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How Many Carbs Should You Eat A Day If You Are Prediabetic?

Everything You Need To Know About A Diabetic Diet

Everything You Need To Know About A Diabetic Diet

Not only are 86 million Americans prediabetic, but 90% of them don't even know they have it, the Centers for Disease Control reports. What's more, doctors diagnose as many as 1.5 million new cases of diabetes each year, according to the American Diabetes Association. Whether you're at risk, prediabetic or following a diabetic diet as suggested by your doctor, a few simple strategies can help control blood sugar and potentially reverse the disease entirely. Plus, implementing just a few of these dietary changes can have other beneficial effects like weight loss, all without sacrificing flavor or feeling deprived. First, let's start with the basics. What is diabetes? There are two main forms of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease that's usually diagnosed during childhood. Environmental and genetic factors can lead to the destruction of the beta cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. That's the hormone responsible for delivering glucose (sugar) to your cells for metabolism and storage. In contrast, type 2 diabetes is often diagnosed in adulthood and caused by a variety of lifestyle factors like obesity, physical inactivity and high cholesterol. Typically, type 2 diabetics still have functioning beta cells, meaning that they're still producing insulin. However, the peripheral tissues become less sensitive to the hormone, and the liver produces more glucose, causing high blood sugar. When left unmanaged, type 2 diabetics may stop producing insulin altogether. While you may have some symptoms of high blood sugar (nausea, lethargy, frequent thirst and/or urination), a clinical diagnosis of diabetes or prediabetes requires a repeat test of your blood sugar levels. How does a diabetic diet help? Unlike many other health conditions, the incredible th Continue reading >>

Apps To Help Prevent & Reverse Diabetes

Apps To Help Prevent & Reverse Diabetes

According to the Center for Disease Control and prevention, it’s estimated that 86 million Americans have prediabetes, a condition of high blood sugar levels that could turn into type 2 diabetes within 5 years. But studies have shown that prediabetes (and even full-blown Type II diabetes) can be reversed or prevented through healthy diet and exercise. In a TEDx talk at Purdue University, Dr. Sarah Hallberg cited that as much as 50% of the population could have insulin resistance to some degree even if their blood sugar levels still test normal. With insulin resistance, insulin cannot process the high amounts of sugars and carbohydrates, and the glucose gets stored as fat. As a society, a lot of our diet is made up of carbohydrates — from potato chips and pretzels to bread, pasta, rice and more. Add in the sugars from desserts and store-bought snacks and the hidden sugar in condiments like ketchup, and it's easy to exceed the USDA's recommended 225 grams of carbs per day. Over time, this can cause a condition called insulin resistance or prediabetes. Dr. Hallberg cites success in reversing pre-diabetes and Type II diabetes with a low sugar, low carbohydrate diet. And she’s not alone. There is a wealth of studies supporting her findings (see an overview of the efficacy of low-carb diets by the American Diabetes Association). So when I was diagnosed with prediabetes, I knew that it was time to seriously change the way I ate. I chose a diet high in vegetables, protein and healthy fats and low in starch and sugar (i.e., a low-carb diet). In search of information, recipes, and support, I found the four apps that were the key to my success — Low Carb Info, Carb Counter & Diet Tracker by Atkins, Calorie Counter & Diet Tracker by MyFitnessPal, and MyDietician. MyDieticia Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should A Pre Diabetic Have In A Day ? | Health For All – How Do Diabetics Count Carbohydrates

How Many Carbs Should A Pre Diabetic Have In A Day ? | Health For All – How Do Diabetics Count Carbohydrates

