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How Many Diabetes Patients In The World

Diabetes Prevalence (% Of Population Ages 20 To 79) - Country Ranking

Diabetes Prevalence (% Of Population Ages 20 To 79) - Country Ranking

Definition: Diabetes prevalence refers to the percentage of people ages 20-79 who have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Source: International Diabetes Federation, Diabetes Atlas. Rank Country Value Year 1 Mauritius 22.30 2015 2 Palau 20.90 2015 3 Saudi Arabia 20.00 2015 3 Qatar 20.00 2015 3 Kuwait 20.00 2015 6 New Caledonia 19.60 2015 6 Bahrain 19.60 2015 8 United Arab Emirates 19.30 2015 9 Kiribati 18.60 2015 10 Malaysia 17.90 2015 11 Seychelles 17.40 2015 12 Tuvalu 17.30 2015 13 Egypt 16.70 2015 14 Vanuatu 16.60 2015 15 Belize 16.50 2015 16 Solomon Islands 16.40 2015 17 Mexico 15.80 2015 18 Papua New Guinea 15.30 2015 19 Oman 14.80 2015 20 Fiji 13.80 2015 21 Brunei 13.70 2015 21 Tonga 13.70 2015 23 Trinidad and Tobago 13.60 2015 23 Antigua and Barbuda 13.60 2015 23 Barbados 13.60 2015 26 The Bahamas 13.20 2015 27 Cayman Islands 13.10 2015 28 Lebanon 13.00 2015 28 St. Kitts and Nevis 13.00 2015 30 Turkey 12.80 2015 31 Dominica 12.60 2015 32 Suriname 12.50 2015 33 Puerto Rico 12.10 2015 34 Venezuela 12.00 2015 35 St. Vincent and the Grenadines 11.90 2015 36 Jordan 11.70 2015 37 Jamaica 11.50 2015 38 Grenada 11.40 2015 39 Guyana 11.20 2015 40 Guatemala 11.10 2015 41 St. Lucia 10.90 2015 42 United States 10.80 2015 43 Singapore 10.50 2015 43 Montenegro 10.50 2015 45 Libya 10.40 2015 45 Brazil 10.40 2015 47 Serbia 10.30 2015 47 Albania 10.30 2015 47 Macedonia 10.30 2015 50 Iran 10.10 2015 51 Chile 10.00 2015 51 Cuba 10.00 2015 51 Colombia 10.00 2015 54 Bosnia and Herzegovina 9.90 2015 54 Comoros 9.90 2015 54 Malta 9.90 2015 54 Portugal 9.90 2015 58 Panama 9.80 2015 58 China 9.80 2015 60 Paraguay 9.70 2015 61 Cyprus 9.60 2015 61 Tunisia 9.60 2015 63 Iraq 9.30 2015 63 Bhutan 9.30 2015 63 India 9.30 2015 66 Honduras 9.20 2015 66 Nicaragua 9.20 2015 66 El Salvador 9.20 2015 66 Ecuad Continue reading >>

The Looming Public Health Crises Threatening To Take Down China’s Health Care System

The Looming Public Health Crises Threatening To Take Down China’s Health Care System

