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How Long To Fast For A1c

Ask The Doctor: What Blood Tests Require Fasting?

Ask The Doctor: What Blood Tests Require Fasting?

Q. Sometimes my doctor tells me it's okay to eat before a blood test, and sometimes it isn't. Why is that? A. Actually, fasting affects the results of very few blood tests. For example, measurements of kidney, liver, and thyroid function, as well as blood counts, are not influenced by fasting. However, fasting is required before commonly ordered tests for glucose (blood sugar) and triglycerides (part of the cholesterol, or lipid, panel) for accurate results. Subscribe to Harvard Health Online for immediate access to health news and information from Harvard Medical School. Continue reading >>

Intermittent Dieting Has More Negatives Than Positives For Weight Loss.

Intermittent Dieting Has More Negatives Than Positives For Weight Loss.

The New Zealand researchers found the risk of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) was increased during the fasting days, as expected, but that the two intermittent fasting plans they tested still managed to produce weight loss and a drop in A1c levels, which is used to assess your risk for diabetes;1 the study is published in Diabetic Medicine. However, three endocrinology experts who reviewed and commented on the study for EndocrineWeb say other approaches are less hazardous and just as, or more effective in producing a healthy weight loss. Evaluating the Research on Intermittent Fasting Researchers from Wellington Hospital and the University of Otago in New Zealand defined intermittent fasting a bit differently than we do here in the US. Participants could eat whatever they wanted five days a week and then they were instructed to fast for the next two days.1 They had to do this for 12 weeks. In this study, the ''fast'' was actually a very low-calorie diet. Men could eat about 600 calories on a fast day and women were limited to 500 calories. At the start, 41 participants who had been living with type 2 diabetes (T2D) for years were randomly assigned to this 5:2 plan, as it is sometimes called. About half of them were instructed to fast for two days in a row during the week; the others were instructed to fast on non-consecutive days. In the consecutive fasting group, the average age was 62 years and their diabetes diagnosis had been made 13 years ago, on average. In the non-consecutive group, the average age was 58 years, and their diagnosis had been made 9 years earlier.1 The men and women were on a variety of medications, including insulin, sulfonylureas, metformin, and oral hypoglycemic agents.1 The researchers made adjustments to their medications in response to lower Continue reading >>

5 Simple Ways To Lower Your A1c This Week

5 Simple Ways To Lower Your A1c This Week

The A1C blood test is a simple test that analyzes your glucose (blood sugar) levels by measuring the amount of glycated hemoglobin in your blood. Hemoglobin is a protein in your red blood cells; when glucose enters the blood, it attaches to the hemoglobin. The result is glycated hemoglobin. The more glucose in your blood, the higher your glycated hemoglobin. The A1C is a valuable indicator of how well your diabetes management plan is working. While your individual A1C goal will depend on factors including your age and your personal medical profile, most people with diabetes aim to keep their A1C below 7 percent. By keeping your A1C number within your target range, you can reduce the risk of diabetes complications. While it is important to develop a long-term diabetes management plan with your physician, there are several steps you can take right away to help reduce your A1C. Small changes add up, so consider trying some of these strategies to lower your A1C this week. 1. Try Short Sessions of High Intensity Exercise According to research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2015, type 2 diabetes patients who did 10 minutes of exercise three times a day, five days a week at 85 percent of their target heart rate had a twofold improvement in A1C levels compared to patients who exercised for 30 minutes a day at 65 percent of their target heart rate. Be sure to check with your doctor before trying high intensity exercise, and wear a heart rate monitor so you don’t overdo it. 2. Shrink Your Dinner Plate Instead of a large dinner plate for your meals, use a smaller salad plate. This simple swap can trick your eyes and brain into thinking you’re eating more than you really are, and you’ll feel satisfied with less food. It’s especially helpfu Continue reading >>

While Fasting, When Do I Take My Meds?

While Fasting, When Do I Take My Meds?

