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How Long Does Novolog Work

Novolog

Novolog

Novolog is a prescription medication used to treat type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Novolog is a fast-acting form of insulin. It is usually given with a long-acting insulin to provide a steady amount of insulin to control blood glucose (sugar) levels. This medication comes in an injectable form available in vials and prefilled pens. Novolog should be injected just under the skin 5 to 10 minutes before meals. It may also be injected directly into a vein (IV) by a healthcare provider or by an insulin pump. Common side effects of Novolog include low blood sugar, reaction at the injection site, and weight gain. Novolog is a prescription medication used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Serious side effects may occur. See "Novolog Precautions" section. Common side effects of Novolog include weight gain, reaction at the injection site, and low blood sugar. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is the most common side effect seen with Novolog use. Symptoms of low blood sugar may include: sweating dizziness or lightheadedness shakiness hunger fast heart beat tingling of lips and tongue trouble concentrating or confusion blurred vision slurred speech anxiety, irritability or mood changes headache Severe low blood sugar can cause unconsciousness (passing out), seizures, and death. Know your symptoms of low blood sugar. Follow your healthcare provider’s instructions for treating low blood sugar. Talk to your healthcare provider if low blood sugar is a problem for you. Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Especially tell your doctor if you tak Continue reading >>

Novolog Rapid-acting Insulin | Novolog (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml

Novolog Rapid-acting Insulin | Novolog (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml

Selected Important Safety Information for NovoLog Do not share your NovoLogFlexPen, NovoLogFlexTouch, PenFillcartridge or PenFillcartridge compatible insulin delivery device with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. your blood sugar is too low (hypoglycemia) or you are allergic to any of its ingredients. Read the Instructions for Use and take exactly as directed. NovoLog is fast-acting. Eat a meal within 5 to 10 minutes after taking it. Know the type and strength of your insulin. Do not change your insulin type unless your health care provider tells you to. Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should check them. Do not reuse or share your needles with other people. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. What is NovoLog (insulin aspart injection) 100 U/mL? NovoLogis a man-made insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. Important Safety Information for NovoLog Do not share your NovoLogFlexPen, NovoLogFlexTouch, PenFillcartridge or PenFillcartridge compatible insulin delivery device with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. your blood sugar is too low (hypoglycemia) or you are allergic to any of its ingredients. Before taking NovoLog, tell your health care provider about all your medical conditions including, if you are: pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding. taking new prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including supplements. Talk to your health care provider about how to manage low blo Continue reading >>

Novolog

Novolog

Last reviewed on RxList 11/13/2017 NovoLog (insulin aspart [rDNA origin] injection) is a form of insulin, a hormone that is produced in the body, used to treat type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes in adults and children who are at least 2 years old. NovoLog is usually given together with another long-acting insulin. The most common side effect of NovoLog is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Symptoms of low blood sugar may include headache, nausea, hunger, confusion, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, blurred vision, fast heartbeat, sweating, tremor, trouble concentrating, confusion, or seizure (convulsions). Other common side effects of NovoLog include: injection site reactions (e.g., pain, redness, irritation). Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects of NovoLog including: signs of low potassium level in the blood (such as muscle cramps, weakness, or irregular heartbeat). The dosage of NovoLog is individualized. The total daily insulin requirement may vary and is usually between 0.5 to 1.0 units/kg/day. NovoLog may interact with albuterol, clonidine, reserpine, guanethidine, or beta-blockers. There are many other medicines that can increase or decrease the effects of insulin. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant before using NovoLog. Tell your doctor if you become pregnant. Your doctor may switch the type of insulin you use during pregnancy. This medication does not pass into breast milk. Your insulin needs may change while breastfeeding. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding. Our NovoLog (insulin aspart [rDNA origin] injection) Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehens Continue reading >>

Novolog® (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml Indications And Usage

Novolog® (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml Indications And Usage

NovoLog® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® or one of its excipients. Never Share a NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill® Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. NovoLog® (insulin aspart injection) 100 U/mL is an insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. NovoLog® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® or one of its excipients. Never Share a NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill® Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse effect of insulin therapy. The timing of hypoglycemia may reflect the time-action profile of the insulin formulation. Glucose monitoring is re Continue reading >>

Insulin Actions Times And Peak Times

Insulin Actions Times And Peak Times

A good way to improve your glucose levels is to track the peaks and drops in your glucose , so you can figure out why they happened and how to correct them. Once you identify glucose patterns (they ARE there!), you also want to understand when each of your insulins is active and when they typically stop lowering your glucose. This helps you adjust your doses or food intake to stop unwanted ups and downs in your readings. The table below shows the start, peak, and end times for various insulins with some explanations and typical uses for each. When Does My Insulin Peak and How Long Does It Last? designed to peak, covers meals and lowers high BGs Humalog , Novolog and Apidra insulins currently give the best coverage for meals and help keep the glucose lower afterward. Their glucose lowering activity starts to work about 20 minutes after they are taken, with a gradual rise in activity over the next 1.75 to 2.25 hours. Their activity gradually falls over the next 3 hours with about 5 to 6 hours of activity being common with these insulins.Although insulin action times are often quoted as 3-5 hours, the actual duration of insulin action is typically 5 hours or more. See our article Duration of Insulin Action for more information on this important topic. In general, "rapid" insulins are still too slow for many common meals where the glucose peaks within an hour and digestion is complete within 2-3 hours. The best kept secret on stopping post meal spiking is to eake the injection or bolus earlier before the meal and to eat slower low glycemic carbs. Regular insulin still carries its original name of "fast insulin" but its slower action often works better for people who take Symlin or for those who have gastroparesis (delayed digestion). It is also a great choice for those who Continue reading >>

