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How Many Calories Should A Diabetic Woman Eat?

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

The mainstays of diabetes treatment are: Working towards obtaining ideal body weight Following a diabetic diet Regular exercise Diabetic medication if needed Note: Type 1 diabetes must be treated with insulin; if you have type 2 diabetes, you may not need to take insulin. This involves injecting insulin under the skin for it to work. Insulin cannot be taken as a pill because the digestive juices in the stomach would destroy the insulin before it could work. Scientists are looking for new ways to give insulin. But today, shots are the only method. There are, however, new methods to give the shots. Insulin pumps are now being widely used and many people are having great results. In this Article Working towards obtaining ideal body weight An estimate of ideal body weight can be calculated using this formula: For women: Start with 100 pounds for 5 feet tall. Add 5 pounds for every inch over 5 feet. If you are under 5 feet, subtract 5 pounds for each inch under 5 feet. This will give you your ideal weight. If you have a large frame, add 10%. If you have a small frame, subtract 10%. A good way to decide your frame size is to look at your wrist size compared to other women's. Example: A woman who is 5' 4" tall and has a large frame 100 pounds + 20 pounds (4 inches times 5 pounds per inch) = 120 pounds. Add 10% for large frame (in this case 10% of 120 pounds is 12 pounds). 120 pounds + 12 pounds = 132 pounds ideal body weight. For men: Start with 106 pounds for a height of 5 foot. Add 6 pounds for every inch above 5 foot. For a large frame, add 10%. For a small frame, subtract 10%. (See above for further details.) Learn More about Treating Type 2 Diabetes The Diabetic Diet Diet is very important in diabetes. There are differing philosophies on what is the best diet but below is Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should A Diabetic Eat?

How Many Carbs Should A Diabetic Eat?

Figuring out how many carbs to eat when you have diabetes can seem confusing. Meal plans created by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) provide about 45% of calories from carbs. This includes 45–60 grams per meal and 10–25 grams per snack, totaling about 135–230 grams of carbs per day. However, a growing number of experts believe people with diabetes should be eating far fewer carbs than this. In fact, many recommend fewer carbs per day than what the ADA allows per meal. This article takes a look at the research supporting low-carb diets for diabetics and provides guidance for determining optimal carb intake. Glucose, or blood sugar, is the main source of fuel for your body's cells. In people with diabetes, the body's ability to process and use blood sugar is impaired. Although there are several types of diabetes, the two most common forms are type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 Diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is unable to produce insulin, a hormone that allows sugar from the bloodstream to enter the body's cells. Instead, insulin must be injected to ensure that sugar enters cells. Type 1 diabetes develops because of an autoimmune process in which the body attacks its own insulin-producing cells, which are called beta cells. This disease is usually diagnosed in children, but it can start at any age, even in late adulthood (1). Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is more common, accounting for about 90% of people with diabetes. Like type 1 diabetes, it can develop in both adults and children. However, it isn't as common in children and typically occurs in people who are overweight or obese. In this form of the disease, either the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or the body's cells are resistant to insulin's effects. Therefore, too much sugar stays Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes And Nutrition

Gestational Diabetes And Nutrition

What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is a kind of diabetes some women get during pregnancy. (Say: jess-tay-shun-al die-ah-bee-tees) If you have gestational diabetes, your body cannot use glucose (blood sugar) the way it should. Too much sugar stays in your blood. If you have gestational diabetes, you might be able to control your blood sugar levels with exercise and a healthy diet. Or, you might need insulin shots to keep your blood sugar at the right level. How does gestational diabetes affect my baby and me? Most women with gestational diabetes deliver healthy babies. Problems may develop if you have gestational diabetes that is not treated. Gestational diabetes can cause you to have a large baby. Giving birth to a large baby may hurt you or the baby. You may need a cesarean section (a surgical delivery) if your baby is too large to be born naturally. Gestational diabetes also can affect babies after they are born. Some of these babies have low blood sugar levels or jaundice (yellow-colored skin). These problems are treated in the hospital. A baby with a low blood sugar level is given sugar water. A baby with jaundice spends time under a special light. After delivery, you probably will not remain diabetic. However, you will be at higher risk for getting diabetes later in life. Why is it important to follow a special diet during pregnancy? A healthy diet can help protect you and your baby from gestational diabetes. For a pregnant woman, a normal diet consists of 2,200 to 2,500 calories per day. If you are overweight before you get pregnant, you will need fewer calories than other women. It is important to pay attention to what you eat and when you eat. What foods should I eat? Read package labels. Packaged foods are labeled to describe how much of certain Continue reading >>

