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How Long Is Humalog Good For After Opening

How Long Do Humalog And Lantus Last After Opening? - Diabetes

How Long Do Humalog And Lantus Last After Opening? - Diabetes

How long do Humalog and Lantus last after opening? The packaging says not to use after one month, but it seems to work fine for at least two months. My diabetic son is still a toddler so he doesn't even go through half a bottle in a month. Advice appreciated! Just put the bottle back in the fridge after you administer insulin and it will last pretty much until the expiration date. That being said, in an air-conditioned home a couple months doesn't seem all that surprising. If you're going to the beach and such you're definitely rolling the dice as far as expiration goes. I have my 'emergency' bottle that I keep in my backpack. It goes through all kinds of temperature changes and still works, even after more than a year, but it's just not as reliable as the good stuff. tl;dr Insulin isn't the delicate flower it's sometimes made out to be, but it will decay with enough time and high temperatures. For my own use, I have used insulin long after the expiration date. it is expensive and Ive gone through periods where I could'nt afford it. During this period, I had used insulin 10+months "expired" and it worked to a satisfactory level. More recently, even now that I am "fully stocked" I still have bottles at or near expiration and use them and it is effective, per my ratios. I have never re-stored insulin in the fridge and always kept it at room temperature after opening. That being said, I am going against manufacturer recommendations, and would not say this is the best course of action. However, like logdogday said, insulin is not as delicate as it is made out to be. You will be fine if you use it until the expiration date. Just make sure it never gets warm/hot. it looses potency. In reality you can use them a lonngggggg time. I've gone a month without refrigeration in warm Continue reading >>

Can I Use My Insulin Past Its Expiration Date?

Can I Use My Insulin Past Its Expiration Date?

A certified diabetes educator answers whether older insulin is still safe to use. Integrated Diabetes Services (IDS) provides detailed advice and coaching on diabetes management from certified diabetes educators and dieticians. Insulin Nation hosts a regular Q&A column from IDS that answers questions submitted from the Type 1 diabetes community. Q: Should I really worry about using insulin after its expiration date? What about using it for more than 30 days? I think the insulin companies promote that just to make us throw out good insulin. A: When it comes to insulin, we have to make darned sure that the stuff is at full potency, or blood glucose levels can go dangerously high. The insulin manufacturers are required to test their products rigorously before bringing them to market. They can more or less guarantee that their products will work as indicated if used within the expiration date and for not more than a month after the seal on the vial, cartridge, or pen is broken. This is, of course, assuming that the insulin has been stored properly and not exposed to extreme heat, freezing cold, or direct sunlight. sponsor Does this mean that insulin suddenly goes belly up at the stroke of midnight on the expiration date, or 28 days after being put into use? Hardly. Many people, including clinicians with diabetes, have used insulin beyond the “deadlines” without a hitch. It simply means that the manufacturer has not tested their product beyond the dates indicated, so there is no guarantee — no way of knowing exactly how long the insulin will remain at full strength. Read “Can I Get Insulin Over the Counter?” This is where common sense comes into play. For those with good insurance coverage and plenty of insulin on-hand, it’s best to follow the rules and discard i Continue reading >>

Can Insulin Go Back In The Fridge?

Can Insulin Go Back In The Fridge?

After removing insulin glargine (Lantus) from the refrigerator for use, can it be refrigerated over and over again after having warmed to room temperature, or does this degrade it? Continue reading >>

How Long Should Insulin Be Used Once A Vial Is Started?

How Long Should Insulin Be Used Once A Vial Is Started?

Editor’s comment: The commentary by Dr. Grajower has such important clinical relevance that responses were invited from the three pharmaceutical companies that supply insulin in the U.S. and the American Diabetes Association, and all of these combined in this commentary. The commenting letter and individual responses were authored separately and are completely independent of each other. Diabetic patients treated with insulin, whether for type 1 or type 2 diabetes, are prone to often unexplained swings in their blood glucose. These swings can vary from dangerously low to persistently high levels. Most diabetic patients, and most physicians, will adjust insulin regimens so as to avoid hypoglycemia at the expense of hyperglycemia. Among the “textbook” reasons for variable glucose responses to any given insulin regimen are 1) site of administration, 2) exercise, 3) bottles not adequately mixed before drawing the insulin (for NPH, Lente, or Ultralente), and 4) duration of treatment with insulin (1). A new insulin was marketed by Aventis Pharmaceuticals about 1 year ago, insulin glargine (Lantus). The manufacturer seemed to stress that patients not use a started bottle of this insulin for >28 days (2). Two patients of mine highlighted this point. L.K. is a 76-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes, diagnosed at 55 years of age, and treated with insulin since age 56. Her insulin regimen was changed to Lantus at night together with Novolog before meals. She monitors her blood glucose four times a day. She used a bottle of Lantus until it ran out; therefore, a bottle lasted for 2 months. Her recent HbA1c was 7.6%. I retrospectively analyzed her home glucose readings by averaging her fasting blood glucose levels for the first 15 days of a new bottle and the last 15 days of tha Continue reading >>