How Do Diabetics Count Carbohydrates Prediabetes how many carbohydrates per day for a pre-diabetic. Conditions content t2 diabetic carbohydrates per day recommendations meal plans with diabetes. For any other person who is or is diabetic, how many grams of sugar and carbohydrates should I prepare here? If you have too much sugar one day, you can do it. Whole grains contain fiber and nutrients, 12 dietary guidelines advise consuming 45. Carbohydrates per day for a borderline diabetic woman carbohydrates livestrong 521528 class "_zkb" url? Q webcache. I was diagnosed about 4 weeks ago, so I am learning all this. Or do you know) that shows the limit of other ingredients that should predate them? Do you have an idea of ​​how many grams of carbohydrates you eat today? . Eat a balanced breakfast and know how many carbohydrates you can eat at breakfast. If you have pre-diabetes, your body does not use insulin well, which causes a high blood dietitian to tell you about food. How many carbohydrates per day can you eat prediabetic? . As a diabetic, you must choose carbohydrates that are whole grains. A prediabetic should avoid all grains including whole grains, take almost no carbohydrate, prohibit 18 for those with diabetes and prediabetes. The proper control of most of the foods you eat contain carbohydrates, breads, cookies, pasta, rice, the problem is that many people do not. choose quantities of healthy types. Describe the types of eye damage that can result from diabetes. If you have prediabetes, carbohydrates should comprise between 50 and 60 percent of your total daily caloric intake. Carbohydrates contain 4 calories per gram. It is very basic to eat too many carbohydrates can increase the total amount of sugar should constitute about 45 to 60 percent of your daily di Continue reading >>

> Meal Plans And Diabetes

> Meal Plans And Diabetes

Kids with diabetes benefit from a healthy diet the same as everyone else. Although kids with diabetes don't have to follow a special diabetes diet, they may need to pay more attention to when they eat and how much is on their plates. Meal planning goals for kids with diabetes often are the same as those for other kids: They need foods that help them have overall good health, normal growth, and a healthy weight. But kids with diabetes also have to balance their intake of carbohydrates (carbs) with their insulin and activity levels to keep blood sugar levels under control, and they should eat foods that help keep the levels of lipids (fats like cholesterol and triglycerides) in the blood in a healthy range. Doing so can help prevent some of the long-term health problems that diabetes can cause. Kids with diabetes face the same food challenges as everyone else — mainly, sticking with healthy eating habits. You need to know what's in the foods you're serving and eating. It's easy to guess what some foods contain, but others are more of a challenge. So look to food labels to find a food's ingredients, nutritional information, and calories. Be sure to look for information on carbs, which can affect blood sugar levels. Usually, they're clearly listed on food labels in grams. The two main forms of carbs are sugars and starches. Types of sugars include fructose (sugar found in fruit and some baked goods), glucose (the main sugar in our bodies that's also found in foods like cake, cookies, and soft drinks), and lactose (sugar found in milk and yogurt). Starches include vegetables like potatoes, corn, and peas; grains, rice, and cereals; and breads. The body breaks down or converts most carbs into glucose, which is absorbed into the bloodstream. As the glucose level rises in the Continue reading >>

Diabetes: More Than Just Sugar Overload?

Diabetes: More Than Just Sugar Overload?

I walk every day, eat a healthful diet, and have no diabetes in my immediate family. I'm not model skinny (truth be told, I've been known to pack on a few extra pounds), but I'm certainly not a couch potato or junk food addict. So, imagine my surprise when a routine blood test showed that my blood sugar was elevated and I was officially prediabetic. Prediabetic, meaning I have higher-than-normal blood sugar levels that put me at risk of developing diabetes, the seventh-leading cause of death in the United States. Yikes! The fact that I'm not alone doesn't make me feel any better -- 57 million Americans have prediabetes and another 24 million have diabetes (90 to 95 percent of all diabetes diagnosed is type 2, which typically appears in adults and is associated with obesity, physical inactivity, family history, and other factors). Being part of what's shaping up to be a diabetes epidemic in America isn't a club I want to join. Health.com: How to lower your risks for developing diabetes Another wake-up call It turns out that prediabetes isn't really "pre" anything, according to Mark Hyman, M.D., author of "UltraMetabolism" and "The UltraMind Solution: Fix Your Broken Brain by Healing Your Body First." "It's a danger in and of itself that sets off a whole cascade of problems," he says. In fact, there's now evidence that a prediabetic patient's risks for eye, kidney, and nerve damage, as well as heart disease, are nearly as great as a diabetic's, says Alan J. Garber, M.D., chairman of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists task force that's currently writing new guidelines for managing prediabetes. What's more, diabetes can be especially dangerous for mothers and their unborn children, potentially leading to miscarriage or birth defects. Women with diabetes a Continue reading >>

