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How Many Grams Of Fat Per Day For Type 2 Diabetes

Carbohydrate Counting & Diabetes

Carbohydrate Counting & Diabetes

What is carbohydrate counting? Carbohydrate counting, also called carb counting, is a meal planning tool for people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Carbohydrate counting involves keeping track of the amount of carbohydrate in the foods you eat each day. Carbohydrates are one of the main nutrients found in food and drinks. Protein and fat are the other main nutrients. Carbohydrates include sugars, starches, and fiber. Carbohydrate counting can help you control your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, levels because carbohydrates affect your blood glucose more than other nutrients. Healthy carbohydrates, such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables, are an important part of a healthy eating plan because they can provide both energy and nutrients, such as vitamins and minerals, and fiber. Fiber can help you prevent constipation, lower your cholesterol levels, and control your weight. Unhealthy carbohydrates are often food and drinks with added sugars. Although unhealthy carbohydrates can also provide energy, they have little to no nutrients. More information about which carbohydrates provide nutrients for good health and which carbohydrates do not is provided in the NIDDK health topic, Diabetes Diet and Eating. The amount of carbohydrate in foods is measured in grams. To count grams of carbohydrate in foods you eat, you’ll need to know which foods contain carbohydrates learn to estimate the number of grams of carbohydrate in the foods you eat add up the number of grams of carbohydrate from each food you eat to get your total for the day Your doctor can refer you to a dietitian or diabetes educator who can help you develop a healthy eating plan based on carbohydrate counting. Which foods contain carbohydrates? Foods that contain carbohydrates include grains, such as b Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Fat Intake

Diabetes And Fat Intake

If you have diabetes, you know that you need to count carbohydrates carefully to keep blood sugar stable. Here's what’s equally important when it comes to your diabetes diet and diabetes management in general — controlling fat intake. That's because diabetes already puts you at an increased risk for heart disease — diabetes slowly damages the arteries in the body unless blood sugar is very tightly controlled. If you don't eat wisely by following a diabetes diet that reduces fat intake, you’re likely to further increase your risk for heart attack and stroke. Need some convincing? Three out of four people with diabetes die of some type of heart disease, and U.S. government figures estimate that the risk of stroke is two to four times greater in adults with diabetes than in those who don't have this condition. Diabetes Management: Types of Diabetes The increased risk of cardiovascular disease exists no matter which of the three types of diabetes you have: Type 1 diabetes. With this type, your body cannot produce insulin, the hormone that helps process glucose. You must eat carefully at all times to lower the risk of complications such as heart disease. Type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetics produce insulin, but their cells have developed a resistance to it, often because they are overweight or obese. Watching your fat intake is a necessary part of losing weight and keeping diabetes under control. Gestational diabetes. If you develop diabetes during pregnancy, you need to watch your fat intake to keep from gaining too much weight as well as to prevent additional stress on your body that could harm you or your unborn baby. Bad Fats, Good Fats Not all fats are bad for you, but it's important to learn the difference. Saturated fats and trans fats. These are considered bad f Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should A Diabetic Eat?

How Many Carbs Should A Diabetic Eat?

Figuring out how many carbs to eat when you have diabetes can seem confusing. Meal plans created by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) provide about 45% of calories from carbs. This includes 45–60 grams per meal and 10–25 grams per snack, totaling about 135–230 grams of carbs per day. However, a growing number of experts believe people with diabetes should be eating far fewer carbs than this. In fact, many recommend fewer carbs per day than what the ADA allows per meal. This article takes a look at the research supporting low-carb diets for diabetics and provides guidance for determining optimal carb intake. Glucose, or blood sugar, is the main source of fuel for your body's cells. In people with diabetes, the body's ability to process and use blood sugar is impaired. Although there are several types of diabetes, the two most common forms are type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 Diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is unable to produce insulin, a hormone that allows sugar from the bloodstream to enter the body's cells. Instead, insulin must be injected to ensure that sugar enters cells. Type 1 diabetes develops because of an autoimmune process in which the body attacks its own insulin-producing cells, which are called beta cells. This disease is usually diagnosed in children, but it can start at any age, even in late adulthood (1). Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is more common, accounting for about 90% of people with diabetes. Like type 1 diabetes, it can develop in both adults and children. However, it isn't as common in children and typically occurs in people who are overweight or obese. In this form of the disease, either the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or the body's cells are resistant to insulin's effects. Therefore, too much sugar stays Continue reading >>

How Much Saturated Fat Can I Eat Per Day If I Have Diabetes?