How do I manage diabetes when fasting for a blood test or a colonoscopy? I had to skip my colonoscopy last year because of low blood sugar. And now I have to have a cholesterol test. What do I do? Continue reading >>

A1c Blood Test Ok For Diabetes Diagnosis

A1c Blood Test Ok For Diabetes Diagnosis

Dec. 29, 2009 -- The American Diabetes Association (ADA) is recommending that a simple blood test currently used to assess whether diabetes is under control also be used to diagnose the disease. The blood test -- known as the A1C test -- has several important advantages over traditional blood glucose testing. Patients do not need to fast before the test is given, and it is far less likely to identify clinically irrelevant fluctuations in blood sugar because it measures average blood glucose levels over several months. The new guidelines do not call for replacing traditional screening with the A1C test. It is believed that around 6 million Americans have diabetes but don't know it, and another 57 million have prediabetes. The A1C test may help identify a large number of people in both of these groups, former ADA president for medicine and science John Buse, MD, PhD, tells WebMD. Buse, who is chief of endocrinology at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, helped draft the new ADA diabetes care guidelines, which were made public today. "We now know that early diagnosis and treatment can have a huge impact on outcomes by preventing the complications commonly seen when diabetes is not well controlled," he says. "Our hope is that people with early or prediabetes who might otherwise not be tested would have the A1C test." The A1C test has been used since the late 1970s as a measure of how well diabetes is managed, but the ADA had not previously recommended it for diagnosing the disease. In part, this is because earlier versions of the test were not as accurate as current versions. The test measures the percentage of glycated hemoglobin, or A1C, in the blood and provides an assessment of blood sugar levels over the previous two to three months. Hemoglobin is a protein Continue reading >>

Fast Or Not Prior To Test? A1c

Fast Or Not Prior To Test? A1c

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Hello, I am supposed to get an A1C tomorrow and I was not told if I have to fast or not? My Fasting blood glucose has been normal but I think the A1C may be helpful. Thanks No you don't need to fast before an A1c test. The test measures the amount of glucose in your system over a 3 month period, not how much is in your system when they do the test, so don't worry about fasting. No you don't need to fast before an A1c test. The test measures the amount of glucose in your system over a 3 month period, not how much is in your system when they do the test, so don't worry about fasting. Thanks. I appreciate the helpful info. I always hear about this test. I hope it gives me some informative input. Hello, I am supposed to get an A1C tomorrow and I was not told if I have to fast or not? My Fasting blood glucose has been normal but I think the A1C may be helpful. Thanks Whenever I get blood work done they do an A1C and a fasting bg,so it depends on whether your doctor ordered the full diabetes tests or just the A1C. The doctor gives me a sheet that he fills out with the different test marked on it and tells me to have the blood done in three months. They check FBG A1C, Cholesterol, etc, etc. Whenever I get blood work done they do an A1C and a fasting bg,so it depends on whether your doctor ordered the full diabetes tests or just the A1C. The doctor gives me a sheet that he fills out with the different test marked on it and tells me to have the blood done in three months. They check FBG A1C, Cholesterol, etc, etc. It really does depend if you are just getting A1c or A1c and other blood work. My Doctor Continue reading >>

