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How Many Diabetes In Us

The 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report Is Here

The 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report Is Here

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has released the 2017 Diabetes Statistics Report with estimates for “prevalence and incidence of diabetes, prediabetes, risk factors for complications, acute and long-term complications, deaths, and costs.” Where are we now? There are 30.3 million people with diabetes (9.4% of the US population) including 23.1 million people who are diagnosed and 7.2 million people (23.8%) undiagnosed. The numbers for prediabetes indicate that 84.1 million adults (33.9% of the adult U.S. population) have prediabetes, including 23.1 million adults aged 65 years or older (the age group with highest rate). The estimated percentage of individuals with type 1 diabetes remains at 5% among those with diabetes. The statistics are also provided by age, gender, ethnicity, and for each state/territory so you can search for these specifics. The CDC has produced wonderful infographics, “A Snapshot of Diabetes in the U.S.” and “Prediabes: Could it be You?” for everyone to use and reproduce. They illustrate estimates for diabetes, prediabetes, the cost of diabetes (dollars, risk of death, medical costs), specifics about type 1 and type 2 diabetes, risk factors for type 2 diabetes, and a “What You Can Do” section. If we compare the numbers with previous estimates, we see that there has been an increase in those with diabetes and a decrease in those with prediabetes. However, the numbers are all still extremely high, and the costs and health burdens are staggering! What can we do with these statistics? Use them to help focus efforts to prevent and control diabetes in the U.S. Share the positive messages regarding prevention strategies with those at risk of developing or with type 2 diabetes Distribute the information to local media and Continue reading >>

Study Finds Half Of U.s. Adults Have Diabetes Or Prediabetes

Study Finds Half Of U.s. Adults Have Diabetes Or Prediabetes

Recently, researchers set out to quantify just how prevalent the disease and its precursor are among American adults. In a large population-based study(jama.jamanetwork.com) published Sept. 8 in JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association, authors examined the prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes and related disease trends in U.S. adults from 1988-2012. One of the most startling findings in this study was that in 2012, more than half of American adults had either diabetes or prediabetes. Also of interest was the fact that more than one-third of those who met the study's criteria for diabetes were unaware they had the disease. Breakdown of Study Methods The study used data collected as part of the 1988-94 and the 1999-2000 to 2011-12 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES), which are designed to be nationally representative of the civilian, noninstitutionalized U.S. population. Specifically, researchers used data from 2,781 adults from 2011-12 to estimate recent prevalence and an additional 23,634 adults from all NHANES conducted between 1988 and 2010 to estimate trends. Furthermore, the researchers used two definitions of undiagnosed and total diabetes to bolster the reliability of their results. The first of these defined undiagnosed diabetes as any participant who had a hemoglobin A1c level of 6.5 percent or greater, a fasting plasma glucose (FPG) level of 126 mg/dL or greater, or a two-hour plasma glucose (2-hour PG) level of 200 mg/dL or greater (i.e., the hemoglobin A1c, FPG or 2-hour PG definition). Total diabetes was defined as any participant who had either diagnosed diabetes or undiagnosed diabetes according to the hemoglobin A1c, FPG or 2-hour PG definition. Because 2-hour PG levels were not available for all age groups and for a Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics: Facts And Trends