How Much Saturated Fat Can I Eat Per Day If I Have Diabetes?

How much saturated fat can I eat per day if I have diabetes? If you have diabetes, try to stick to less than 7% of your calories as saturated fat. If you know how many calories you eat, you can use the information on labels to help you stick to your total amount of saturated fat for the day. 1200 calories -- 9 grams of saturated fat 1500 calories -- 11 grams of saturated fat 1800 calories -- 14 grams of saturated fat 2000 calories -- 15 grams of saturated fat Diabetes mellitus (MEL-ih-tus), often referred to as diabetes, is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that result from the bodys inability to produce enough insulin and/or effectively utilize the insulin. Diabetes ... is a serious, life-long condition and the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism (the body's way of digesting food and converting it into energy). There are three forms of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that accounts for five- to 10-percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes may account for 90- to 95-percent of all diagnosed cases. The third type of diabetes occurs in pregnancy and is referred to as gestational diabetes. Left untreated, gestational diabetes can cause health issues for pregnant women and their babies. People with diabetes can take preventive steps to control this disease and decrease the risk of further complications. Chemical Toxins Relationship Abuse Diabetes Complications Body Contouring Your Lifestyle The Five Senses Stages Of Colon Cancer Patient Education For Improving Rx Drug Adherence Your Mind Male Reproductive System Parts Parenting Teens Morning Sickness & Pregnancy Mental Health Therapies Sharecare Bladder Cancer Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Digestive Diseases Schizophreni Continue reading >>

How To Count Carbs In 10 Common Foods

How To Count Carbs In 10 Common Foods

What are carbohydrates? Carbohydrates are sugar-based molecules found in many foods, from cookies to cantaloupes. If you have diabetes, planning your carb intake—and sticking to the plan—is critical to keep blood sugar on an even keel and to cut your risk of diabetes-related problems like heart disease and stroke. Whether or not you have diabetes, you should aim to get about half your calories from complex carbohydrates (which are high in fiber), 20-25% from protein, and no more than 30% from fat, says Lalita Kaul, PhD, RD, a spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association. How to read a food label The Nutrition Facts label lists the total amount of carbohydrates per serving, including carbs from fiber, sugar, and sugar alcohols. (If you're counting carbs in your diet, be aware that 15 grams of carbohydrates count as one serving.) Sugar alcohols are often used in sugar-free foods, although they still deliver calories and carbs. Sugar alcohols and fiber don't affect blood sugar as much as other carbs, because they're not completely absorbed. If food contains sugar alcohol or 5 or more grams of fiber, you can subtract half of the grams of these ingredients from the number of total carbs. (See more details at the American Diabetes Association and University of California, San Francisco.) How many carbs per day? If you eat 2,000 calories a day, you should consume about 250 grams of complex carbohydrates per day. A good starting place for people with diabetes is to have roughly 45 to 60 grams of carbs per meal and 15 to 30 grams for snacks. While snacks are key for people with diabetes who use insulin or pills that increase insulin production (otherwise, they run the risk of low blood sugar), they aren’t essential for non-insulin users. The goal for anyone with diab Continue reading >>

Nutritional Recommendations For Individuals With Diabetes

Nutritional Recommendations For Individuals With Diabetes

Go to: INTRODUCTION This chapter will summarize current information on nutritional recommendations for persons with diabetes for health care practitioners who treat them. The key take home message is that the 1800 calorie ADA diet is dead! The modern diet for the individual with diabetes is based on concepts from clinical research, portion control, and individualized lifestyle changes. It cannot simply be delivered by giving a patient a diet sheet in a one-size-fits-all approach. The lifestyle modification guidance and support needed requires a team effort, best led by an expert in this area; a registered dietitian (RD), or a referral to a diabetes self-management education (DSME) program that includes instruction on nutrition therapy. Dietary recommendations need to be individualized for and accepted by the given patient. It’s important to note that the nutrition goals for diabetes are similar to those that healthy individuals should strive to incorporate into their lifestyle. Leading authorities and professional organizations have concluded that proper nutrition is an important part of the foundation for the treatment of diabetes. However, appropriate nutritional treatment, implementation, and ultimate compliance with the plan remain some of the most vexing problems in diabetic management for three major reasons: First, there are some differences in the dietary structure to consider, depending on the type of diabetes. Second, a plethora of dietary information is available from many sources to the patient and healthcare provider. Nutritional science is constantly evolving, so that what may be considered true today may be outdated in the near future. Different types of diabetes require some specialized nutritional intervention; however, many of the basic dietary princ Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

