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How Many Carbs Per Day For Diabetic

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

The mainstays of diabetes treatment are: Working towards obtaining ideal body weight Following a diabetic diet Regular exercise Diabetic medication if needed Note: Type 1 diabetes must be treated with insulin; if you have type 2 diabetes, you may not need to take insulin. This involves injecting insulin under the skin for it to work. Insulin cannot be taken as a pill because the digestive juices in the stomach would destroy the insulin before it could work. Scientists are looking for new ways to give insulin. But today, shots are the only method. There are, however, new methods to give the shots. Insulin pumps are now being widely used and many people are having great results. In this Article Working towards obtaining ideal body weight An estimate of ideal body weight can be calculated using this formula: For women: Start with 100 pounds for 5 feet tall. Add 5 pounds for every inch over 5 feet. If you are under 5 feet, subtract 5 pounds for each inch under 5 feet. This will give you your ideal weight. If you have a large frame, add 10%. If you have a small frame, subtract 10%. A good way to decide your frame size is to look at your wrist size compared to other women's. Example: A woman who is 5' 4" tall and has a large frame 100 pounds + 20 pounds (4 inches times 5 pounds per inch) = 120 pounds. Add 10% for large frame (in this case 10% of 120 pounds is 12 pounds). 120 pounds + 12 pounds = 132 pounds ideal body weight. For men: Start with 106 pounds for a height of 5 foot. Add 6 pounds for every inch above 5 foot. For a large frame, add 10%. For a small frame, subtract 10%. (See above for further details.) Learn More about Treating Type 2 Diabetes The Diabetic Diet Diet is very important in diabetes. There are differing philosophies on what is the best diet but below is Continue reading >>

How Low Is Low Carb?

How Low Is Low Carb?

Many agree: People with diabetes should eat a low-carb diet. Last week we looked at what “carbs” are. But what is meant by “low?” How much carbohydrate should you eat? The Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010, (PDF) recommend that healthy people get 50–65% of their calories from carbohydrates. A study posted on the American Diabetes Association (ADA) Web site agrees. For a woman eating a below-average 2,000 calories a day, 50–65% would be 250–325 grams of carb a day. The Dietary Guidelines call for “a balanced diet that includes six one-ounce (28.3 g) servings of grain foods each day.” This would mean 170 grams of carbohydrate from grains alone each day. And the average American diet includes many other carb sources. Most men eat closer to 3,000 calories a day, so their numbers would be higher. Sixty percent of 3,000 would be 1,800 calories, equivalent to 450 grams of carbohydrate each day. Anything less than the recommended range is sometimes considered “low-carb.” Most popular low-carb diets, like Atkins, South Beach, Zone, and Protein Power, are much lower, from 45% of calories down to 5%. Many diabetes experts recommend somewhat lower carb intakes than ADA does. On our site, dietitian Jacquie Craig wrote, “Most people need between 30–75 grams of carbohydrate per meal and 15–30 grams for snacks.” So that sounds like between 120 and 300 grams a day. Dr. Richard Bernstein, an MD with Type 1 diabetes and a long-time advocate of the low-carb approach to diabetes, suggests much lower intakes. He says eat 6 grams of carbs at breakfast, and snacks, 12 grams each at lunch and dinner. So that would be about 40 grams of carbs per day. If 12 grams per meal sounds like a small amount, it is. It’s about the amount in an average slice of bread. An Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should A Diabetic Take A Day?

How Many Carbs Should A Diabetic Take A Day?

Are you a diabetic patient? Not sure how many carbs should a diabetic have a day? Are you struggling to maintain your blood sugar level? Do you still need to lose weight? Well, read this article to find the answers. Let’s find what American Diabetes Association says about it. ADA suggests that a diabetic patient should take 45% of a day’s calories from carbohydrates. This means that a person should eat 45 – 60 grams per meal and total 135 – 230 grams per day. On the other hand, one intelligentsia of the diet says that 135 – 230 grams per day of carbs are too much for diabetic patients. They argue that diabetic patients should eat far fewer carbohydrates than the suggestion of ADA. There are two types of diabetic patients, Type 1 and Type 2. Remember that the number of carbohydrates are different for both types of patients. Let’s go deep into both types and analyze what amount of carbohydrates a diabetic patient should have per day. Type 1 Diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the human body does not produce insulin that is mandatory to regulate blood sugar level. Basically, insulin allows the sugar to enter into body cells and store excess sugar into fats in the body. How do carbohydrates affect the blood sugar level of type 1 patients? The body gets calories from carbs, proteins and fats. However, excess carbs intake affects blood sugar level badly. Unlike the proteins and fats, when carbs are digested by the body, that are converted into glucose (Sugar) and, eventually, it enters into the blood. Therefore, eating a high amount of carbs means that you are raising the blood sugar level and you need to inject more insulin to regularize the blood sugar level. Most catastrophic results come at that point when your body does not produce insulin and you inject. You are un Continue reading >>