How Long Does Insulin Last Once It's Been Opened?

How Long Does Insulin Last Once It's Been Opened?

A fellow caregiver asked... My mother has type 2 diabetes and needs help with her insulin injections. After I open a new bottle, how long does insulin last for, how should I store it, and how do I know whether it's gone bad? Expert Answers As a general rule, most bottles of insulin are good for 28 days once they're opened. Of course, how quickly a person goes through a vial is highly individual. Some may go through a bottle in a week or two. Others, on a lower dosage, may not use all the insulin within four weeks. But the drug's stability and potency is only guaranteed for 28 days. Opened insulin pens typically last 14 days, though some last only 10 days. If you're uncertain, check with your mother's pharmacist to find out how long her insulin should last. When either of you opens a new vial or pen, make a note on the calendar -- and note the date when you'll need to throw out any remaining insulin. It's best to store an opened bottle of insulin at room temperature, even though manufacturers often recommend refrigeration for opened containers. It's usually less painful to inject insulin when it's at room temperature than when it's cold. Store unopened insulin vials and pen cartridges in the fridge, though, where they should last until their expiration date. Insulin shouldn't be exposed to extreme temperatures, so don't leave it in the car, next to the stove, in the freezer, or in the bathroom. If the bottle freezes, it must be discarded. Two typical signs that insulin has gone bad: poor performance and unusual appearance. If your mother is following her treatment plan and her glucose levels stay stubbornly, inexplicably high, her insulin may have lost its potency. Insulin that's cloudy when it's supposed to be clear or that contains particles, crystals, or small clumps Continue reading >>

Beware Summer Extremes With Insulin

Beware Summer Extremes With Insulin

Living with diabetes blog With summer arriving in Minnesota and many other places, I'd like to talk about how to manage insulin storage in extreme temperatures such as this season brings. A number of years ago, I met with a client who used a rapid insulin pen for meal dosing. She shared with me a story of how she attended the county fair on an exceptionally hot day, and had placed her insulin pen in the back pocket of tight jeans and walked around the fairgrounds all day. She used the pen for covering meals eaten at the fair, and her blood sugars were running higher than normal, but she related this to all the junk food. The next day her blood sugars continued to run high and when she took her (rapid) insulin, it didn't seem to affect her blood sugar level at all; in fact, it was like she was taking water instead of insulin. She wondered if the heat had affected her insulin, so she switched to a new insulin (disposable) pen, and soon after her blood sugars started to drop. Has this or something similar happened to you? I looked at insulin manufacturers' websites and found that for the majority of all types and brands of insulin, the maximum temperatures recommended are as follows: Opened room temperature insulin should not exceed 86 F (30 C) with the exception of Lantus, which should not exceed 77 F (25 C). Most manufacturers of insulin recommend discarding insulin if it exceeds 98.6 F (37 C). Other non insulin diabetic injectable medications: Glucagon and Byetta should not exceed 77 F (25 C). Symlin should not exceed 86 F (30 C). Avoiding potential problems Temperatures exceeding manufacturer's recommendations for insulin/medications Store your insulin in the refrigerator, in an insulated case or cooler with a freezable gel pack, or use a cooling wallet. Cooling wallet Continue reading >>