Carbohydrate Counting & Diabetes

Carbohydrate Counting & Diabetes

What is carbohydrate counting? Carbohydrate counting, also called carb counting, is a meal planning tool for people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Carbohydrate counting involves keeping track of the amount of carbohydrate in the foods you eat each day. Carbohydrates are one of the main nutrients found in food and drinks. Protein and fat are the other main nutrients. Carbohydrates include sugars, starches, and fiber. Carbohydrate counting can help you control your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, levels because carbohydrates affect your blood glucose more than other nutrients. Healthy carbohydrates, such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables, are an important part of a healthy eating plan because they can provide both energy and nutrients, such as vitamins and minerals, and fiber. Fiber can help you prevent constipation, lower your cholesterol levels, and control your weight. Unhealthy carbohydrates are often food and drinks with added sugars. Although unhealthy carbohydrates can also provide energy, they have little to no nutrients. More information about which carbohydrates provide nutrients for good health and which carbohydrates do not is provided in the NIDDK health topic, Diabetes Diet and Eating. The amount of carbohydrate in foods is measured in grams. To count grams of carbohydrate in foods you eat, you’ll need to know which foods contain carbohydrates learn to estimate the number of grams of carbohydrate in the foods you eat add up the number of grams of carbohydrate from each food you eat to get your total for the day Your doctor can refer you to a dietitian or diabetes educator who can help you develop a healthy eating plan based on carbohydrate counting. Which foods contain carbohydrates? Foods that contain carbohydrates include grains, such as b Continue reading >>

How To Count Carbs In 10 Common Foods

How To Count Carbs In 10 Common Foods

What are carbohydrates? Carbohydrates are sugar-based molecules found in many foods, from cookies to cantaloupes. If you have diabetes, planning your carb intake—and sticking to the plan—is critical to keep blood sugar on an even keel and to cut your risk of diabetes-related problems like heart disease and stroke. Whether or not you have diabetes, you should aim to get about half your calories from complex carbohydrates (which are high in fiber), 20-25% from protein, and no more than 30% from fat, says Lalita Kaul, PhD, RD, a spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association. How to read a food label The Nutrition Facts label lists the total amount of carbohydrates per serving, including carbs from fiber, sugar, and sugar alcohols. (If you're counting carbs in your diet, be aware that 15 grams of carbohydrates count as one serving.) Sugar alcohols are often used in sugar-free foods, although they still deliver calories and carbs. Sugar alcohols and fiber don't affect blood sugar as much as other carbs, because they're not completely absorbed. If food contains sugar alcohol or 5 or more grams of fiber, you can subtract half of the grams of these ingredients from the number of total carbs. (See more details at the American Diabetes Association and University of California, San Francisco.) How many carbs per day? If you eat 2,000 calories a day, you should consume about 250 grams of complex carbohydrates per day. A good starting place for people with diabetes is to have roughly 45 to 60 grams of carbs per meal and 15 to 30 grams for snacks. While snacks are key for people with diabetes who use insulin or pills that increase insulin production (otherwise, they run the risk of low blood sugar), they aren’t essential for non-insulin users. The goal for anyone with diab Continue reading >>

How Many Calories Should You Eat A Day?

How Many Calories Should You Eat A Day?

Research shows that the total calories you eat, whether too many or just right, has the biggest effect on your body weight compared with increasing or decreasing carbs, protein, or fat. So how many calories should you eat each day? While the answer is different for everyone, this guide will provide a helpful starting point. Research shows that the total calories you eat, whether too many or just right, has the biggest effect on your body weight compared with increasing or decreasing carbs, protein, or fat. So how many calories should you eat each day? While the answer is different for everyone, this guide will provide a helpful starting point. Research shows that the total calories you eat, whether too many or just right, has the biggest effect on your body weight compared with increasing or decreasing carbs, protein, or fat. So how many calories should you eat each day? While the answer is different for everyone, this guide will provide a helpful starting point. Research shows that the total calories you eat, whether too many or just right, has the biggest effect on your body weight compared with increasing or decreasing carbs, protein, or fat. So how many calories should you eat each day? While the answer is different for everyone, this guide will provide a helpful starting point. Continue reading >>