The Low-carb Diabetes Plan That Works

The Low-carb Diabetes Plan That Works

After hearing for years that a high-carb, low-fat diet is the only real road to weight loss, you might be wondering how a low-carb diabetes diet can help you finally drop the pounds and help you get control of your blood sugar. Let us explain. The high-carb, low-fat idea basically oversimplified how food works once it enters your body. It ignored the fact that not all carbs are good, and glossed over that not all fats are bad. Therefore, we loaded up on all the breads, pastas, and low-fat goodies, never realizing that it was making us fatter. Here's how it really works. All carbs are converted to glucose and raise your blood sugar, but they aren't all converted at the same rate. How fast they are absorbed--and how much--is what affects your weight. There are two general classes of carbs--refined and unrefined. Refined carbs (white breads, white flour, pastas) are essentially refined sugars, meaning once you eat them they are quickly turned into glucose in your system. Unrefined carbs are the kinds found in whole grains, beans, fruits, and many vegetables. The fiber in these foods helps to slow down your body's absorption of carbs, therefore slowing the process of turning carbs into glucose. The problem comes in when you eat too many carbs--especially too many refined carbs. If you eat excessive amounts of quickly absorbed carbs, you create a situation where more glucose becomes available than your body needs. That excess glucose gets turned into fat. What's the problem with eating lots of carbs if you have diabetes? If you eat excessive amounts of quickly absorbed carbs, you upset your body's precise balance of blood sugar. Simply put, eating too many carbohydrate grams may cause a situation where more glucose becomes available to the cells than the body needs. Obviousl Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Can I Eat With Diabetes?

How Many Carbs Can I Eat With Diabetes?

If you have diabetes and you're counting carbohydrates (carbs), keep these guidelines in mind: Women need about 3 to 4 carb servings per meal (or split between a meal and a snack). Men need about 4 to 5 carb servings per meal (or meal and snack). In general, men with diabetes should aim for 60-75 grams per meal & females should aim for 45-60 grams per meal. An appropriate amount for snacks would be 15-30 grams. An average person without diabetes and with healthy eating habits consumes about 200 to 300 grams of carbs a day. Since diabetes is one of the few chronic conditions which is directly impacted by food choices, it is important to keep track of the amount and kind of carbs consumed. Aside from very active or athletic individuals, most people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes are better off cutting their carbohydrate intake to 100 to 150 grams of carbs a day. If weight loss is also a goal, carbs may have to be reduced even more. In all cases, ask your physician or diabetes educator for guidance. Remember all carbs are not the same in the body. People with diabetes should avoid high-glycemic index carbs such as sugar like in soda or candy, enriched carbs such as starches, and some very sweet fruits. Depending on how many calories your body needs depends on the amount of carbohydrates necessary. Usually a breakfast, lunch, and dinner has 30-60 grams of carbohydrate. Each snack should be around 15 grams of carbohydrates. Meet with a Registered Dietitian to get the exact grams of carbohydrate that are necessary to consume. Carbohydrate quantity is individualized so you will need to meet with your Registered Dietitian to find out how many grams of carbohydrate you will consume. Your dietitian will give you a meal plan that will balance out the amount carbohydrates throughou Continue reading >>

Carbohydrate Counting

Carbohydrate Counting

Carbohydrate counting is a flexible way to plan your meals. It focuses on foods that contain carbohydrate as these raise your blood glucose (sugar) the most. Follow these steps to count carbohydrates and help manage your blood glucose levels. Your registered dietitian will guide you along the way. Step 1: Make healthy food choices Enjoy a variety of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, low fat milk products, and meat and alternatives at your meals. A variety of foods will help to keep you healthy. Use added fats in small amounts. This helps to control your weight and blood cholesterol. Choose portion sizes to help you to reach or maintain a healthy weight. Step 2: Focus on carbohydrate Your body breaks down carbohydrate into glucose. This raises your blood glucose (sugar) levels. Carbohydrate is found in many foods including grains and starches, fruits, some vegetables, legumes, milk and milk alternatives, sugary foods and many prepared foods. Meat and alternatives, most vegetables and fats contain little carbohydrate. Moderate servings will not have a big effect on blood glucose (sugar) levels. Step 3: Set carbohydrate goals Your dietitian will help you set a goal for grams of carbohydrate at each meal and snack. This may be the same from day to day or may be flexible, depending on your needs. Aim to meet your target within five grams per meal or snack. Step 4: Determine carbohydrate content Write down what you eat and drink throughout the day. Be sure to note the portion sizes. You may need to use measuring cups and food scales to be accurate. Record the grams of carbohydrate in these foods and drinks. For carbohydrate content of foods, check the nutrition label on food packages, food composition books, restaurant fact sheets and websites. Step 5: Monitor effect on blood Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should A Diabetic Eat?

