diabetestalk.net

How Many Calories Should A Pregnant Woman With Gestational Diabetes Consume

What Is The Best Diet For Gestational Diabetes?

What Is The Best Diet For Gestational Diabetes?

Gestational diabetes can cause a range of complications during pregnancy. Fortunately, a woman can help reduce complications by following a healthful diet. What foods should women eat and what foods should they avoid if they have gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes occurs if a woman's body cannot produce enough insulin, during her pregnancy. This deficiency leads to high blood sugar. High blood sugar levels may cause problems for the woman and her baby if not managed properly. This article explains what type of diet a woman should follow during pregnancy if she has gestational diabetes. It also considers other treatment options for gestational diabetes and what complications may occur if the condition is not properly managed. Contents of this article: Understanding gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that can develop during pregnancy. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), between 2 and 10 percent of pregnancies are affected by gestational diabetes each year in the United States. This type of diabetes occurs when a woman's body cannot make enough of the hormone insulin. Insulin is made by the pancreas and helps the body's cells to use sugar from the blood as energy. When a woman is pregnant, her body will produce more hormones, and she may put on weight. Both of these changes may mean that her body's cells may not use insulin as well as they used to. This is called insulin resistance. Becoming resistant to insulin means that the body needs more of it in order to use up the sugar in the blood. Sometimes a woman's body cannot produce enough insulin to keep up. This leads to a sugar buildup in the blood, resulting in high blood sugar levels. Symptoms of gestational diabetes may include: being unusually thirsty Continue reading >>

What Type Of Pregnancy Diet Should I Follow If I Have Gestational Diabetes?

What Type Of Pregnancy Diet Should I Follow If I Have Gestational Diabetes?

Good nutrition is especially important during pregnancy if you've developed gestational diabetes. Diabetes develops when your body can't efficiently produce or use insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas that allows cells to turn sugar in your blood (glucose) into usable fuel. When large amounts of glucose accumulate in your blood, it means that your cells aren't getting the fuel they need. High blood sugar can be harmful for you and your developing baby, so it's important to try to control it. One way to keep your blood sugar levels under control is to follow a specific meal plan. I strongly recommend seeing a registered dietitian who can create a diet particularly suited to you, based on your weight, height, physical activity, and the needs of your growing baby, as well as your level of glucose intolerance. She'll also take into account your personal food preferences. (Note: If dietary changes aren't sufficient to keep your blood sugar in a healthy range, you'll need to take insulin as well. If your practitioner prescribes insulin injections, you'll need to meet again with your dietitian to reassess your diet.) A dietitian starts by determining how many calories you need each day. Then she teaches you how to determine portion sizes and how to balance your meals with just the right amounts of protein, carbohydrates, and fat. She also assesses your current eating habits to make sure you're getting enough vitamins and minerals. Here are some general dietary guidelines: Eat a variety of foods, distributing calories and carbohydrates evenly throughout the day. Make sure both your meals and your snacks are balanced. The American Diabetes Association recommends that you eat three small-to-moderate-size meals and two to four snacks every day, including an after-dinner snack. Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes And Nutrition

Gestational Diabetes And Nutrition

What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is a kind of diabetes some women get during pregnancy. (Say: jess-tay-shun-al die-ah-bee-tees) If you have gestational diabetes, your body cannot use glucose (blood sugar) the way it should. Too much sugar stays in your blood. If you have gestational diabetes, you might be able to control your blood sugar levels with exercise and a healthy diet. Or, you might need insulin shots to keep your blood sugar at the right level. How does gestational diabetes affect my baby and me? Most women with gestational diabetes deliver healthy babies. Problems may develop if you have gestational diabetes that is not treated. Gestational diabetes can cause you to have a large baby. Giving birth to a large baby may hurt you or the baby. You may need a cesarean section (a surgical delivery) if your baby is too large to be born naturally. Gestational diabetes also can affect babies after they are born. Some of these babies have low blood sugar levels or jaundice (yellow-colored skin). These problems are treated in the hospital. A baby with a low blood sugar level is given sugar water. A baby with jaundice spends time under a special light. After delivery, you probably will not remain diabetic. However, you will be at higher risk for getting diabetes later in life. Why is it important to follow a special diet during pregnancy? A healthy diet can help protect you and your baby from gestational diabetes. For a pregnant woman, a normal diet consists of 2,200 to 2,500 calories per day. If you are overweight before you get pregnant, you will need fewer calories than other women. It is important to pay attention to what you eat and when you eat. What foods should I eat? Read package labels. Packaged foods are labeled to describe how much of certain Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Nutrition

