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How Many Americans Have Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics: Facts And Trends

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics: Facts And Trends

Diabetes mellitus, or diabetes, is a disease that causes high blood sugar. It occurs when there is a problem with insulin. Insulin is a hormone that takes sugar from foods and moves it to the body's cells. If the body does not make enough insulin or does not use insulin well, the sugar from food stays in the blood and causes high blood sugar. There are several different types of diabetes, but the most common is type 2. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Diabetes Report, 2014, 90 to 95 percent of people with diabetes in the United States have type 2. Just 5 percent of people have type 1. Contents of this article: Key facts about diabetes in the U.S. Diabetes is at an all-time high in the U.S. The CDC's Division of Diabetes Translation states that 1 percent of the population, which is about a half of a million people, had diagnosed diabetes in 1958. Today, nearly 10 percent of the population have diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). That's 29.1 million Americans, and more than a quarter of these people do not know they have it. The ADA report that the number of people who have diabetes increased by 382 percent from 1988 to 2014. The risk of developing diabetes increases with age. The CDC report that 4.1 percent of people age 20-44 have diabetes, but the number jumps to 25.9 percent for people over 65 years old. As obesity has become more prevalent over the past few decades, so too has the rate of type 2 diabetes. An article in the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology states that 25.6 percent of Americans are obese, much higher than the 15.3 percent of obese people in 1995. In that same period, the incidence of diabetes increased by 90 percent. Although the link between obesity and diabetes is well Continue reading >>

Almost Half The Us Population Has Diabetes Or Its Precursor

Almost Half The Us Population Has Diabetes Or Its Precursor

Almost Half the US Population Has Diabetes or Its Precursor Almost one in10 US adults has diabetes, while more than one in threehas prediabetes, indicates the latest National Diabetes Statistics Report by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). As of 2015, 30.3 million adults living in the United States or 9.4% of the population, have diabetes, according to the new report. Moreover, nearly one in four adults living with diabetes, or 7.2 million American adults, are not aware that they have it. Another 84.1 million have prediabetes, the report indicates. And nine in 10 adults with prediabetes are not aware they have a condition that places them at high risk to progress to type 2 diabetes within 5 years, according to a statement by the CDC. This is important, as the authors point out, because individuals with prediabetes can cut their risk of type 2 diabetes in half by being more active and making healthier food choices. On the other hand, the rate at which new cases of diabetes are being diagnosed remains steady, with an estimated 1.5 million new cases of diabetes being spotted in American adults in 2015. "Although these findings reveal some progress in diabetes management and prevention, there are still too many Americans with diabetes and prediabetes," Brenda Fitzgerald, MD, director of the CDC said in the statement. "Now, more than ever, we must step up our efforts to reduce the burden of this serious disease," she added. Native Americans Have Double the Risk of Diabetes Compared With Whites The National Diabetes Statistics Report, which comes out approximately every 2years, was published online July 18. As the report notes, the likelihood that an individual will be diagnosed with diabetes increases with age and depends on race or ethnicity. Of adults aged 18 to 44 ye Continue reading >>

Who: Diabetes Rates Skyrocketing Worldwide

Who: Diabetes Rates Skyrocketing Worldwide

Diabetes rates nearly doubled in the past three decades, largely due to increases in obesity and sugary diets, according to a report released Wednesday by the World Health Organization. The percentage of adults living with diabetes worldwide grew from 4.7% in 1980 to 8.5% in 2014. Overall, there was a nearly four-fold increase in worldwide cases: An estimated 422 million adults were living with diabetes in 2014, up from 108 million in 1980. The WHO describes diabetes as a serious, chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar, or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. In 2012, 29.1 million Americans, or 9.3% of the population, had diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. About 1.4 million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes every year, according to the organization. More than 8.1 million Americans with diabetes don't know it, putting them at greater risk of complications. The disease can develop slowly over time. In 2012, 86 million Americans age 20 and older had prediabetes, a condition in which blood sugar is higher than normal but doesn't yet qualify as diabetes. Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the United States, killing about 69,000 Americans a year. The disease contributes to an additional 234,000 deaths each year, according to the American Diabetes Association. Worldwide, diabetes killed 1.5 million people in 2012, according to the WHO report. High blood sugar caused an additional 2.2 million deaths by increasing the risks of heart disease and other chronic conditions. About 43% of these deaths occur before the age of 70. The percentage of deaths attributable to high blood glucose or diabetes that occur prior to age 70 is higher in l Continue reading >>

Over 45% Of American Adults Have Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Or Prediabetes

Over 45% Of American Adults Have Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Or Prediabetes

