healthy to eat. This article will explain how to count carbohydrates, how to incorporate rice into the diet, and what the healthy alternatives to rice are. Diabetes basics Diabetes mellitus is a group of diseases where the body does not adequately produce insulin, use insulin properly, or both. Insulin plays a crucial role in allowing blood sugar to enter the cells and be used for energy. There are two main types: type 1 and type 2 diabetes. People with diabetes have abnormally high levels of blood sugar. This can damage many organs in the body if left untreated. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases recommend the following steps to manage diabetes: making healthy choices in eating engaging in regular physical activity or exercise taking medications, if required A nutritious diet is important in keeping blood sugar levels at a healthy level. The healthy range is 80 to 130 milligrams per deciliter mg/dL before meals or below 180 mg/dL after meals, according to the American Diabetes Association. People with type 1 diabetes require insulin. Various insulin delivery systems and protocols are used to manage blood sugar levels both between and at meal times. People with type 2 diabetes often manage their condition with diet and exercise, and with medications as needed to keep their blood sugar levels within the target range. These medications vary in how they work. People with diabetes will have different treatment plans, and they will respond to food, exercise, and medication differently. It is important that people consult with a doctor to get personalized recommendations on target blood suga Continue reading >>

The Right Diet For Prediabetes

The Right Diet For Prediabetes

A prediabetes diagnosis can be alarming. This condition is marked by abnormally high blood sugar (glucose) most often due to insulin resistance. This is a condition in which the body doesn’t use insulin properly. It’s often a precursor to type 2 diabetes. According to the Mayo Clinic, people with prediabetes are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes within 10 years. With prediabetes, you may also be at risk of developing cardiovascular disease. However, a prediabetes diagnosis doesn’t mean you will definitely get type 2 diabetes. The key is early intervention; to get your blood sugar out of the prediabetes range. Your diet is important, and you need to know the right kind of foods to eat. How diet relates to prediabetes There are many factors that increase your risk for prediabetes. Genetics can play a role, especially if diabetes runs in your family. Excess body fat and a sedentary lifestyle are other potential risk factors. In prediabetes, sugar from food begins to build up in your bloodstream because insulin can’t easily move it into your cells. Eating carbohydrates doesn’t cause prediabetes. But a diet filled with carbohydrates that digest quickly can lead to blood sugar spikes. For most people with prediabetes, your body has a difficult time lowering blood sugar levels after meals. Avoiding blood sugar spikes can help. When you eat more calories than your body needs, they get stored as fat. This can cause you to gain weight. Body fat, especially around the belly, is linked to insulin resistance. This explains why many people with prediabetes are also overweight. You can’t control all risk factors for prediabetes, but some can be mitigated. Lifestyle changes can help you maintain balanced blood sugar levels as well as a healthy weight. Watch carbs with Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs/fat Grams Do You Eat Per Day?

How Many Carbs/fat Grams Do You Eat Per Day?

How many carbs/fat grams do you eat per day? How many carbs/fat grams do you eat per day? I was diagnosed as prediabetic in August (A1C was 5.8). I have been sticking to 100-130 carbs a day (this is before fiber is counted), but I am having a hard time keeping my fat grams under 50 (I eat 1400-1600 calories a day). They are good fats, but I am still consuming too many (I feel). About how many carbs and fat grams do you consume daily? I consume around 30g of net carbs a day and limit protein to the amount required for cell maintenance and renewal to avoid conversion of excess grams to glucose via gluconeogenesis. Fats are as many as I want, usually between 160 and 200g per day, mostly saturated and monounsaturated fat from cream, butter, cheese and the fat on meat. This allowed me to lose 24kg and bring my BG into the normal, non-diabetic range within a few months of diagnosis. I never see a BG reading in the diabetic range except for the extremely rare occasions when I splash out and eat potato. HbA1c 1st November 2017 31mmol/mol (5.0%) D.D. Family Pre-Diabetic since April 2017 Being on a LCHF diet, my proportions are a bit different than yours. I eat about 40-ish grams of net carbs-- 60-ish including fiber (mostly veggies). About 115-ish grams of fat, and 60-ish grams of protein. I eat about 1500-1600 kCal a day. ETA: The fat keeps me full and gives me energy, the low carb count keeps my cravings in check and blood sugars normal. Last edited by AnnieP; 10/01/17 at 10:07 PM. Reason: added stuff. ;) Diagnosed pre-diabetic in April 2017; treating with lchf diet and exercise. 120 mg Nadolol, Magnesium, pacemaker/ICD implant since Apr 2014 Thank you both! I thought that a good percentage of your daily calories is 30% or so (?) I usually hit around 80 fat grams a day and I Continue reading >>