Gestational Diabetes Nutrition

Eating a balanced diet is an important part of any pregnancy. The food you eat helps your baby grow and develop while in the womb. Diet is even more important if you have diabetes. Most of the time, eating properly can keep your blood sugar (glucose) levels from becoming too high or too low. Eating properly can also help you avoid needing medications for your diabetes. You can help manage gestational diabetes with diet and exercise. Every pregnancy is different. Your doctor and dietitian will create a diet just for you, based on: Your weight (pregnant women who are obese may need a diet with fewer calories that other pregnant women) How fast and how large your baby is growing Remember that eating for two does not mean eating twice as many calories. You usually need just 300 extra calories a day (such as a glass of milk, a banana, and 10 crackers). The best way to improve your diet is by eating a variety of healthy foods. You should learn how to read food labels, and consult them when making food decisions. Talk to your doctor or dietitian if you are a vegetarian or on some other special diet. In general, your diet should be moderate in fat and protein and provide controlled levels of carbohydrates through foods including fruits, vegetables, and complex carbohydrates (such as bread, cereal, pasta, and rice). You will also be asked to cut back on foods that have a lot of sugar, such as soft drinks, fruit juices, and pastries. You will be asked to eat three small- to moderate- sized meals and one or more snacks each day. Do not skip meals and snacks. Keep the amount and types of food (carbohydrates, fats, and proteins) the same from day to day. Carbohydrates should make up less than half of the calories you eat. Most carbohydrates are found in starchy or sugary foods, suc Continue reading >>

Eating For Two With Gestational Diabetes - Calorie Control Council

Eating For Two With Gestational Diabetes - Calorie Control Council

Pregnancy can bring joy and happiness as mom welcomes a new baby into the world. For some women, though, pregnancy can also bring on gestational diabetes . Diabetes is a serious disease in which your body cannot properly control the amount of sugar, known as glucose, in your blood. (If you have diabetes and plan to become pregnant it is important to discuss any concerns and dietary habits with a healthcare professional.) With gestational diabetes,the potential complications and risks for the mother and baby can be serious, which is why doctors test blood glucose several times throughout a womans pregnancy. Being diagnosed with diabetes during pregnancy may seem daunting but its important to work with a healthcare team to develop a plan to control blood glucose. This often requires lifestyle changes including diet modifications, managing your weight gain, being physically active, and in some cases, medications. (In many cases,gestational diabetes goes away after you give birth.) A mothers diet is very important during pregnancy since it not only affects the mother but the developing baby as well. Cravings and various food aversions are normal during pregnancy so discuss them with a registered dietitian or another member of your healthcare team so they can help develop a plan that not only meets your nutritional needs but is also appealing. (If your diet is full of foods you dont enjoy or like, you are not likely to stick to it.) Its important to remember that moms need to eat enough calories and nutrients for both the moms and the babys health, which may leave less room for treats. Regardless of whether a food is perceived as healthy (such as fruits and vegetables) or indulgent (such as desserts) many foods affect blood glucose. Your healthcare provider can assist you i Continue reading >>