Over 45% of American adults have type 2 diabetes mellitus or prediabetes Continued research and education are needed Diabetes and prediabetes remain serious threats for more than one-third of Americans the statistics are staggering, William T. Cefalu, MD, chief scientific, medical, and mission officer of the American Diabetes Association, said in a written statement . We must continue to innovate in scientific research and to translate findings to the clinical level to decrease the prevalence of diabetes. These data clearly confirm it is critical for us to continue to provide the education and support needed to improve health outcomes and decrease the daily burden of diabetes. We must reduce the incidence of diabetes and its enormous costs, including both the financial costs and the human toll of lost quality of life, he said. More than 114 million American adults have type 2 diabetes mellitus or prediabetes, according to estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. As of 2015, the combined prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes was 45.4% among adults in the United States: 11.5% (30.3 million) have diabetes and 33.9% have prediabetes, representing 84.1 million people who could develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years, the CDC said in the National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2017 . Prevalence rates for both diabetes and prediabetes vary considerable by race/ethnicity, with non-Hispanic blacks having the highest combined rate at 54% (17.7% diabetes and 36.3% prediabetes), followed by non-Hispanic Asians at 51.7% (16% and 35.7%), Hispanics at 48.1% (16.4% and 31.7%), and non-Hispanic whites at 40.8% (9.3% and 40.8%), the CDC reported. Lack of knowledge about having the disease was common: Almost a quarter (23.8%) of adults with diabetes didnt know they had Continue reading >>

New Cdc Report: More Than 100 Million Americans Have Diabetes Or Prediabetes

New Cdc Report: More Than 100 Million Americans Have Diabetes Or Prediabetes

More than 100 million U.S. adults are now living with diabetes or prediabetes, according to a new report released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The report finds that as of 2015, 30.3 million Americans – 9.4 percent of the U.S. population –have diabetes. Another 84.1 million have prediabetes, a condition that if not treated often leads to type 2 diabetes within five years. The report confirms that the rate of new diabetes diagnoses remains steady. However, the disease continues to represent a growing health problem: Diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S. in 2015. The report also includes county-level data for the first time, and shows that some areas of the country bear a heavier diabetes burden than others. “Although these findings reveal some progress in diabetes management and prevention, there are still too many Americans with diabetes and prediabetes,” said CDC Director Brenda Fitzgerald, M.D. “More than a third of U.S. adults have prediabetes, and the majority don’t know it. Now, more than ever, we must step up our efforts to reduce the burden of this serious disease.” Diabetes is a serious disease that can often be managed through physical activity, diet, and the appropriate use of insulin and other medications to control blood sugar levels. People with diabetes are at increased risk of serious health complications including premature death, vision loss, heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, and amputation of toes, feet, or legs. The National Diabetes Statistics Report, released approximately every two years, provides information on diabetes prevalence and incidence, prediabetes, risk factors for complications, acute and long-term complications, mortality, and costs in the U.S. Key findings from Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Read on to learn some of the key facts and statistics about the people who have it and how to manage it. Risk factors Many risk factors for type 2 diabetes include lifestyle decisions that can be reduced or even cut out entirely with time and effort. Men are also at slightly higher risk of developing diabetes than women. This may be more associated with lifestyle factors, body weight, and where the weight is located (abdominally versus in the hip area) than with innate gender differences. Significant risk factors include: older age excess weight, particularly around the waist family history certain ethnicities physical inactivity poor diet Prevalence Type 2 diabetes is increasingly prevalent but also largely preventable. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes in adults. The CDC also gives us the following information: In general Research suggests that 1 out of 3 adults has prediabetes. Of this group, 9 out of 10 don't know they have it. 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes, but 8.1 million may be undiagnosed and unaware of their condition. About 1.4 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in United States every year. More than one in every 10 adults who are 20 years or older has diabetes. For seniors (65 years and older), that figure rises to more than one in four. Cases of diagnosed diabetes cost the United States an estimated $245 billion in 2012. This cost is expected to rise with the increasing diagnoses. In pregnancy and parentingAccording to the CDC, 4.6 to 9.2 percent of pregnancies may be affected by gestational diabetes. In up to 10 percent of them, the mother is diagnosed w Continue reading >>