How Much Fruit Should You Eat Per Day?

How Much Fruit Should You Eat Per Day?

Fruit is an important part of a healthy diet. In fact, diets high in fruit are associated with all sorts of health benefits, including a decreased risk of many diseases. However, some people are concerned with the sugar content of fruit and worry that eating too much of it may be harmful. So how many servings of fruit should you eat each day to be healthy? And is it possible to eat too much? This article explores the current research on the topic. The nutrient composition of fruit varies greatly among the different types, but all varieties contain important nutrients. For starters, fruit tends to be high in vitamins and minerals. These include vitamin C, potassium and folate, of which many people don't get enough (1, 2). Fruit is also high in fiber, which has many health benefits. Eating fiber may help lower cholesterol, increase feelings of fullness and contribute to weight loss over time (3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8). What's more, fruits are loaded with antioxidants, which help fight free radicals that can damage cells. Eating a diet high in antioxidants may help slow aging and reduce the risk of disease (9, 10, 11). Because different fruits contain different amounts of nutrients, it is important to eat a variety of them to maximize the health benefits. Fruit is high in important nutrients like vitamins, minerals, fiber and antioxidants. Eat many different types to get the most benefits. Fruits are high in nutrients and relatively low in calories, making them a great choice for those looking to lose weight. What's more, they are high in water and fiber, which help you feel full. Because of this, you can typically eat fruit until you're satisfied, without consuming a lot of calories. In fact, multiple studies indicate that eating fruit is associated with lower calorie intake and Continue reading >>

More Evidence That A High-fiber Diet Can Curb Type 2 Diabetes

More Evidence That A High-fiber Diet Can Curb Type 2 Diabetes

People who ate more than 26 grams of fiber a day had an 18 percent lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those who ate 19 grams a day or less Fiber may benefit diabetes by altering hormonal signals, slowing down nutrient absorption or altering fermentation in the large intestine, along with promoting feelings of satiety and weight loss The majority of your fiber should come from vegetables, not grains By Dr. Mercola In the US, nearly 80 million people, or one in four has some form of diabetes or pre-diabetes. One in two people with diabetes do not know they have it,1 which increases the odds of developing complications, which can be deadly. Leading a healthy lifestyle is one of the best strategies to prevent, and treat, type 2 diabetes, and even more specifically, eating a high-fiber diet is emerging as a key strategy you can use to lower your risk. More Than 26 Grams of Fiber a Day May Lower Your Diabetes Risk US dietary guidelines call for adults to consume 20-30 grams of fiber per day. I believe an ideal amount for most adults is around 50 grams per 1,000 calories consumed. Most people, however, get only half that, or less. In a recent study conducted by researchers at the Imperial College London, those who had the highest intake of fiber (more than 26 grams a day) had an 18 percent lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those with the lowest intake (less than 19 grams a day).2 The fiber may benefit diabetes by altering hormonal signals, slowing down nutrient absorption or altering fermentation in the large intestine, along with promoting feelings of satiety.3 Eating a high-fiber diet is also associated with weight loss, and the researchers believe this may, in turn, lower diabetes risk. In fact, when the researchers accounted for participants' BMI, th Continue reading >>

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