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How Long To Adjust To Metformin

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure Serious urinary tract infections (UTI), some that lead to hospitalization, occu Continue reading >>

Surviving Metformin

Surviving Metformin

What was your first week on Metformin like? Horrendous? Terrible? Filled with waves of nausea? The sickest you’ve felt in your life? Let’s reminisce for a minute: About a dozen years ago, on December 24, I went to the doctor for a routine physical. Are you envious of my holiday plans? This was in the years before Pinterest, so I was carrying on with regular life activities on Christmas Eve morn rather than bedazzling the cap of an Elf on the Shelf. Anyway, at the Christmas Eve check-up, my physician mentioned that he had read promising things about Metformin being used in women with PCOS. We chatted about Metformin for a bit, talked about other PCOS things, finished up the tests, and then I headed to the pharmacy to pick up the prescription. We had our traditional Christmas Eve dinner of ham, funeral potatoes, salad with asparagus and strawberries; rolls, and other delicious items. Breaking with tradition, this year’s Christmas Eve dinner was followed by Metformin for me. After dinner, we read the Christmas story from the Bible, watched a short film depicting the events in Luke 2, read a new Christmas book, and headed off to bed. That’s when the fun began. In sum: Worst Christmas Ever. Pros: Family, friends, gifts, good music, good food. Cons: Visiting the loo every 15 minutes, constant nausea, wanting to curl up in bed and not wake up for days. Public Service Announcement: Do not start Metformin for the first time on the day prior to a major holiday. My first year on Metformin was pretty rough. I felt like I had morning sickness every single day. I had diarrhea and nausea every morning. When I skipped a few doses hoping for relief, my symptoms would be twice as bad when I re-started. Looking back, I’m actually amazed that I kept taking the medication. If I st Continue reading >>

How Long Did It Take You To Get Adjusted To Metformin ?

How Long Did It Take You To Get Adjusted To Metformin ?

Good evening. Both my husband and I take Metformin and didn't experience any GI problems when we started several years ago. But after reading your email and I thought about it, my husband seems to be having problems with his bowels lately. We haven't talked about it yet but you've given me something to consider,sometimes we tend to forget that most meds have side effects! The way we usually handle side effects we weigh the difference of the side effects, if just a nuisance, with the gains gotten from the med. Sometimes it's a side effect from a totally different medication so it's difficult to know which one is causing the problem! So if your GI problems are liveable you may want to keep taking the pills as it often turns itself around, if not maybe a change is needed. Mention it to your Dr and see what they say? I have had diabetes for 22 years and for most of them I was on Metformin, usually given to overweight people but eventually everyone seems to be prescribed it, I am certainly not overweight, never have been but was still put on it even though I was classed as underweight. When I was first put onto the tablets the dose was three a day but I dropped the middle one as it was causing lots of bowel problems and it soon settled down but it was several weeks before it did but not everyone is the same. Last year I began to feel extremely tired and it turned out I had low Vitamin B12, Metformin is a known side effect of B12 deficiency. This meant that I had to have a course of six injections a couple of days apart to boost my B12 which seems to have sorted it out. About four months ago I had such a low appetitie (Metformin is an appetitite suppressant) so decided to stop taking it for a couple of weeks and I experienced hunger pains for the first time in years and my ap Continue reading >>

Metformin...how Long Does It Take To Work?

Metformin...how Long Does It Take To Work?

Metformin...how long does it take to work? Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Metformin...how long does it take to work? Hey, I was just diagnosed yesterday with type 2 diabetes, and given Metformin. Does anyone know how long this takes to start having an effect on my blood sugar? When can I expect results? (I have already started making massive dietary changes) Also, has anyone lost weight on Metformin? The Dr. said I most likely will...I hope so! It is so hard for me to lose any, even though I am a runner and a cyclist! And I feel like it has helped control my appetite, so yes, it has helped me lose. But mostly cutting out starch and sugar has taken care of it all. 4-6 weeks is average ... but could be longer. It may also take awhile for your body to adjust to the met, the gastrointestinal side effects range from minor to OMG (this was me) I had no effect after 6 weeks, just this past week I increased the dose to 1500 and the last couple of days I've seen some lower numbers. Not low, but lower. We'll see if that continues. It definitely takes time. wow, sounds like i may have a waiting game on my hands! I can tell you that within the first day, the sweet taste I have had in my mouth started getting better, so that was, in my opinion, a good sign. Well, now I know that I will need to hang in there before things can really change! Thanks a lot...I also welcome anyone else's Metformin experiences...being new to this, it is great to hear as many stories as I can! We all have different bodies that react differently. We've all read different things that we've interpreted in different ways. Having said all that, I'm just plain baff Continue reading >>

Stopping Metformin: When Is It Ok?