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics: Facts And Trends

Diabetes mellitus, or diabetes, is a disease that causes high blood sugar. It occurs when there is a problem with insulin. Insulin is a hormone that takes sugar from foods and moves it to the body's cells. If the body does not make enough insulin or does not use insulin well, the sugar from food stays in the blood and causes high blood sugar. There are several different types of diabetes, but the most common is type 2. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Diabetes Report, 2014, 90 to 95 percent of people with diabetes in the United States have type 2. Just 5 percent of people have type 1. Contents of this article: Key facts about diabetes in the U.S. Diabetes is at an all-time high in the U.S. The CDC's Division of Diabetes Translation states that 1 percent of the population, which is about a half of a million people, had diagnosed diabetes in 1958. Today, nearly 10 percent of the population have diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). That's 29.1 million Americans, and more than a quarter of these people do not know they have it. The ADA report that the number of people who have diabetes increased by 382 percent from 1988 to 2014. The risk of developing diabetes increases with age. The CDC report that 4.1 percent of people age 20-44 have diabetes, but the number jumps to 25.9 percent for people over 65 years old. As obesity has become more prevalent over the past few decades, so too has the rate of type 2 diabetes. An article in the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology states that 25.6 percent of Americans are obese, much higher than the 15.3 percent of obese people in 1995. In that same period, the incidence of diabetes increased by 90 percent. Although the link between obesity and diabetes is well Continue reading >>

How Many People Have Diabetes?

How Many People Have Diabetes?

Rates of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are increasing globally. According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) Diabetes Atlas, here are the overall rates including both type 1 and type 2: 415 million adults have diabetes (1 in 11 adults) By 2040, 642 million adults (1 in 10 adults) are expected to have diabetes 46.5% of those with diabetes have not been diagnosed 1 in 7 births is affected by gestational diabetes 12% of global health expenditure is spent on diabetes ($673 billion) You can see an interactive map of global diabetes statistics at the IDF website. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the most current data is for 2012 (source): 29 million people in the United States (9.3 percent) have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. 1.7 million people aged 20 years or older were newly diagnosed with type or type 2 diabetes in 2012. Non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, and American Indian/Alaska Native adults are about twice as likely to have diagnosed with some form of diabetes as non-Hispanic white adults. 208,000 people younger than 20 years have been diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. 86 million adults aged 20 years and older have prediabetes. The percentage of U.S. adults with prediabetes is similar for non-Hispanic whites (35 percent), non-Hispanic blacks (39 percent), and Hispanics (38 percent). Similar data is available from a study called Prevalence and Incidence Trends for Diagnosed Diabetes Among Adults Aged 20 to 79 Years, United States, 1980-2012 published in Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). This study found that 49% to 52% of the adult population had either diabetes or prediabetes. Then came the most stunning number: 83% of adults over 65 have either diabetes or prediabetes! Thankfully, the authors of this s Continue reading >>

Current Burden Of Diabetes In The U.s.

Current Burden Of Diabetes In The U.s.

Diabetes is one of the most common and costly chronic diseases. An estimated 23.1 million people in the United States are diagnosed with diabetes at a cost of more than $245 billion per year.1,2 The CDC estimates that another 7.2 million people have diabetes but remain undiagnosed, while another 84.1 million adults 18 years and older have prediabetes.1 The highest rates of diabetes are found among minority populations and older Americans; however, across the United States, the overall prevalence continues to increase as overweight and obesity rates rise.3 Individuals with diabetes are at greater risk than other similar adults for many common problems, including coronary heart disease, stroke, hypertension, depression, pain, polypharmacy, and functional disability.4 Diabetes remains the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults in the United States, and the leading cause of end-stage renal failure. Annual updates on the impact of diabetes on the health of the U.S. population are available from the CDC National Diabetes Statistics Report . Despite significant advances in therapy over the past several years, diabetes remains the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. Intensive treatment of glucose, blood pressure, and lipid levels in individuals with diabetes substantially reduces the risk of developing diabetes-related complications. However, under current models of care, many individuals with diabetes are not achieving the targets for optimal care recommended by clinical experts. In the most recent reports from the National Committee for Quality Assurance on health maintenance organizations (HMOs), 31 percent of patients continue to have an A1C greater than 9 percent, while 35 percent have blood pressure of ≥140/90 mm Hg.5 This gap between curr Continue reading >>