The slender, steel needle pierced Mary Shi’s pudgy belly. The sharp point pricked her skin and as her thumb pushed down on the syringe, cloudy insulin began to swim in her bloodstream. Shi was running out of places to inject herself: her stomach, arms and legs all bore the bruising from regular shots. More importantly, she was tired of having to forgo wearing T-shirts and skirts for clothes that would strategically cover her body when she went out for afternoon tea with her girlfriends in Shanghai. “When you can stand the psychosocial burden of diabetes and social discrimination, injections are really a piece of cake,” said Shi, a 30-year-old app developer. Shi was diagnosed as a diabetic when she was 18. She had been studying for the highly competitive gaokao college entrance exam when she fainted at school. An emergency doctor explained that Shi had diabetes and if the illness was left unregulated, she’d be blind within five years. Her bewildered parents became depressed and Shi came to resent the disease and the rules it imposed on her lifestyle, hiding her illness from her friends for several years. Shi is one of millions of people caught in China’s diabetes epidemic. In the 1980s diabetes was a rarity affecting just one percent of China’s population. Now, due to rapid economic development, and the subsequent growth in availability of high-calorie diets, cars and sedentary lifestyles, China has the highest number of diabetics in the world, totaling 109 million people in 2015—roughly 11 percent of the population. That makes China home to a third of the world’s diabetic population. The scale of this public health problem is huge, particularly because it comes at a time when the country’s health system as a whole is under reform, moving from a rudimen Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Read on to learn some of the key facts and statistics about the people who have it and how to manage it. Risk factors Many risk factors for type 2 diabetes include lifestyle decisions that can be reduced or even cut out entirely with time and effort. Men are also at slightly higher risk of developing diabetes than women. This may be more associated with lifestyle factors, body weight, and where the weight is located (abdominally versus in the hip area) than with innate gender differences. Significant risk factors include: older age excess weight, particularly around the waist family history certain ethnicities physical inactivity poor diet Prevalence Type 2 diabetes is increasingly prevalent but also largely preventable. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes in adults. The CDC also gives us the following information: In general Research suggests that 1 out of 3 adults has prediabetes. Of this group, 9 out of 10 don't know they have it. 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes, but 8.1 million may be undiagnosed and unaware of their condition. About 1.4 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in United States every year. More than one in every 10 adults who are 20 years or older has diabetes. For seniors (65 years and older), that figure rises to more than one in four. Cases of diagnosed diabetes cost the United States an estimated $245 billion in 2012. This cost is expected to rise with the increasing diagnoses. In pregnancy and parentingAccording to the CDC, 4.6 to 9.2 percent of pregnancies may be affected by gestational diabetes. In up to 10 percent of them, the mother is diagnosed w Continue reading >>

The Global Prevalence Of Diabetes

The Global Prevalence Of Diabetes

Common health risks, associated symptoms, and impact on healthcare costs Diabetes, a disease affecting blood glucose control, is a growing issue worldwide. From 1980 to 2014, the number of people affected by diabetes almost quadrupled from 108 million to 422 million worldwide, or a growth in diabetes prevalence of 4.7% to 8.5%.1 This growth trend is not estimated to stop or slow in the future, according to the IDF Diabetes Atlas, by 2040 the number of worldwide diabetics are expected to grow to 642 million, representing a potential future healthcare crisis for patients and providers alike.2 The healthcare costs are also expected to balloon. In the years between 2007 and 2012, the total healthcare costs associated with diabetes rose from $174 billion to $245 billion, or 41% in just a 5-year period.3 The majority of diabetes cases occur in developing countries, representing a high proportion of the disease’s economic burden. Prevalence of diabetes in Asian countries is particularly high and expected to increase.4 In fact, 60% of the world’s diabetic population are concentrated in Asian countries, with socio-economic growth, industrialization, and urbanization being three of the most common factors associated with increased prevalence of the disease.4 Diabetes is also growing in potentially epidemic proportions in India where over 62 million people are affected.5,6 Genetic factors, improved living standards, and rising levels of obesity are some of the many reasons associated diabetes is growing in this geographic region.7 Diabetes: health effects The short- and long-term health effects associated with diabetes are many, and each of these health effects worsen with poor glycemic control. Managing diabetes appropriately with prescribed therapies, diet, and lifestyle cha Continue reading >>

Worldwide Trends In Diabetes Since 1980: A Pooled Analysis Of 751 Population-based Studies With 4·4 Million Participants

Worldwide Trends In Diabetes Since 1980: A Pooled Analysis Of 751 Population-based Studies With 4·4 Million Participants