Eating Right During Pregnancy

Eating Right During Pregnancy

The amount of healthy weight gain in pregnancy varies. These are general guidelines: Normal total weight gain for a healthy woman is 25 to 35 pounds (11 to 16 kg). Overweight women should gain only 10 to 20 pounds (4 to 9 kg) during pregnancy. Underweight women or women with multiples (twins or more) should gain 35 to 45 pounds (16 to 20 kg) in pregnancy. Ask your health care provider how much weight you should gain. Eating for two does not mean eating twice as much food. Pregnant women need about 300 extra calories a day. But, where these calories come from matters. If you eat sweets or junk food, the extra calories do not provide the nutrients your baby needs. As a result, your growing baby will get the vitamins and minerals it needs from your own body. Your health could suffer. Instead of junk food, choose foods that are: Low in sugar (sugar provides only empty calories) or refined carbohydrates high in fiber Iron, for the baby's blood supply. It also prevents anemia in the mother. Folic acid, for reducing the risk for spina bifida (incomplete closing of the spinal column), anencephaly (defect of the brain), and other birth defects. Eating a well-rounded diet with all of the right nutrients and getting at least 30 minutes of exercise per day is important for a healthy pregnancy. For most normal-weight pregnant women, the right amount of calories is: About 1,800 calories per day during the first trimester About 2,200 calories per day during the second trimester About 2,400 calories per day during the third trimester These foods give you carbohydrates. They turn into energy for your body and for your baby's growth. Whole-grain and fortified products have folic acid and iron. Vegetables are a good source of vitamins A and C, folic acid, iron, and magnesium. Try to get Continue reading >>

Nutritional Management Of Gestational Diabetes And Nutritional Management Of Womenwith A History Of Gestational Diabetes: Two Different Therapies Or The Same?

Nutritional Management Of Gestational Diabetes And Nutritional Management Of Womenwith A History Of Gestational Diabetes: Two Different Therapies Or The Same?

Nutritional Management of Gestational Diabetes and Nutritional Management of Women With a History of Gestational Diabetes: Two Different Therapies or the Same? Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as carbohydrate intolerance of varying degrees of severity with onset or first recognition during pregnancy. This definition applies regardless of whether insulin is used for treatment or the condition persists after pregnancy. It does not exclude the possibility that unrecognized glucose intolerance may have antedated the pregnancy.1 GDM is the most common medical complication of pregnancy,2 occurring in 4% of all pregnancies in the United States (all ethnicities),3 or approximately 100,000 pregnant women annually. In addition, it is increasing in prevalence globally.3 The incidence of this metabolic complication of pregnancy will also notably increase if the new diagnostic criteria extrapolated from the O'Sullivan and Mahan data by Carpenter and Coustan as suggested by the 4th International Workshop-Conference on GDM are accepted and widely used.4 The new diagnostic criteria are suggested in part because of the thought that intervention at a lower level of blood glucose will help prevent the major complication of GDM, macrosomia of the infant. Currently, the American Diabetes Association is sponsoring the writing of a technical paper that will assess the scientific evidence on which the proposal to change the new diagnostic standard is based. This technical paper should be finished this fall, and its conclusions are anticipated to be included as a Clinical Practice Recommendation at the earliest in the spring of 2000. (personal communication, Gwen Twillman, Manager of Clinical Affairs, American Diabetes Association). Although there is still considerable controvers Continue reading >>