Keeping An Eye On Your Insulin

Keeping An Eye On Your Insulin

For millions of people with diabetes, technology has supplied us with wonderful, helpful aids to help control blood sugar. While some of these medications come in pill form and remain stable when stored out of light and at moderate temperatures, people with diabetes who use insulin need to depend on more than technology to make sure their insulin is in top form. As associate dean and professor of pharmacy at Washington State University, a certified diabetes educator and a person with diabetes for more than 50 years, Keith Campbell knows the importance of keeping an eye on insulin. Campbell believes that establishing a routine surrounding insulin use helps ensure the product stays potent and stable. Step One: Check the Label Campbell advises that the first thing a person with diabetes should do is check the insulin’s expiration date, even before leaving the pharmacy. “Drug companies and the FDA are very conservative with the dates,” says Campbell. This means they tend set expiration date at the earliest time the insulin could possibly go bad, and sometimes even earlier. Sofia Iqbal, RPh, a drug information scientist with Novo Nordisk Pharmaceuticals, confirms this. “Expiration dates and storage guidelines are based on stability data obtained for batches of each formulation of insulin,” Iqbal says. She adds that the dates are valid as long as the insulin is kept stored under the correct conditions. “Never use insulin after the expiration date printed on the label and carton,” Iqbal warns. If you get your insulin home and discover the expiration date has passed, what should you do? Campbell advises that you return it to the pharmacy immediately for replacement. Step Two: Examine the Insulin Eli Lilly and Company’s Kara Appell, RPh, a medical information adm Continue reading >>

Humalog 50-50

Humalog 50-50

HUMALOG® Mix50/50™ 50% Insulin Lispro Protamine Suspension and 50% Insulin Lispro Injection (Rdna Origin) 100 Units Per Ml (U-100) DESCRIPTION Humalog® Mix50/50™ [50% insulin lispro protamine suspension and 50% insulin lispro injection, (rDNA origin)] is a mixture of insulin lispro solution, a rapid-acting blood glucose-lowering agent and insulin lispro protamine suspension, an intermediate-acting blood glucose-lowering agent. Chemically, insulin lispro is Lys(B28), Pro(B29) human insulin analog, created when the amino acids at positions 28 and 29 on the insulin B-chain are reversed. Insulin lispro is synthesized in a special non-pathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli bacteria that has been genetically altered to produce insulin lispro. Insulin lispro protamine suspension (NPL component) is a suspension of crystals produced from combining insulin lispro and protamine sulfate under appropriate conditions for crystal formation. Insulin lispro has the following primary structure: Insulin lispro has the empirical formula C257H383N65O77S6 and a molecular weight of 5808, both identical to that of human insulin. Humalog Mix50/50 vials and Pens contain a sterile suspension of insulin lispro protamine suspension mixed with soluble insulin lispro for use as an injection. Each milliliter of Humalog Mix50/50 injection contains insulin lispro 100 units, 0.19 mg protamine sulfate, 16 mg glycerin, 3.78 mg dibasic sodium phosphate, 2.20 mg Metacresol, zinc oxide content adjusted to provide 0.0305 mg zinc ion, 0.89 mg phenol, and Water for Injection. Humalog Mix50/50 has a pH of 7.0 to 7.8. Hydrochloric acid 10% and/or sodium hydroxide 10% may have been added to adjust pH. Continue reading >>

How Long Should You Keep Your Open Insulin Vials?

How Long Should You Keep Your Open Insulin Vials?

With so many different insulin and insulin-like products out there these days it can be hard to keep track of when your vial should be tossed. Depending on your dose, you may still have insulin left in your vial by the manufacturer-recommended time to throw it away. If this sounds like a familiar situation, know that it is important to throw away your vial regardless of whether you have any leftover. You might think it is wasteful to throw out what you may consider “perfectly good insulin,” but using the medication past the recommended time can actually do you more harm than good. You may notice that if you continue to use insulin from a vial past the manufacturers discard date, your blood glucose could be higher or a greater dose may be needed to achieve a normal blood glucose reading. There are several different types of insulin and a variety of other injectable diabetes medications, and the recommendations for how long they keep varies. For a quick overview, the different categories of insulin are: Rapid-acting Short-acting (regular) Intermediate-acting Long-acting So how long can you hold on to your insulin after you start using a vial? Rapid-acting insulin Short-acting insulin Humulin R: use within 31 days after puncturing vial Humulin R U-500 concentrated: use within 31 days after puncturing vial Intermediate-acting insulin Long-acting insulin Other injectable diabetes medications in vials A glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is a preferred screening test for diabetes. Done easily with a fingerstick in your physician’s office, it eliminates the need for fasting (not eating) prior to the test. The diagnosis of diabetes is confirmed if two consecutive A1c levels are greater than or equal to 6.5. What is the HbA1c? Red blood cells are permeable to glucose (sugar)—so Continue reading >>

Insulin Pens Are Welcome Back To The Fridge!

Insulin Pens Are Welcome Back To The Fridge!

