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How Many Carbs Per Day For Diabetic

What Is The Recommended Daily Intake Of Carbs For A Diabetic Male

What Is The Recommended Daily Intake Of Carbs For A Diabetic Male

Male diabetics can usually handle slightly more carbohydrates compared to female diabetics, but the optimal amount of carbs you should eat will also depend on your weight, physical activity level and blood-sugar control. Male diabetics will generally need fewer carbs compared to non-diabetics because an excess of carbs is associated with higher blood-sugar levels, which can eventually lead to diabetes complications. Working with a diabetes educator or registered dietitian can help you dial in your carb intake to help you optimize your diabetes control and prevent complications. Carbohydrate counting is an important skill to learn to help diabetic males better understand the link between the food they eat and their blood-sugar levels. Carbohydrates are mainly found in foods containing sugar or flour, as well as in grains, starchy vegetables and fruits. Look at the nutrition facts table on food labels to determine the amount of carbs found per serving. Adjust the carb content according to the serving you consume. For example, if the label of a package of rice says that 1 cup of cooked rice contains 45 grams of carbs and you usually eat 2 cups of rice, your carb intake will reach 90 grams. Keep a food diary to keep track of the food you eat and your carb intake. Standard Advice The daily carb intake for male diabetics recommended by the American Diabetes Association varies between 135 and 180 grams for your three basic meals along with up to 60 to 90 grams of extra carbohydrates at snack time. Your daily recommended carb intake could therefore vary between 135 grams a day if you don't snack up to 270 grams a day. Since these recommendations are quite broad, the American Diabetes Association suggests working with a diabetes educator or registered dietitian to get more speci Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should I Eat A Day?

How Many Carbs Should I Eat A Day?

Carbs are part of a well-balanced diet "Carbs," also known as carbohydrates, are one of the macronutrients, which are the compounds that give your body energy in the form of calories. Foods with carbs are digested into sugar, which provides your body with glucose, an important source of energy. Your body requires carbohydrates to function properly. There are two main types of carbs: complex and simple. Complex carbohydrates are those that are less processed, more slowly digested, and high in dietary fiber. Simple carbohydrates are those that are more quickly digested. They are often added to processed and prepared foods in the form of refined sugars and processed sweeteners. Some sources of carbohydrates are healthier than others. Learn how many carbs you need and which carbs to stay away from. How many carbs do you need? Depending on your age, sex, activity level, and overall health, your carbohydrate requirements will vary. According to the Mayo Clinic, 45 to 65 percent of your daily calories should come from carbohydrates. That's equal to about 225 to 325 grams of carbs if you eat 2,000 calories a day. It's not always practical to count your carbs, so the American Diabetes Association offers a simple strategy to structure your plate at every meal to help you get the right amount of carbs: Draw an imaginary vertical line down the middle of your plate. Then draw a horizontal line across one half, so your plate is divided into three sections. Fill the big section with non-starchy vegetables, such as spinach, carrots, lettuce, green cabbage, or mushrooms. Fill one of the small sections with starchy vegetables, such as potatoes or winter squash, or grains, such as whole grain pasta or brown rice. Legumes, such as black peas or pinto beans, are also great options. Fill the Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Per Day For A Diabetic?

How Many Carbs Per Day For A Diabetic?

Did you know that one of the most commonly asked questions we get is: how many carbs per day is best for a diabetic to eat? No doubt that's why you're here reading this as well, right? And like many other people you may be totally confused by that question. That's not surprising because the amount of carbs recommended does vary depending on where you read it. Why is this? Well, there is no specific recommendation for carbs, that's why there are so many different numbers. However, there is good scientific evidence to suggest what's best. But unfortunately, that information is not getting out to the public (to YOU) as fast as it should. Luckily though, here at Diabetes Meal Plans, we pride ourselves on sharing up-to-date evidence-based info because we want you to get the best results. And we're proud to say what we share works: Sheryl says: “My doctor’s report was best ever: A1c was normal for the first time since I was diagnosed diabetic in 2007; My LDL was 60; my total cholesterol was 130. My lab results were improved across the board. Best news: I am taking less diabetic meds, and my weight is within 5 lbs of normal BMI. I am a believer in what you have written, and I’m grateful to have a site I can trust.” Here at Diabetes Meal Plans we encourage a low carb diet because research shows that lower carb diets produce far more effective results than traditional low fat diets. As you read on, be prepared to have some of your longheld diet beliefs shattered. But also be prepared to be amazed by the possibilities. Because with a few dietary changes, you can reverse* your diabetes and live your life anew! Rethinking ‘Mainstream' Carb Recommendations Over the years it’s been pretty common practice to recommend a low fat, high carbohydrate diet to people with type 2 Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should A Diabetic Take A Day?