The A1c Test & Diabetes

The A1c Test & Diabetes

What is the A1C test? The A1C test is a blood test that provides information about a person’s average levels of blood glucose, also called blood sugar, over the past 3 months. The A1C test is sometimes called the hemoglobin A1c, HbA1c, or glycohemoglobin test. The A1C test is the primary test used for diabetes management and diabetes research. How does the A1C test work? The A1C test is based on the attachment of glucose to hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen. In the body, red blood cells are constantly forming and dying, but typically they live for about 3 months. Thus, the A1C test reflects the average of a person’s blood glucose levels over the past 3 months. The A1C test result is reported as a percentage. The higher the percentage, the higher a person’s blood glucose levels have been. A normal A1C level is below 5.7 percent. Can the A1C test be used to diagnose type 2 diabetes and prediabetes? Yes. In 2009, an international expert committee recommended the A1C test as one of the tests available to help diagnose type 2 diabetes and prediabetes.1 Previously, only the traditional blood glucose tests were used to diagnose diabetes and prediabetes. Because the A1C test does not require fasting and blood can be drawn for the test at any time of day, experts are hoping its convenience will allow more people to get tested—thus, decreasing the number of people with undiagnosed diabetes. However, some medical organizations continue to recommend using blood glucose tests for diagnosis. Why should a person be tested for diabetes? Testing is especially important because early in the disease diabetes has no symptoms. Although no test is perfect, the A1C and blood glucose tests are the best tools available to diagnose diabetes—a serious and li Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Fasting Before A Blood Test

Everything You Need To Know About Fasting Before A Blood Test

How do you prepare for a blood test? Some blood tests will require you to fast beforehand. In these cases, your doctor will instruct you not to eat or drink anything, except water, in the hours leading up to the test. Fasting before certain blood tests is important to help make sure that your test results are accurate. The vitamins, minerals, fats, carbohydrates, and proteins that make up all food and beverages can impact blood-level readings, clouding the results of your test. Not all blood tests will require you to fast beforehand. Blood tests that you will likely need to fast for include: renal function panel lipoprotein panel If your doctor has prescribed a new blood test for you, or doesn’t mention whether or not you should fast or for how long, ask them if fasting is required. Some tests, such as a fecal occult blood test, don’t require fasting but do limit certain foods. Red meats, broccoli, and even some medications may cause a false positive test. Always follow your doctor’s advice when preparing for a test. The amount of time you need to fast for will vary depending on the test. For most tests, you will be told not to consume anything but water for eight hours leading up to the test. For a few tests, a 12-hour fast may be needed. Schedule your test as early in the day as possible. The hours you spend sleeping are considered part of the fasting period, as long as you don’t break your fast with coffee or food once you’re awake. Even if you drink it black, coffee can interfere with blood test results. That’s because it contains caffeine and soluble plant matter, which might skew your test results. Coffee is also a diuretic, which means that it will increase how much you pee. This can have a dehydrating effect. The less hydrated you are, the harder it Continue reading >>

What Is The Fasting Blood Sugar Test?

What Is The Fasting Blood Sugar Test?

The fasting blood sugar test (FBS) measures the amount of glucose (sugar) in your blood when you have not had anything to eat or drink for several hours. This test is also called a fasting plasma glucose test (FBS). Why is this test done? The most common use of this test is to check for diabetes. How do I prepare for this test? The simplest way to check for diabetes is to check your blood sugar before you've had anything to eat or drink in the morning. In most cases you will fast overnight, eating nothing and drinking nothing but water after your evening meal and in the morning before your blood is drawn. If you do shift work, it's best to have your blood checked after your usual sleeping time (after at least 6 hours of sleep) and before you start your active day. When you wake up, you should have nothing to eat and nothing to drink except water before your blood is drawn. You may need to avoid taking certain medicines before the test because they might affect the test result. Make sure your healthcare provider knows about any medicines, herbs, or supplements that you are taking. Don't stop any of your regular medicines without first consulting with your healthcare provider. Talk to your healthcare provider if you have any questions. How is the test done? Your healthcare provider may poke your finger with a lancet and fill a small tube with the blood. Or a small amount of blood may be taken from your arm with a needle. The blood is sent to a lab. Having this test will take just a few minutes. Ask your healthcare provider when and how you will get the result of your test. What does the test result mean? The normal fasting blood sugar range in most labs is 70 to 99 milligrams per deciliter (3.9 to 5.5 millimoles per liter). A fasting blood sugar level of 100 to 125 mg/dL Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting Could Help Tackle Diabetes – Here’s The Science