Jump to Section Diabetes is an important cause of mortality, morbidity, and health-system costs in the world.1, 2 Therefore, there is an urgent need to implement population-based interventions that prevent diabetes, enhance its early detection, and use lifestyle and pharmacological interventions to prevent or delay its progression to complications. To motivate such actions, one of the global targets set after the 2011 UN High-Level Meeting on Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) is to halt, by 2025, the rise in the age-standardised adult prevalence of diabetes at its 2010 levels.3 Valid and consistent estimates of diabetes prevalence over time are needed to evaluate the effect of interventions, compare trends in different countries, and measure progress towards the agreed target. A previous study estimated trends in mean fasting plasma glucose from 1980 to 2008 and reported diabetes prevalence, but only as a secondary outcome and estimated based on mean fasting plasma glucose.4 The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) periodically reports diabetes prevalence,5, 6 but does not analyse trends; uses some sources that are based solely on self-reported diabetes; and does not fully account for differences in diabetes definitions in different data sources,7 even though diabetes prevalence varies depending on whether it is defined based on fasting plasma glucose, 2 h plasma glucose in an oral glucose tolerance test (2hOGTT), or haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c).8 Furthermore, it is not known how trends in prevalence, together with population growth and ageing, have affected the number of adults with diabetes. Our aim was to estimate worldwide trends in the prevalence and number of adults with diabetes. We also estimated the probability of achieving the global diabetes target. Evidence bef Continue reading >>

Who: Diabetes Rates Skyrocketing Worldwide

Who: Diabetes Rates Skyrocketing Worldwide

Diabetes rates nearly doubled in the past three decades, largely due to increases in obesity and sugary diets, according to a report released Wednesday by the World Health Organization. The percentage of adults living with diabetes worldwide grew from 4.7% in 1980 to 8.5% in 2014. Overall, there was a nearly four-fold increase in worldwide cases: An estimated 422 million adults were living with diabetes in 2014, up from 108 million in 1980. The WHO describes diabetes as a serious, chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar, or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. In 2012, 29.1 million Americans, or 9.3% of the population, had diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. About 1.4 million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes every year, according to the organization. More than 8.1 million Americans with diabetes don't know it, putting them at greater risk of complications. The disease can develop slowly over time. In 2012, 86 million Americans age 20 and older had prediabetes, a condition in which blood sugar is higher than normal but doesn't yet qualify as diabetes. Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the United States, killing about 69,000 Americans a year. The disease contributes to an additional 234,000 deaths each year, according to the American Diabetes Association. Worldwide, diabetes killed 1.5 million people in 2012, according to the WHO report. High blood sugar caused an additional 2.2 million deaths by increasing the risks of heart disease and other chronic conditions. About 43% of these deaths occur before the age of 70. The percentage of deaths attributable to high blood glucose or diabetes that occur prior to age 70 is higher in l Continue reading >>

What Are The Major Personal Genomics Companies, And What Are Their Strengths/weaknesses?

What Are The Major Personal Genomics Companies, And What Are Their Strengths/weaknesses?

Consumer and Clinical Genomic diagnostics: Xcode Life Sciences Xcode Life - DNA Analysis and Genetic Testing Company in India Provides both clinical and consumer genetics reports including Health, Wellness, Nutrition, Fitness, Weight Loss, Medication sensitivity (precision medicine), Skin, Allergy, Ancestry, IVF, and many more to come. Xcode also accepts genetic raw data from most Ancestry companies in the world including [23andme, FTDNA, Ancestry DNA, Helix, Living DNA, MyHeritage and more]. They work with professional practitioners such as physicians, Dietitians, Nutritionists, Sports specialists, fitness trainers etc. A variety of raw data formats from Whole Genome sequencing data to genotyping data can be sent to them. Coriell Personal Medicine Collaborative - cpmc.coriell.org/: Free Affymetrix GeneChip SNP sequencing, but only for "potentially medically actionable" conditions. Currently this list includes 10 conditions, and will grow as the Informed Cohort Oversight Board approves more conditions. Counsyl.com/ : offers a (I presume) a chip-based screen for 100 genetic disease markers, including some for cystic fibrosis. Trying to sell both direct to consumers and clinically and aiming for insurance coverage. DTC costs $349. Not sure how they ensure the results are clinically useful. PathwayGenomics.com/ : offers carrier testing for 61 genetic diseases, metabolism genes for 9 different drugs, as well as ancestry analysis for $199-$399. Not sure how they ensure the results are clinically useful. GenomicHealth.com / OncotypeDX.com : 21-gene expression assay that predicts recurrence of certain kinds of breast cancer. Considered a multivariate assay and regulated by the FDA; has more clinical data than most other genetic diagnostics demonstrating it's clinical validity Continue reading >>

