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How Long Is Levemir Vial Good For After Opening

How Long Should You Keep Your Open Insulin Vials?

How Long Should You Keep Your Open Insulin Vials?

With so many different insulin and insulin-like products out there these days it can be hard to keep track of when your vial should be tossed. Depending on your dose, you may still have insulin left in your vial by the manufacturer-recommended time to throw it away. If this sounds like a familiar situation, know that it is important to throw away your vial regardless of whether you have any leftover. You might think it is wasteful to throw out what you may consider “perfectly good insulin,” but using the medication past the recommended time can actually do you more harm than good. You may notice that if you continue to use insulin from a vial past the manufacturers discard date, your blood glucose could be higher or a greater dose may be needed to achieve a normal blood glucose reading. There are several different types of insulin and a variety of other injectable diabetes medications, and the recommendations for how long they keep varies. For a quick overview, the different categories of insulin are: Rapid-acting Short-acting (regular) Intermediate-acting Long-acting So how long can you hold on to your insulin after you start using a vial? Rapid-acting insulin Short-acting insulin Humulin R: use within 31 days after puncturing vial Humulin R U-500 concentrated: use within 31 days after puncturing vial Intermediate-acting insulin Long-acting insulin Other injectable diabetes medications in vials A glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is a preferred screening test for diabetes. Done easily with a fingerstick in your physician’s office, it eliminates the need for fasting (not eating) prior to the test. The diagnosis of diabetes is confirmed if two consecutive A1c levels are greater than or equal to 6.5. What is the HbA1c? Red blood cells are permeable to glucose (sugar)—so Continue reading >>

Levemir

Levemir

LEVEMIR® (insulin detemir [rDNA origin]) Injection DESCRIPTION LEVEMIR® (insulin detemir [rDNA origin] injection) is a sterile solution of insulin detemir for use as a subcutaneous injection. Insulin detemir is a long-acting (up to 24-hour duration of action) recombinant human insulin analog. LEVEMIR® is produced by a process that includes expression of recombinant DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae followed by chemical modification. Insulin detemir differs from human insulin in that the amino acid threonine in position B30 has been omitted, and a C14 fatty acid chain has been attached to the amino acid B29. Insulin detemir has a molecular formula of C267H402O76N64S6 and a molecular weight of 5916.9. It has the following structure: Figure 1: Structural Formula of insulin detemir LEVEMIR® is a clear, colorless, aqueous, neutral sterile solution. Each milliliter of LEVEMIR® contains 100 units (14.2 mg/mL) insulin detemir, 65.4 mcg zinc, 2.06 mg m-cresol, 16.0 mg glycerol, 1.80 mg phenol, 0.89 mg disodium phosphate dihydrate, 1.17 mg sodium chloride, and water for injection. Hydrochloric acid and/or sodium hydroxide may be added to adjust pH. LEVEMIR® has a pH of approximately 7.4. Continue reading >>

Levemir Vs. Lantus: Similarities And Differences

Levemir Vs. Lantus: Similarities And Differences

Levemir and Lantus are both long-acting injectable insulins that can be used for long-term management of diabetes. Insulin is a hormone that is naturally produced in the body by the pancreas. It helps convert the glucose (sugar) in your bloodstream into energy. This energy is then distributed to cells throughout your body. With diabetes, your pancreas produces little or no insulin or your body is unable to use the insulin correctly. Without insulin, your body can’t use the sugars in your blood and can become starved for energy. The excess sugar in your blood can also damage different parts of your body, including your blood vessels and kidneys. Everyone with type 1 diabetes and many people with type 2 diabetes must use insulin to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Levemir is a solution of insulin detemir, and Lantus is a solution of insulin glargine. Both are basal insulin formulas. That means that they work slowly to lower your blood sugar levels. They’re both absorbed into your body over a 24-hour period. They keep blood sugar levels lowered for longer than short-acting insulins do. Although the formulations are slightly different, Levemir and Lantus are very similar drugs. There are only a few differences between them. Children and adults can use both Levemir and Lantus. Specifically, Levemir can be used by people who are 2 years or older. Lantus can be used by people who are 6 years or older. Levemir or Lantus can help with daily management of diabetes. However, you may still need to use short-acting insulin to treat spikes in your blood sugar levels and diabetic ketoacidosis (a dangerous buildup of acids in your blood). Learn more: All about diabetic ketoacidosis » Administration Both Levemir and Lantus are given through injection in the same way. You can gi Continue reading >>

How Long Does A Vial Of Lantus Really Last?