Cdc Report: Over 100 Million Americans Have Diabetes | Daily Mail Online

Cdc Report: Over 100 Million Americans Have Diabetes | Daily Mail Online

Almost a third of the US population - 100 million people - either has diabetes or pre-diabetes, a new federal report has revealed. Diabetes is a serious disease that doubles the risk of early death. Complications can include blindness, heart disease, stroke, kidney failure and amputation of fingers, toes and limbs. In the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Diabetes Statistics Report, released about every two years, the agency described diabetes as a 'growing health problem' that was the seventh leading cause of death in the US in 2015. That year alone, an estimated 1.5 million new cases of diabetes were diagnosed among people ages 18 and older, the report said. In 2015 alone, an estimated 1.5 million new cases of diabetes were diagnosed among people ages 18 and older, the CDC said 'Consistent with previous trends, our research shows that diabetes cases are still increasing, although not as quickly as in previous years,' said Ann Albright, director of the CDC's Division of Diabetes Translation. A total of 30.3 million people in the United States have diabetes, accounting for 9.4 percent of the population. Another 84.1 million -- about one in three people -- have prediabetes, a condition that if not treated often leads to type 2 diabetes within five years. People with prediabetes have higher than normal blood sugar, but not quite to the threshold of being type 2 diabetes. However, doctors say that damage to the heart, blood vessels and kidneys may already be starting. Another troubling statistic unearthed by the report showed many people are unaware of their condition. 'Nearly one in four adults living with diabetes -- 7.2 million Americans -- didn't know they had the condition,' it said. A full 88 percent of adults with prediabetes did not know the Continue reading >>

Diabetes By The Numbers: Facts, Statistics, And You

Diabetes By The Numbers: Facts, Statistics, And You

Insulin acts as a “key.” It allows the glucose to go from the blood into the cells. It also helps you store energy. Insulin is a vital part of metabolism. Without it, your body isn’t able to function or perform properly. Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to serious complications. It can cause damage to small and large blood vessels and organs. This can often lead to heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, nerve damage, and eye disease. Managing diabetes requires keeping track of blood glucose levels. Treatment may include taking insulin or other medications. Healthy eating habits and regular exercise can also help manage diabetes. Types of Diabetes There are different types of diabetes. Each has something to do with insulin and blood glucose. Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes is a disorder in which the pancreas cannot longer produce insulin. It used to be called juvenile diabetes. It’s also sometimes called insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. There is no cure. If you have it, you must take insulin to survive. Type 2 diabetes In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas can produce insulin, at least initially. But the body doesn’t respond to it or use it effectively. This is called insulin resistance. Over time, the ability of the pancreas to make insulin decreases. Then blood sugars go up. Some, but not all people with type 2 diabetes need to take insulin. Most of the time a proper diet, exercise, and medications can manage the disease. Gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes develops during pregnancy. According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), women with gestational diabetes have a 35 to 60 percent chance of developing type 2 diabetes within 20 years. Prediabetes When blood glucose levels are higher than they should be, but no Continue reading >>

Half Of Americans Have Diabetes Or A High Risk For It — And Many Of Them Are Unaware

Half Of Americans Have Diabetes Or A High Risk For It — And Many Of Them Are Unaware

That’s right. The metabolic condition is about as American as you can get, according to a new national report card on diabetes released Tuesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The report shows that nearly half of Americans have diabetes or prediabetes, which puts them at high risk for the condition. A good number of these folks haven’t been diagnosed and don’t even realize their predicament. People with diabetes have too much sugar in their blood. If the disease isn’t controlled, they can wind up with heart disease, nerve damage, kidney problems, eye damage and other serious health problems. The new report combines data from the CDC, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the Indian Health Service and the Census Bureau. Here’s a numerical look at what they reveal about diabetes in America. 30.3 million The number of people in the U.S. who had diabetes in 2015. The percentage of the U.S. population that has diabetes. That’s nearly 1 in 10. 1.5 million The number of newly diagnosed cases of diabetes among U.S. adults in 2015. That works out to 6.7 new cases per 1,000 people. 24% The percentage of Americans with diabetes who don’t even know they have it. That’s 7.2 million people. 7 Where diabetes ranked on the list of leading causes of death in the U.S. in 2015. Diabetes was listed as a cause of death on 252,806 death certificates that year, including 79,535 that identified diabetes as the primary cause of death. There were two kinds of diabetes included in the study. Type 1 diabetes (formerly known as juvenile diabetes) occurs when the immune system prevents the body from making insulin, and type 2 diabetes (formerly known as adult-onset diabetes) occurs when the body can’t make enough insulin or can’t use it well. About 95 Continue reading >>