Stopping Metformin: When Is It Ok?

The most common medication worldwide for treating diabetes is metformin (Glumetza, Riomet, Glucophage, Fortamet). It can help control high blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. It’s available in tablet form or a clear liquid you take by mouth before meals. Metformin doesn’t treat the underlying cause of diabetes. It treats the symptoms of diabetes by lowering blood sugar. It also increases the use of glucose in peripheral muscles and the liver. Metformin also helps with other things in addition to improving blood sugar. These include: lowering lipids, resulting in a decrease in blood triglyceride levels decreasing “bad” cholesterol, or low-density lipoprotein (LDL) increasing “good” cholesterol, or high-density lipoprotein (HDL) If you’re taking metformin for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, it may be possible to stop. Instead, you may be able to manage your condition by making certain lifestyle changes, like losing weight and getting more exercise. Read on to learn more about metformin and whether or not it’s possible to stop taking it. However, before you stop taking metformin consult your doctor to ensure this is the right step to take in managing your diabetes. Before you start taking metformin, your doctor will want to discuss your medical history. You won’t be able to take this medication if you have a history of any of the following: alcohol abuse liver disease kidney issues certain heart problems If you are currently taking metformin, you may have encountered some side effects. If you’ve just started treatment with this drug, it’s important to know some of the side effects you may encounter. Most common side effects The most common side effects are digestive issues and may include: diarrhea vomiting nausea heartburn abdominal cramps Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects And How To Deal With Them

Metformin Side Effects And How To Deal With Them

Metformin side effects include diabetic neuropathy, brain fog, and digestive issues. You can address them through diet, Vitamin B12, CoQ10, and exercise. Let us understand the drug Metformin in detail and study different forms of metformin, its uses and common metformin side effects along with how to deal with them. Metformin: What Is It Used For? Metformin is an old warhorse in the pharma battle against diabetes. It has been the mainstay in the treatment of Type 2 Diabetes for more than fifty years, often matching or outperforming newer drugs. In fact, many new combination drugs are often created with metformin as one of the main ingredients. Thanks to its long run in the pharmaceutical world, the side effects of Metformin are also well known. The Metformin-PCOS connection has been studied extensively since a majority of health complications associated with PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) are due to hyperinsulinemia (high amounts of insulin in the blood stream). Metformin is known to reduce circulating insulin levels. The use of this drug in women with PCOS has shown highly encouraging results. RELATED: 10 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Diabetics Most Prescribed Names in Metformin Category Include: Fortamet: It is an extended-release formulation that contains metformin hydrochloride. The tablets are designed for once-a-day administration. They deliver either 500 mg or 1000 mg of metformin. The tablet is made using a patented technology called SCOTTM that delivers the active compound slowly and at a constant rate. Glucophage: Glucophage tablets contain metformin hydrochoride. They contain either 500 mg, 850 mg or 1000 mg of the active compound. Glucophage tablets do not contain any special covering and need to be taken multiple times a day until the prescribed dosage is me Continue reading >>