How Many Carbs Should A Diabetic Take A Day?

Are you a diabetic patient? Not sure how many carbs should a diabetic have a day? Are you struggling to maintain your blood sugar level? Do you still need to lose weight? Well, read this article to find the answers. Let’s find what American Diabetes Association says about it. ADA suggests that a diabetic patient should take 45% of a day’s calories from carbohydrates. This means that a person should eat 45 – 60 grams per meal and total 135 – 230 grams per day. On the other hand, one intelligentsia of the diet says that 135 – 230 grams per day of carbs are too much for diabetic patients. They argue that diabetic patients should eat far fewer carbohydrates than the suggestion of ADA. There are two types of diabetic patients, Type 1 and Type 2. Remember that the number of carbohydrates are different for both types of patients. Let’s go deep into both types and analyze what amount of carbohydrates a diabetic patient should have per day. Type 1 Diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the human body does not produce insulin that is mandatory to regulate blood sugar level. Basically, insulin allows the sugar to enter into body cells and store excess sugar into fats in the body. How do carbohydrates affect the blood sugar level of type 1 patients? The body gets calories from carbs, proteins and fats. However, excess carbs intake affects blood sugar level badly. Unlike the proteins and fats, when carbs are digested by the body, that are converted into glucose (Sugar) and, eventually, it enters into the blood. Therefore, eating a high amount of carbs means that you are raising the blood sugar level and you need to inject more insulin to regularize the blood sugar level. Most catastrophic results come at that point when your body does not produce insulin and you inject. You are un Continue reading >>

How To Count Carbs In 10 Common Foods

How To Count Carbs In 10 Common Foods

What are carbohydrates? Carbohydrates are sugar-based molecules found in many foods, from cookies to cantaloupes. If you have diabetes, planning your carb intake—and sticking to the plan—is critical to keep blood sugar on an even keel and to cut your risk of diabetes-related problems like heart disease and stroke. Whether or not you have diabetes, you should aim to get about half your calories from complex carbohydrates (which are high in fiber), 20-25% from protein, and no more than 30% from fat, says Lalita Kaul, PhD, RD, a spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association. How to read a food label The Nutrition Facts label lists the total amount of carbohydrates per serving, including carbs from fiber, sugar, and sugar alcohols. (If you're counting carbs in your diet, be aware that 15 grams of carbohydrates count as one serving.) Sugar alcohols are often used in sugar-free foods, although they still deliver calories and carbs. Sugar alcohols and fiber don't affect blood sugar as much as other carbs, because they're not completely absorbed. If food contains sugar alcohol or 5 or more grams of fiber, you can subtract half of the grams of these ingredients from the number of total carbs. (See more details at the American Diabetes Association and University of California, San Francisco.) How many carbs per day? If you eat 2,000 calories a day, you should consume about 250 grams of complex carbohydrates per day. A good starting place for people with diabetes is to have roughly 45 to 60 grams of carbs per meal and 15 to 30 grams for snacks. While snacks are key for people with diabetes who use insulin or pills that increase insulin production (otherwise, they run the risk of low blood sugar), they aren’t essential for non-insulin users. The goal for anyone with diab Continue reading >>

Carbohydrate Counting & Diabetes

Carbohydrate Counting & Diabetes

What is carbohydrate counting? Carbohydrate counting, also called carb counting, is a meal planning tool for people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Carbohydrate counting involves keeping track of the amount of carbohydrate in the foods you eat each day. Carbohydrates are one of the main nutrients found in food and drinks. Protein and fat are the other main nutrients. Carbohydrates include sugars, starches, and fiber. Carbohydrate counting can help you control your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, levels because carbohydrates affect your blood glucose more than other nutrients. Healthy carbohydrates, such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables, are an important part of a healthy eating plan because they can provide both energy and nutrients, such as vitamins and minerals, and fiber. Fiber can help you prevent constipation, lower your cholesterol levels, and control your weight. Unhealthy carbohydrates are often food and drinks with added sugars. Although unhealthy carbohydrates can also provide energy, they have little to no nutrients. More information about which carbohydrates provide nutrients for good health and which carbohydrates do not is provided in the NIDDK health topic, Diabetes Diet and Eating. The amount of carbohydrate in foods is measured in grams. To count grams of carbohydrate in foods you eat, you’ll need to know which foods contain carbohydrates learn to estimate the number of grams of carbohydrate in the foods you eat add up the number of grams of carbohydrate from each food you eat to get your total for the day Your doctor can refer you to a dietitian or diabetes educator who can help you develop a healthy eating plan based on carbohydrate counting. Which foods contain carbohydrates? Foods that contain carbohydrates include grains, such as b Continue reading >>