More Than 100 Million Americans Have Diabetes Or Prediabetes

More Than 100 Million Americans Have Diabetes Or Prediabetes

More than 100 million Americans have diabetes or prediabetes More than 100 million Americans have diabetes or prediabetes More than 100 million U.S. adults are now living with diabetes or prediabetes, according to a new report released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The report finds that as of 2015, 30.3 million Americans 9.4 percent of the U.S. population have diabetes. Another 84.1 million have prediabetes, a condition that if not treated often leads to type 2 diabetes within five years. Diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S. in 2015. The report also includes county-level data for the first time, and shows that some areas of the country bear a heavier diabetes burden than others. Diabetes is a serious disease that can often be managed through physical activity, diet, and the appropriate use of insulin and other medications to control blood sugar levels. People with diabetes are at increased risk of serious health complications including premature death, vision loss, heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, and amputation of toes, feet, or legs. * In 2015, an estimated 1.5 million new cases of diabetes were diagnosed among people ages 18 and older. * Nearly 1 in 4 four adults living with diabetes 7.2 million Americans didnt know they had the condition. Only 11.6 percent of adults with prediabetes knew they had it. * Rates of diagnosed diabetes increased with age. Among adults ages 18-44, 4 percent had diabetes. Among those ages 45-64 years, 17 percent had diabetes. And among those ages 65 years and older, 25 percent had diabetes. * Rates of diagnosed diabetes were higher among American Indians/Alaska Natives (15.1 percent), non-Hispanic blacks (12.7 percent), and Hispanics (12.1 percent), compared to Asians (8.0 perce Continue reading >>

One Third Of Americans Are Headed For Diabetes, And They Don't Even Know It

One Third Of Americans Are Headed For Diabetes, And They Don't Even Know It

One third of Americans may be on their way to developing full-blown type 2 diabetes, and most of them don't even know it. A recent report from The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows that more than 84 million Americans, or roughly one-third of the population, have prediabetes, a condition marked by higher-than-normal blood sugar. Of that group, 90 percent aren't aware they have the condition. The primary risk factors for type 2 diabetes are genetics and lifestyle — excess weight, obesity and lack of exercise contribute to this alarming medical trend. "People with prediabetes who don't change their lifestyle are at a much higher risk of developing heart disease and stroke and can develop type 2 diabetes within five years if left untreated," said William T. Cefalu, MD, chief scientific, medical & mission officer of the American Diabetes Association. The health risks go beyond heart disease and stroke. As diabetes worsens over time, blindness, kidney disease and lower-limb amputation are also major health risks. Diabetes was the seventh-leading cause of death in the United States in 2015, according to the CDC. This population of diabetes "ticking time bombs" is particularly alarming, because in many cases type 2 diabetes can be avoided, simply by leading a healthy lifestyle. Type 2 diabetes is often progressive, and within 10 years of diagnosis, 50 percent of individuals need to use insulin to control their blood glucose levels, according to the ADA. More than 30 million Americans — 9.4 percent of the U.S. population — are already battling diabetes, according to the CDC's National Diabetes Statistics Report, which used data through 2015. The CDC found that of those cases, 7.2 million were undiagnosed. "The country needs to take this seriously, ratc Continue reading >>

The 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report Is Here

The 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report Is Here

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has released the 2017 Diabetes Statistics Report with estimates for “prevalence and incidence of diabetes, prediabetes, risk factors for complications, acute and long-term complications, deaths, and costs.” Where are we now? There are 30.3 million people with diabetes (9.4% of the US population) including 23.1 million people who are diagnosed and 7.2 million people (23.8%) undiagnosed. The numbers for prediabetes indicate that 84.1 million adults (33.9% of the adult U.S. population) have prediabetes, including 23.1 million adults aged 65 years or older (the age group with highest rate). The estimated percentage of individuals with type 1 diabetes remains at 5% among those with diabetes. The statistics are also provided by age, gender, ethnicity, and for each state/territory so you can search for these specifics. The CDC has produced wonderful infographics, “A Snapshot of Diabetes in the U.S.” and “Prediabes: Could it be You?” for everyone to use and reproduce. They illustrate estimates for diabetes, prediabetes, the cost of diabetes (dollars, risk of death, medical costs), specifics about type 1 and type 2 diabetes, risk factors for type 2 diabetes, and a “What You Can Do” section. If we compare the numbers with previous estimates, we see that there has been an increase in those with diabetes and a decrease in those with prediabetes. However, the numbers are all still extremely high, and the costs and health burdens are staggering! What can we do with these statistics? Use them to help focus efforts to prevent and control diabetes in the U.S. Share the positive messages regarding prevention strategies with those at risk of developing or with type 2 diabetes Distribute the information to local media and Continue reading >>

How Many People Have Diabetes?

How Many People Have Diabetes?