Glucophage Sr 500mg, 750mg And 1000mg Prolonged Release Tablets

Glucophage Sr 500mg, 750mg And 1000mg Prolonged Release Tablets

Glucophage SR 500mg, 750mg and 1000mg prolonged release tablets This information is intended for use by health professionals Glucophage SR 500 mg prolonged release tablets Glucophage SR 750 mg prolonged release tablets Glucophage SR 1000 mg prolonged release tablets 2. Qualitative and quantitative composition 500 mg: One prolonged release tablet contains 500mg metformin hydrochloride corresponding to 390 mg metformin base. 750 mg: One prolonged release tablet contains 750 mg metformin hydrochloride corresponding to 585 mg metformin base. 1000 mg: One prolonged release tablet contains 1000 mg metformin hydrochloride corresponding to 780 mg metformin base. For the full list of excipients, see section 6.1. 500 mg: White to off-white, round, biconvex tablet, debossed on one side with '500'. 750 mg: White capsule-shaped, biconvex tablet, debossed on one side with '750' and on the other side with 'Merck'. 1000 mg: White to off-white capsule-shaped, biconvex tablet, debossed on one side with '1000' and on the other side with 'MERCK'. Reduction in the risk or delay of the onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus in adult, overweight patients with IGT* and/or IFG*, and/or increased HbA1C who are: - at high risk for developing overt type 2 diabetes mellitus (see section 5.1) and - still progressing towards type 2 diabetes mellitus despite implementation of intensive lifestyle change for 3 to 6 months Treatment with Glucophage SR must be based on a risk score incorporating appropriate measures of glycaemic control and including evidence of high cardiovascular risk (see section 5.1). Lifestyle modifications should be continued when metformin is initiated, unless the patient is unable to do so because of medical reasons. *IGT: Impaired Glucose Tolerance; IFG: Impaired Fasting Glucose Trea Continue reading >>

Wait Times: How Long Until Your Med Begins Working

Wait Times: How Long Until Your Med Begins Working

Photography by Mike Watson Images/Thinkstock There are many type 2 medications, and each drug class works in the body in a different way. Here’s a quick guide to help you understand how long each drug will generally take to work: These short-acting oral medications, taken with meals, block the breakdown of complex sugars into simple sugars in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. “Simple sugars are more easily absorbed and cause the blood sugar to ultimately go up,” Sam Ellis, PharmD, BCPS, CDE, associate professor in the Department of Clinical Pharmacy at the University of Colorado says. These drugs are minimally absorbed into the blood, so a certain blood level concentration is not necessary for them to work. You will see the effect immediately with the first dose. “You take it before a meal, and with that meal you see the effect,” says George Grunberger, MD, FACP, FACE, President of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. While researchers aren’t exactly sure how these oral medications work, it’s likely that the meds block some absorption of glucose in the GI tract. “You’ll see most of the effect in the first week with these drugs,” says Ellis. alogliptin, linagliptin, saxagliptin, sitagliptin These drugs work to block the enzyme responsible for the breakdown of a specific gut hormone that helps the body produce more insulin when blood glucose is high and reduces the amount of glucose produced by the liver. Take a DPP-4 inhibitor (they come in pill form) and it’ll work pretty fast—you’ll see the full effect in about a week. “It’s blocking that enzyme after the first dose a little bit, but by the time you get out to dose five, you’re blocking the majority of that enzyme,” Ellis says. albiglutide, dulaglutide, exenatide, exe Continue reading >>

Severity Of Gastrointestinal Side Effects Of Metformin Tablet Compared To Metformin Capsule In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

Severity Of Gastrointestinal Side Effects Of Metformin Tablet Compared To Metformin Capsule In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

Go to: This prospective interventional study was conducted from June to November 2016 at DM clinics affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran. The study obtained approval from the Research Council and Ethics Committee of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (No. 395013). At first, patients diagnosed with Type 2 DM who were treated by metformin tablet alone or in combination with other oral antidiabetic drugs were invited to participate in the study. Then, the participants were selected by the following criteria. Components if the criteria by which the patients were selected consist of adult (age >18 years), Type 2 DM patients, with 6.5%< hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) <9.5%. Criteria of noninclusion are patients being treated with insulin, had received systemic corticosteroids during recent 3 months, chronic gastroparesis or chronic severe GI symptoms, history of gastric or duodenal ulcers, any inadequately controlled or untreated cardiovascular, hepatic, pulmonary, renal, or neurologic conditions, glomerular filtration rate <50 ml/min, pregnancy or plan of pregnancy. After obtaining written informed consent from the selected patients, the data were recorded in a checklist including demographic information (date of birth, gender), body weight and height, laboratory test results (HbA1c, fasting blood sugar, creatinine), medical and surgical history, and relevant medication history. Furthermore, GI side effects before the study related to metformin tablet including diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and bloating were asked and mentioned in the checklist. All included patients received metformin capsule with the same amount of metformin tablet, previously which was kindly provided by Farabi Pharmaceuticals, Isfahan, Iran, on our request which c Continue reading >>