Low-carb Diets For People With Diabetes (may 2017)

Low-carb Diets For People With Diabetes (may 2017)

Save for later Diabetes UK has put together this position statement to explain how low-carb diets might be used to help manage diabetes. We used the best level of evidence to inform the recommendations and conclusions. Where available, we used evidence from systematic reviews and meta-analyses, but also included good-quality randomised controlled trials. The current evidence suggest that low-carb diets can be safe and effective for people with Type 2 diabetes. They can help with weight loss and glucose management, and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. So, we can recommend a low-carb diet for some people with Type 2 diabetes. But there is no consistent evidence that a low-carb diet is any more effective than other approaches in the long term, so it shouldn't be seen as the diet for everyone. At the moment, there is no strong evidence to say that a low-carb diet is safe or effective for people with Type 1 diabetes. Because of this, Diabetes UK does not recommend low-carb diets to people with Type 1 diabetes. Evidence for low-carb diets in children reports adverse effects such as poor growth, a greater risk of cardiovascular disease, and psychological problems. So, we don't recommend low-carb diets for children with diabetes. People should be encouraged to eat more vegetables, fruits, wholegrains, pulses, seafood, nuts, and to eat less red meat and processed meat, sugar-sweetened drinks, sugar-sweetened foods, and refined grains such as white bread. Douglas Twenefour, dietitian and Deputy Head of Care at Diabetes UK said: "It is extremely important that dietary recommendations are based on good evidence rather than individual opinions. This position statement has been put together using the best evidence available, taking into consideration anecdotal reports and f Continue reading >>

The Low-carb Diabetes Plan That Works

The Low-carb Diabetes Plan That Works

After hearing for years that a high-carb, low-fat diet is the only real road to weight loss, you might be wondering how a low-carb diabetes diet can help you finally drop the pounds and help you get control of your blood sugar. Let us explain. The high-carb, low-fat idea basically oversimplified how food works once it enters your body. It ignored the fact that not all carbs are good, and glossed over that not all fats are bad. Therefore, we loaded up on all the breads, pastas, and low-fat goodies, never realizing that it was making us fatter. Here's how it really works. All carbs are converted to glucose and raise your blood sugar, but they aren't all converted at the same rate. How fast they are absorbed--and how much--is what affects your weight. There are two general classes of carbs--refined and unrefined. Refined carbs (white breads, white flour, pastas) are essentially refined sugars, meaning once you eat them they are quickly turned into glucose in your system. Unrefined carbs are the kinds found in whole grains, beans, fruits, and many vegetables. The fiber in these foods helps to slow down your body's absorption of carbs, therefore slowing the process of turning carbs into glucose. The problem comes in when you eat too many carbs--especially too many refined carbs. If you eat excessive amounts of quickly absorbed carbs, you create a situation where more glucose becomes available than your body needs. That excess glucose gets turned into fat. What's the problem with eating lots of carbs if you have diabetes? If you eat excessive amounts of quickly absorbed carbs, you upset your body's precise balance of blood sugar. Simply put, eating too many carbohydrate grams may cause a situation where more glucose becomes available to the cells than the body needs. Obviousl Continue reading >>

Carbohydrate Counting

Carbohydrate Counting

Carbohydrate counting is a flexible way to plan your meals. It focuses on foods that contain carbohydrate as these raise your blood glucose (sugar) the most. Follow these steps to count carbohydrates and help manage your blood glucose levels. Your registered dietitian will guide you along the way. Step 1: Make healthy food choices Enjoy a variety of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, low fat milk products, and meat and alternatives at your meals. A variety of foods will help to keep you healthy. Use added fats in small amounts. This helps to control your weight and blood cholesterol. Choose portion sizes to help you to reach or maintain a healthy weight. Step 2: Focus on carbohydrate Your body breaks down carbohydrate into glucose. This raises your blood glucose (sugar) levels. Carbohydrate is found in many foods including grains and starches, fruits, some vegetables, legumes, milk and milk alternatives, sugary foods and many prepared foods. Meat and alternatives, most vegetables and fats contain little carbohydrate. Moderate servings will not have a big effect on blood glucose (sugar) levels. Step 3: Set carbohydrate goals Your dietitian will help you set a goal for grams of carbohydrate at each meal and snack. This may be the same from day to day or may be flexible, depending on your needs. Aim to meet your target within five grams per meal or snack. Step 4: Determine carbohydrate content Write down what you eat and drink throughout the day. Be sure to note the portion sizes. You may need to use measuring cups and food scales to be accurate. Record the grams of carbohydrate in these foods and drinks. For carbohydrate content of foods, check the nutrition label on food packages, food composition books, restaurant fact sheets and websites. Step 5: Monitor effect on blood Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should Your D-kid Eat Each Day?