Tackling Indonesia’s Diabetes Challenge: Eight Approaches From Around The World

Tackling Indonesia’s Diabetes Challenge: Eight Approaches From Around The World

Indonesia’s economic and demographic evolution is leading to a dramatic rise in noncommunicable diseases. How big is the problem? What approaches are other countries taking that could inform Indonesia’s response? Indonesia is in the midst of a fundamental economic and demographic transition. The country is projected to become one of the top ten economies in the world by 2030, up from the sixteenth largest today. An additional 90 million people are estimated to join the consuming class by 2030. In healthcare, too, Indonesia has made rapid strides, reducing maternal mortality by 56 percent in the last decade and under-five mortality by 86 percent over the past 50 years. An Indonesian’s average life expectancy has increased from 49 years in 1960 to 69 in 2013.1 In 2014, Indonesia introduced the world’s largest single-payor health-insurance program, seeking to provide universal healthcare to its approximately 250 million citizens by 2019. Looking ahead to the next 10 to 15 years, one of Indonesia’s biggest challenges will be addressing noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). In 1990, NCDs represented 43 percent of the country’s disease burden, compared with 49 percent for communicable diseases such as tuberculosis. Today, NCDs’ share has grown to 69 percent,2 and the numbers are rising. In 2014, three NCD categories—cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and its complications, and respiratory diseases—accounted for nearly 50 percent of deaths in the country.3 These three NCDs will cost Indonesia an estimated $2.8 trillion from 2012 to 2030 (three times Indonesia’s GDP in 2014, and nearly 107 times Indonesia’s total health spending in 2014), according to the World Economic Forum. The adoption of a modern lifestyle by the Indonesian middle class and the country’s Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevalence

Diabetes Prevalence

Tweet Since 1996, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK has risen from 1.4 million to 3.5 million. Taking into account the number of people likely to be living with undiagnosed diabetes, the number of people living with diabetes in the UK is over 4 million. Diabetes prevalence in the UK is estimated to rise to 5 million by 2025. Type 2 diabetes in particular has been growing at the particularly high rate and is now one of the world’s most common long term health conditions. UK diabetes prevalence Currently, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK is estimated to be 3.5 million. [16] It is predicted that up to 549,000 people in the UK have diabetes that is yet to be diagnosed. This means that, including the number of undiagnosed people, there is estimated to be over 4 million people living with diabetes in the UK at present. This represents 6% of the UK population or 1 in every 16 people having diabetes (diagnosed and undiagnosed). The prevalence of diabetes in the UK (for adults) is broken down as follows: How many people have diabetes in the UK Country Number of People England 2,913,538 Northern Ireland 84,836 Scotland 271,312 Wales 183,348 The majority of these cases are of type 2 diabetes, which has been linked to increasing cases of obesity. Statistics suggest that a slightly higher proportion of adult men have diabetes. Men account for 56 per cent of UK adults with diabetes and women account for 44 per cent. World diabetes prevalence It is estimated that 415 million people are living with diabetes in the world, which is estimated to be 1 in 11 of the world’s adult population. 46% of people with diabetes are undiagnosed. The figure is expected to rise to 642 million people living with diabetes worldwide by 2040. Prevalence across Continue reading >>

How Can You Improve The Health Of Your Kidneys?

How Can You Improve The Health Of Your Kidneys?