Basic Meal Planning

Basic Meal Planning

Meal plan You need to eat and drink at least 12 carbohydrate choices each day. Most women need 14 carbohydrate choices each day to maintain the desired weight gain of one-half pound each week. If you follow a vegetarian diet, you need 15 to 16 carbohydrate choices each day to get enough nutrients. At breakfast, include: 2 to 3 carbohydrate choices (30 to 45 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely At lunch, include: 3 to 4 carbohydrate choices (45 to 60 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely At dinner, include: 3 to 4 carbohydrate choices (45 to 60 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely For a morning snack, include: 1 to 2 carbohydrate choices (15 to 30 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely For an afternoon snack, include: 1 to 2 carbohydrate choices (15 to 30 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely For an evening snack, include: 1 to 2 carbohydrate choices (15 to 30 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely Breakfast tips Blood glucose is hard to control in the morning when the hormones that boost your blood glucose levels are released. To help, follow these breakfast tips: Eat a small breakfast. Eat whole-grain bread products. Eat a food that has protein. Do not eat cereal or fruit. Do not drink fruit juice at breakfast or any other time of the day. Fruit juice raises your blood glucose very quickly. Completing a meal plan Vegetables Most vegetables do not raise blood glucose. Vegetables supply many nutrients for both you and your baby. Try to eat at least four servi Continue reading >>

How To Safely Gain Weight With Gestational Diabetes

How To Safely Gain Weight With Gestational Diabetes

1 Consume a recommended number of calories per day. When pregnant, women who were of a normal pre-pregnancy weight should consume 30 Calories/kilogram/day, based on their current pregnant weight. Women who were obese prior to becoming pregnant can reduce this number by up to 33%. These women should consume about 25 Calories/kilogram/day based on their current pregnant weight.[3] Remember – these are simply guidelines. A detailed discussion with your healthcare provider is important to arrive at a caloric recommendation that is right for you. Purchase a food scale to measure your food. This will help you to know what one serving is. By reading food labels, you can estimate the calories and macronutrient content contained in each portion of food. Monitor your caloric intake by keeping a food diary. A food diary can be kept by hand in a small notebook. Write down what you eat then look up the calories either on the internet or in a calorie reference guide. There are also smartphone apps available that make calorie tracking easy, such as www.myfitnesspal.com. Combine the food diary with weighing yourself on a regular basis to determine if you are gaining or losing weight. If you are not gaining enough weight, try increasing your daily calories by 200-500 calories per day. Continue to track your weight to see if this gets you back on the right track. 2 Track your carbohydrate intake. Carbohydrates are one of three macronutrients we must consume. The other two are protein and fat. There are three main kinds of carbohydrates – sugars, starches, and fiber. Sugars are the simplest type of carbohydrate. Sugars include fructose, glucose, and sucrose, and some other molecules. Starches are also known as complex carbohydrates, and are made up of many sugars linked together in a Continue reading >>

I've Just Been Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes – What Can I Eat?

I've Just Been Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes – What Can I Eat?

From the moment you are diagnosed with gestational diabetes you are likely to be faced with what seems like an endless list of new tasks: more clinic appointments, more blood tests, taking medications, being more active and eating a healthy, balanced diet. No wonder it can all seem so daunting and overwhelming. One of your first questions is likely to be, “what can I eat?” But, with so much to take in, you could still come away from appointments feeling unsure about the answer. And then, there are lots of myths about diabetes and food that you will need to navigate, too. If you’ve just been diagnosed and aren’t sure about what you can and can’t eat, here’s what you need to know. This may come as a surprise, but you don’t have to go on a special diet when have gestational diabetes. Depending on your current diet, you may have to eat less of some foods and more of others. In the past, people were sent away after their diagnosis with a list of foods they weren't allowed to eat, or often told to simply cut out sugar. Nowadays, you may need to make some changes to your diet, but it’s not a case of cutting things out. Rather, you’ll need to follow the same healthy, balanced diet that’s recommended to everyone. The main aim for managing gestational diabetes is ensuring that your blood glucose levels are under control, so your healthcare team will discuss targets that are right for you. Achieving the targets will increase your chances of having a healthy pregnancy and your food choices play a vital role in this. It is important to enjoy your meals while making changes to your food choices that are realistic and achievable. This will help control your blood glucose levels, and help prevent excessive weight gain during your pregnancy. All carbohydrates will ha Continue reading >>

