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How Many Carbs Should Type 2 Diabetic Eat Daily?

How Low Is Low Carb?

How Low Is Low Carb?

Many agree: People with diabetes should eat a low-carb diet. Last week we looked at what “carbs” are. But what is meant by “low?” How much carbohydrate should you eat? The Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010, (PDF) recommend that healthy people get 50–65% of their calories from carbohydrates. A study posted on the American Diabetes Association (ADA) Web site agrees. For a woman eating a below-average 2,000 calories a day, 50–65% would be 250–325 grams of carb a day. The Dietary Guidelines call for “a balanced diet that includes six one-ounce (28.3 g) servings of grain foods each day.” This would mean 170 grams of carbohydrate from grains alone each day. And the average American diet includes many other carb sources. Most men eat closer to 3,000 calories a day, so their numbers would be higher. Sixty percent of 3,000 would be 1,800 calories, equivalent to 450 grams of carbohydrate each day. Anything less than the recommended range is sometimes considered “low-carb.” Most popular low-carb diets, like Atkins, South Beach, Zone, and Protein Power, are much lower, from 45% of calories down to 5%. Many diabetes experts recommend somewhat lower carb intakes than ADA does. On our site, dietitian Jacquie Craig wrote, “Most people need between 30–75 grams of carbohydrate per meal and 15–30 grams for snacks.” So that sounds like between 120 and 300 grams a day. Dr. Richard Bernstein, an MD with Type 1 diabetes and a long-time advocate of the low-carb approach to diabetes, suggests much lower intakes. He says eat 6 grams of carbs at breakfast, and snacks, 12 grams each at lunch and dinner. So that would be about 40 grams of carbs per day. If 12 grams per meal sounds like a small amount, it is. It’s about the amount in an average slice of bread. An Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

The mainstays of diabetes treatment are: Working towards obtaining ideal body weight Following a diabetic diet Regular exercise Diabetic medication if needed Note: Type 1 diabetes must be treated with insulin; if you have type 2 diabetes, you may not need to take insulin. This involves injecting insulin under the skin for it to work. Insulin cannot be taken as a pill because the digestive juices in the stomach would destroy the insulin before it could work. Scientists are looking for new ways to give insulin. But today, shots are the only method. There are, however, new methods to give the shots. Insulin pumps are now being widely used and many people are having great results. In this Article Working towards obtaining ideal body weight An estimate of ideal body weight can be calculated using this formula: For women: Start with 100 pounds for 5 feet tall. Add 5 pounds for every inch over 5 feet. If you are under 5 feet, subtract 5 pounds for each inch under 5 feet. This will give you your ideal weight. If you have a large frame, add 10%. If you have a small frame, subtract 10%. A good way to decide your frame size is to look at your wrist size compared to other women's. Example: A woman who is 5' 4" tall and has a large frame 100 pounds + 20 pounds (4 inches times 5 pounds per inch) = 120 pounds. Add 10% for large frame (in this case 10% of 120 pounds is 12 pounds). 120 pounds + 12 pounds = 132 pounds ideal body weight. For men: Start with 106 pounds for a height of 5 foot. Add 6 pounds for every inch above 5 foot. For a large frame, add 10%. For a small frame, subtract 10%. (See above for further details.) Learn More about Treating Type 2 Diabetes The Diabetic Diet Diet is very important in diabetes. There are differing philosophies on what is the best diet but below is Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should A Diabetic Eat In A Day?

How Many Carbs Should A Diabetic Eat In A Day?

Diabetes affects the way the body metabolizes sugar. Whether you have type 1, type 2 or gestational diabetes, paying close attention to the amount of carbohydrates you're eating is critical. With proper planning and education, a healthy diabetic diet -- which includes carbohydrates in moderation -- is just as satisfying as a regular one. Video of the Day How Many Carbs Can Diabetics Eat? All foods that have carbohydrates raise blood sugar levels. But some carbohydrates raise blood sugar levels more than others. By keeping track of how many carbohydrates are in foods, diabetics are better able to control their blood sugar levels and subsequently manage their diabetes. The American Diabetes Association recommends that adults with diabetes consume about 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrate per meal, which adds up to 135 to 180 grams of carbohydrates per day. Note that some individuals may need more or fewer carbohydrates. Consult a registered dietitian for an individualized recommendation. The three main type of carbohydrates include starches, sugars and fiber. Starchy foods, also known as complex carbohydrates, include peas, corn, beans, grains, whole wheat pasta, oats, barley and rice. Sugars can occur naturally -- in milk and fruit, for example -- or be added during processing. Common names for sugar include table sugar, brown sugar, honey, beet sugar and high fructose corn syrup. Fiber is the indigestible part of plant foods that passes through the intestine when you consume fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts and legumes. The general recommendation is that adults consume 25 to 30 grams of fiber per day. Fiber offers an added benefit for diabetics, because it helps control blood sugar levels by slowing the release of sugar into the bloodstream after a meal. Carbohydrate C Continue reading >>

Can You Put A Number On Carbs?