3-day Diabetes Meal Plan: 1,500 Calories

3-day Diabetes Meal Plan: 1,500 Calories

Healthy eating is the cornerstone of managing diabetes, yet it can be a challenge figuring out what to eat to balance your blood sugar. Here we've created a delicious 3-day meal plan that makes it easier to follow a diabetes diet. In this plan you'll find a mix of nutritious foods including fiber-rich complex carbohydrates, like whole grains and fresh fruits and vegetables, lean protein sources, healthy fats and dairy. This plan limits the amount of foods with refined carbohydrates (think white bread, white rice and sugar), added sugars and saturated fats, which can negatively impact your health if you eat too much. The carbohydrates are balanced throughout the day with each meal containing around 3 carb servings (45 grams of carbohydrates) and each snack containing around 1-2 carb servings (15-30 grams grams of carbohydrates). The calorie and carbohydrate totals are listed next to each meal and snack so you can swap foods with similar nutrition in and out as you like. Eating with diabetes doesn't need to be restrictive or complicated. Incorporating a variety of foods, as we do in this meal plan, is a healthy and sustainable approach to managing diabetes. Not sure if this is the right plan for you? Calculate your calorie level and find the diet meal plan that will work best for you. Day 1: Meal Prep Tip: Cook or set aside an extra 2/3 cup of black beans tonight at dinner to have for lunch on Day 2. Be sure to rinse canned beans to get rid of excess salt. Breakfast (344 calories, 39 grams carbohydrates) • 1 1/4 cup nonfat plain Greek yogurt • 3/4 cup blueberries • 1 1/2 Tbsp. chopped walnuts • 2 tsp. honey Top yogurt with blueberries, walnuts and honey. Note: We use a small amount of added sweetener, in this case honey, in plain yogurt. People with diabetes can s Continue reading >>

How Many Calories Should A Diabetic Eat Daily?

How Many Calories Should A Diabetic Eat Daily?

Diabetics must monitor their diets carefully to keep blood-sugar levels under control and prevent complications. As with healthy adults, a diabetic's caloric needs depend on gender, weight and physical activity level. If you have diabetes, discuss your calorie and nutrition requirements with your doctor or dietitian. Video of the Day 1,200 to 1,600 Calories The National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse recommends a 1,200- to 1,600-calorie diet for small women who exercise, small and medium-sized women who want to lose weight and medium-sized women who are relatively inactive. This diet should include six servings of starches, two servings of milk and other dairy products, three servings of vegetables, 4 to 6 oz. of meat or meat substitutes, two servings of fruit and up to three servings of fats. 1,600 to 2,000 Calories The diabetes clearinghouse recommends a 1,600- to 2,000-calorie diet for the following: large women who want to lose weight, small men who don't need to lose weight, medium-sized men who are relatively inactive and medium-sized and large men who want to lose weight. This diet should include eight servings of starches, two servings of milk and dairy products, four servings of vegetables, three servings of fruit, 4 to 6 oz. of meat or meat substitutes and up to four servings of fats. 2,000 to 2,400 Calories The diabetes clearinghouse advises a 2,000- to 2,400-calorie diet for medium-sized and large adults who are physically active and large men who don't need to lose weight. This diet should include 10 servings of starches, two servings of milk and dairy products, four servings of vegetables, four servings of fruit, 5 to 7 oz. of meat or meat substitutes and up to five servings of fats. Diabetes exchange lists provide specific serving-size information so Continue reading >>

How Many Calories Per Day I Need To Control Diabetes

How Many Calories Per Day I Need To Control Diabetes

When we talk about how to control diabetes, your weight plays an important role to achieve it. Losing only 10 to 15% of your weight can significantly help you manage your diabetes effectively. And when you want to lose weight, understanding your “calories per day” requirement and following a diet & exercise plan based on it, is the best way to do it. Generally people see calories as a factor in losing weight but know only this much to say, “Eat less calories than you need, to lose weight”. But what that common advice doesn’t tell you is “How many calories per day do you actually need to be perfectly healthy and still lose the weight?” How many calories per day you need depends on various factors such as age, height, weight, sex, size, activity level and health conditions such as pregnancy. A 30 year old 6 foot male who have moderate level of physical activity requires more calories per day than a 5.5 foot, 60 year old lady who has a very little physical activity. According to U.S. Department of Health, an average built adult male requires around 2700 calories per day to maintain his health and weight and on the other hand an average built adult female requires only 2200 calories per day. How many calories per day we eat and burn is directly related to our health and weight. Let’s explore more about calories in depth to understand it better. What are Calories? Calories are basically units of energy. And here we are specifically talking about food calories in nutrition context. The energy we get from foods and burn doing regular body functions and physical activities. You can understand calories with a simple example as in “Battery Charge/Power” which you charge and when used it gets discharged. So, it’s a continuous cycle of eating and burning the c Continue reading >>

How Low Is Low Carb?

How Low Is Low Carb?