Proper Use

Proper Use

Drug information provided by: Micromedex This medicine usually comes with a patient information insert. Read the information carefully and make sure you understand it before taking this medicine. If you have any questions, ask your doctor. Carefully follow the special meal plan your doctor gave you. This is a very important part of controlling your condition, and is necessary if the medicine is to work properly. Also, exercise regularly and test for sugar in your blood or urine as directed. Metformin should be taken with meals to help reduce stomach or bowel side effects that may occur during the first few weeks of treatment. Swallow the extended-release tablet whole with a full glass of water. Do not crush, break, or chew it. While taking the extended-release tablet, part of the tablet may pass into your stool after your body has absorbed the medicine. This is normal and nothing to worry about. Measure the oral liquid with a marked measuring spoon, oral syringe, or medicine cup. The average household teaspoon may not hold the right amount of liquid. Use only the brand of this medicine that your doctor prescribed. Different brands may not work the same way. You may notice improvement in your blood glucose control in 1 to 2 weeks, but the full effect of blood glucose control may take up to 2 to 3 months. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about this. Dosing The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so. The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the Continue reading >>

Does Body

Does Body "adjust" To Metformin

Thank you Tori, for all the info. Keep up your good work.chris The first I heard of the strength training/insulin connection was on another bulletin board I frequent. Here's the link: www.soulcysters.net/pick-up-weights Now, none of these are specific "women with PCOS" research studies. But the reason metformin helps with PCOS is by improving insulin resistance, so anything that helps with insulin resistance would be good for us, and research is pointing to strength training. My personal experience with strength training: A few years ago I lost weight (down to 185-180 lbs) with mostly cardio for my exercise. I was the same size I am now (except less toned and didn't look as good) and didn't have regular periods (my PCOS symptoms were still out of control!) This time around, I actually hired a trainer and stuck with the weights and I've been very happy with the results. I'm wearing clothes that looked awful on me before, even at a lighter weight. If you can possibly swing it, hire a trainer to get you started and motivated. But there are other options if you really can't deal with the gym. The link on soul cysters also suggests a few video plans that can have the same impact (just read the posts further down the thread!). There are similar "videos" available on exercise TV on demand if you have digital cable. I really like Jackie Warner's One-on-one and Jillian Michael's 30 Day Shred, but there are others as well. Anything focused on toning and using either hand weights or body weight exercises will help. Hi Tori, I was not aware that weight training would improve insulin use. I know weight training is something that is inevitable for me to become more successful losing this extra weight.I just hate going to the gym, I vowed..NEVER AGAIN" after wasting so much $$$ on me Continue reading >>

Metformin What Every Diabetic Should Know

Metformin What Every Diabetic Should Know

Metformin What Every Diabetic Should Know Diabetes affects millions of people throughout the world and for all the ones who know that they have it and are doing something to control it there will be just as many who do not know they have it. It is caused by the pancreas not creating enough insulin and this leaves you with too much sugar in the blood as your body can not process it properly. Metformin is a drug that is used to treat diabetes. Its main role is in regulating the amount of sugar in the body and this alone will help the diabetic. It only treats type 2 diabetes and there are other medicines available for those suffering from type 1. It is a member of a group of drugs known as biguanides and they have been used effectively for some time. Metformin manages to control the amount of sugar in the blood in three distinct ways. Firstly it works on the food that you eat. Most foods have some degree of sugar in them and too much can cause the diabetes to become worse. The amount that the body absorbs is important and Metformin makes sure that not too much gets through. If too much does get through the body cannot deal with it and it is then that you become ill. Secondly it keeps down the amount of sugar that is produced by the liver. If this can be slowed down, there will be less sugar travelling around the body and the outcome will be that you are less likely to be ill. Its final function is to make sure that insulin is regulated. It works on both injected insulin and that produced naturally by the body. As a result of this some people who already have to inject may find that they no longer have to do this, or at least cut down the amount of times they have to do it. It will be important how much Metformin that you take and the amount will be prescribed by your doct Continue reading >>

