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How Long Is Humalog Good For After Opening

Lantus Vials, How Long Are They Really Good For?

Lantus Vials, How Long Are They Really Good For?

Lantus vials, how long are they really good for? Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Lantus vials, how long are they really good for? I have recieved the standard advice from my DE; throw away the Lantus vials after 30 days from the date you first open them. I still have half a vial left at that point and I have been using them longer (maybe 45 days) with no noticeable ill effects. Any input? You may end up hearing a range of answers on this. My own experience has been like this: so long as the vial is not exposed to extremes in temperature or sunlight, the insulin will remain good well beyond 30 days. During periods when my basal dose was 14 to 16u daily, I've used up the whole vial, meaning I have had vials last me over 60 days. As I understand it, testing insulin stability and viability is done over a period of 28 days, that is how long the pharmaceuticals conduct tests with standard protocols, but they don't test beyond that time period. Because of that, the vials can be guaranteed for 28 days but not beyond because there is no data. My own personal data does not qualify as being scientific in that regard. On the other hands, I would point out I feel it is a reasonably inductive conclusion to think that there is no real reason to think that the insulin would go bad 28 days after puncture because of the passage of time from day 28 to day 29. There may well exist some critical time period after opening when an insulin would go bad -- it's just that that rigorous testing protcols have never gone in search of that time period thus giving us the usual instructions by DEs for us to toss that vial after the 28th day. That's a good Continue reading >>

Humalog Vs. Novolog: Important Differences And More

Humalog Vs. Novolog: Important Differences And More

Humalog and Novolog are two diabetes medications. Humalog is the brand-name version of insulin lispro, and Novolog is the brand-name version of insulin aspart. These drugs both help control blood glucose (sugar) in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Humalog and Novolog are both rapid acting. That means they work more quickly than other types of insulin. There are important distinctions between Humalog and Novolog, however, and the drugs are not directly interchangeable. Check out this comparison so you can work with your doctor to choose a drug that’s right for you. Insulin is injected under your skin fat. It’s the most common type of treatment for type 1 diabetes because it works quickly. It’s also the only type of diabetes medication that’s absorbed into the bloodstream. Humalog and Novolog are both equivalent to the insulin made in your body. Unlike oral diabetes drugs, insulin provides fast relief for changes in your blood sugar. The type of insulin your doctor prescribes depends on how often and how much your blood sugar fluctuates each day. The table below provides quick facts at a glance. Brand name Humalog Novolog What is the generic drug? insulin lispro insulin aspart Is a generic version available? no no What does it treat? type 1 and type 2 diabetes type 1 and type 2 diabetes What form does it come in? solution for injection solution for injection What strengths does it come in? • 3-mL cartridges • 3-mL prefilled KwikPen • 3-mL vials • 10-mL vials • 3-mL FlexPen • 3-mL FlexTouch • 3-mL PenFill cartridges • 10-mL vials What is the typical length of treatment? long-term long-term How do I store it? Refrigerate at 36° to 46°F (2° to 8°C). Do not freeze the drug. Refrigerate at 36° to 46°F (2° to 8°C). Do not freeze the drug. Continue reading >>