How Long Does A Vial Of Lantus Really Last?

My vet, my pharmacist, and the official Lantus info all give conflicting accounts. Help! haha, yes, we've all gotten that conflicting advice! how's a person supposed to know what to do!? here ya go: the sticky on lantus/levemir care was just updated recently on that question: I used my vial for over 80 days. I opened a new pen to see if Champ's numbers changed, but they didn't, which tells me that the vial of insulin, even after 80 days was still good. The following is from the sticky on storage and handling of Lantus. Opened Lantus and Levemir vials, cartridges, and pens can last longer than many FDMB members seem to think. Some caregivers of diabetic cats have used Lantus/Levemir down to the last drop. Lantus users from the German Katzen Forum have reported using opened Lantus for up to six months and Levemir up to four months if kept refrigerated and handled properly. Lantus is NOT as fragile as we once thought. From two of the leading researchers in the field of lantus use with feline diabetics, Jacquie S. Rand BVS, DVS and Rhett D.Marshall BVS (University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia): "Glargine should be refrigerated because it has a shelf life of 4 weeks once opened and kept at room temperature. We have found that opened vials kept refrigerated can be used for more than 6 months. If using an insulin pen, the manufacturer recommends that once a vial of insulin is used, the pen be kept at room temperature because temperature changes associated with refrigeration alter the volume administered by the pen." Continue reading >>

Can Novorapid And Levemir That's In Use Be Put Back In A Fridge?

Can Novorapid And Levemir That's In Use Be Put Back In A Fridge?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Can NovoRapid and Levemir That's in Use Be Put Back in a Fridge? I am in Italy now and it gets very hot during the day. The temperature in my room easily reaches 30 degrees C and sometimes exceeds it. I put the insulin I use in a fridge I have in my room. I am not sure this is a good practice: putting the insulin I have stored in rooom temperature back into a fridge. I also have a frio with me but have not used it yet. I suppose I should use the frio. But has anyone seen any detrimental effects to NovoRapid or Levemir if you put it back to fridge after having been stored at room room tempreature? Once the insulin has been out of the fridge and at room temperature it should be used up within 4 weeks, that is the manufacturers advice and says so in the patient leaflet. Once the insulin has been out of the fridge and at room temperature it should be used up within 4 weeks, that is the manufacturers advice and says so in the patient leaflet. Ok. So as long as I do not exceed the 4 weeks, I can keep storing it at room temperature and in the fridge interchangeably without any problems. Ok. So as long as I do not exceed the 4 weeks, I can keep storing it at room temperature and in the fridge interchangeably without any problems. Not sure what effect it would have on the insulin swapping it from room to fridge temperature intermediately, why don't you just use your Frio Wallet to keep your insulin cool whilst in use. Thanks for the advice, I will do that. It has just been too convenient to use the fridge... I've never seen any info to say whether it is harmful to put insulin in use back in the fridge. The leaflet says no but I wonder why? Yes, use the frio wa Continue reading >>

Insulin Expiration Date Question???

Insulin Expiration Date Question???

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I have to questions concerning insulin expiration dates. 1) I have an vial that has never been used and kept in the fridge, but my expiration date is approaching. I got it filled a month ago. At that time it was thought that I would need to take much more injections than it turns out. Please tell me that I don't have to throw this out. 2) The vial I have been using is also now about a month old. Can I also still use it? Interesting. The Lantus Solostar pen I'm currently using doesn't expire until December of 2012. I have no idea how long fast-acting insulin is suppose to stay viable in a storage environment. I would think a lot longer than a month since some diabetics buy 90 day supplies from mail order. You may have gotten stuck with a lot from the pharmacy that was just about to expire. As an aside: Doesn't everything expire in December of 2012? Your insulin only had a month or two in-date when you bought it? That doesn't seem fair or right - the first thing I'd do is ask for a replacement. As for your current vial - the official line is a month then chuck it out as it may then be losing potency. It's pretty much up to you if you want to push or flaunt that guideline - some people talk of going longer with no problems, usually not more than a few weeks, but I wouldn't take that as consensus or medical advice. How much do you have left? I am going to the pharmacy tomorrow and will bring this to thier attention. I was unaware of the date and that the insulin should last longer until now. I am assuming something is amiss. All of my apidra seems to expire 10-14 months out from when I get it. I Continue reading >>

Insulin Pens Are Welcome Back To The Fridge!