We all know that unopened insulin must be kept in the refrigerator. But once in use can we put it back in the fridge to protect it from excessive heat? The answer to this simple question is not as easy as one might think. All manufacturers explicitly recommend to ‘Not refrigerate’ insulin pens in use. This guideline that causes confusion among users is now being revoked by one manufacturer. Let’s try to understand the reasoning behind it and what it means for users now. What? I shouldn’t put my insulin pen back in the refrigerator? When it comes to storing medications, it is recommended you follow the leaflet or packaging instructions. For insulin in particular, there are two different situations: storing and in-use. · Before Opening: When insulin is to be stored long-term and has not been opened, keeping it in the fridge ensures it lasts until expiration date. · During Use: Once a vial, a cartridge or a new disposable pen are used for the first time, the insulin can be kept at room temperature. But it needs to be used within weeks. It makes sense: higher temperatures and an open product mean a shorter shelf life. But there is one extra sentence on insulin pens packages, which has caused quite some confusion: Pens in use — ‘Do not refrigerate.’ What does ‘do not refrigerate’ mean for users? Let’s take a trip back to 2003, when the recommendation to not refrigerate opened insulin first appeared. Take Lilly’s Humalog for example, for which the label was first altered 14-years ago: What was the reason behind this? People started to speculate this warning was a result of preventing any kind of temperature extremes from affecting the insulin once it is in use. Many insulin users know from experience that high temperature can lower the effectiveness of Continue reading >>

Storage

Storage

NovoLog® Storage Home or Away, NovoLog® Goes With You NovoLog® lasts up to 28 days without refrigeration after first use, so it can be taken almost anywhere. Once in use, NovoLog® FlexPen® must be kept at room temperature below 86°F for up to 28 days. Its ability to stand up to heat is equal to, or better than, other major fast-acting insulin brands. Here is a quick guide to NovoLog® storage: Storage for NovoLog® FlexPen® 3 mL PenFill® cartridge,a and 10mL vial: Temperature Use up to In useb,c (opened) Room temperature: up to 86°F 28 days Not in use (unopened) Room temperature: up to 86°F 28 days Not in use (unopened) Refrigerated: 36°F to 46°F Expiration date a3 mL PenFill® cartridge is available for NovoPen Echo®. bFlexPen® and PenFill® cartridges in use (opened) must NOT be stored in the refrigerator. cIn use vials (opened) may be stored in the refrigerator. Do's: Don'ts: Do store unused NovoLog® in a refrigerator between 36° to 46°F (2° and 8°C) Don’t store NovoLog® in the freezer or directly adjacent to the refrigerator cooling element Don’t freeze NovoLog® or use NovoLog® if it has been frozen Don’t draw NovoLog® into a syringe and store for later use Do keep vials at temperatures below 86°F (30°C) for up to 28 days after initial use. Opened vials may be refrigerated Do use unpunctured vials until the expiration date printed on the label if they are stored in a refrigerator Do keep unused vials in the carton so they will stay clean and protected from light Don’t expose vials to excessive heat or light Do keep NovoLog® FlexPen® at temperatures below 86°F (30°C) for up to 28 days once it is punctured Don’t store in use NovoLog® FlexPen® in the refrigerator Do keep NovoLog® FlexPen® and all PenFill® cartridges away from Continue reading >>

How Long Does Slin Keep For ?

How Long Does Slin Keep For ?

Used 1/2 a humalog for 4 weeks and its been in the fridge since i stopped using it about 3 weeks ago. Can i use it on my next bulk or do i buy a new one ? RE: How long does slin keep for ? 2008/05/14 18:00:49( permalink ) if its been in the fridge it should last until the expiry on the vial clat. it lasts about 4 weeks out of the fridge.. RE: How long does slin keep for ? 2008/05/14 19:11:02( permalink ) RE: How long does slin keep for ? 2008/05/14 19:12:16( permalink ) RE: How long does slin keep for ? 2008/05/14 19:58:51( permalink ) I did that before and when I used again the humalog pen, I didn't feel the commun sleepiness, lethargy that I alway have when I use slin PWO...so I open a new humalog pen and BANG!!! sleepiness, lethargy, came to me as hard as usually... So you should try and check whith you glucometer if you have... and if nothing is changing, you should use a new one... Good judgment usually comes from experience and experience usually comes from bad judgement RE: How long does slin keep for ? 2008/05/15 18:23:39( permalink ) Ive used it on a cut, more risky but great for muscle fullness while dieting do you think you could let me know the protocol for this ? RE: How long does slin keep for ? 2008/05/15 18:25:51( permalink ) Ive used it on a cut, more risky but great for muscle fullness while dieting do you think you could let me know the protocol for this ? Pretty much mate, it just means you base the majority of your carbs pre and post workout.. Be careful tho, start on a lower dose and take your time to build up, you wont have as many carbs in your system as when you previously used it so the chances of going hypo are increased RE: How long does slin keep for ? 2008/05/16 00:11:48( permalink ) feeling small on this cut, the slin may help RE: How lon Continue reading >>