About Metformin

About Metformin

Metformin is a medicine used to treat type 2 diabetes and sometimes polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Type 2 diabetes is an illness where the body doesn't make enough insulin, or the insulin that it makes doesn't work properly. This can cause high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia). PCOS is a condition that affects how the ovaries work. Metformin lowers your blood sugar levels by improving the way your body handles insulin. It's usually prescribed for diabetes when diet and exercise alone have not been enough to control your blood sugar levels. For women with PCOS, metformin stimulates ovulation even if they don't have diabetes. It does this by lowering insulin and blood sugar levels. Metformin is available on prescription as tablets and as a liquid that you drink. Key facts Metformin works by reducing the amount of sugar your liver releases into your blood. It also makes your body respond better to insulin. Insulin is the hormone that controls the level of sugar in your blood. It's best to take metformin with a meal to reduce the side effects. The most common side effects are feeling sick, vomiting, diarrhoea, stomach ache and going off your food. Metformin does not cause weight gain (unlike some other diabetes medicines). Metformin may also be called by the brand names Bolamyn, Diagemet, Glucient, Glucophage, and Metabet. Who can and can't take metformin Metformin can be taken by adults. It can also be taken by children from 10 years of age on the advice of a doctor. Metformin isn't suitable for some people. Tell your doctor before starting the medicine if you: have had an allergic reaction to metformin or other medicines in the past have uncontrolled diabetes have liver or kidney problems have a severe infection are being treated for heart failure or you have recentl Continue reading >>

A Comprehensive Guide To Metformin

A Comprehensive Guide To Metformin

Metformin is the top of the line medication option for Pre-Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes. If you must start taking medication for your newly diagnosed condition, it is then likely that your healthcare provider will prescribe this medication. Taking care of beta cells is an important thing. If you help to shield them from demise, they will keep your blood sugar down. This medication is important for your beta cell safety if you have Type 2 Diabetes. Not only does Metformin lower blood sugar and decrease resistance of insulin at the cellular level, it improves cell functioning, lipids, and how fat is distributed in our bodies. Increasing evidence in research points to Metformin’s effects on decreasing the replication of cancer cells, and providing a protective action for the neurological system. Let’s find out why Lori didn’t want to take Metformin. After learning about the benefits of going on Metformin, she changed her mind. Lori’s Story Lori came in worrying. Her doctor had placed her on Metformin, but she didn’t want to get the prescription filled. “I don’t want to go on diabetes medicine,” said Lori. “If I go on pills, next it will be shots. I don’t want to end up like my dad who took four shots a day.” “The doctor wants you on Metformin now to protect cells in your pancreas, so they can make more insulin. With diet and exercise, at your age, you can reverse the diagnosis. Would you like to talk about how we can work together to accomplish that?” “Reverse?” she asked. “What do you mean reverse? Will I not have Type 2 Diabetes anymore?” “You will always have it, but if you want to put it in remission, you are certainly young enough to do so. Your doctor wants to protect your beta cells in the pancreas. If you take the new medication, Continue reading >>

How Long Does It Take To Get Used To Metformin?

How Long Does It Take To Get Used To Metformin?

How long does it take to get used to Metformin? I have PCOS and need to start Metformin but I heard it takes a long time to get used to it (ie stop having the runs). What foods should I avoid (I have heard eggs and lettuce, anything else)? Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: Generally, you build up to whatever dose you are going to be on. So, for about a week you are only on 500mg per day. When you feel OK on that, then up it to 1000mg for about a week. Do this until you are on your highest dose. Here's some tips about metformin and the side effects: *Metformin is neither a weight loss nor a fertility medication. It helps our body use glucose/insulin better. In turn, it helps our body balance its hormones. Some of the "happy" side effects can be weight loss, regular periods, and ovulation. It can also potentially help with our other symptoms. It is recommended that PCOSers take 1500mg to 2550 mg of Met/Gluc daily (after building up). *****It can take up to 6 months on the right dosage to see any effects.***** *If you are taking the Extended Release version of Metformin/Glucophage, then you should be taking all of your pills at the same time each day. Start the dosage out slowly, like one pill for a week or two and then add another one for a week or two until you are up to your prescribed dosage. They recommend taking it with dinner. What I, personally, have found is that I am better off taking it before bed. But everyone is different! *If you are on the regular version of Metformin/Glucophage, you should be spacing your pills out through your day. Start the dosage out slowly, like one pill for a week or two and then add another one for a week or two until you are up to your prescribed dosage. Start taking your first pill at night. Your second pill Continue reading >>

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