How To Store Insulin

How To Store Insulin

Insulin is measured in units. Most bottles, cartridges, and pens of insulin sold in the United States have 100 units of insulin per milliliter of fluid and are labeled U-100. Different strengths, like U-500, also are available in the U.S. Different strengths are used in other countries. It's important to know the type of insulin you take and whether it should appear cloudy or clear. When you prepare to use a bottle, cartridge, or pen, check the insulin: NPH should look uniformly cloudy after you gently roll the bottle or pen. All other insulin should look clear. If your insulin doesn't look right, don't use it. Take it back to your pharmacy. Don't shake your insulin. Gently roll it. Don't toss it around or handle it roughly. If you don't handle your insulin correctly, it's more likely to clump or frost. Don't use the insulin if you can see clumps after you gently roll the bottle or pen, or if the sides look frosted. Storage Guidelines Take steps to store your insulin correctly, or it might not work. Keep your insulin away from heat and light. Any insulin that you don't store in the refrigerator should be kept as cool as possible (between 56°F and 80°F.) Never let your insulin freeze. If your insulin freezes, don't use it, even after it's thawed. Keep unused bottles, cartridges, and pens of insulin in the refrigerator (between 36°F and 46°F). If stored properly, these will be good until the expiration date listed on the insulin. Keep insulin cartridges and pens that you're currently using at room temperature (between 56°F and 80°F.) Expiration Guidelines An open insulin bottle, cartridge, or pen is only good for a limited time. Follow these guidelines for discarding insulin: Glargine (Lantus): Discard opened bottles, pens, and cartridges 28 days after you've starte Continue reading >>

Can I Use My Insulin Past Its Expiration Date?

Can I Use My Insulin Past Its Expiration Date?

A certified diabetes educator answers whether older insulin is still safe to use. Integrated Diabetes Services (IDS) provides detailed advice and coaching on diabetes management from certified diabetes educators and dieticians. Insulin Nation hosts a regular Q&A column from IDS that answers questions submitted from the Type 1 diabetes community. Q: Should I really worry about using insulin after its expiration date? What about using it for more than 30 days? I think the insulin companies promote that just to make us throw out good insulin. A: When it comes to insulin, we have to make darned sure that the stuff is at full potency, or blood glucose levels can go dangerously high. The insulin manufacturers are required to test their products rigorously before bringing them to market. They can more or less guarantee that their products will work as indicated if used within the expiration date and for not more than a month after the seal on the vial, cartridge, or pen is broken. This is, of course, assuming that the insulin has been stored properly and not exposed to extreme heat, freezing cold, or direct sunlight. sponsor Does this mean that insulin suddenly goes belly up at the stroke of midnight on the expiration date, or 28 days after being put into use? Hardly. Many people, including clinicians with diabetes, have used insulin beyond the “deadlines” without a hitch. It simply means that the manufacturer has not tested their product beyond the dates indicated, so there is no guarantee — no way of knowing exactly how long the insulin will remain at full strength. Read “Can I Get Insulin Over the Counter?” This is where common sense comes into play. For those with good insurance coverage and plenty of insulin on-hand, it’s best to follow the rules and discard i Continue reading >>

Can Humalog Handle The Heat?

Can Humalog Handle The Heat?

See also: Kinetic vs Dynamics and User's Reports Humalog is a terrific insulin that improves postmeal readings, reduces the frequency of lows, and generally makes people feel better. But reports from people on both pumps and injections have surfaced indicating that Humalog has trouble handling the heat. These reports began to appear just after Humalog was released. Most insulins are relatively stable in hot weather, and lose potency only with unusually high temperatures (i.e., a non-refrigerated delivery truck with a flat tire in Phoenix in August). However, Humalog has gained a reputation for wanting to stay in your refrigerator, raising concerns about how your insulin is handled in transit to your pharmacy or home. Users report random, unexpected high blood sugars that correct when a new bottle of Humalog is started. Inspection of the bad bottle reveals either 1) several very tiny particles, much smaller than those typically found in a bad bottle of Regular, 2) one or two large hazy particles, or 3) small particles attached to the insides of the bottle. Healthy Humalog will appear as pure as clear water, with no particles or haze. Insulin pumps may be especially prone to unexpected highs because they use only Humalog. Heat-related problems typically start after three to four days use in a pump, or, when a bad bottle is encountered, immediately after first use of that bottle. On injections, the problem typically shows up as unexpected high readings after meals. Research studies undertaken so far have indicated no problem with use of Humalog in pumps. Prior to Humalog's release, Lilly conducted extensive heat and stability testing, and believed that it was as stable as Regular insulin which has an excellent history. But in the larger lab of the world, a loss of activit Continue reading >>

How Long Is An Open Vial Of Insulin Good For?