Insulin Pens Are Welcome Back To The Fridge!

We all know that unopened insulin must be kept in the refrigerator. But once in use can we put it back in the fridge to protect it from excessive heat? The answer to this simple question is not as easy as one might think. All manufacturers explicitly recommend to ‘Not refrigerate’ insulin pens in use. This guideline that causes confusion among users is now being revoked by one manufacturer. Let’s try to understand the reasoning behind it and what it means for users now. What? I shouldn’t put my insulin pen back in the refrigerator? When it comes to storing medications, it is recommended you follow the leaflet or packaging instructions. For insulin in particular, there are two different situations: storing and in-use. · Before Opening: When insulin is to be stored long-term and has not been opened, keeping it in the fridge ensures it lasts until expiration date. · During Use: Once a vial, a cartridge or a new disposable pen are used for the first time, the insulin can be kept at room temperature. But it needs to be used within weeks. It makes sense: higher temperatures and an open product mean a shorter shelf life. But there is one extra sentence on insulin pens packages, which has caused quite some confusion: Pens in use — ‘Do not refrigerate.’ What does ‘do not refrigerate’ mean for users? Let’s take a trip back to 2003, when the recommendation to not refrigerate opened insulin first appeared. Take Lilly’s Humalog for example, for which the label was first altered 14-years ago: What was the reason behind this? People started to speculate this warning was a result of preventing any kind of temperature extremes from affecting the insulin once it is in use. Many insulin users know from experience that high temperature can lower the effectiveness of Continue reading >>

Storage

Storage

NovoLog® Storage Home or Away, NovoLog® Goes With You NovoLog® lasts up to 28 days without refrigeration after first use, so it can be taken almost anywhere. Once in use, NovoLog® FlexPen® must be kept at room temperature below 86°F for up to 28 days. Its ability to stand up to heat is equal to, or better than, other major fast-acting insulin brands. Here is a quick guide to NovoLog® storage: Storage for NovoLog® FlexPen® 3 mL PenFill® cartridge,a and 10mL vial: Temperature Use up to In useb,c (opened) Room temperature: up to 86°F 28 days Not in use (unopened) Room temperature: up to 86°F 28 days Not in use (unopened) Refrigerated: 36°F to 46°F Expiration date a3 mL PenFill® cartridge is available for NovoPen Echo®. bFlexPen® and PenFill® cartridges in use (opened) must NOT be stored in the refrigerator. cIn use vials (opened) may be stored in the refrigerator. Do's: Don'ts: Do store unused NovoLog® in a refrigerator between 36° to 46°F (2° and 8°C) Don’t store NovoLog® in the freezer or directly adjacent to the refrigerator cooling element Don’t freeze NovoLog® or use NovoLog® if it has been frozen Don’t draw NovoLog® into a syringe and store for later use Do keep vials at temperatures below 86°F (30°C) for up to 28 days after initial use. Opened vials may be refrigerated Do use unpunctured vials until the expiration date printed on the label if they are stored in a refrigerator Do keep unused vials in the carton so they will stay clean and protected from light Don’t expose vials to excessive heat or light Do keep NovoLog® FlexPen® at temperatures below 86°F (30°C) for up to 28 days once it is punctured Don’t store in use NovoLog® FlexPen® in the refrigerator Do keep NovoLog® FlexPen® and all PenFill® cartridges away from Continue reading >>