Intermittent Fasting Could Help Tackle Diabetes – Here’s The Science

Intermittent fasting is currently all the rage. But don’t be fooled: it’s much more than just the latest fad. Recent studies of this kind of fasting – with restricted eating part of the time, but not all of the time – have produced a number of successes, but the latest involving diabetes might be the most impressive yet. The idea of intermittent fasting arose after scientists were wowed by the effects of constant calorie restriction. A number of studies in many different animals have shown that restricted eating throughout adulthood leads to dramatic improvements in lifespan and general health. The reasons for these improvements aren’t yet clear. Part of it seems to be that going without food gives cells in the body a much needed break to perform maintenance and repair. But the lack of food also forces cells to resort to alternative sources of energy. Some of these, such as ketones – molecules created in the liver from recycled fat – appear to be beneficial. ‘Fasting’ without fasting The problem is that constant calorie restriction isn’t practical: it’s easy for scientists to impose upon lab animals, but hard for humans to impose upon themselves in the real world. Fortunately, we’ve learned that constant calorie restriction isn’t really necessary. Intermittent fasting seems to have many of the same benefits. There are two main types of intermittent fasting. One type, known as “time restricted feeding”, requires eating only during a few hours of the day – say between 10am and 6pm. This approach gives the body a long break from food each night, and also reinforces beneficial circadian rhythms. The other type of intermittent fasting – made popular by the 5:2 diet – is known as “periodic fasting”. This approach involves alternating be Continue reading >>

Tests For Blood Sugar (glucose) And Hba1c

Tests For Blood Sugar (glucose) And Hba1c

Blood sugar (glucose) measurements are used to diagnose diabetes. They are also used to monitor glucose control for those people who are already known to have diabetes. Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. If your glucose level remains high then you have diabetes. If the level goes too low then it is called hypoglycaemia. The main tests for measuring the amount of glucose in the blood are: Random blood glucose level. Fasting blood glucose level. The HbA1c blood test. Oral glucose tolerance test. Capillary blood glucose (home monitoring). Urine test for blood sugar (glucose). Blood tests for blood sugar (glucose) Random blood glucose level A sample of blood taken at any time can be a useful test if diabetes is suspected. A level of 11.1 mmol/L or more in the blood sample indicates that you have diabetes. A fasting blood glucose test may be done to confirm the diagnosis. Fasting blood glucose level Continue reading >>

All About The Hemoglobin A1c Test

All About The Hemoglobin A1c Test

People with diabetes used to depend only on urine tests or daily finger sticks to measure their blood sugars. These tests are accurate, but only in the moment. As an overall measurement of blood sugar control, they’re very limited. This is because blood sugar can vary wildly depending on the time of day, activity levels, and even hormone changes. Some people may have high blood sugars at 3 a.m. and be totally unaware of it. Once A1C tests became available in the 1980s, they became an important tool in controlling diabetes. A1C tests measure average blood glucose over the past two to three months. So even if you have a high fasting blood sugar, your overall blood sugars may be normal, or vice versa. A normal fasting blood sugar may not eliminate the possibility of type 2 diabetes. This is why A1C tests are now being used for diagnosis and screening of prediabetes. Because it doesn’t require fasting, the test can be given as part of an overall blood screening. The A1C test is also known as the hemoglobin A1C test or HbA1C test. Other alternate names include the glycosylated hemoglobin test, glycohemoglobin test, and glycated hemoglobin test. A1C measures the amount of hemoglobin in the blood that has glucose attached to it. Hemoglobin is a protein found inside red blood cells that carries oxygen to the body. Hemoglobin cells are constantly dying and regenerating, but they have a lifespan of approximately three months. Glucose attaches, or glycates, to hemoglobin, so the record of how much glucose is attached to your hemoglobin also lasts for about three months. If there’s too much glucose attached to the hemoglobin cells, you’ll have a high A1C. If the amount of glucose is normal, your A1C will be normal. The test is effective because of the lifespan of the hemogl Continue reading >>