What you eat makes a big difference when you have diabetes. When you build your diet, four key things to focus on are carbs, fiber, fat, and salt. Here's what you should know about each of them. Carbs give you fuel. They affect your blood sugar faster than fats or protein. You’ll mainly get them from: Fruit Milk and yogurt Bread, cereal, rice, pasta Starchy vegetables like potatoes, corn, and beans Some carbs are simple, like sugar. Other carbs are complex, like those found in beans, nuts, vegetables, and whole grains. Complex carbohydrates are better for you because they take longer for your body to digest. They give you steady energy and fiber. You may have heard of “carbohydrate counting.” That means you keep track of the carbs (sugar and starch) you eat each day. Counting grams of carbohydrate, and splitting them evenly between meals, will help you control your blood sugar. If you eat more carbohydrates than your insulin supply can handle, your blood sugar level goes up. If you eat too little, your blood sugar level may fall too low. You can manage these shifts by knowing how to count carbs. One carbohydrate serving equals 15 grams of carbohydrates. A registered dietitian can help you figure out a carbohydrate counting plan that meets your specific needs. For adults, a typical plan includes two to four carb servings at each meal, and one to two as snacks. You can pick almost any food product off the shelf, read the label, and use the information about grams of carbohydrates to fit the food into your meal plan. Anyone can use carb counting. It’s most useful for people who take more than one daily injection of insulin, use the insulin pump, or want more flexibility and variety in their food choices. You get fiber from plant foods -- fruits, vegetables, whole g Continue reading >>

Fats And Diabetes

Fats And Diabetes

Fat is very high in calories with each gram of fat providing more than twice as many calories compared to protein and carbohydrate. Eating too much fat can lead to you taking in more calories than your body needs which causes weight gain which can affect your diabetes control and overall health. The type of fat is important too. Having too much saturated fat in your diet can cause high levels of what’s known as ‘bad cholesterol’ (low-density lipoprotein or LDL), which increases the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). People with diabetes are at increased risk of CVD, so it’s even more important to make healthier food choices. In this section Should I avoid fat completely? Fat plays a very important role in the body, so you need to include a small amount of it in your diet. Fat in our body fulfils a wide range of functions, which include: supplying energy for cells providing essential fatty acids that your body can't make transporting fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E and K) providing a protective layer around vital organs being necessary in the production of hormones. However, fats are high in calories, so it’s important to limit the amount you use – especially if you’re trying to manage your weight. Next time you’re cooking or shopping, have a look at the nutritional label to see what types of fats are in the product you’re buying. The main types of fat found in our food are saturated and unsaturated, and most foods will have a combination of these. All of us need to cut saturated fat and use unsaturated fats and oils, such as rapeseed or olive oil, as these types are better for your heart. Saturated fats Saturated fat is present in higher amounts in animal products, such as: butter cream cheese meat meat products and poultry processed foods like pastri Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Per Day For A Diabetic?

How Many Carbs Per Day For A Diabetic?

Did you know that one of the most commonly asked questions we get is: how many carbs per day is best for a diabetic to eat? No doubt that's why you're here reading this as well, right? And like many other people you may be totally confused by that question. That's not surprising because the amount of carbs recommended does vary depending on where you read it. Why is this? Well, there is no specific recommendation for carbs, that's why there are so many different numbers. However, there is good scientific evidence to suggest what's best. But unfortunately, that information is not getting out to the public (to YOU) as fast as it should. Luckily though, here at Diabetes Meal Plans, we pride ourselves on sharing up-to-date evidence-based info because we want you to get the best results. And we're proud to say what we share works: Sheryl says: “My doctor’s report was best ever: A1c was normal for the first time since I was diagnosed diabetic in 2007; My LDL was 60; my total cholesterol was 130. My lab results were improved across the board. Best news: I am taking less diabetic meds, and my weight is within 5 lbs of normal BMI. I am a believer in what you have written, and I’m grateful to have a site I can trust.” Here at Diabetes Meal Plans we encourage a low carb diet because research shows that lower carb diets produce far more effective results than traditional low fat diets. As you read on, be prepared to have some of your longheld diet beliefs shattered. But also be prepared to be amazed by the possibilities. Because with a few dietary changes, you can reverse* your diabetes and live your life anew! Rethinking ‘Mainstream' Carb Recommendations Over the years it’s been pretty common practice to recommend a low fat, high carbohydrate diet to people with type 2 Continue reading >>