What Is The Recommended Daily Intake Of Carbs For A Diabetic Male

What Is The Recommended Daily Intake Of Carbs For A Diabetic Male

Male diabetics can usually handle slightly more carbohydrates compared to female diabetics, but the optimal amount of carbs you should eat will also depend on your weight, physical activity level and blood-sugar control. Male diabetics will generally need fewer carbs compared to non-diabetics because an excess of carbs is associated with higher blood-sugar levels, which can eventually lead to diabetes complications. Working with a diabetes educator or registered dietitian can help you dial in your carb intake to help you optimize your diabetes control and prevent complications. Carbohydrate counting is an important skill to learn to help diabetic males better understand the link between the food they eat and their blood-sugar levels. Carbohydrates are mainly found in foods containing sugar or flour, as well as in grains, starchy vegetables and fruits. Look at the nutrition facts table on food labels to determine the amount of carbs found per serving. Adjust the carb content according to the serving you consume. For example, if the label of a package of rice says that 1 cup of cooked rice contains 45 grams of carbs and you usually eat 2 cups of rice, your carb intake will reach 90 grams. Keep a food diary to keep track of the food you eat and your carb intake. Standard Advice The daily carb intake for male diabetics recommended by the American Diabetes Association varies between 135 and 180 grams for your three basic meals along with up to 60 to 90 grams of extra carbohydrates at snack time. Your daily recommended carb intake could therefore vary between 135 grams a day if you don't snack up to 270 grams a day. Since these recommendations are quite broad, the American Diabetes Association suggests working with a diabetes educator or registered dietitian to get more speci Continue reading >>

How Many Carbohydrates Can I Have Per Day If I Was Told To Watch My Carbs Due To Being Pre Diabetic?

How Many Carbohydrates Can I Have Per Day If I Was Told To Watch My Carbs Due To Being Pre Diabetic?

I don’t think you got the message right, or the message is wrong. From three large studies trying to prevent pre-diabetes developing into clinical diabetes, we know that the most effective measures are lifestyle modification being (1) lose weight (2) exercise In losing weight we need to be eating less, lowering fat intake (to <30% of total calorie intake), less saturated fats (<10%), more fiber eat a little, cutting carbs is helpful but only part of it, modest portion, no seconds, no snacking, no cakes, no sugared soft drinks of fruit juices, no alcohol, resulting in at least 5% weight loss. According to this interesting video-cast by Gary Taubes for doc’s CME avoiding sugar to lose weight is quite important Eating less is far more effective for weight loss than exercise, listen to this podcast by Dr. Aseem Malhotra You can’t outrun a bad diet: @DrAseemMalhotra on weight loss strategies Exercise: at least 150 minutes of moderate, or 75 minutes of intensive exercise a week. These are the percentage of less type 2 diabetes developing over the duration of the study The Da Qing Chinese diabetes prevention trial (after 20 years see Page on thelancet.com), the Finnish diabetes prevention trial (after a mean of 3.2 years see NEJM) and the Diabetes Prevention Program DPP Lifestyle trial (after a mean of 2.8 years see Reduction in the Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes with Lifestyle Intervention or Metformin — NEJM) the intervention was a lifestyle change see above. with quite a reduction in the rate of development of diabetes, less after 20 years in the Da Qing trial. Continue reading >>