How Long Is An Open Vial Of Insulin Good For?

Once an insulin vial is punctured and open there is a limited amount of time that the vial can be stored before it becomes unsafe to use. Many people who use insulin will have left over medication in the vial because of the size of their daily dosages. Different insulin products have different time limits on being able to store it safely and it can be hard to track and remember. Not all types of glucose will have the same expiration time on open vials. They not only vary by type but also by the drug used. Here’s a help list to refer to for the proper length of time to store open (punctured) vials: Long-Acting Insulin Intermediate-Acting Insulin Humulin N: 1 month (31 days) after opening Short-Acting Insulin Novolin R: 42 days after opening Humulin R: 31 days after opening Humulin R U-500 concentrated: 31 days after opening Rapid-Acting Insulin Aspart (novolog): 28 days after opening Glulisine (apidra): 28 days after opening Lispro (humalog): 28 days after opening Other Non-Insulin Injected Medication Bydureon: use immediately once punctured and mixed. Do not store any unused portions. Helpful Tips Do not keep insulin in a hot space or overly warm room. Heat will break down the insulin and make it ineffective. Open vials can be stored at room temperature or in the refrigerator. Do not store insulin in sunlight. Direct light will also break down the insulin. Look at your insulin vial before using it after storage. Insulin should always be clear, never cloudy in appearance. There should not be any white particles or solid crystals. Insulin that is not clear or that has a smell or odor should not be used and must be thrown away. It may feel wasteful to throw away unused insulin when the recommended use time is reached. However, the medication loses its effectiveness past Continue reading >>

Humalog 50-50

Humalog 50-50

HUMALOG® Mix50/50™ 50% Insulin Lispro Protamine Suspension and 50% Insulin Lispro Injection (Rdna Origin) 100 Units Per Ml (U-100) DESCRIPTION Humalog® Mix50/50™ [50% insulin lispro protamine suspension and 50% insulin lispro injection, (rDNA origin)] is a mixture of insulin lispro solution, a rapid-acting blood glucose-lowering agent and insulin lispro protamine suspension, an intermediate-acting blood glucose-lowering agent. Chemically, insulin lispro is Lys(B28), Pro(B29) human insulin analog, created when the amino acids at positions 28 and 29 on the insulin B-chain are reversed. Insulin lispro is synthesized in a special non-pathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli bacteria that has been genetically altered to produce insulin lispro. Insulin lispro protamine suspension (NPL component) is a suspension of crystals produced from combining insulin lispro and protamine sulfate under appropriate conditions for crystal formation. Insulin lispro has the following primary structure: Insulin lispro has the empirical formula C257H383N65O77S6 and a molecular weight of 5808, both identical to that of human insulin. Humalog Mix50/50 vials and Pens contain a sterile suspension of insulin lispro protamine suspension mixed with soluble insulin lispro for use as an injection. Each milliliter of Humalog Mix50/50 injection contains insulin lispro 100 units, 0.19 mg protamine sulfate, 16 mg glycerin, 3.78 mg dibasic sodium phosphate, 2.20 mg Metacresol, zinc oxide content adjusted to provide 0.0305 mg zinc ion, 0.89 mg phenol, and Water for Injection. Humalog Mix50/50 has a pH of 7.0 to 7.8. Hydrochloric acid 10% and/or sodium hydroxide 10% may have been added to adjust pH. Continue reading >>

How Long Does Slin Keep For ?

How Long Does Slin Keep For ?