Can You Put A Number On Carbs?

I'd appreciate learning about how many grams of carbohydrate I should eat as a guideline to keep my glucose numbers normal. Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should I Eat A Day?

How Many Carbs Should I Eat A Day?

Carbs are part of a well-balanced diet "Carbs," also known as carbohydrates, are one of the macronutrients, which are the compounds that give your body energy in the form of calories. Foods with carbs are digested into sugar, which provides your body with glucose, an important source of energy. Your body requires carbohydrates to function properly. There are two main types of carbs: complex and simple. Complex carbohydrates are those that are less processed, more slowly digested, and high in dietary fiber. Simple carbohydrates are those that are more quickly digested. They are often added to processed and prepared foods in the form of refined sugars and processed sweeteners. Some sources of carbohydrates are healthier than others. Learn how many carbs you need and which carbs to stay away from. How many carbs do you need? Depending on your age, sex, activity level, and overall health, your carbohydrate requirements will vary. According to the Mayo Clinic, 45 to 65 percent of your daily calories should come from carbohydrates. That's equal to about 225 to 325 grams of carbs if you eat 2,000 calories a day. It's not always practical to count your carbs, so the American Diabetes Association offers a simple strategy to structure your plate at every meal to help you get the right amount of carbs: Draw an imaginary vertical line down the middle of your plate. Then draw a horizontal line across one half, so your plate is divided into three sections. Fill the big section with non-starchy vegetables, such as spinach, carrots, lettuce, green cabbage, or mushrooms. Fill one of the small sections with starchy vegetables, such as potatoes or winter squash, or grains, such as whole grain pasta or brown rice. Legumes, such as black peas or pinto beans, are also great options. Fill the Continue reading >>

How Many Carbohydrates Should A Diabetic Eat?

How Many Carbohydrates Should A Diabetic Eat?

This post is part of the T2 Diabetes Nutrition & Health Series. Here’s what we are going to cover from Nov 10th-28th: Information on type 2 diabetes Can a diabetic eat eggs? 5 tips to control type 2 diabetes How many carbs to eat A carb counting tutorial We’ll talk about numbers Testing for insulin resistance and pre-diabetes The best diet for pre-diabetes Food lists Easy tasty meals Inflammation and diabetes Sample diabetes meal plan And more So as you can see there’s lots in store for this T2 Diabetes health series, so be sure to subscribe for updates by clicking on the button below. So how many carbohydrates should a diabetic eat? Are you totally confused by that question? I don’t blame you because it does vary depending on what and where you read something. The American Diabetes Association suggests that: “A place to start is at about 45-75 grams of carbohydrate at a meal”. But most diabetics I know find 75 g per meal way too high to manage blood sugars well and herein lies the problem. Because what tends to happen is that most diabetics are eating far too many carbohydrates and are struggling to manage their blood sugars. And unfortuantely they are often left wondering why, are you like that? Have you been eating 75 g of carbs a day and wondering why you can’t get things under control? Well this info will be very helpfull to you Now before moving on let me just say that we are talking about managing type 2 diabetes here. So how many carbs should you eat? Most people I know and work with find around 120 g of carbohydrate is a comfortable amount to work from. I also know some people who follow a very low carb diet of 50-60 g a day. Yes, that’s maximum per day! This certainly doesn’t suit everyone so 120 g seems to be a comfortable place to start and Continue reading >>