Diet For Gestational Diabetes

Diet For Gestational Diabetes

I have gestational diabetes. Do I have to watch what I eat? Yes. Eating well helps all women stay healthy during pregnancy. But if you have gestational diabetes, choosing the right food to eat is even more important. That's because many women with gestational diabetes can manage their condition by following a healthy eating plan, monitoring their blood sugar, and exercising regularly. Keeping your blood sugar stable by eating healthy food and exercising makes it less likely that you'll need medication to control your condition. You and your baby are also less likely to have any complications from your condition. Watching what you eat also helps you gain a healthy amount of weight during pregnancy. If you were overweight before becoming pregnant, your healthcare provider may recommend limiting calories so you don't gain too much as your baby grows. Do I need to monitor carbohydrates? Yes. The amount and type of carbohydrates (natural starches and sugars) in food affects your blood sugar levels. And with gestational diabetes, you'll need to track your carbohydrate intake in particular. Setting a limit on the amount of carbohydrates you eat at each meal is the first step to managing your blood sugar. Your provider is likely to recommend reducing the total amount of carbohydrates to about 40 percent of your daily calories. Try to eat carbohydrates that are high in fiber. Fibrous foods are harder to digest. Whole grains are high in fiber, so choosing brown rice and whole grain bread instead of refined versions (white bread and rice) means that they take longer to digest and release sugar more slowly into your bloodstream. Vegetables, beans, lentils, and chickpeas are also high in fiber and release sugar into your blood slowly. Avoid food and drinks that are high in added sug Continue reading >>

Meal Planning For Pregnant Women With Diabetes

Meal Planning For Pregnant Women With Diabetes

Your meal plan for diabetes needs to be modified when you are pregnant. The total calories you need are based on your prepregnancy weight, age, activity level, and whether you are carrying more than one baby. Dieting to lose weight during pregnancy is not recommended, because you may not receive enough nourishment for you and your baby, and it may increase your risk for premature delivery. Follow these guidelines for your meal plan during pregnancy. Carbohydrate Inadequate carbohydrate intake can result in low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) for women taking insulin and in ketone production for women who have gestational diabetes. Excessive carbohydrate intake can result in elevated blood sugar levels. Make sure your meal plan contains: Complex carbohydrate, especially foods high in fiber, such as oatmeal, brown rice, bran cereal, whole wheat bread, whole wheat pasta, and beans. Fresh fruits. Milk. Fresh or frozen vegetables. Limit these carbohydrate foods in your diet: Refined sugar and foods with a high content of refined sugars (sweets) Refined starches, such as highly processed breakfast cereals, instant potatoes, instant rice, or instant noodles Fruit juice Protein If your kidney function is impaired, your protein allowance may be lowered. Fat Monounsaturated fats and omega-3 fats, rather than saturated fats, should continue to be the primary source of fat in your diet. Fiber Get enough fiber each day. Fiber can help stabilize your blood sugar levels and relieve constipation, which is common during pregnancy. Most people get far more sodium than they need. Talk to your doctor about how much sodium you should eat. Vitamins and minerals Take a prenatal vitamin with folic acid and iron to meet your body's increased need for these micronutrients. Folic acid is needed for th Continue reading >>

Dietary Recommendations For Gestational Diabetes

Dietary Recommendations For Gestational Diabetes

Diabetes diagnosed during pregnancy is called gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs in about 7 percent of all pregnancies. It usually arises in the second half of pregnancy and goes away as soon as the baby is born. However, if gestational diabetes is not treated, you may experience complications. The first step in treating gestational diabetes is to modify your diet to help keep your blood sugar level in the normal range, while still eating a healthy diet. Most women with well-controlled blood sugar deliver healthy babies without any complications. One way of keeping your blood sugar levels in normal range is by monitoring the amount of carbohydrates in your diet. Carbohydrate foods digest and turn into blood glucose (a type of sugar). Glucose in the blood is necessary because it is the fuel for your body and nourishment your baby receives from you. However, it's important that glucose levels stay within target. Carbohydrates in Food Carbohydrates are found in the following foods: Milk and yogurt Fruits and juices Rice, grains, cereals and pasta Breads, tortillas, crackers, bagels and rolls Dried beans, split peas and lentils Potatoes, corn, yams, peas and winter squash Sweets and desserts, such as sugar, honey, syrups, pastries, cookies, soda and candy also typically have large amounts of carbohydrate. Carbohydrates in foods are measured in units called grams. You can count how many carbohydrates are in foods by reading food labels and learning the exchange lists. The two most important pieces of information on food labels for a carbohydrate-controlled diet is the serving size and grams of total carbohydrate in each serving. Dietary Recommendations It is important to be meet with a registered dietitian to have your diet assessed. The dietitian will calcula Continue reading >>