50% Us Adults Have Diabetes Or Pre-diabetes - Study

50% Us Adults Have Diabetes Or Pre-diabetes - Study

Half of all US adults currently have diabetes or pre-diabetes, a new study revealed. The new research shows that the disease has made gains across every racial and ethnic group in the last 18 years, regardless of income level or education. “We found 14% of the people in the US have diabetes, and this was even higher in blacks, Asians and Hispanics,” said Andy Menke, PhD, epidemiologist and lead author for the study, which was published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Previous studies had shown cases of diabetes, once a rare disease, increasing. There are currently an estimated 27 million people with diabetes and 86 million with pre-diabetes in the US, according to the WebMD website. Researchers conducting the study wanted find percentages for those in the population who had been diagnosed with diabetes, those with undiagnosed diabetes, and those with pre-diabetes indicators. Among the findings was that diabetes was more prevalent in those aged 65 years and older, with 33 percent affected, compared to those aged 45-64 years (17.5 percent), and those aged 45 or younger (5 percent). Broken down by gender, diabetes affected 15 percent of men and 13 percent of women. The study involved 26,000 people participating in a series of nationally representative surveys conducted by the National Health and Nutritional Examination Surveys organization. It involved in-home interviews and mobile exam centers, the testing of blood samples for glucose levels, as well as the use of the Body Mass Index, which measures fat and muscle ratios based on weight and height. The first survey was conducted between 1988 and 1994, and the most recent between 2011 and 2012. Researchers found a 25 percent increase in diabetes in each age group, for both sexes and each rac Continue reading >>

The Cdc Mapped Out Where People With Diabetes Live In The Us — Here's What It Found

The Cdc Mapped Out Where People With Diabetes Live In The Us — Here's What It Found

A paramedic checking the blood sugar levels of a diabetes patient. Beawiharta Beawiharta/Reuters Diabetes, a group of conditions in which the body can't properly regulate blood sugar, affects roughly 30 million people in the US — about 9% of the population. That's in addition to 84.1 million Americans who the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate have prediabetes, a condition that can lead to type 2 diabetes if it isn't treated. (Type 2 accounts for the majority of diabetes cases.) In a new report by the CDC, researchers found that while the rate of new diabetes diagnoses in the US has stayed steady, the disease is still a major public health issue across the country. Diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the US in 2015. "Although these findings reveal some progress in diabetes management and prevention, there are still too many Americans with diabetes and prediabetes," CDC director Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald said in a news release. Those cases are disproportionately spread around the country. The map below shows where people with diabetes live across the US, with the darker red shades representing areas where a larger percentage of the population has been diagnosed with diabetes. CDC Areas with the highest concentration of cases are southern states like Mississippi and Alabama, along with Puerto Rico, a US territory. In those locations, diabetes was prevalent in more than 11% of adults over 20. When it comes to new diagnoses, the states with the highest rates per 1,000 people are also in the southeast, as well as parts of Ohio, Kentucky, and West Virginia. CDC Information about where diabetes prevalence is highest can help public health officials figure out where to devote the most attention in their attempt to bring down the number of cases nat Continue reading >>

Diabetes In The United States

Diabetes In The United States

Diabetes affects an estimated 25.8 million children and adults in the United States. It dramatically increases the risk of heart disease, kidney disease and cancer, and is the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S. An estimated 25.8 million children and adults in the United States - 8.3% of the population – have diabetes. About 18.8 million people have diagnosed diabetes, 7 million are undiagnosed and 79 million have prediabetes. In 2010, nearly 1.9 million new cases of diabetes were diagnosed in people aged 20 years or older. Research at the University of Louisville’s Diabetes and Obesity Center is shaping the future of our community and developing novel prevention and treatment strategies for people with diabetes and obesity. Integrating basic research with community outreach and expert clinical care, our researchers, students and staff work tirelessly to help fight these growing epidemics. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported in 2007 an estimated 23.6 million people (7.8% of the total U.S. population) have diabetes. Of these people, only 17.9 million know they have diabetes, while 5.7 million have not been diagnosed. The GOOD news is that the percentage of people with diabetes who don't know it has decreased from 30% to 25%. The BAD news is that the number of Americans with diabetes is increasing. The Centers For Disease Control and Prevention also reported that in 2009-10, an estimated 68% of the U.S. Population was considered obese or overweight. The high prevalence of obesity is a concern, because it increases the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease. The prevalence of Type 2 diabetes has increased by more than 60% since 1990. Which means, in the U.S. alone more than 18.2 million people suffer from T2D presently. Continue reading >>