The Prediabetes Diet Everyone Should Follow

The Prediabetes Diet Everyone Should Follow

Skip the sugary sodas and processed food, and opt for whole foods like fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean meats, low-fat dairy, and healthy fats like olive oil and avocado, Experts believe the number of people living with diabetes will rise dramatically over the next 40 years. If current trends continue, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as many as one in three adults could have the disease by 2050. And about 79 million American adults now have prediabetes, a condition marked by above-normal blood sugar levels that aren't high enough to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. If there's a silver lining to these alarming statistics, it's that there's plenty you can do to prevent the disease or slow the progression, including eating a balanced diet. Everyone can benefit from a healthy eating plan aimed at containing prediabetes, regardless of whether you're at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes, says Barbara Borcik, RD, a certified diabetes eductor at the Diabetes & Nutrition Center at Northwest Hospital in Randallstown, Md. 7 Golden Rules of Healthy Eating Here are seven sound diet principles that can keep your blood sugars from creeping upward, among other health benefits. Skip the sugary drinks. No sweet tea. No juice. No soda. No sweetened lemonade. No mocha latte coffee creations. "My number one recommendation to people is: Don't drink your sugar," Borcik says. Sugary drinks provide nothing more than empty calories, and they won't help you feel full. "All the sugary drinks out there are a real risk factor for obesity," she stresses. Pull back on portions. You still can eat many of the foods you like, just have smaller amounts of them, Borcik says, adding that this is especially true for starchy foods like white rice, white potat Continue reading >>

Carb Counting At Breakfast: Start Your Day Off Right

Carb Counting At Breakfast: Start Your Day Off Right

You already know that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. To help you get off on the right foot, we’ve put together some tips for how to make the most of this meal when you’re counting carbs. This article will give you the tools for how to count carbs at breakfast, as well as ideas for what would be a good, balanced breakfast. We’ll also show you that you don’t have to eat the same breakfast every day—you can switch it up when you’re carb counting. Rest assured, your registered dietitian (RD), certified diabetes educator, and other members of your diabetes team will help you determine the amount of carbs you should eat at breakfast. This number will be based on how active you and whether you take insulin or other diabetes medications. What Should You Eat for Breakfast? When you sit down for breakfast, you’ll have an allocated amount of carbs that you’ve already established with your diabetes team. But in general, the American Diabetes Association recommends starting with 45 to 60 grams of carbs for each meal.1 You may need a little more or a little less carbohydrates at every meal. This will depend on various factors such as your pre-prandial (before eating) and postprandial (after eating) blood glucose level. The following is a list of common breakfast foods. These foods have about 15 grams of carbohydrate per serving: 1/2 cup of cooked oatmeal 1 small piece of fruit 1 slice of bread 1 cup of milk 1 cup of plain yogurt To help balance out your breakfast, it may help to include a protein or fat to keep you full until your next meal. (This is actually an important thing to keep in mind for all of your meals.) Eating balanced meals is important because it can help you achieve goal blood glucose levels, feel your best, and lower your risk of di Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should You Eat?

How Many Carbs Should You Eat?

Could there possibly be a more controversial topic than how many carbs we should be eating?! One of the perks of following a Paleo framework is that when we maximize nutrient density (see The Importance of Nutrient Density) and eat high-quality foods from both the plant and animal kingdom, other elements of diet, like macronutrient ratios, tend to fall into place without us needing to obsessively count fat or carb grams. Still, considering how much bad press carbohydrates tend to get (as well as the tendency for the media—and even some leaders within the Paleo movement itself—to mis-portray Paleo as being low carb), a great deal of confusion exists surrounding optimal carb intake. What’s the scoop? The short answer is… it depends! It depends on what our goals are, how far away we are from those goals, how active our lifestyles are, how well we sleep, how well-managed our stress is, and what health issues we might be dealing with. All of these factors can influence the healthiest level of carbs for our specific situation. The AIP Lecture Series is a 6-week video-based, self-directed online course that will teach you the scientific foundation for the diet and lifestyle tenets of the Autoimmune Protocol. But, while there’s no one-size-fits-all recommendation we can all safely shoot for, we can definitely pull together some guidelines based on available evidence. Hunter-Gatherer Intakes Let’s start with hunter-gatherers! According to Loren Cordain’s 2000 publication, “Plant-animal subsistence ratios and macronutrient energy estimations in worldwide hunter-gatherer diets” (which analyzed ethnographic data for 229 hunter-gatherer societies), the majority of hunter-gatherer populations ate between 22 and 40% of their diets as carbohydrates. That translates to Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