2,200 Calorie Meal Plan For Diabetic Pregnant Women

2,200 Calorie Meal Plan For Diabetic Pregnant Women

Eating small meals and snacks throughout the day helps keep blood sugar under control.Photo Credit: photodeti/iStock/Getty Images 2,200 Calorie Meal Plan for Diabetic Pregnant Women Jill Corleone is a registered dietitian and health coach who has been writing and lecturing on diet and health for more than 15 years. Her work has been featured on the Huffington Post, Diabetes Self-Management and in the book "Noninvasive Mechanical Ventilation," edited by John R. Bach, M.D. Corleone holds a Bachelor of Science in nutrition. If you have diabetes, you already know the important role that diet plays in helping you control your blood sugar. Although you may need to eat more calories and protein when you're pregnant, as a diabetic you still need to pay close attention to your diet to keep blood sugar under control. Uncontrolled blood sugars not only affect your health but the baby's as well. Your doctor can help you determine your specific calorie needs, but a 2,200-calorie diet is a good place to start. Eat on a set schedule.Photo Credit: michaeljung/iStock/Getty Images You need to eat a set schedule of three meals and three snacks each day on your 2,200-calorie diabetic pregnancy meal plan, says Ohio State's Wexner Medical Center. Eating small, frequent meals at regular intervals helps control blood sugar and ensures you get all the nutrients you and your baby need for a healthy pregnancy. Each meal and snack should contain a set amount of carbohydrates and protein. Carbohydrates in food affect blood sugar, so eating a set amount at each meal and snack is essential for blood sugar control. Learn about healthy food choices.Photo Credit: IPGGutenbergUKLtd/iStock/Getty Images Before you start meal planning, learn about which foods choices are healthiest for you. Carbohydrate ch Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Diet

Gestational Diabetes Diet

Gestational diabetes, which causes higher-than-normal blood sugar levels to be present, occurs during pregnancy. Gestational diabetes testing usually occurs between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. If you have risk factors for diabetes, your doctor may recommend testing earlier in the pregnancy. If you receive a gestational diabetes diagnosis, you’ll need testing 6 to 12 weeks after giving birth to see whether the diabetes is still present. Gestational diabetes usually resolves after you deliver, although you’re at higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes later in life. According to Johns Hopkins Medicine, gestational diabetes affects 3 to 8 percent of pregnant women in the United States. Gestational diabetes increases the risk of having a large baby, which may cause problems with delivery. It also increases the risk of having a baby born with hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Respiratory distress, jaundice, and low calcium and magnesium levels are also more common in babies whose mothers have gestational diabetes. There’s a higher risk of your baby developing diabetes later in life as well. Changing your diet is generally the first method of treatment for gestational diabetes. The amount of calories you should consume each day depends on a number of factors, such as your weight and activity level. Pregnant women should generally increase their calorie consumption by 300 calories per day from their prepregnancy diet. Doctors recommend three meals and two to three snacks per day. Eating smaller meals more frequently can help you keep your blood sugar levels stable. Your doctor will likely recommend that you monitor your blood sugar levels to help manage gestational diabetes. Testing your blood sugar after meals tells you how that meal affected your blood sugar. Your d Continue reading >>

More in diabetes