Levemir Packaging

Levemir Packaging

Hello. For those who use the above product, Seems to be alot of waste.....at $199 for D.D. Family Getting much harder to control Some use past the opened date others do not. If it is kept in the fridge they will last to the expiration date so there should be no waste. From my experience I have been able to go past the 30 day range and be ok. Friend type 2 on insulin, on the pump MM723 levimer open shelf life is 42 days according to the package insert. But it should last longer if refrigerated. Mar 09 7.6:Sept 09 5.9:Jan 6 2010 5.5: The 30 or 30 or 42 day expiration time starts ticking when you start using it, and exposing the insulin to air. So if you never start using it (and it stays refrigerated), it should be good until the expiration date on the pack, not 30 or 30 or 42 days after you get it from the pharmacy. D.D. Family T2 DX '07: Diet, Basal/Bolus insulin levimer open shelf life is 42 days according to the package insert. But it should last longer if refrigerated. Yes it is. I think Lantus is 30 days. I use Levemir well past the 42 days, and have not noticed a loss of potency. My Rx insurance pays about $120 for Levemir, and I have a $39 copay. $199 a vial seems high; I'd shop around. I keep my Levemir refigerated D.D. Family T1 since 1977 - using Novolog in an Animas pump. I use disposable pens or pen cartridges. I currently have a 6 month supply in the fridge, which I brought with me from Mexico an New Zealand. I don't expect to see significant loss of potency by the time I use it all up. Opening a 10ml vial and using it over an extended period is more likely to be problematic, though. Like Mark, I use Levemir pen cartridges (or disposable pens if I have to) that come in five small (300 unit) containers per box. I have a one year supply tucked away in the fri Continue reading >>

Can Insulin Go Back In The Fridge?

Can Insulin Go Back In The Fridge?

After removing insulin glargine (Lantus) from the refrigerator for use, can it be refrigerated over and over again after having warmed to room temperature, or does this degrade it? Continue reading >>

What Is Long-acting Insulin?

What Is Long-acting Insulin?

Long-acting insulins are insulin analogs that are steadily released and can last in the body for up to 24 hours. It is often used in the morning or at bedtime as a basal insulin to help control your blood sugar throughout the day. Insulin is made inside the beta cells of the pancreas. It helps regulate the glucose (sugar) in the bloodstream by stimulating the cells to absorb the glucose, which is needed by the cells for energy. Insulin also keeps the liver from producing more glucose. In type 2 diabetes, the body can lose the ability to produce insulin and if insulin is produced, the body isn’t able to use it properly (insulin resistance). Different types of insulin therapies, such as long-acting insulin, enables the body to get the insulin that is needed for optimal glycemic control. Some of the long-acting insulins available in the US include: Levemir contains insulin detemir, which is a long-acting, basal insulin that is used to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes. It can help keep your blood sugar levels within a normal range by moving glucose from the bloodstream into the cells, and it prevents the liver from producing more glucose. Levemir is available in a vial and pre-filled pen called Levemir FlexTouch, each containing 100 units/ml (U-100) of insulin detemir. Once the pen is in use, it is good for 42 days and should not be refrigerated but stored at room temperature (below 86°F). The vial is also good for 42 days after first use, and can be stored in the refrigerator or at room temperature. Levemir is injected under the skin (subcutaneously) in the abdomen, thigh or upper arm once daily, or twice daily depending on your personal requirements. Injection sites should be rotated within the same region from one injection to the next to red Continue reading >>

How Long Does The Insulin Last? Do The Math!

How Long Does The Insulin Last? Do The Math!

In assessing an in-patient’s diabetic educational needs, I was reviewing with him his in-home regimen for his insulin therapy. Per his report, he stated that he took Levemir 50 units twice a day. I asked if it was by needle, syringe and vial preparation, which it was. I instructed him re: the shelf life of Levemir of 42 days once opened. He stated, “I throw it out after a month, but there is always insulin in the vial.” He also said he has more than an adequate supply. He was receiving his insulin by mail-order, receiving as he should, but not using it in a timely fashion. In other words, he was stockpiling his insulin. I asked him to review with me again the dosing that he takes as I reviewed the math with him. If he is taking 100 units per day and a vial contains 1000 units, his Levemir should be gone in 10 days. Both he and his wife had quite a perplexed look on their face after they did the math in their head. She stated she always left his medication management to him. I reviewed his dosing again with him and reviewed how many vials he should go through in a month. I taught them how to properly draw up and administer the insulin. He performed a return demonstration. I requested that they work together as a team and to have his wife review with him his drawing up technique for accuracy. I encouraged them to follow up with me at discharge to discuss further questions/concerns. Lessons Learned: Inform patient about how long an insulin vial or pen should last. Inform the patient how long an insulin vial or pen should last once opened. This stresses the importance of proper expiration once opened versus shelf life. Explore with the patient not only what he or she is verbally telling you, but ask how often they use a new vial or pen, and if they have extras at home Continue reading >>

Can I Use My Insulin Past Its Expiration Date?

Can I Use My Insulin Past Its Expiration Date?