The Ratio Of Fats, Carbohydrates & Protein For Diabetics

The Ratio Of Fats, Carbohydrates & Protein For Diabetics

If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, then you understand the importance of eating a healthy diet. Diabetes is a condition where your body does not produce or use insulin correctly. Without proper insulin function your body is not able to regulate your blood sugar levels, leading to serious problems with your nerves, kidneys and heart. A proper diabetes diet is balanced and based on healthy foods. The diet uses portion control and scheduling to help manage glucose levels throughout the day. Video of the Day Generally speaking you should limit your daily fat intake to about 20 to 35 percent of your total calories, according to MedlinePlus. The three types of fats include saturated fat, trans fat and unsaturated fat. If you have diabetes avoid foods that contain a lot of saturated or trans fat. This includes meat and other animal products, as well as processed foods like margarine. It is recommended that you avoid trans fat all together and in order to do so, you will need to read the nutrition labels on food to find out which foods contain trans fat. Unsaturated fats are healthy forms of fat and you should include them in your diet. According to the Harvard School of Public Health, strict guidelines have not been published regarding the amount of unsaturated fat that you should eat, instead it recommends that a good rule of thumb is to choose unsaturated fats over saturated whenever possible. Good sources of healthy forms of fat include fish, nuts, vegetable oils, lean meats and beans. Protein is an essential nutrient for health. According to the Harvard School of Public Health, adults get about 15 percent of their calories from protein. It further states that the American Diabetes Association recommends limiting protein intake to around 10 percent of daily caloric i Continue reading >>

Fat Grams—how Much Fat Should You Eat Per Day?

Fat Grams—how Much Fat Should You Eat Per Day?

By Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE Fat is an important part of your diet, but figuring out how much to eat can be confusing. Over the last 50 years, everyday diets have gone from moderate-fat to low-fat, based on recommendations from health organizations. However, the 2015–2020 US Dietary Guidelines no longer specify an upper limit for how much total fat you should consume. This article takes a detailed look at different types of fat and provides suggestions for how much to eat per day. What Is Fat? Along with protein and carbs, fat is one of the three macronutrients in your diet. You consume fat in the form of triglycerides. A triglyceride molecule is made up of three fatty acids attached to a glycerol backbone. The fatty acids contain chains of carbons and hydrogens. One way fats are classified is by the length of their carbon chains: Short-chain fatty acids: Fewer than 6 carbons. Medium-chain fatty acids: 6–12 carbons. Long-chain fatty acids: 13–21 carbons. Very-long-chain fatty acids: 22 or more carbons. Most of the fats you eat are long-chain fatty acids. Short-chain fatty acids are mainly produced when bacteria ferment soluble fiber in your colon, although milk fat also contains small amounts. Long-chain and very-long-chain fats are absorbed into the bloodstream and released into the body’s cells as needed. However, short-chain and medium-chain fats are taken up directly by the liver to be used as energy. Bottom Line: Fats are one of the three macronutrients. They are absorbed from food and used by the body for energy and other functions. Functions and Benefits of Fat Fat performs a number of functions and provides several health benefits: Energy: Fat is an excellent energy source. It provides 9 calories per gram, whereas protein and carbs each provide 4 calo Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs/fat Grams Do You Eat Per Day?

How Many Carbs/fat Grams Do You Eat Per Day?