How Many Carbs Should A Diabetic Eat?

Figuring out how many carbs to eat when you have diabetes can seem confusing. Meal plans created by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) provide about 45% of calories from carbs. This includes 45–60 grams per meal and 10–25 grams per snack, totaling about 135–230 grams of carbs per day. However, a growing number of experts believe people with diabetes should be eating far fewer carbs than this. In fact, many recommend fewer carbs per day than what the ADA allows per meal. This article takes a look at the research supporting low-carb diets for diabetics and provides guidance for determining optimal carb intake. Glucose, or blood sugar, is the main source of fuel for your body's cells. In people with diabetes, the body's ability to process and use blood sugar is impaired. Although there are several types of diabetes, the two most common forms are type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 Diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is unable to produce insulin, a hormone that allows sugar from the bloodstream to enter the body's cells. Instead, insulin must be injected to ensure that sugar enters cells. Type 1 diabetes develops because of an autoimmune process in which the body attacks its own insulin-producing cells, which are called beta cells. This disease is usually diagnosed in children, but it can start at any age, even in late adulthood (1). Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is more common, accounting for about 90% of people with diabetes. Like type 1 diabetes, it can develop in both adults and children. However, it isn't as common in children and typically occurs in people who are overweight or obese. In this form of the disease, either the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or the body's cells are resistant to insulin's effects. Therefore, too much sugar stays Continue reading >>

What Is The Recommended Daily Intake Of Carbs For A Diabetic Male

What Is The Recommended Daily Intake Of Carbs For A Diabetic Male

Male diabetics can usually handle slightly more carbohydrates compared to female diabetics, but the optimal amount of carbs you should eat will also depend on your weight, physical activity level and blood-sugar control. Male diabetics will generally need fewer carbs compared to non-diabetics because an excess of carbs is associated with higher blood-sugar levels, which can eventually lead to diabetes complications. Working with a diabetes educator or registered dietitian can help you dial in your carb intake to help you optimize your diabetes control and prevent complications. Carbohydrate counting is an important skill to learn to help diabetic males better understand the link between the food they eat and their blood-sugar levels. Carbohydrates are mainly found in foods containing sugar or flour, as well as in grains, starchy vegetables and fruits. Look at the nutrition facts table on food labels to determine the amount of carbs found per serving. Adjust the carb content according to the serving you consume. For example, if the label of a package of rice says that 1 cup of cooked rice contains 45 grams of carbs and you usually eat 2 cups of rice, your carb intake will reach 90 grams. Keep a food diary to keep track of the food you eat and your carb intake. Standard Advice The daily carb intake for male diabetics recommended by the American Diabetes Association varies between 135 and 180 grams for your three basic meals along with up to 60 to 90 grams of extra carbohydrates at snack time. Your daily recommended carb intake could therefore vary between 135 grams a day if you don't snack up to 270 grams a day. Since these recommendations are quite broad, the American Diabetes Association suggests working with a diabetes educator or registered dietitian to get more speci Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should My Pre-diabetic Husband Eat Each Day?

How Many Carbs Should My Pre-diabetic Husband Eat Each Day?