Rates of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are increasing globally. According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) Diabetes Atlas, here are the overall rates including both type 1 and type 2: 415 million adults have diabetes (1 in 11 adults) By 2040, 642 million adults (1 in 10 adults) are expected to have diabetes 46.5% of those with diabetes have not been diagnosed 1 in 7 births is affected by gestational diabetes 12% of global health expenditure is spent on diabetes ($673 billion) You can see an interactive map of global diabetes statistics at the IDF website. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the most current data is for 2012 (source): 29 million people in the United States (9.3 percent) have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. 1.7 million people aged 20 years or older were newly diagnosed with type or type 2 diabetes in 2012. Non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, and American Indian/Alaska Native adults are about twice as likely to have diagnosed with some form of diabetes as non-Hispanic white adults. 208,000 people younger than 20 years have been diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. 86 million adults aged 20 years and older have prediabetes. The percentage of U.S. adults with prediabetes is similar for non-Hispanic whites (35 percent), non-Hispanic blacks (39 percent), and Hispanics (38 percent). Similar data is available from a study called Prevalence and Incidence Trends for Diagnosed Diabetes Among Adults Aged 20 to 79 Years, United States, 1980-2012 published in Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). This study found that 49% to 52% of the adult population had either diabetes or prediabetes. Then came the most stunning number: 83% of adults over 65 have either diabetes or prediabetes! Thankfully, the authors of this s Continue reading >>

New Cdc Report: How Many Americans Have Diabetes Or Prediabetes?

New Cdc Report: How Many Americans Have Diabetes Or Prediabetes?

Advertisement Diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S. in 2015. More than 100 million U.S. adults are now living with diabetes or prediabetes, according to a new report released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The report finds that as of 2015, 30.3 million Americans – 9.4% of the U.S. population –have diabetes. Another 84.1 million have prediabetes, a condition that if not treated often leads to type 2 diabetes within five years. The report confirms that the rate of new diabetes diagnoses remains steady. However, the disease continues to represent a growing health problem. It also includes county-level data for the first time, and shows that some areas of the country bear a heavier diabetes burden than others. Key findings from the National Diabetes Statistics Report The report finds that: In 2015, an estimated 1.5 million new cases of diabetes were diagnosed among people ages 18 and older. Nearly 1 in 4 four adults living with diabetes – 7.2 million Americans – didn’t know they had the condition. Only 11.6% of adults with prediabetes knew they had it. Rates of diagnosed diabetes increased with age. Among adults ages 18-44, 4% had diabetes. Among those ages 45-64 years, 17% had diabetes. And among those ages 65 years and older, 25% had diabetes. Rates of diagnosed diabetes were higher among American Indians/Alaska Natives (15.1%), non-Hispanic blacks (12.7%), and Hispanics (12.1%), compared to Asians (8.0%) and non-Hispanic whites (7.4%). Other differences include: Diabetes prevalence varied significantly by education. Among U.S. adults with less than a high school education, 12.6% had diabetes. Among those with a high school education, 9.5% had diabetes; and among those with more than a high school education, Continue reading >>

More Than 100 Million Americans Have Been Diagnosed With Diabetes Or Prediabetes, Latest Cdc Report Reveals

More Than 100 Million Americans Have Been Diagnosed With Diabetes Or Prediabetes, Latest Cdc Report Reveals

The new ‘National Diabetes Statistics Report’ released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on 18th July 2017, says that over 100 million adults in U.S. are presently living with prediabetes or diabetes. According to the report, as of 2015, 9.4 % of the U.S. population, i.e., 30.3 million people have diabetes and 84.1 million were diagnosed with prediabetes, which if left untreated causes type 2 diabetes in five years. Further Reading It is confirmed by the study that the rate of diagnoses of new diabetes remains stable, yet, the disease continues to be a growing health issue. And in 2015, diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S. Brenda Fitzgerald, M.D, the Director of CDC said: “Although these findings reveal some progress in diabetes management and prevention, there are still too many Americans with diabetes and prediabetes. More than a third of U.S. adults have prediabetes, and the majority don’t know it. Now, more than ever, we must step up our efforts to reduce the burden of this serious disease.” Diabetes, even though a serious condition that increases the risk of severe health complications such as, premature death, loss of vision, heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, and amputation of toes, feet, or legs, can usually be managed through physical activities, diet, as well as the suitable use of insulin and other medications to control levels of blood sugar. In order to provide information on diabetes prevalence and incidence, prediabetes, risk factors for complications, acute and long-term complications, mortality, and costs in the U.S, CDC releases the National Diabetes Statistics Report approximately every two years. For the first time, the newly released report contains county-level data, which shows that a few Continue reading >>

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