Carbohydrate Counting For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Carbohydrate Counting For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Carbohydrate counting is an effective medical nutrition therapy option for adults with type 2 diabetes. This meal planning tool has increased in popularity as a result of research demonstrating the benefits of intensive therapy in individuals with type 1 diabetes.1 It can also lead to improved diabetes control and weight loss in adults with type 2 diabetes. This article describes our experience in teaching carbohydrate counting in a diabetes specialty practice using "carbohydrate homework." In my full-time practice with an endocrinologist and diabetologist, I see a large population of patients with type 2 diabetes. Nutrition services are provided in one-to-one consultations, and 8–12 patients are seen per day. Our type 2 diabetes population spans the spectrum in terms of educational and socioeconomic level. Whether working or retired, many eat the majority of their meals out or on the run, because their spouse has died, their children are grown, or busy lifestyles don't allow for meals at home. Most have a misconception of the role nutrition plays in their diabetes control. When patients enter our practice, they often express frustration with their lack of glycemic control, lack of success with weight loss, and continuing problems with weight gain. Patients report frustration that, although they are following a meal plan and their premeal blood glucose levels are close to target, their HbAlc levels are still elevated. It is often at this frustration point that a patient first meets with the dietitian, and the concept of carbohydrate counting is introduced. Carbohydrate counting with fat- gram counting is an effective way to work on weight loss and to improve the control of diabetes. Carbohydrate is converted to blood glucose almost 100% within approximately 90 minutes Continue reading >>

T2 Diabetic Carbs Per Day Recommendations

T2 Diabetic Carbs Per Day Recommendations

Did you know that one of the most commonly asked questions is how many carbs per day is best for a diabetic to eat? And like many other people you may also be totally confused by that question? It's not surprising because the amount of carbs recommended does vary depending on where you read it or who tells you. Why is this? Well, believe it or not, there is no specific recommendation for carbs – that's why there are so many different numbers. So what we are going to share today is: A range of information Some view points for you to think about And also the experience of other people with diabetes Here at Diabetes Meal Plans we use a natural whole foods, lower carb approach and aim for around 80 g carbs per day. This is quite low compared to some of the recommendations, but research shows that lower carb diets work better than low fat diets. Studies show that lowering carbs helps lower insulin, improve insulin sensitivity, reduces blood glucose levels, reduces total and LDL cholesterol (the bad stuff, raises HDL cholesterol (the good stuff), and lowers A1C levels. A lower carb diet always outperforms a low fat, calorie restricted diet. This is something that science has proved time and time again. Yet, for some reason, this is not the type of information that is being made available publicly – it's just one of the major annoying things about the diabetes industry. So what the information I'm going to share about carbohydrates below is somewhat controversial – but the science is there, and so is the positive experience of many other diabetics. The stuff is not so controversial that I'm the only one sharing it. Many leading doctors and health practitioners believe in a lower carbohydrate approach for diabetes – such as Dr Sarah Hallberg, Dr Mark Hyman, Dr Gary Fett Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Diet Myths

10 Diabetes Diet Myths

Have you heard that eating too much sugar causes diabetes? Or maybe someone told you that you have to give up all your favorite foods when you’re on a diabetes diet? Well, those things aren’t true. In fact, there are plenty of myths about dieting and food. Use this guide to separate fact from fiction. MYTH. The truth is that diabetes begins when something disrupts your body's ability to turn the food you eat into energy. MYTH. If you have diabetes, you need to plan your meals, but the general idea is simple. You’ll want to keep your blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible. Choose foods that work along with your activities and any medications you take. Will you need to make adjustments to what you eat? Probably. But your new way of eating may not require as many changes as you think. MYTH. Carbs are the foundation of a healthy diet whether you have diabetes or not. They do affect your blood sugar levels, which is why you’ll need to keep up with how many you eat each day. Some carbs have vitamins, minerals, and fiber. So choose those ones, such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. Starchy, sugary carbs are not a great choice because they have less to offer. They’re more like a flash in the pan than fuel your body can rely on. MYTH. Because carbs affect blood sugar levels so quickly, you may be tempted to eat less of them and substitute more protein. But take care to choose your protein carefully. If it comes with too much saturated fat, that’s risky for your heart’s health. Keep an eye on your portion size too. Talk to your dietitian or doctor about how much protein is right for you. MYTH. If you use insulin for your diabetes, you may learn how to adjust the amount and type you take to match the amount of food you eat. But this doesn't mean you Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs A Day Should A Diabetic Eat?

How Many Carbs A Day Should A Diabetic Eat?