The mainstays of diabetes treatment are: Working towards obtaining ideal body weight Following a diabetic diet Regular exercise Diabetic medication if needed Note: Type 1 diabetes must be treated with insulin; if you have type 2 diabetes, you may not need to take insulin. This involves injecting insulin under the skin for it to work. Insulin cannot be taken as a pill because the digestive juices in the stomach would destroy the insulin before it could work. Scientists are looking for new ways to give insulin. But today, shots are the only method. There are, however, new methods to give the shots. Insulin pumps are now being widely used and many people are having great results. In this Article Working towards obtaining ideal body weight An estimate of ideal body weight can be calculated using this formula: For women: Start with 100 pounds for 5 feet tall. Add 5 pounds for every inch over 5 feet. If you are under 5 feet, subtract 5 pounds for each inch under 5 feet. This will give you your ideal weight. If you have a large frame, add 10%. If you have a small frame, subtract 10%. A good way to decide your frame size is to look at your wrist size compared to other women's. Example: A woman who is 5' 4" tall and has a large frame 100 pounds + 20 pounds (4 inches times 5 pounds per inch) = 120 pounds. Add 10% for large frame (in this case 10% of 120 pounds is 12 pounds). 120 pounds + 12 pounds = 132 pounds ideal body weight. For men: Start with 106 pounds for a height of 5 foot. Add 6 pounds for every inch above 5 foot. For a large frame, add 10%. For a small frame, subtract 10%. (See above for further details.) Learn More about Treating Type 2 Diabetes The Diabetic Diet Diet is very important in diabetes. There are differing philosophies on what is the best diet but below is Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should My Pre-diabetic Husband Eat Each Day?

How Many Carbs Should My Pre-diabetic Husband Eat Each Day?

My husband has been diagnosed as being pre-diabetic. What amount of carbs should he eat per day? I know that carbs are bad for him, but as they are in most foods, it's hard to be totally carb free. Also, we both eat a lot of fresh fruits and veggies, so what about the sugars they contain? Dr. Gourmet Says.... I am sorry for your husband's new diagnosis. For many the issue of having "pre-diabetes" or "insulin intolerance" is one that can be controlled through making changes in diet and exercise. In a lot of cases weight is a major factor and losing weight is key. First and foremost, carbohydrates are not bad. The issue is that most folks today eat far too many calories and end up eating a lot of carbohydrates. Often this is in the form of low quality carbs like the simple sugars in soda, candy, etc.. The key is for your husband to eat high quality calories no matter whether those calories come from carbohydrates, protein or fats. For instance, both Coca Cola and oatmeal are full of carbohydrates. The Coke contains 35 grams of carbs all in the form of simple sugar. That's about 150 calories that is drunk and used pretty quickly by the body and has been shown in research to not satisfy hunger well. In many cases folks drink that extra 35 grams of carbohydrates along with a meal and it is simply added calories that they don't need. On the other hand, a half cup of dry oatmeal has about 25 grams of carbohydrate. This is a large serving and even with a teaspoon of sugar on top (4 grams carbs) this is not many more calories than the soda. It is, however, filling, satisfying, and really good for you. There's 4 grams of fiber, 5 grams of protein and tons of vitamins and minerals. We know that in the case of diabetics eating oatmeal and other high fiber (good quality carbohydrate Continue reading >>

What To Eat If You Have Prediabetes

What To Eat If You Have Prediabetes

This is a very important topic for women with PCOS! 50% of women with PCOS will get diabetes or prediabetes before the age of 40. Make sure you keep tabs your blood sugar numbers and do all you can NOW to help prevent diabetes or prediabetes. You get a call from your doctor telling you your sugar is a little high on your blood test. You don’t have diabetes but will need to watch it. You’re told to cut out sugar, bread and pasta. But now you are in a panic because you don’t know what to eat. Carbs are everywhere! Do you need to cut out carrots? Can you ever eat bread or pasta? And what about wine? The good news is that you can probably eat a lot more than you think. And if you make some lifestyle changes now, you may be able to prevent diabetes. Read my tips on what to do when you have prediabetes. Scary stats First, a few scary stats. We know diabetes is an epidemic. 30.3 million Americans have diabetes. But prediabetes is the real epidemic. 84.1 million people have it. This is 1 in 3 adults. And it’s even higher for adults ages 65 and older – the NIH estimates that 50% of older adults have prediabetes. And only 11% of people with prediabetes know they have it. Many of these people will go on to develop diabetes at some time in their life. But it doesn’t mean it’s inevitable! Insulin resistance Before moving on to my tips, I’d like to explain what it means to be insulin resistant as this occurs in most people with prediabetes and diabetes. When we eat carbohydrates, they break down into sugar in our blood. This happens with all carbs, including candy, juice, fruit, brown rice, potatoes, etc. In response to rising blood sugar levels, our pancreas secretes insulin in attempts to get the sugar out of the blood and into fat and muscle cells to be used as ene Continue reading >>