One Third Of Americans Are Headed For Diabetes, And They Don't Even Know It

One Third Of Americans Are Headed For Diabetes, And They Don't Even Know It

One third of Americans may be on their way to developing full-blown type 2 diabetes, and most of them don't even know it. A recent report from The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows that more than 84 million Americans, or roughly one-third of the population, have prediabetes, a condition marked by higher-than-normal blood sugar. Of that group, 90 percent aren't aware they have the condition. The primary risk factors for type 2 diabetes are genetics and lifestyle — excess weight, obesity and lack of exercise contribute to this alarming medical trend. "People with prediabetes who don't change their lifestyle are at a much higher risk of developing heart disease and stroke and can develop type 2 diabetes within five years if left untreated," said William T. Cefalu, MD, chief scientific, medical & mission officer of the American Diabetes Association. The health risks go beyond heart disease and stroke. As diabetes worsens over time, blindness, kidney disease and lower-limb amputation are also major health risks. Diabetes was the seventh-leading cause of death in the United States in 2015, according to the CDC. This population of diabetes "ticking time bombs" is particularly alarming, because in many cases type 2 diabetes can be avoided, simply by leading a healthy lifestyle. Type 2 diabetes is often progressive, and within 10 years of diagnosis, 50 percent of individuals need to use insulin to control their blood glucose levels, according to the ADA. More than 30 million Americans — 9.4 percent of the U.S. population — are already battling diabetes, according to the CDC's National Diabetes Statistics Report, which used data through 2015. The CDC found that of those cases, 7.2 million were undiagnosed. "The country needs to take this seriously, ratc Continue reading >>

Half Of American Adults Headed For Diabetes By 2020, Unitedhealth Says

Half Of American Adults Headed For Diabetes By 2020, Unitedhealth Says

Half of all American adults are destined to develop diabetes or pre-diabetes by 2020 if they don't slim down, according to a dire new prediction that pegs the cost of their care at $3.35 billion by decade's end. Under the scenario, if current trends continue, the ranks of American adults with excessive blood sugar levels would swell from 93.8 million this year (about 28 million diabetics and 66 million more with pre-diabetes) to 135 million in 2020. Sixty percent of the annual $500 billion burden of the obesity-driven diabetes epidemic would be borne by the U.S. government, according to "The United States of Diabetes," a provocative working paper produced by the Center for Health Reform & Modernization, part of the healthcare giant UnitedHealth Group Inc. UnitedHealth issued the report on the heels of an Oct. 22 forecast from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that as many as 1 in 3 adults could be diabetic by 2050. That's an enormous jump from current diabetes prevalence, which is 1 in 10 among adults. The nation's "diabesity" epidemic, part of a paired global rise in obesity and Type 2 diabetes, has enormous ramifications for Americans' health and well-being, as well as their pocketbooks. Type 2 diabetes, the form of the disease associated with excess body weight, is a powerful driver of heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney failure and amputation, all of which are expensive conditions. "Our new research shows there is a diabetes time bomb ticking in America, but fortunately there are practical steps that can be taken now to defuse it," Simon Stevens, executive vice president of UnitedHealth Group and chairman of its Center for Health Reform & Modernization, said in a prepared statement. "Making a major impact on the pre-diabetes and diabetes epidemic w Continue reading >>

Deaths Attributable To Diabetes In The United States: Comparison Of Data Sources And Estimation Approaches