Used 1/2 a humalog for 4 weeks and its been in the fridge since i stopped using it about 3 weeks ago. Can i use it on my next bulk or do i buy a new one ? RE: How long does slin keep for ? 2008/05/14 18:00:49( permalink ) if its been in the fridge it should last until the expiry on the vial clat. it lasts about 4 weeks out of the fridge.. RE: How long does slin keep for ? 2008/05/14 19:11:02( permalink ) RE: How long does slin keep for ? 2008/05/14 19:12:16( permalink ) RE: How long does slin keep for ? 2008/05/14 19:58:51( permalink ) I did that before and when I used again the humalog pen, I didn't feel the commun sleepiness, lethargy that I alway have when I use slin PWO...so I open a new humalog pen and BANG!!! sleepiness, lethargy, came to me as hard as usually... So you should try and check whith you glucometer if you have... and if nothing is changing, you should use a new one... Good judgment usually comes from experience and experience usually comes from bad judgement RE: How long does slin keep for ? 2008/05/15 18:23:39( permalink ) Ive used it on a cut, more risky but great for muscle fullness while dieting do you think you could let me know the protocol for this ? RE: How long does slin keep for ? 2008/05/15 18:25:51( permalink ) Ive used it on a cut, more risky but great for muscle fullness while dieting do you think you could let me know the protocol for this ? Pretty much mate, it just means you base the majority of your carbs pre and post workout.. Be careful tho, start on a lower dose and take your time to build up, you wont have as many carbs in your system as when you previously used it so the chances of going hypo are increased RE: How long does slin keep for ? 2008/05/16 00:11:48( permalink ) feeling small on this cut, the slin may help RE: How lon Continue reading >>

Storage

Storage

NovoLog® Storage Home or Away, NovoLog® Goes With You NovoLog® lasts up to 28 days without refrigeration after first use, so it can be taken almost anywhere. Once in use, NovoLog® FlexPen® must be kept at room temperature below 86°F for up to 28 days. Its ability to stand up to heat is equal to, or better than, other major fast-acting insulin brands. Here is a quick guide to NovoLog® storage: Storage for NovoLog® FlexPen® 3 mL PenFill® cartridge,a and 10mL vial: Temperature Use up to In useb,c (opened) Room temperature: up to 86°F 28 days Not in use (unopened) Room temperature: up to 86°F 28 days Not in use (unopened) Refrigerated: 36°F to 46°F Expiration date a3 mL PenFill® cartridge is available for NovoPen Echo®. bFlexPen® and PenFill® cartridges in use (opened) must NOT be stored in the refrigerator. cIn use vials (opened) may be stored in the refrigerator. Do's: Don'ts: Do store unused NovoLog® in a refrigerator between 36° to 46°F (2° and 8°C) Don’t store NovoLog® in the freezer or directly adjacent to the refrigerator cooling element Don’t freeze NovoLog® or use NovoLog® if it has been frozen Don’t draw NovoLog® into a syringe and store for later use Do keep vials at temperatures below 86°F (30°C) for up to 28 days after initial use. Opened vials may be refrigerated Do use unpunctured vials until the expiration date printed on the label if they are stored in a refrigerator Do keep unused vials in the carton so they will stay clean and protected from light Don’t expose vials to excessive heat or light Do keep NovoLog® FlexPen® at temperatures below 86°F (30°C) for up to 28 days once it is punctured Don’t store in use NovoLog® FlexPen® in the refrigerator Do keep NovoLog® FlexPen® and all PenFill® cartridges away from Continue reading >>

Why Humalog® U-100?

Why Humalog® U-100?

You may have been taking a long-acting insulin for a while now. So why did your doctor prescribe another insulin? Well, it’s to help control the blood sugar spikes that happen naturally when you eat. Everyone gets them, but when you have diabetes you may need extra help controlling them. That’s where Humalog comes in. Humalog is different than your long-acting insulin. Long-acting insulin helps control your blood sugar throughout the whole day. Humalog is fast-acting insulin—it helps control the blood sugar spikes that happen naturally when you eat. Humalog is available in the Humalog U-100 KwikPen, which is portable and easy to use. And, since it shouldn’t be refrigerated after the first use, you can take it just about anywhere. Continue reading >>