A certified diabetes educator answers whether older insulin is still safe to use. Integrated Diabetes Services (IDS) provides detailed advice and coaching on diabetes management from certified diabetes educators and dieticians. Insulin Nation hosts a regular Q&A column from IDS that answers questions submitted from the Type 1 diabetes community. Q: Should I really worry about using insulin after its expiration date? What about using it for more than 30 days? I think the insulin companies promote that just to make us throw out good insulin. A: When it comes to insulin, we have to make darned sure that the stuff is at full potency, or blood glucose levels can go dangerously high. The insulin manufacturers are required to test their products rigorously before bringing them to market. They can more or less guarantee that their products will work as indicated if used within the expiration date and for not more than a month after the seal on the vial, cartridge, or pen is broken. This is, of course, assuming that the insulin has been stored properly and not exposed to extreme heat, freezing cold, or direct sunlight. sponsor Does this mean that insulin suddenly goes belly up at the stroke of midnight on the expiration date, or 28 days after being put into use? Hardly. Many people, including clinicians with diabetes, have used insulin beyond the “deadlines” without a hitch. It simply means that the manufacturer has not tested their product beyond the dates indicated, so there is no guarantee — no way of knowing exactly how long the insulin will remain at full strength. Read “Can I Get Insulin Over the Counter?” This is where common sense comes into play. For those with good insurance coverage and plenty of insulin on-hand, it’s best to follow the rules and discard i Continue reading >>

Can Insulin Vials Be Kept Safely Outside The Refrigerator?

Can Insulin Vials Be Kept Safely Outside The Refrigerator?

Q. I am on a website where information is exchanged between people with type 1 diabetes. Half the people say that insulin doesn’t need refrigeration after it is opened and half say that it still needs refrigeration. After having diabetes for 42 years, I have never heard that keeping insulin at room temperature is okay. Is it? Doesn’t temperature affect how well the insulin works? A. The American Diabetes Association recommends that a bottle of insulin can be stored at room temperature (59 to 86 degrees F) for up to one month after it is opened. Storing it in the refrigerator after opening does not make it last longer. Unopened insulin can be stored at room temperature for one month or in the refrigerator (not in the freezer!) until it reaches its expiration date. Insulin must be protected from extremes of heat or cold, which means not leaving it in the glove box or trunk of the car during the summer. Mail order delivery can pose problems. One reader had a delivery of insulin sit outside for hours in the winter. The pharmacy told her it should be fine, but it did not control her blood sugar properly. If you get your insulin by mail order, check with the pharmacy to verify that it will not sit in a hot delivery truck or mailbox in warm weather. Continue reading >>

Levemir Flextouch And Vial | Levemir (insulin Detemir [rdna Origin] Injection)

Levemir Flextouch And Vial | Levemir (insulin Detemir [rdna Origin] Injection)

Levemir FlexTouch, the latestin prefilled pen technology from Novo Nordisk Low-injection force push button.A built-in spring mechanism requires low force to inject all doses. When your dose is delivered, youshould hear or feel a clicka Accurate dosing.Turn the dose selector to select the number of units you need to inject, from 1-80 units. A large and clear dose display shows the units you have selected Thinnest needle available.The 32G Tip needle is the thinnest needle made by Novo Nordisk,b a leader in diabetes care for more than 90 years More insulin than a vial.One box of LevemirFlexTouch contains 5 disposable pens, each prefilled with 300 units of Levemir for a total of 1500 units of Levemirinsulin. Youll get 50% more insulin than you get from a vial (1000 units) Insurance coverage.Levemir FlexTouch is covered by most health insurance and Medicare plans nationwide aAfter dose counter has returned to 0, keep needle in skin for 6 seconds before the needle is removed. If you do not, you may not have received your full dose and you should check your blood sugar more often because you may need more insulin. You may or may not hear an audible click at end of dose. bNeedles are sold separately and may require a prescription in some states. Needles and LevemirFlexTouchmust not be shared. If you prefer to take your insulin with a vial and syringe, or if you need to receive your insulin in a vial for insurance reasons, you can still get Levemir. Unopened Levemirshould be kept in the refrigerator at a temperature range between 36 and 46F (2 and 8C) Keep unopened Levemir in the carton to protect from light Unopened Levemir can stay in the refrigerator until expiration. See the expiration date on the box Keep at room temperature, below 86F (30C), and not refrigerated for up to Continue reading >>

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