For a diabetic, controlling the daily diet is of utmost importance. There are a lot of foods that can spike the sugar levels and some more that lower. The trick is to know which is right for you and which isn’t. And counting carbohydrates is the first step you need to take when deciding on your diabetic meal plan. Why Are Carbs Important For Diabetics? Diabetes is your body not being able to process carbs properly, which results in fluctuating blood sugar levels. Here, either your body produces less or no insulin to absorb glucose. Carbs contribute to treating diabetes because they are generally broken down in your body to form glucose, raising blood sugar levels when required. How Many Carbs Should A Diabetic Eat? The dietary reference intake for healthy, adult men and women is 130 g per day.1 But this level for diabetics differs from one person to another. The average number of carbohydrates a diabetic requires is about 45%–65% of the daily calorie intake. However, research thus far has not come up with an ideal quantity yet, so this is not a set standard. The number of carbs you eat should be in accordance with your weight, age, lifestyle, activity level, the type and amount of medicine/insulin you take, the blood glucose level, and the target you want to reach.2 For example, you’ll need to eat lesser carbs if you have a comparatively inactive lifestyle. For Type 1 Diabetes If you take multiple injections daily, you need to alter the insulin intake depending on your carb levels. If you take a steady dose of medication every day, the carb intake should be altered and should be consistent with the time and quantity. This will not only balance the sugar levels but also reduce the risk of hypoglycemia.3 4 For Type 2 Diabetes Controlling the portion size and opting Continue reading >>

How To Count Carbs In 10 Common Foods

How To Count Carbs In 10 Common Foods

What are carbohydrates? Carbohydrates are sugar-based molecules found in many foods, from cookies to cantaloupes. If you have diabetes, planning your carb intake—and sticking to the plan—is critical to keep blood sugar on an even keel and to cut your risk of diabetes-related problems like heart disease and stroke. Whether or not you have diabetes, you should aim to get about half your calories from complex carbohydrates (which are high in fiber), 20-25% from protein, and no more than 30% from fat, says Lalita Kaul, PhD, RD, a spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association. How to read a food label The Nutrition Facts label lists the total amount of carbohydrates per serving, including carbs from fiber, sugar, and sugar alcohols. (If you're counting carbs in your diet, be aware that 15 grams of carbohydrates count as one serving.) Sugar alcohols are often used in sugar-free foods, although they still deliver calories and carbs. Sugar alcohols and fiber don't affect blood sugar as much as other carbs, because they're not completely absorbed. If food contains sugar alcohol or 5 or more grams of fiber, you can subtract half of the grams of these ingredients from the number of total carbs. (See more details at the American Diabetes Association and University of California, San Francisco.) How many carbs per day? If you eat 2,000 calories a day, you should consume about 250 grams of complex carbohydrates per day. A good starting place for people with diabetes is to have roughly 45 to 60 grams of carbs per meal and 15 to 30 grams for snacks. While snacks are key for people with diabetes who use insulin or pills that increase insulin production (otherwise, they run the risk of low blood sugar), they aren’t essential for non-insulin users. The goal for anyone with diab Continue reading >>

Carbohydrate Guidelines For Type 2 Diabetes

Carbohydrate Guidelines For Type 2 Diabetes

Carbohydrates are an essential part of a healthy diet. But carbs also raise your blood sugar. When you have type 2 diabetes, it’s important to aim for a balanced carb intake. It can seem confusing and a little overwhelming at first, but don’t be discouraged. Your doctor, diabetes educator, or dietitian can help you find a meal plan that works for you. By setting limits on your carb intake—and tracking what you eat to make sure you stay within those limits—you can improve your blood sugar control. To get started, here are some basic facts you need to know. On top of tracking your diet and blood sugar, regular exercise is a key part of managing your diabetes. And while any exercise is better than none, certain activities have specific benefits for people with diabetes. 2017 Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced or reprinted without permission from Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. Use of this information is governed by the Healthgrades User Agreement. Crash Course in Carbs Foods that contain carbohydrates include: Grains, such as breads, cereals, pasta, and rice Fruits and fruit juices Starchy vegetables, such as potatoes and corn (nonstarchy vegetables also contain carbs, but usually very little) Dried beans and peas Dairy foods, such as milk and yogurt Sweets, such as cookies, pastries, cakes and candy Snack foods, such as potato chips To find the carb content of a food, check the amount of total carbohydrate on the food label. Be sure to look at the serving amount as well. If you’re eating twice as much as the listed serving, you’ll need to double the total carbs. If a food doesn’t have a label, there are many apps and books available to help you track carbs. One great free tool is MyFoodAdvisor from the Americ Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should I Eat In A Day?

How Many Carbs Should I Eat In A Day?