Keeping An Eye On Your Insulin

Keeping An Eye On Your Insulin

For millions of people with diabetes, technology has supplied us with wonderful, helpful aids to help control blood sugar. While some of these medications come in pill form and remain stable when stored out of light and at moderate temperatures, people with diabetes who use insulin need to depend on more than technology to make sure their insulin is in top form. As associate dean and professor of pharmacy at Washington State University, a certified diabetes educator and a person with diabetes for more than 50 years, Keith Campbell knows the importance of keeping an eye on insulin. Campbell believes that establishing a routine surrounding insulin use helps ensure the product stays potent and stable. Step One: Check the Label Campbell advises that the first thing a person with diabetes should do is check the insulin’s expiration date, even before leaving the pharmacy. “Drug companies and the FDA are very conservative with the dates,” says Campbell. This means they tend set expiration date at the earliest time the insulin could possibly go bad, and sometimes even earlier. Sofia Iqbal, RPh, a drug information scientist with Novo Nordisk Pharmaceuticals, confirms this. “Expiration dates and storage guidelines are based on stability data obtained for batches of each formulation of insulin,” Iqbal says. She adds that the dates are valid as long as the insulin is kept stored under the correct conditions. “Never use insulin after the expiration date printed on the label and carton,” Iqbal warns. If you get your insulin home and discover the expiration date has passed, what should you do? Campbell advises that you return it to the pharmacy immediately for replacement. Step Two: Examine the Insulin Eli Lilly and Company’s Kara Appell, RPh, a medical information adm Continue reading >>

Insulin Pens Are Welcome Back To The Fridge!

Insulin Pens Are Welcome Back To The Fridge!

We all know that unopened insulin must be kept in the refrigerator. But once in use can we put it back in the fridge to protect it from excessive heat? The answer to this simple question is not as easy as one might think. All manufacturers explicitly recommend to ‘Not refrigerate’ insulin pens in use. This guideline that causes confusion among users is now being revoked by one manufacturer. Let’s try to understand the reasoning behind it and what it means for users now. What? I shouldn’t put my insulin pen back in the refrigerator? When it comes to storing medications, it is recommended you follow the leaflet or packaging instructions. For insulin in particular, there are two different situations: storing and in-use. · Before Opening: When insulin is to be stored long-term and has not been opened, keeping it in the fridge ensures it lasts until expiration date. · During Use: Once a vial, a cartridge or a new disposable pen are used for the first time, the insulin can be kept at room temperature. But it needs to be used within weeks. It makes sense: higher temperatures and an open product mean a shorter shelf life. But there is one extra sentence on insulin pens packages, which has caused quite some confusion: Pens in use — ‘Do not refrigerate.’ What does ‘do not refrigerate’ mean for users? Let’s take a trip back to 2003, when the recommendation to not refrigerate opened insulin first appeared. Take Lilly’s Humalog for example, for which the label was first altered 14-years ago: What was the reason behind this? People started to speculate this warning was a result of preventing any kind of temperature extremes from affecting the insulin once it is in use. Many insulin users know from experience that high temperature can lower the effectiveness of Continue reading >>

How Long Should You Keep Your Open Insulin Vials?

How Long Should You Keep Your Open Insulin Vials?