Keep hydrated. Many people underestimate que importance of an adequate ingestion of fluids throughout the date. Avoid taking indiscriminately taking anti-inflammatory drugs, such as Ibuprofen or Naproxen. They directly lower the Glomerular Filtration Rate, which is amount of blood that your kidneys will be able to “clean” over time. Avoid eating too much salt, as it will trigger neuro-hormonal mechanisms, increasing blood pressure. Hypertension is one of the leading causes of Chronic Kidney Disease, and a high blood pressure will, in most cases, cause kidney damage in the long term. Avoid eating too much sugar, specially added sugar. It can lower your Insulin Sensitivity, resulting in Diabetes. Diabetes is the world leading cause of Chronic Kidney Disease. In the long term it will irreversibly damage you kidneys. Be very careful about most herbal supplements or teas. Some those products might carry unknown toxins, which, after accumulating in the renal tubules, can cause severe toxicity and kidney damage. During my own practice, I have found many of those cases. It happens a lot more than most people think. Quit smoking. It’s one of the most important risk factors for Atherosclerotic Disease (accumulation of “fat” in your blood vessels), leading to damage in the renal arteries (which alters the kidney’s function, specially how it regulates blood pressure). Exercise. Weight excess and obesity are some of the most important risk factors for Atherosclerotic Disease. In a blood test, high creatinine levels are usually a sign of kidney malfunction, specially on younger patients, as its levels will only increase after a big drop in renal function. If hope I could help. Sorry for the non-native English. The rights of the pictures belong to their authors. Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Key facts The number of people with diabetes has risen from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014 (1). The global prevalence of diabetes* among adults over 18 years of age has risen from 4.7% in 1980 to 8.5% in 2014 (1). Diabetes prevalence has been rising more rapidly in middle- and low-income countries. Diabetes is a major cause of blindness, kidney failure, heart attacks, stroke and lower limb amputation. In 2015, an estimated 1.6 million deaths were directly caused by diabetes. Another 2.2 million deaths were attributable to high blood glucose in 2012**. Almost half of all deaths attributable to high blood glucose occur before the age of 70 years. WHO projects that diabetes will be the seventh leading cause of death in 2030 (1). Healthy diet, regular physical activity, maintaining a normal body weight and avoiding tobacco use are ways to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. Diabetes can be treated and its consequences avoided or delayed with diet, physical activity, medication and regular screening and treatment for complications. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. Insulin is a hormone that regulates blood sugar. Hyperglycaemia, or raised blood sugar, is a common effect of uncontrolled diabetes and over time leads to serious damage to many of the body's systems, especially the nerves and blood vessels. In 2014, 8.5% of adults aged 18 years and older had diabetes. In 2015, diabetes was the direct cause of 1.6 million deaths and in 2012 high blood glucose was the cause of another 2.2 million deaths. Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes (previously known as insulin-dependent, juvenile or childhood-onset) is charact Continue reading >>

Is It True That The Canadians Go To The Usa When They Need A Major Surgery Because Canadian Doctors Are Not As Good As The American Ones?

Is It True That The Canadians Go To The Usa When They Need A Major Surgery Because Canadian Doctors Are Not As Good As The American Ones?

Nope. Canadians with money sometimes go to the U.S. for medical care to jump the queue and avoid waiting times for certain major procedures. Because in most or all Canadian provincial health care systems, patients are triaged for things like hip replacements and transplants based on need and priority in line, not based on how much money you have. So sometimes you have to wait if your case isn’t as urgent. Those with the money who don’t want to wait have the option of going to the U.S. But let’s be brutally honest. Some Canadian provinces manage their healthcare systems better than others. Quebec, for example, has a bad habit of overspending for years and then panicking and making huge cutbacks all at once. About 20 years ago, this roller-coaster cycle left the province with a shortage of cancer-treatment beds for a couple of years, so in the interim they sent some patients for treatment in upstate New York. That may be what you heard, in distorted form. All that said, I agree with Catherine that Canadians are really getting tired of questions like this. We manage our healthcare differently in the two countries. The U.S. triages based on money: If you have money or a decent private insurance plan, you get your major surgery when you need it. If you don’t have money or insurance, you don’t get it at all, or you get the absolute bare minimum of care from a charity hospital. Which you probably have to wait for. In Canada, we triage based on time. Everyone gets treated, but you’re prioritized first based on need, not on your ability to pay. That means everybody waits longer for really major stuff (like transplants or hip replacements), but everyone also gets the treatments they need. And remember, this doesn’t apply to major trauma like car accidents. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Continues To Spread Around The World