My husband has been diagnosed as being pre-diabetic. What amount of carbs should he eat per day? I know that carbs are bad for him, but as they are in most foods, it's hard to be totally carb free. Also, we both eat a lot of fresh fruits and veggies, so what about the sugars they contain? Dr. Gourmet Says.... I am sorry for your husband's new diagnosis. For many the issue of having "pre-diabetes" or "insulin intolerance" is one that can be controlled through making changes in diet and exercise. In a lot of cases weight is a major factor and losing weight is key. First and foremost, carbohydrates are not bad. The issue is that most folks today eat far too many calories and end up eating a lot of carbohydrates. Often this is in the form of low quality carbs like the simple sugars in soda, candy, etc.. The key is for your husband to eat high quality calories no matter whether those calories come from carbohydrates, protein or fats. For instance, both Coca Cola and oatmeal are full of carbohydrates. The Coke contains 35 grams of carbs all in the form of simple sugar. That's about 150 calories that is drunk and used pretty quickly by the body and has been shown in research to not satisfy hunger well. In many cases folks drink that extra 35 grams of carbohydrates along with a meal and it is simply added calories that they don't need. On the other hand, a half cup of dry oatmeal has about 25 grams of carbohydrate. This is a large serving and even with a teaspoon of sugar on top (4 grams carbs) this is not many more calories than the soda. It is, however, filling, satisfying, and really good for you. There's 4 grams of fiber, 5 grams of protein and tons of vitamins and minerals. We know that in the case of diabetics eating oatmeal and other high fiber (good quality carbohydrate Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Diet Myths

10 Diabetes Diet Myths

Have you heard that eating too much sugar causes diabetes? Or maybe someone told you that you have to give up all your favorite foods when you’re on a diabetes diet? Well, those things aren’t true. In fact, there are plenty of myths about dieting and food. Use this guide to separate fact from fiction. MYTH. The truth is that diabetes begins when something disrupts your body's ability to turn the food you eat into energy. MYTH. If you have diabetes, you need to plan your meals, but the general idea is simple. You’ll want to keep your blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible. Choose foods that work along with your activities and any medications you take. Will you need to make adjustments to what you eat? Probably. But your new way of eating may not require as many changes as you think. MYTH. Carbs are the foundation of a healthy diet whether you have diabetes or not. They do affect your blood sugar levels, which is why you’ll need to keep up with how many you eat each day. Some carbs have vitamins, minerals, and fiber. So choose those ones, such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. Starchy, sugary carbs are not a great choice because they have less to offer. They’re more like a flash in the pan than fuel your body can rely on. MYTH. Because carbs affect blood sugar levels so quickly, you may be tempted to eat less of them and substitute more protein. But take care to choose your protein carefully. If it comes with too much saturated fat, that’s risky for your heart’s health. Keep an eye on your portion size too. Talk to your dietitian or doctor about how much protein is right for you. MYTH. If you use insulin for your diabetes, you may learn how to adjust the amount and type you take to match the amount of food you eat. But this doesn't mean you Continue reading >>

How To Count Carbs For Better Blood Sugar Control

How To Count Carbs For Better Blood Sugar Control

Your doctor may have told you to “count carbs” or use something called the glycemic index to plan your meals. A healthy diet consists of a balance of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. However, people with type 2 diabetes need to watch carbohydrates carefully. Why? Because when any food that contains carbohydrates is digested, it turns into sugar, which increases your blood-glucose level. It’s pretty basic: Eating too many carbs can raise the amount of sugar in your bloodstream and lead to complications. The key for people like you with type 2 diabetes is to eat carbs in limited amounts at each meal and when you snack. Total carbs should make up about 45 to 60 percent of your daily diet (and be spaced out throughout the day) if you have type 2 diabetes. There’s no one diet that works for everyone with type 2 diabetes — there are just too many variables: Age, weight, level of physical activity, medications, as well as daily routine and personal preference need to be taken into account. So here’s where your diabetes care team comes in: Talk to your dietitian or diabetes educator to determine the right carb-counting number for you so you’ll be able to provide your body with a steady flow of energy throughout the day, maintain a healthy weight, and manage your blood sugar. The Basics of Counting Carbs Counting carbs is an effective way to monitor your carb intake and keep sugar from building up in the blood. You can use these basic tips to help manage your carb consumption: Foods that contain carbohydrates include starches, fruits, vegetables, dairy products, beans, and sweets. Most people with type 2 diabetes should stick to eating around 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates per meal. For foods that have nutrition labels, add up the grams of carbohydrates per serv Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should Your D-kid Eat Each Day?

How Many Carbs Should Your D-kid Eat Each Day?