How Many Carbs Should Your D-kid Eat Each Day?

Please remember that I never give medical advice. Ask your endocrinologist or pediatrician for advice about your own child. Make your own informed decisions for your own child. Dietary Guidelines I’m going to refer to the 2010 Health.gov dietary guidelines. The 2015 guidelines are forthcoming. I’m also going to use my own child’s age and gender when referring to the suggested calories and carbs. The following two tables I’ve taken from “Dietary Guidelines For Americans, 2010” linked to above and will call it “dietary guidelines” here. According to the dietary guidelines, “Carbohydrates provide 4 calories per gram.” For girls aged 9-13 they recommend 1,600-2,000 calories per day if they are moderately active. Of these calories, carbohydrates should make up 45-65% of those calories. Using these numbers, and if I did my math correctly, here are the two extremes and the middle: 1,600 calories x 45% carbohydrates (at 4 calories per carb) = 180 carbs per day 1,800 calories x 55% carbohydrates (at 4 calories per carb) = 247.5 carbs per day 2,000 calories x 65% carbohydrates (at 4 calories per carb) = 325 carbs per day So really, if my child is moderately active and eats between 180 and 325 carbs in a given day, we are within the recommended guidelines. My Thoughts Sometimes when we carb count a meal I’m amazed at how many carbs it is. For instance at Wendy’s if Q is particularly hungry, she might ask for a junior hamburger (25 CHO), small chili (16 CHO), value sized fries (30 CHO) and a junior frosty (32 CHO). And every time I think, wow, that’s a lot of carbs! A hundred and three, to be exact. But what are kids who don’t have type 1 diabetes having at that same meal? They probably aren’t going for the lower carb kid-size frosty! And they are prob Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes – Know Your Carbs

Type 1 Diabetes – Know Your Carbs

It’s been a busy week for 17-year-old Lauren Stanford. She had powder puff practice, a Model United Nations meeting, soccer practice, and a dinner date with her dad. In between all these activities she still managed to go to the gym four times and work a few shifts at her part-time job. On top of all that, Lauren took time each day (as she does every day) to manage the carbohydrates in her diet. This is a major priority for Lauren because, since being diagnosed at age 6, she has been living with type 1 diabetes. Actively involved in JDRF’s Children’s Congress, Lauren is an advocate for diabetes awareness and a strong proponent for diabetes research. Diabetes: Know Your Carbs It’s important for people with type 1 diabetes to know how many carbs they eat. That way they can match their insulin dose with what they eat and ultimately have better control over blood sugar levels. Foods that are highest in carbohydrates are starches, fruits, and dairy, as well as combination-type foods like beans and rice, lasagna, and pizza. Non-starchy vegetables like carrots also contain carbs, but in smaller amounts (5 grams per serving). Each serving of starch, fruit, and milk contain 15 grams of carbs. A serving size can be one slice of bread, a small container of unsweetened yogurt or a 1/2 cup of strawberries. Protein and fat do not contain carbs. Lauren says she often overhears her friends talking about how many carbs are in different foods. “I want to interrupt and say there are way more carbs in them than you think!” she says. Lauren has had plenty of practice reading labels and watching portion sizes. Even though she now uses an insulin pump, which gives her a lot of flexibility with food, carb counting has stuck with her. She’s comfortable calling herself “a label r Continue reading >>

Can You Put A Number On Carbs?

Can You Put A Number On Carbs?