Diabetes Continues To Spread Around The World

On World Diabetes Day, news about the disease's global impact is dire. An estimated 382 million people worldwide have diabetes, according to a new report from the International Diabetes Federation. The IDF expects that number to rise to 592 million by 2035, when one in every 10 people will have the disease. "Diabetes in all its forms imposes unacceptably high human, social and economic costs on countries at all income levels," the report authors begin in the executive summary. They go on to say that this latest edition of the Diabetes Atlas "carries a bitter but unavoidable message: despite the array of tools at our disposal to tackle the disease... the battle to protect people from diabetes and its disabling, life-threatening complications is being lost." Epidemiologist Leonor Guariguata, project coordinator for IDF's Diabetes Atlas, wasn't surprised by the report's findings. In fact, she says the estimates are conservative, and that diabetes may be a much bigger problem than we think. "The thing that strikes me is that we keep saying the same thing again," she said. "Every time we produce new estimates, they are above and beyond what we had projected from past estimates." There are three types of diabetes: Type 1, Type 2 and gestational diabetes. People who have Type 1 diabetes do not produce insulin, a hormone the body needs to convert sugar and starches into energy. Type 1 diabetes used to be called juvenile onset diabetes because it is usually diagnosed in adolescence. Around 5% of the diabetic population in the United States has Type 1 diabetes. People with Type 2 diabetes have developed a resistance to the insulin their body produces. Most people who develop Type 2 diabetes are adults, although experts worry about the increasing number of young people being diagn Continue reading >>

Diabetes Rates May Double Worldwide By 2030

Diabetes Rates May Double Worldwide By 2030

April 26, 2004 -- The number of people with diabetes will double worldwide by 2030, according to new estimates from researchers at the World Health Organization (WHO) and several European universities. Although the U.S. is expected to experience a far more rapid increase in diabetes rates, the study suggests the greatest relative increases will be in the Middle East, sub-Saharan Africa, and India. That's because researchers say deaths due to infectious diseases as well as maternal and infant deaths in developing countries are expected to continue to drop in the next 30 years. Meanwhile, as diabetes rates climb in these areas, deaths due to related diseases, such as heart disease, will increase and account for a larger proportion of deaths in developing countries. According to the study, published in the May issue of Diabetes Care, the top 10 countries with the highest number of estimated diabetes cases for 2000 and 2030 are as follows: 2000 2030 Rank Country People with diabetes (millions) Country People with diabetes (millions) 1 India 31.7 India 79.4 2 China 20.8 China 42.3 3 U.S. 17.7 U.S. 30.3 4 Indonesia 8.4 Indonesia 21.3 5 Japan 6.8 Pakistan 13.9 6 Pakistan 5.2 Brazil 11.3 7 Russian Federation 4.6 Bangladesh 11.1 8 Brazil 4.6 Japan 8.9 9 Italy 4.3 Philippines 7.8 10 Bangladesh 3.2 Egypt 6.7 *CGM-based treatment requires fingersticks for calibration, if patient is taking acetaminophen, or if symptoms/expectations do not match CGM readings, and if not performed, may result in hypoglycemia. Please see important risk and safety information. The study shows that the three countries with the most people with diabetes are expected to remain India, China, and the U.S. But researchers predict an even higher increase than the CDC predicted in 2001. The CDC study projected Continue reading >>

World Health Day: India Among Top 3 Countries With High Diabetic Population

World Health Day: India Among Top 3 Countries With High Diabetic Population

After tightening laws on tobacco and alcohol, experts now want a high tax on sugary drinks as they cause a sugar high that leads to insulin resistance. Ahead of World Health Day (April 7), the Lancet study (to be published online late tonight) said there is a fourfold rise in the number of diabetics – from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014 and half of them live in India, China, USA, Brazil and Indonesia. According to the Lancet study, China, India and USA are among the top three countries with a high number of diabetic population. While the numbers climbed from 20.4 million in China in 1980 to 102.9 million in 2014, the rise has been equally dramatic in India from 11.9 million in 1980 to 64.5 million in India. Prevalence of diabetes has more than doubled for men in India and China (3.7 per cent to 9.1 per cent in India and 3.5 per cent to 9.9 per cent in China). It has also increased by 50 per cent among women in China (5.0 per cent to 7.6 per cent) and 80 per cent among women in India (4.6 per cent to 8.3 per cent). Dietary patterns must change, with more fibre and protein and less of sugar and starches in the diet. A high tax on sugary drinks is needed, as they cause a sugar high that leads to insulin resistance, Dr K Srinath Reddy, President of Public Health Foundation of India told The Indian Express. The government launched an adult screening programme for diabetes and hypertension in some districts, but it has had an inadequate response. Unless early detection and effective treatment become a part of routinely available primary health services, we will fail in protecting persons with diabetes from having serious complications. Urban planning must support safe and pleasurable physical activity, especially active commuting. Public education on the prevent Continue reading >>

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