If you have diabetes and are confused by carb counting, here's an easy-to-understand explanation from a registered dietitian. Carbohydrates are one of three macronutrients in food that supply your body with energy. Once carbs are broken down into simple sugars and absorbed into your bloodstream, the hormone insulin attaches itself to the sugar and pulls it out of the blood and into body cells, where it is converted to energy. Insulin also helps store sugar in your liver when you have too much in your blood and release sugar when you don’t have enough. When you have diabetes, you need to balance the amount of carbohydrates you eat with the amount of insulin your body needs to perform these tasks. Your job, along with your dietitian or diabetes educator, is to find the exact number of carbs that will help you stay healthy in the long run and feel your best from day to day. The American Diabetes Association recommends starting with 45 to 60 g carbohydrate at each meal and 15 to 20 g for snacks. You may need more or less, depending on your weight, activity level, blood glucose goals, and the type of medication you take. Your daily starting goal should be to get between 45 and 65% of your calories from carbs. So, for instance, if you eat 1,800 calories a day, that translates to approximately 200 g carbohydrate each day. If you eat more or fewer calories, adjust your carb count accordingly. Keeping in mind that 1 g of carbohydrate contains 4 calories, here’s the math: 1,800 calories x .45 (percent of calories from carbs) = 810 calories 810 calories / 4 (number of calories in 1 g of carbs) = 202.5 g carbohydrate Not all Carbs are Created Equal You have to learn the number of carbs in individual foods in order to figure out how many carbs you are getting in each meal or sna Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should A Diabetic Eat?

How Many Carbs Should A Diabetic Eat?

Figuring out how many carbs to eat when you have diabetes can seem confusing. Meal plans created by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) provide about 45% of calories from carbs. This includes 45–60 grams per meal and 10–25 grams per snack, totaling about 135–230 grams of carbs per day. However, a growing number of experts believe people with diabetes should be eating far fewer carbs than this. In fact, many recommend fewer carbs per day than what the ADA allows per meal. This article takes a look at the research supporting low-carb diets for diabetics and provides guidance for determining optimal carb intake. Glucose, or blood sugar, is the main source of fuel for your body's cells. In people with diabetes, the body's ability to process and use blood sugar is impaired. Although there are several types of diabetes, the two most common forms are type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 Diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is unable to produce insulin, a hormone that allows sugar from the bloodstream to enter the body's cells. Instead, insulin must be injected to ensure that sugar enters cells. Type 1 diabetes develops because of an autoimmune process in which the body attacks its own insulin-producing cells, which are called beta cells. This disease is usually diagnosed in children, but it can start at any age, even in late adulthood (1). Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is more common, accounting for about 90% of people with diabetes. Like type 1 diabetes, it can develop in both adults and children. However, it isn't as common in children and typically occurs in people who are overweight or obese. In this form of the disease, either the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or the body's cells are resistant to insulin's effects. Therefore, too much sugar stays Continue reading >>

How To Count Carbs For Better Blood Sugar Control

How To Count Carbs For Better Blood Sugar Control

Your doctor may have told you to “count carbs” or use something called the glycemic index to plan your meals. A healthy diet consists of a balance of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. However, people with type 2 diabetes need to watch carbohydrates carefully. Why? Because when any food that contains carbohydrates is digested, it turns into sugar, which increases your blood-glucose level. It’s pretty basic: Eating too many carbs can raise the amount of sugar in your bloodstream and lead to complications. The key for people like you with type 2 diabetes is to eat carbs in limited amounts at each meal and when you snack. Total carbs should make up about 45 to 60 percent of your daily diet (and be spaced out throughout the day) if you have type 2 diabetes. There’s no one diet that works for everyone with type 2 diabetes — there are just too many variables: Age, weight, level of physical activity, medications, as well as daily routine and personal preference need to be taken into account. So here’s where your diabetes care team comes in: Talk to your dietitian or diabetes educator to determine the right carb-counting number for you so you’ll be able to provide your body with a steady flow of energy throughout the day, maintain a healthy weight, and manage your blood sugar. The Basics of Counting Carbs Counting carbs is an effective way to monitor your carb intake and keep sugar from building up in the blood. You can use these basic tips to help manage your carb consumption: Foods that contain carbohydrates include starches, fruits, vegetables, dairy products, beans, and sweets. Most people with type 2 diabetes should stick to eating around 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates per meal. For foods that have nutrition labels, add up the grams of carbohydrates per serv Continue reading >>

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