I'd appreciate learning about how many grams of carbohydrate I should eat as a guideline to keep my glucose numbers normal. Continue reading >>

Asknadia: How Many Carbs A Day For Diabetics

Asknadia: How Many Carbs A Day For Diabetics

Dear Nadia, How many carbs should be eaten by a diabetic in one day? Narendra K Dear Narendra: There are no simple answers to your question. It goes without saying that carbohydrates are the one food source that can be the most dangerous to people living with diabetes. How dangerous depends on the type and quantity of carbs you consume. Ironically, people with diabetes have been far ahead of the curve when it comes to questioning the conventional wisdom that focusing on carbs and avoiding fat and protein are the best ways to protect themselves from cardiovascular disease. In hindsight it’s ironic when Americans joined the low fat cult in the 1990’s, the rate of new diabetes cases skyrocketed. Should people with diabetes still consume carbohydrates? Definitely yes. But that “yes” has some important considerations attached to it and needs to be discussed with your healthcare professional. The Number of Grams What range of daily grams of carb consumption is “good” or “bad?” The American Diabetes Association recommends daily consumption of up to 130 to 160 grams of carbs, spread over three or more meals. Dr. Richard K. Bernstein, a type 1 and guru in the diabetes industry, has been able to keep his blood glucose down around 83—the statistical norm for non-diabetic people—by severely restricting his carb consumption. He advises his patients to eat no more than 30 grams of carbohydrates daily. That’s quite a large spread between two well known sources. But given what we now know about carbs, it would appear following Dr. Bernstein’s advice, keeping carb intake as low as possible, 30 grams of carbs per day is difficult for most people. The Types of Carbs Are Important Even before researchers realized that increased carb consumption could be directly lin Continue reading >>

Counting Carbohydrates

Counting Carbohydrates

To best control your blood sugar: Do not skip meals. Counting calories might be something you’ve already done at one time or another in your life. Counting carbohydrates may be something new to you. So why is counting carbohydrates so important when you have diabetes? Counting carbohydrates: Keeps you in control of your blood sugar Keeps you in balance with with your medication or insulin dose Keeps you in control of food portions to manage your body weight How much carbohydrate do I need each day? Carbohydrates are measured in units called grams. Grams are a measure of weight. The total grams or amount of carbohydrate you need each day depends on your calorie goals, activity level and personal preferences. Carbohydrates generally provide 45-65% of your daily calories. For most people with type 1 diabetes, this ranges from 150-250 grams of carbohydrate a day. How you distribute this carbohydrate throughout the day can also make a difference in your blood sugar. To best control your blood sugar: Eat three meals a day, roughly 4-6 hours apart. Do not skip meals. Try to consistently eat the same amount of carbohydrate at each meal. Your registered dietitian can help you choose a carbohydrate goal and daily meal plan that keeps your food, medication and physical activity in mind. How much carbohydrate is found in the foods I eat? There are many resources you can use to count carbohydrates: The American Diabetes Association Exchange Lists for Meal Planning: Choose Your Foods lists grams of carbohydrate per exchange serving size. In this system, one carbohydrate exchange serving equals 15 grams of carbohydrate. Carbohydrate counting and food composition books are available. These resources can also be found online. Some cookbooks are available that provide nutrition informa Continue reading >>

How Many Carbohydrates Should A Person With Diabetes Eat Each Day?

How Many Carbohydrates Should A Person With Diabetes Eat Each Day?

Many diabetics know that carbs are something you shouldn’t eat too much of if you want to keep your blood sugar down. The types of carbohydrate foods you eat each day and how many carbs you eat are vital when managing your blood sugars. The idea is to strike a balance between the insulin levels in the body and the number of carbohydrates you take in. It is understood by nutritionists that your carbohydrate intake strongly affects your blood sugar levels—even more than the amount of protein and fat you consume in your diet. If you eat too many carbs in any given day, your blood sugar levels may be high. In the same way, taking medications to lower the glucose level may cause you to have low blood sugar, also known as hypoglycemia. The actual amount of carbohydrates you need to take in depends on what medications you are taking for the diabetes and is unique to each diabetic. Things like your activity level, how much insulin resistance you have, and the range of blood sugar levels you need play a role in how many carbohydrates you should eat per day. When counting carbs, it is important to learn how many carbs is in each snack or meal you take in so you can count those carbs toward your total. In general, it is recommended that a woman with diabetes, should take in about 45 grams of carbohydrates in each meal, while men can eat 60 grams of carbohydrates in each meal. This is because men tend to be bigger and can have normal blood sugar levels after eating more carbs when compared to women. Carbohydrate intake should be spread throughout the day so that there are no spikes in blood sugar when you eat a high carbohydrate meal or snack. In order to know if eating 45 grams of carbohydrate in your meal or snack is appropriate, you need to eat a meal that contains 45 grams Continue reading >>

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