Please remember that I never give medical advice. Ask your endocrinologist or pediatrician for advice about your own child. Make your own informed decisions for your own child. Dietary Guidelines I’m going to refer to the 2010 Health.gov dietary guidelines. The 2015 guidelines are forthcoming. I’m also going to use my own child’s age and gender when referring to the suggested calories and carbs. The following two tables I’ve taken from “Dietary Guidelines For Americans, 2010” linked to above and will call it “dietary guidelines” here. According to the dietary guidelines, “Carbohydrates provide 4 calories per gram.” For girls aged 9-13 they recommend 1,600-2,000 calories per day if they are moderately active. Of these calories, carbohydrates should make up 45-65% of those calories. Using these numbers, and if I did my math correctly, here are the two extremes and the middle: 1,600 calories x 45% carbohydrates (at 4 calories per carb) = 180 carbs per day 1,800 calories x 55% carbohydrates (at 4 calories per carb) = 247.5 carbs per day 2,000 calories x 65% carbohydrates (at 4 calories per carb) = 325 carbs per day So really, if my child is moderately active and eats between 180 and 325 carbs in a given day, we are within the recommended guidelines. My Thoughts Sometimes when we carb count a meal I’m amazed at how many carbs it is. For instance at Wendy’s if Q is particularly hungry, she might ask for a junior hamburger (25 CHO), small chili (16 CHO), value sized fries (30 CHO) and a junior frosty (32 CHO). And every time I think, wow, that’s a lot of carbs! A hundred and three, to be exact. But what are kids who don’t have type 1 diabetes having at that same meal? They probably aren’t going for the lower carb kid-size frosty! And they are prob Continue reading >>

How Many Carbohydrates Should A Person With Diabetes Eat Each Day?

How Many Carbohydrates Should A Person With Diabetes Eat Each Day?

Many diabetics know that carbs are something you shouldn’t eat too much of if you want to keep your blood sugar down. The types of carbohydrate foods you eat each day and how many carbs you eat are vital when managing your blood sugars. The idea is to strike a balance between the insulin levels in the body and the number of carbohydrates you take in. It is understood by nutritionists that your carbohydrate intake strongly affects your blood sugar levels—even more than the amount of protein and fat you consume in your diet. If you eat too many carbs in any given day, your blood sugar levels may be high. In the same way, taking medications to lower the glucose level may cause you to have low blood sugar, also known as hypoglycemia. The actual amount of carbohydrates you need to take in depends on what medications you are taking for the diabetes and is unique to each diabetic. Things like your activity level, how much insulin resistance you have, and the range of blood sugar levels you need play a role in how many carbohydrates you should eat per day. When counting carbs, it is important to learn how many carbs is in each snack or meal you take in so you can count those carbs toward your total. In general, it is recommended that a woman with diabetes, should take in about 45 grams of carbohydrates in each meal, while men can eat 60 grams of carbohydrates in each meal. This is because men tend to be bigger and can have normal blood sugar levels after eating more carbs when compared to women. Carbohydrate intake should be spread throughout the day so that there are no spikes in blood sugar when you eat a high carbohydrate meal or snack. In order to know if eating 45 grams of carbohydrate in your meal or snack is appropriate, you need to eat a meal that contains 45 grams Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should I Eat A Day?

How Many Carbs Should I Eat A Day?

Carbs are part of a well-balanced diet "Carbs," also known as carbohydrates, are one of the macronutrients, which are the compounds that give your body energy in the form of calories. Foods with carbs are digested into sugar, which provides your body with glucose, an important source of energy. Your body requires carbohydrates to function properly. There are two main types of carbs: complex and simple. Complex carbohydrates are those that are less processed, more slowly digested, and high in dietary fiber. Simple carbohydrates are those that are more quickly digested. They are often added to processed and prepared foods in the form of refined sugars and processed sweeteners. Some sources of carbohydrates are healthier than others. Learn how many carbs you need and which carbs to stay away from. How many carbs do you need? Depending on your age, sex, activity level, and overall health, your carbohydrate requirements will vary. According to the Mayo Clinic, 45 to 65 percent of your daily calories should come from carbohydrates. That's equal to about 225 to 325 grams of carbs if you eat 2,000 calories a day. It's not always practical to count your carbs, so the American Diabetes Association offers a simple strategy to structure your plate at every meal to help you get the right amount of carbs: Draw an imaginary vertical line down the middle of your plate. Then draw a horizontal line across one half, so your plate is divided into three sections. Fill the big section with non-starchy vegetables, such as spinach, carrots, lettuce, green cabbage, or mushrooms. Fill one of the small sections with starchy vegetables, such as potatoes or winter squash, or grains, such as whole grain pasta or brown rice. Legumes, such as black peas or pinto beans, are also great options. Fill the Continue reading >>

Can You Put A Number On Carbs?

Can You Put A Number On Carbs?

I'd appreciate learning about how many grams of carbohydrate I should eat as a guideline to keep my glucose numbers normal. Continue reading >>

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