How many carbs/fat grams do you eat per day? How many carbs/fat grams do you eat per day? I was diagnosed as prediabetic in August (A1C was 5.8). I have been sticking to 100-130 carbs a day (this is before fiber is counted), but I am having a hard time keeping my fat grams under 50 (I eat 1400-1600 calories a day). They are good fats, but I am still consuming too many (I feel). About how many carbs and fat grams do you consume daily? I consume around 30g of net carbs a day and limit protein to the amount required for cell maintenance and renewal to avoid conversion of excess grams to glucose via gluconeogenesis. Fats are as many as I want, usually between 160 and 200g per day, mostly saturated and monounsaturated fat from cream, butter, cheese and the fat on meat. This allowed me to lose 24kg and bring my BG into the normal, non-diabetic range within a few months of diagnosis. I never see a BG reading in the diabetic range except for the extremely rare occasions when I splash out and eat potato. HbA1c 1st November 2017 31mmol/mol (5.0%) D.D. Family Pre-Diabetic since April 2017 Being on a LCHF diet, my proportions are a bit different than yours. I eat about 40-ish grams of net carbs-- 60-ish including fiber (mostly veggies). About 115-ish grams of fat, and 60-ish grams of protein. I eat about 1500-1600 kCal a day. ETA: The fat keeps me full and gives me energy, the low carb count keeps my cravings in check and blood sugars normal. Last edited by AnnieP; 10/01/17 at 10:07 PM. Reason: added stuff. ;) Diagnosed pre-diabetic in April 2017; treating with lchf diet and exercise. 120 mg Nadolol, Magnesium, pacemaker/ICD implant since Apr 2014 Thank you both! I thought that a good percentage of your daily calories is 30% or so (?) I usually hit around 80 fat grams a day and I Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

The mainstays of diabetes treatment are: Working towards obtaining ideal body weight Following a diabetic diet Regular exercise Diabetic medication if needed Note: Type 1 diabetes must be treated with insulin; if you have type 2 diabetes, you may not need to take insulin. This involves injecting insulin under the skin for it to work. Insulin cannot be taken as a pill because the digestive juices in the stomach would destroy the insulin before it could work. Scientists are looking for new ways to give insulin. But today, shots are the only method. There are, however, new methods to give the shots. Insulin pumps are now being widely used and many people are having great results. In this Article Working towards obtaining ideal body weight An estimate of ideal body weight can be calculated using this formula: For women: Start with 100 pounds for 5 feet tall. Add 5 pounds for every inch over 5 feet. If you are under 5 feet, subtract 5 pounds for each inch under 5 feet. This will give you your ideal weight. If you have a large frame, add 10%. If you have a small frame, subtract 10%. A good way to decide your frame size is to look at your wrist size compared to other women's. Example: A woman who is 5' 4" tall and has a large frame 100 pounds + 20 pounds (4 inches times 5 pounds per inch) = 120 pounds. Add 10% for large frame (in this case 10% of 120 pounds is 12 pounds). 120 pounds + 12 pounds = 132 pounds ideal body weight. For men: Start with 106 pounds for a height of 5 foot. Add 6 pounds for every inch above 5 foot. For a large frame, add 10%. For a small frame, subtract 10%. (See above for further details.) Learn More about Treating Type 2 Diabetes The Diabetic Diet Diet is very important in diabetes. There are differing philosophies on what is the best diet but below is Continue reading >>

How Many Grams Of Fat Should I Be Eating A Day?

How Many Grams Of Fat Should I Be Eating A Day?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community How many grams of fat should I be eating a day? I'm on the LCHF diet. For carbs, my goal is 40 grams a day (Bernstein's Diabetes Solution). For protein, my goal is 70 grams a day (using the 1 gram protein per kilogram of body weight formula). Just need to figure out how many grams of fat I need each day. Anyone know? References are always appreciated. Thanks Indy51. I entered my information and goals into the fields. The recommendations were helpful. Both the grams of proteins and fat seemed okay. I liked that it gave me a maximum of 100 grams of fat. I also ordered both of her books. I like that she gives you the good and the bad regarding the LCHF diet and that the research is up-to-date. Also like that she used surveys to convey the real life experiences of those who are on the diet. Looking forward to digging into both books. Thanks for helping me find my bearings. Was surveying the information from the bottom up, didn't find what I was looking for, got frustrated, and gave up. As I was closing articles I had open, I gave this another read, this time from the beginning. She provided an excellent explanation that I was able to understand. Fill up on fat until you are full. It is that simple. My ratio is around 5% carbs (36g), 15% protein, 80% fat. Trudi Deakin (eat fat book- NHS x-pert health) says she eats 82% fat. Protein does affect your BG levels, I have to be careful with too much protein. If you want to eat more fat content, avoid lean meat (chicken breast etc) and choose fatty cuts. Most people find the more fat you eat the better your HDL (good) Cholesterol levels are. Was surveying the information from the bottom up, didn't find what I was Continue reading >>

Can You Put A Number On Carbs?

Can You Put A Number On Carbs?

I'd appreciate learning about how many grams of carbohydrate I should eat as a guideline to keep my glucose numbers normal. Continue reading >>

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