How To Store Insulin

How To Store Insulin

Insulin is measured in units. Most bottles, cartridges, and pens of insulin sold in the United States have 100 units of insulin per milliliter of fluid and are labeled U-100. Different strengths, like U-500, also are available in the U.S. Different strengths are used in other countries. It's important to know the type of insulin you take and whether it should appear cloudy or clear. When you prepare to use a bottle, cartridge, or pen, check the insulin: NPH should look uniformly cloudy after you gently roll the bottle or pen. All other insulin should look clear. If your insulin doesn't look right, don't use it. Take it back to your pharmacy. Don't shake your insulin. Gently roll it. Don't toss it around or handle it roughly. If you don't handle your insulin correctly, it's more likely to clump or frost. Don't use the insulin if you can see clumps after you gently roll the bottle or pen, or if the sides look frosted. Storage Guidelines Take steps to store your insulin correctly, or it might not work. Keep your insulin away from heat and light. Any insulin that you don't store in the refrigerator should be kept as cool as possible (between 56°F and 80°F.) Never let your insulin freeze. If your insulin freezes, don't use it, even after it's thawed. Keep unused bottles, cartridges, and pens of insulin in the refrigerator (between 36°F and 46°F). If stored properly, these will be good until the expiration date listed on the insulin. Keep insulin cartridges and pens that you're currently using at room temperature (between 56°F and 80°F.) Expiration Guidelines An open insulin bottle, cartridge, or pen is only good for a limited time. Follow these guidelines for discarding insulin: Glargine (Lantus): Discard opened bottles, pens, and cartridges 28 days after you've starte Continue reading >>

How Long Does Insulin Really Last?

How Long Does Insulin Really Last?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I've seen a similar thread in the past, but now I've got my own experience to go on, and I'd like to hear about yours. Your actual experience, mind - not what you've read. Now, everybody knows what the drug companies say - 28 days after first use and then get rid of it. Yet it can stay "unopened" in the fridge for 2 years. When I was researching this (will try to give references if I can find them again) the papers I found cited several factors for length of original potency: When I was using vials, I always left them in the fridge. Injecting cold doesn't bother me, but if it bothers you, let the syringe warm up instead of the whole bottle. I could routinely go 45 days with no loss of potency (Lantus). I've never had vials of Novolog, so I can't speak to that. The pens change things, because there is no added air. They have caps, so no light. Don't carry them around, so no motion. I can see no reason why they cannot be used until their expiration date. I've got a NovoPen I've been using (from the fridge) for 2 months, and it works just fine. Also, I've still got a pen (Novolog) that I started using November 4 (it has been room temp for that time). I do carry it with me (as a backup) - mostly I 'm at home for meals. I do check for cloudiness, etc, but so far so good. Used it recently, and I did shoot 5 U, instead of the 3 U I would with fresh, and worked just as expected. Yes, after 3 months it's time to change it out. So I'm asking about two things really. One is saving money - why throw it out when it is fine if kept cold? I'm sure big Pharma likes it only good 28 days - why that magic numbe Continue reading >>

Why Humalog® U-100?

Why Humalog® U-100?

You may have been taking a long-acting insulin for a while now. So why did your doctor prescribe another insulin? Well, it’s to help control the blood sugar spikes that happen naturally when you eat. Everyone gets them, but when you have diabetes you may need extra help controlling them. That’s where Humalog comes in. Humalog is different than your long-acting insulin. Long-acting insulin helps control your blood sugar throughout the whole day. Humalog is fast-acting insulin—it helps control the blood sugar spikes that happen naturally when you eat. Humalog is available in the Humalog U-100 KwikPen, which is portable and easy to use. And, since it shouldn’t be refrigerated after the first use, you can take it just about anywhere. Continue reading >>

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