Deaths Attributable To Diabetes In The United States: Comparison Of Data Sources And Estimation Approaches

Abstract The goal of this research was to identify the fraction of deaths attributable to diabetes in the United States. We estimated population attributable fractions (PAF) for cohorts aged 30–84 who were surveyed in the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) between 1997 and 2009 (N = 282,322) and in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) between 1999 and 2010 (N = 21,814). Cohort members were followed prospectively for mortality through 2011. We identified diabetes status using self-reported diagnoses in both NHIS and NHANES and using HbA1c in NHANES. Hazard ratios associated with diabetes were estimated using Cox model adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, educational attainment, and smoking status. We found a high degree of consistency between data sets and definitions of diabetes in the hazard ratios, estimates of diabetes prevalence, and estimates of the proportion of deaths attributable to diabetes. The proportion of deaths attributable to diabetes was estimated to be 11.5% using self-reports in NHIS, 11.7% using self-reports in NHANES, and 11.8% using HbA1c in NHANES. Among the sub-groups that we examined, the PAF was highest among obese persons at 19.4%. The proportion of deaths in which diabetes was assigned as the underlying cause of death (3.3–3.7%) severely understated the contribution of diabetes to mortality in the United States. Diabetes may represent a more prominent factor in American mortality than is commonly appreciated, reinforcing the need for robust population-level interventions aimed at diabetes prevention and care. Figures Citation: Stokes A, Preston SH (2017) Deaths Attributable to Diabetes in the United States: Comparison of Data Sources and Estimation Approaches. PLoS ONE 12(1): e0170219. Editor: C. Mary School Continue reading >>

Who: Diabetes Rates Skyrocketing Worldwide

Who: Diabetes Rates Skyrocketing Worldwide

Diabetes rates nearly doubled in the past three decades, largely due to increases in obesity and sugary diets, according to a report released Wednesday by the World Health Organization. The percentage of adults living with diabetes worldwide grew from 4.7% in 1980 to 8.5% in 2014. Overall, there was a nearly four-fold increase in worldwide cases: An estimated 422 million adults were living with diabetes in 2014, up from 108 million in 1980. The WHO describes diabetes as a serious, chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar, or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. In 2012, 29.1 million Americans, or 9.3% of the population, had diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. About 1.4 million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes every year, according to the organization. More than 8.1 million Americans with diabetes don't know it, putting them at greater risk of complications. The disease can develop slowly over time. In 2012, 86 million Americans age 20 and older had prediabetes, a condition in which blood sugar is higher than normal but doesn't yet qualify as diabetes. Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the United States, killing about 69,000 Americans a year. The disease contributes to an additional 234,000 deaths each year, according to the American Diabetes Association. Worldwide, diabetes killed 1.5 million people in 2012, according to the WHO report. High blood sugar caused an additional 2.2 million deaths by increasing the risks of heart disease and other chronic conditions. About 43% of these deaths occur before the age of 70. The percentage of deaths attributable to high blood glucose or diabetes that occur prior to age 70 is higher in l Continue reading >>