A Diabetic & Prediabetic Diet Ultimate Faq

A Diabetic & Prediabetic Diet Ultimate Faq

According to a 2011 study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there are 25.8 million people, or over 9% of the U.S. population that are affected by either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. For those with diabetes, it's necessary to follow a diabetic or prediabetic diet depending upon whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes respectively. This diet takes into account your health and ensures you eat only foods that will help to improve your blood sugar control and insulin sensitivity. Here are some of the most Frequently Asked Questions about a diabetic and prediabetic diet:​ Q: What is a Diabetic Diet? A: A Diabetic Diet is one that helps to control your blood sugar levels by eating primarily low-carb foods. A good diabetes diet plan involves plenty of: The diet should steer clear of: It's actually a fairly simple diet plan to follow, once you understand which foods are good for your blood sugar levels and which aren't. Q: Is it different from a Prediabetic Diet? A: A Prediabetic diet focuses mostly on weight loss, while a Diabetic Diet focuses primarily on blood sugar control. The foods promoted as "healthy" are fairly similar with both diets. The primary difference is the Prediabetic Diet is designed to combat body fat as well. That's not to say a Diabetic Diet can't be effective for weight loss. The foods you eat are mostly low in calories, sugar, and fat, so you may be able to see effective weight loss over the course of your Diabetic Diet. Q: How many carbs per day on a Diabetic Diet? A: The amount of carbohydrates you consume on your Diabetic Diet will be determined by your: The larger and more active, the more carbs you need. The smaller and more sedentary, the fewer carbs required for healthy body function. All of this information will be provided by Continue reading >>

Healthful Eating To Prevent Diabetes

Healthful Eating To Prevent Diabetes

All foods provide calories and affect blood glucose levels. There are no "good" or "bad" foods. Eating a variety of foods can improve your health and keep meal time interesting. Tip Choose carbohydrate foods that are high in fiber, such as whole grains, fruits, vegetables and legumes (navy, kidney and black beans, lentils, etc.). Fiber: slows digestion to help you feel fuller longer slows the rate carbohydrates are absorbed into your bloodstream helps reduce cholesterol by binding to the cholesterol in your digestive tract and getting rid of it Spreading out your meals and snacks helps you manage your blood glucose levels. Try to eat main meals at least four hours apart. Wait about two hours between a meal and a snack, if you eat snacks. The foods you eat fall into three main food groups: carbohydrates, protein and fat. Carbohydrates Carbohydrates provide your best energy source. All carbohydrate foods turn into glucose. Carbohydrate foods are breads, crackers, cereals, rice, pasta, fruit and fruit juice, milk, vegetables and sweets. It is important that you don't avoid carbohydrate foods. They should make up 50 to 60 percent of your food plan. Carbohydrate counting Carbohydrate counting is a way to help you manage the amount of carbohydrate foods you eat during the day. A carbohydrate choice is a serving of carbohydrate food that contains about 15 grams of carbohydrate. The following chart gives general guidelines for carbohydrate choices at each meal. You may need to eat more or less, depending on your personal goals. To lose weight To control weight For the very active Women 2 to 3 choices (30 to 45 grams) 3 to 4 choices (45 to 60 grams) 4 to 5 choices (60 to 75 grams) Men 3 to 4 choices (45 to 60 grams) 4 to 5 choices (60 to 75 grams) 4 to 6 choices (60 to 90 grams) Continue reading >>

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