Many agree: People with diabetes should eat a low-carb diet. Last week we looked at what “carbs” are. But what is meant by “low?” How much carbohydrate should you eat? The Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010, (PDF) recommend that healthy people get 50–65% of their calories from carbohydrates. A study posted on the American Diabetes Association (ADA) Web site agrees. For a woman eating a below-average 2,000 calories a day, 50–65% would be 250–325 grams of carb a day. The Dietary Guidelines call for “a balanced diet that includes six one-ounce (28.3 g) servings of grain foods each day.” This would mean 170 grams of carbohydrate from grains alone each day. And the average American diet includes many other carb sources. Most men eat closer to 3,000 calories a day, so their numbers would be higher. Sixty percent of 3,000 would be 1,800 calories, equivalent to 450 grams of carbohydrate each day. Anything less than the recommended range is sometimes considered “low-carb.” Most popular low-carb diets, like Atkins, South Beach, Zone, and Protein Power, are much lower, from 45% of calories down to 5%. Many diabetes experts recommend somewhat lower carb intakes than ADA does. On our site, dietitian Jacquie Craig wrote, “Most people need between 30–75 grams of carbohydrate per meal and 15–30 grams for snacks.” So that sounds like between 120 and 300 grams a day. Dr. Richard Bernstein, an MD with Type 1 diabetes and a long-time advocate of the low-carb approach to diabetes, suggests much lower intakes. He says eat 6 grams of carbs at breakfast, and snacks, 12 grams each at lunch and dinner. So that would be about 40 grams of carbs per day. If 12 grams per meal sounds like a small amount, it is. It’s about the amount in an average slice of bread. An Continue reading >>

3-day Diabetes Meal Plan: 1,200 Calories

3-day Diabetes Meal Plan: 1,200 Calories

Eating with diabetes doesn't need to be restrictive or complicated. Healthy eating is the cornerstone of managing diabetes, yet it can be a challenge figuring out what to eat to balance your blood sugar. Here we've created a delicious 3-day meal plan that makes it easier to follow a diabetes diet. In this plan you'll find a mix of nutritious foods including fiber-rich complex carbohydrates, like whole grains and fresh fruits and vegetables, lean protein sources, healthy fats and dairy. This plan limits the amount of foods with refined carbohydrates (think white bread, white rice and sugar), added sugars and saturated fats, which can negatively impact your health if you eat too much. The carbohydrates are balanced throughout the day with each meal containing 2-3 carb servings (30-45 grams of carbohydrates) and each snack containing around 1 carb serving (15 grams of carbohydrates). The calorie and carbohydrate totals are listed next to each meal and snack so you can swap foods with similar nutrition in and out as you like. Eating with diabetes doesn't need to be restrictive or complicated. Incorporating a variety of foods, as we do in this meal plan, is a healthy and sustainable approach to managing diabetes. Not sure if this is the right plan for you? Calculate your calorie level and find the diet meal plan that will work best for you. Day 1 Meal Prep Tip: Cook or set aside an extra 1/2 cup of black beans tonight at dinner to have for lunch on Day 2. Be sure to rinse canned beans to get rid of excess salt. Breakfast (298 calories, 32 grams carbohydrates) • 1 cup nonfat plain Greek yogurt • 1/2 cup blueberries • 1 1/2 Tbsp. chopped walnuts • 2 tsp. honey Top yogurt with blueberries, walnuts and honey. Note: We use a small amount of added sweetener, in this case h Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Type 2 Diabetes Diet

The right diabetes diet is crucial to managing type 2 diabetes, maintaining stable blood sugar levels, and preserving your overall health. However, it's not as complex or out of the ordinary as you might expect. A smart diabetic diet actually looks a lot like the healthy eating plan doctors recommend for everyone: plenty of fruits and vegetables, simple carbohydrates in moderation, and fats sparingly. Count Calories to Manage Diabetes The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recommends the following calorie guidelines for people who are managing diabetes: About 1,200 to 1,600 calories a day for small women who are physically active, small or medium-sized women interested in weight loss, or medium-sized women who are not physically active. About 1,600 to 2,000 calories a day for large women interested in weight loss, small men at a healthy weight, medium-sized men who aren't physically active, or medium-sized or large men interested in weight loss. About 2,000 to 2,400 calories a day for medium-sized or large men who are physically active, large men at a healthy weight or who are medium-sized, or large women who are very physically active. Reach for the Right Carbohydrates You can't avoid carbohydrates completely. They are our main source of energy, but they also lead to the biggest fluctuations in blood sugar levels. Choosing your carbohydrates wisely is critical to managing diabetes. Complex carbohydrates, or those that are rich in fiber, should constitute between 45 and 65 percent of your daily caloric intake. To make the best choices, keep these guidelines in mind: Get most or all of your carbohydrates from high-fiber sources like vegetables, beans, fruits, and whole grains. High-fiber foods are digested more slowly, which helps keep your blood sugar levels stable. Av Continue reading >>