Diabetes Data: Surveillance And Evaluation

Diabetes Data: Surveillance And Evaluation

Implementation and evaluation of diabetes prevention and control programs depends on reliable data. The following data sources tell us how many people in Texas are estimated to have diabetes and the groups most affected by the disease. They allow for development of culturally appropriate messages and assist in focusing prevention efforts on high-risk populations. The Diabetes Program at DSHS develops epidemiological reports on diabetes incidence, prevalence, morbidity, and mortality in Texas. The program contracts for annual statewide telephone surveys through the Texas Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, participates in statewide and international collaborative data collection projects, and reviews information from the Health Plan Employer Data and Information Set (HEDIS) and the TMF Health Quality Institute, which is the state’s Medicare Quality Improvement Organization. Data from these and other sources are collected and illustrated in the burden report below. The Diabetes Program updates this report periodically as data collection occurs and data is verified for publication. The Texas Diabetes Fact Sheet offers at-a-glance diabetes prevalence and mortality statistics for Texas by race/ethnicity, age, and gender. Requests for specific data will be addressed as time and availability of data permit. To ensure that data requests are fulfilled in a timely manner, please submit your requests at least two weeks before the data is needed. Texas Diabetes and Prediabetes Fact Sheet (Updated September 2017, 178kb, PDF viewing information) Diabetes and prediabetes prevalence, mortality, and cost data for Texas. Diabetes Trend Data, Texas and US, 2011-2015 (Updated March 2017, PDF 923kb, PDF viewing information) Current Diabetes Prevalence Among Adults by Demographic C Continue reading >>

One Third Of Diabetes In The U.s. Is Undiagnosed

One Third Of Diabetes In The U.s. Is Undiagnosed

(Reuters Health) - Diabetes affects up to 14% of the U.S. population - an increase from nearly 10% in the early 1990s - yet over a third of cases still go undiagnosed, according to a new analysis. Screening seems to be catching more cases, accounting for the general rise over two decades, the study authors say, but mainly whites have benefited; for Hispanic and Asian people in particular, more than half of cases go undetected. "We need to better educate people on the risk factors for diabetes - including older age, family history and obesity - and improve screening for those at high risk," lead study author Andy Menke, an epidemiologist at Social and Scientific Systems in Silver Spring, Maryland, said by email. Globally, about one in nine adults has diagnosed diabetes, and the disease will be the seventh leading cause of death by 2030, according to the World Health Organization. Most of these people have type 2 diabetes. Menke and colleagues estimated the prevalence of diabetes (hemoglobin A1c 6.5% or higher) and pre-diabetes (hemoglobin A1c between 5.7% and 6.4%) using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) collected on 2,781 adults in 2011 to 2012 and an additional 23,634 adults from 1988 to 2010. While the prevalence of diabetes increased over time in the overall population, gains were more pronounced among racial and ethnic minorities, the study found. About 11% of white people have diabetes, the researchers calculated, compared with 22% of non-Hispanic black participants, 21% of Asians and 23% of Hispanics. Among Asians, 51% of those with diabetes were unaware of it, and the same was true for 49% of Hispanic people with the condition. An additional 38% of adults fell into the pre-diabetes category. Added to the prevalence of diabete Continue reading >>

How Is Diabetes And Hypertension Related?

How Is Diabetes And Hypertension Related?

Diabetes and hypertension do not have a common etiology (cause). However they have lot of things in common; Please note that the diabetes i am referring to here is type 2 diabetes. Both of them are in someway related to lifestyle - with obesity being a common risk factor and treatment includes restrictions in diet (salt restriction in case of hypertension, sugar restriction for diabetes) and exercise. Atherosclerosis, the pathology which causes hypertension may be worsened by diabetes. Both the diseases effect heart, kidney and brain- so chances of myocardial infarction, renal failure, stroke increase when they co-exist. Diabetes can mask the symptoms of angina(heart pain) or myocardial infarction( heart attack) which are complications of hypertension and hence extra caution is required. One more important thing to remember is that both are required to take medications daily and may cause drug interactions hence the treating physician will take precautions to avoid drugs that may interact. Diabetes Mellitus and Hypertension are not inherently related to each other, but are universally declared as bad companions, in the medical world. India is supposed to be the Diabetic capital of the world. This is a disease that affects a significant number of the population in both the developed and developing countries.The causative factors are many, including genetic and environmental and lifestyle factors. Studies regarding the association of Diabetes with Smoking and Alcohol intake are many and there are so much of conflict in the findings that the final word is yet to be written. There is a greater incidence of coexistence of Diabetes and Blood pressure, especially in the 40 to 60 age group. The significance of this companion effect is reflected in the increased incidence of Car Continue reading >>

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