Ultimate Guide To The A1c Test: Everything You Need To Know

Ultimate Guide To The A1c Test: Everything You Need To Know

The A1C is a blood test that gives us an estimated average of what your blood sugar has been over the past 2-3 months. The A1c goes by several different names, such aswa Hemoglobin A1C, HbA1C, Hb1C, A1C, glycated hemoglobin, glycohemoglobin and estimated glucose average. What is Hemoglobin? Hemoglobin is a protein in your blood cells that carries oxygen. When sugar is in the blood, and it hangs around for a while, it starts to attach to the red blood cells. The A1C test is a measurement of how many red blood cells have sugar attached. So, if your A1C result is 7%, that means that 7% of your red blood cells have sugar attached to them. What are the Symptoms of a High A1C Test Level? Sometimes there are NO symptoms! That is probably one of the scariest things about diabetes, your sugar can be high for a while and you may not even know it. When your blood sugar goes high and stays high for longer periods of time you may notice the following: tired, low energy, particularly after meals feel very thirsty you may be peeing more than normal, waking a lot in the middle of the night to go dry, itchy skin unexplained weight loss crave sugar, hungrier than normal blurred vision, may feel like you need new glasses tingling in feet or hands cuts or sores take a long time to heal or don’t heal well at all frequent infections (urinary tract, yeast infections, etc.) When your blood sugar is high, this means the energy that you are giving your body isn’t getting into the cells. Think about a car that has a gas leak. You put gas in, but if the gas can’t get to the engine, the car will not go. When you eat, some of the food is broken down into sugar and goes into your bloodstream. If your body can’t get the sugar to the cells, then your body can’t “go.” Some of the sugar tha Continue reading >>

How Long Does It Take To See A Change In The A1c Test Or Eag?

How Long Does It Take To See A Change In The A1c Test Or Eag?

Diabetes mellitus (MEL-ih-tus), often referred to as diabetes, is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that result from the body’s inability to produce enough insulin and/or effectively utilize the insulin. Diabetes is a serious, life-long condition and the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism (the body's way of digesting food and converting it into energy). There are three forms of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that accounts for five- to 10-percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes may account for 90- to 95-percent of all diagnosed cases. The third type of diabetes occurs in pregnancy and is referred to as gestational diabetes. Left untreated, gestational diabetes can cause health issues for pregnant women and their babies. People with diabetes can take preventive steps to control this disease and decrease the risk of further complications. Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Your A1c Test

Diabetes: Your A1c Test

www.CardioSmart.org The hemoglobin A1c test is a simple blood test that checks howmuch sugar, or glucose, is stuck to your red blood cells. This test also is called the glycohemoglobin test or the A1c test. Most doctors think the A1c test is the best way to monitor your diabetes over the long term. What does your A1c result mean? Your test results tell you how well you have controlled your diabetes over the last 3 months. With this information, your doctor can adjust your medicine and diabetes treatment, if necessary. This test also gives you an idea of how likely you are to develop problems such as kidney failure, vision trouble, or numbness in your leg or foot. Keeping your A1c level in your target range can lower your chance for problems. The test result is usually given as a percentage. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that most non-pregnant adults with diabetes have an A1c level less than 7%. If your A1c level is higher than your target A1c level, the ADA recommends that your doctor look at making changes in your diabetes treatment. To lower your A1c level, your blood sugar needs to be lower. In some people with diabetes, having blood sugar that is too low may cause problems. Your doctor can help you decide the best and safest A1c level. How often should you have your A1c tested? If you have diabetes, your doctor may order a test every 3 to 6months, depending on your type of diabetes and how well you control it. Generally, A1c is checked 2 to 4 times a year. Talk with your doctor about how often you should expect to have this test. If your levels have been good for several tests, you may not need the test as often. Do you need to fast before your A1c test? You do not need to fast before this test. You can have this test at any time during the day, Continue reading >>

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