Patient Education: Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Diet (beyond The Basics)

Patient Education: Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Diet (beyond The Basics)

TYPE 2 DIABETES OVERVIEW Diet and physical activity are critically important in the management of the ABCs (A1C, Blood pressure, and Cholesterol) of type 2 diabetes. To effectively manage glycated hemoglobin (A1C) and blood sugar levels, it is important to understand how to balance food intake, physical activity, and medication. Making healthy food choices every day has both immediate and long-term effects. With education, practice, and assistance from a dietitian and/or a diabetes educator, it is possible to eat well and control diabetes. This article discusses diet in the management of type 2 diabetes. The role of diet and activity in managing blood pressure and cholesterol are reviewed separately. (See "Patient education: High blood pressure, diet, and weight (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: High cholesterol and lipids (hyperlipidemia) (Beyond the Basics)".) Articles that discuss other aspects of type 2 diabetes are also available. (See "Patient education: Diabetes mellitus type 2: Overview (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Diabetes mellitus type 2: Insulin treatment (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Self-monitoring of blood glucose in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Diabetes mellitus type 2: Alcohol, exercise, and medical care (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Preventing complications in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)".) WHY IS DIET IMPORTANT? Many factors affect how well diabetes is controlled. Many of these factors are controlled by the person with diabetes, including how much and what is eaten, how frequently the blood sugar is monitored, physical activity levels, and accuracy and consi Continue reading >>

How Much Should I Eat Daily To Control My Blood Sugar Levels With Diabetes?

How Much Should I Eat Daily To Control My Blood Sugar Levels With Diabetes?

The types of food you eat, when you eat them, the timing of medications and even physical activity levels can all affect blood sugar levels. A good component to type 2 diabetes management is keeping your blood sugar levels under control as best as possible. The road to management can be a challenging and winding one. The day-to-day efforts you put in trying to ensure you maintain your target blood sugar levels, can sometimes seem like minute-to-minute efforts. You’ve learned how to check your blood sugar, what medications you should take, recommendations on what you should eat, but have you learned what foods work best for you and your blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels are the one consistent factor in diabetes management that everyone, including doctors can agree require more information on how to manage them more effectively. What’s The Big Deal on Blood Sugars? Type 2 diabetes happens when your body is no longer sensitive to the insulin, or it begins to develop a delayed response to the way insulin is secreted to change your blood sugar levels. Beyond the complications associated with diabetes, high blood sugar levels can gradually do damage to all the blood vessels in the body. Over a longer period of time, these elevated blood sugars and damage can lead to a bigger problem of the loss in sensation throughout the body, particularly in the legs and feet. This condition is known as neuropathy. Deterioration of your eyesight, reduced kidney function and an elevated risk for heart disease are also potential complications. For more information read these guides: Episodes of hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar put those with type 2 diabetes at just as high of a risk for complications. Loss of consciousness, confusion, risk of seizures and potential brain damage when Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs To Eat A Day

How Many Carbs To Eat A Day

Q: How many grams of carbohydrates should a woman with diabetes have each day? A: Generally speaking, being a woman means you likely need to eat fewer carbohydrates each day than a man. However, the amount of carbohydrates you need should depend on many factors, including your size, age, activity, desire to lose weight, and food preferences. There is not a one-size-fits-all amount of carbohydrates for all women. Everyone is different and has diverse nutritional needs. Carb intake depends on: Height and weight. Are you currently underweight, normal weight, or overweight? Activity level. Are you sedentary, moderately active, or highly active? Gender. Generally, men require more calories, and thus more carbohydrates, than women. Pregnant women and those who are breast-feeding require more as well. Most adults need 6-11 servings of carbs per day, depending on the factors listed above. The general starting point for a moderate-size woman is 45-60 grams of carbohydrates at each meal; for moderate-size men, 60-75 grams of carbs per meal. Most people with diabetes don't need to eat snacks. If you enjoy eating a snack in the late afternoon or before bed, use some of your allotted carb grams, say 15-30 grams, for a snack. To work with a registered dietitian to learn more about your carbohydrate needs and controlling your diabetes, find a diabetes education program in your area by contacting the American Diabetes Association. Jeannette Jordan, M.S., RD, CDE, is the American Dietetic Association's national spokesperson for African-American nutrition issues and oversees nutrition education at the Medical University of South Carolina. Virginia Zamudio Lange, a member of Diabetic Living's editorial advisory board, is a founding partner of Alamo Diabetes Team, LLP. Continue reading >>

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