With so many different insulin and insulin-like products out there these days it can be hard to keep track of when your vial should be tossed. Depending on your dose, you may still have insulin left in your vial by the manufacturer-recommended time to throw it away. If this sounds like a familiar situation, know that it is important to throw away your vial regardless of whether you have any leftover. You might think it is wasteful to throw out what you may consider “perfectly good insulin,” but using the medication past the recommended time can actually do you more harm than good. You may notice that if you continue to use insulin from a vial past the manufacturers discard date, your blood glucose could be higher or a greater dose may be needed to achieve a normal blood glucose reading. There are several different types of insulin and a variety of other injectable diabetes medications, and the recommendations for how long they keep varies. For a quick overview, the different categories of insulin are: Rapid-acting Short-acting (regular) Intermediate-acting Long-acting So how long can you hold on to your insulin after you start using a vial? Rapid-acting insulin Short-acting insulin Humulin R: use within 31 days after puncturing vial Humulin R U-500 concentrated: use within 31 days after puncturing vial Intermediate-acting insulin Long-acting insulin Other injectable diabetes medications in vials A glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is a preferred screening test for diabetes. Done easily with a fingerstick in your physician’s office, it eliminates the need for fasting (not eating) prior to the test. The diagnosis of diabetes is confirmed if two consecutive A1c levels are greater than or equal to 6.5. What is the HbA1c? Red blood cells are permeable to glucose (sugar)—so Continue reading >>

The Abcs Of Insulin Care

The Abcs Of Insulin Care

Differing opinions about how to best care for insulin are stirring up a whirlwind of confusion. Over the last few months readers have been sending their questions and concerns to DIABETES HEALTH. The questions are simple enough: What is the best temperature to keep my insulin? Is it okay to use insulin past the expiration date? How should I mix my insulin? But answers to these questions can vary, making it hard to be sure one is doing the right thing. Here the questions and comments of insulin users will be presented with the recommendations of the companies who produce insulin. Too Hot or Too Cold? Brian Leslie, a DIABETES HEALTH on-line reader, writes: “I have had great results keeping my vial of insulin at work in my desk … However, I would imagine that taking a vial of medication and constantly fluctuating its temperature would tend to degrade its effectiveness faster.” According to Wayman Wendell Cheatham, MD, medical director at Novo Nordisk, it is okay to keep insulin in and out of the refrigerator while the vial is in use. But prior to being opened, a vial of insulin should be stored in a refrigerator. “As long as the insulin is kept away from high temperatures and freezing, a change in temperature (while in use) is not a problem,” says Dr. Cheatham. He adds that insulin should not be left in the car during the summer months even if only for a short period of time. Laura Stallman, a spokesperson for Eli Lilly and Company, agrees that moving a vial of insulin in and out of the refrigerator while in use does not affect its potency – assuming that it is used before the expiration date. Best If Used By… Eli Lilly and Novo Nordisk, the only two companies who market insulin in the United States, provide directions and expiration dates with their product. Continue reading >>

What Is Rapid-acting Insulin?

What Is Rapid-acting Insulin?

Rapid-Acting insulins are insulin analogs that were developed to help imitate meal-induced insulin secretion. Many type 2 diabetes patients will eventually require bolus mealtime insulin to help achieve blood glucose control. Bolus mealtime insulin works quickly to lower the increase in blood sugar after eating. It does this by stimulating the cells in the body to absorb glucose from the bloodstream. They have a quick onset of action (15-20 minutes) and short duration of action (2-4 hours).* Rapid-acting insulin analogs are often used over regular insulin because of their quick onset, which allows patients to inject it closer to mealtime and because of their short duration, which decreases the risk of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Some of the rapid-acting insulins available in the US include: Apidra (insulin glulisine) is a rapid-acting insulin analog used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes.Apidra is given as a subcutaneous (under the skin) injection within 15 minutes before or within 20 minutes after starting a meal, but always consult with your healthcare provider on proper use. It can be injected in the abdomen, thigh, or shoulder. Injection sites should be rotated each time to prevent the risk of lipodystrophy, an accumulation of fatty tissue under the skin at the site where insulin is injected. Your healthcare provider will help determine your proper dose based on each individual’s specific needs and lifestyle. Apidra’s onset of action is 25 minutes and its effect lasts about 4-5 hours. Apidra can also be used in an insulin pump.1 People who are allergic to any of the ingredients in Apidra (insulin glulisine) should not take it. Always check with your healthcare professional about any potential drug interactions before starting treatment. Apidra is available Continue reading >>

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