Humalog Vs. Novolog: Important Differences And More

Humalog Vs. Novolog: Important Differences And More

Humalog and Novolog are two diabetes medications. Humalog is the brand-name version of insulin lispro, and Novolog is the brand-name version of insulin aspart. These drugs both help control blood glucose (sugar) in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Humalog and Novolog are both rapid acting. That means they work more quickly than other types of insulin. There are important distinctions between Humalog and Novolog, however, and the drugs are not directly interchangeable. Check out this comparison so you can work with your doctor to choose a drug that’s right for you. Insulin is injected under your skin fat. It’s the most common type of treatment for type 1 diabetes because it works quickly. It’s also the only type of diabetes medication that’s absorbed into the bloodstream. Humalog and Novolog are both equivalent to the insulin made in your body. Unlike oral diabetes drugs, insulin provides fast relief for changes in your blood sugar. The type of insulin your doctor prescribes depends on how often and how much your blood sugar fluctuates each day. The table below provides quick facts at a glance. Brand name Humalog Novolog What is the generic drug? insulin lispro insulin aspart Is a generic version available? no no What does it treat? type 1 and type 2 diabetes type 1 and type 2 diabetes What form does it come in? solution for injection solution for injection What strengths does it come in? • 3-mL cartridges • 3-mL prefilled KwikPen • 3-mL vials • 10-mL vials • 3-mL FlexPen • 3-mL FlexTouch • 3-mL PenFill cartridges • 10-mL vials What is the typical length of treatment? long-term long-term How do I store it? Refrigerate at 36° to 46°F (2° to 8°C). Do not freeze the drug. Refrigerate at 36° to 46°F (2° to 8°C). Do not freeze the drug. Continue reading >>

Know About Novolog Insulin Peak Time, Onset And Duration Of Action

Know About Novolog Insulin Peak Time, Onset And Duration Of Action

What is Novolog? Novolog is a fast acting insulin that is used to treat patients with diabetes mellitus. It can be prescribed to adults with type 2 diabetes, and adults and children above the age of 2 with type 1 diabetes. Novolog is also known as insulin aspart. Insulin aspart is a man made insulin that mimics the way the natural hormone works, which is to help glucose enter the body’s cells to be used for fuel. When you inject this insulin, it starts to work quickly to reduce your blood sugar levels. After using insulin aspart, it is advised that you eat within 5 to 10 minutes tp prevent low blood sugar. This medication is usually prescribed together with intermediate or long acting insulin. Novolog insulin peak time, onset and duration of action Insulin types such as novolog are usually classified according to the time period they take to control blood sugar levels. To understand how this medication works in the body, it is important you know the meaning of onset, peak, and duration of the medication. The onset refers to how fast it takes before the insulin begins to reduce blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. On the other hand, peak refers to the time when insulin is working the best in the body to reduce blood sugar levels. The duration refers to how long the insulin keeps working in your body. The drug peak time is generally between one to four hours, while novolog onset is between 10 to 20 minutes. How to take it Novolog can be injected subcutaneously using an injection pen or a syringe. Your healthcare provider will show you the best part of your body to inject this medication. Usually, it is injected into the fat tissue of the stomach, thigh, upper arm or buttocks. You should not inject this medication on the same spot twice. Instead, change the inject Continue reading >>

Rapid Insulins | Diabetesnet.com

Rapid Insulins | Diabetesnet.com

Thu, 11/18/2010 - 15:27 -- Richard Morris See also Kinetics vs. Dynamics , Humalog & Heat and Users' Reports Like Regular, Humalog and Novolog are used to cover meals and snacks. Most meals raise the blood sugar for only 2 to 3 hours afterwards. Once injected, Regular insulin takes 30 minutes to begin working, peaks between 2 and 4 hours and hangs on for 6 to 8 hours, long after the meal stopped raising the blood sugar. Humalog and Novolog, on the other hand, begin working in about 10 minutes, peaks at one to one and a half hours and are gone in about three and a half to four hours. Many people who've tried these faster insulins report that their control is improved and that they feel better. The great advantage of fast insulins are that they match the "action time" for most meals. You can take them as you begin eating, rather than the 30 to 45 minutes prior to eating required of Regular. No longer do you need to accurately anticipate when you (or your young child with diabetes) will begin eating. In addition, Humalog and Novolog leave your body faster so you don't have residual insulin causing low blood sugars in the late afternoon or, even worse, in the middle of the night. For most meals, fast insulins will be lowering the blood sugar at the same time the food is raising it. The rise in the blood sugar seen in the couple of hours after eating is much lower, especially with Novolog, and by the end of three hours the blood sugar is often back to its starting point. With Humalog or Novolog, you're better equipped to prevent spiking blood sugar between meals, while avoiding the lows that result from the combined buildup of Regular and long-acting insulins. The new Lantus insulin is an excellent choice when using these fast insulins to cover meals. The clearly defined ac Continue reading >>

Faqs About Novolog, Flexpen, And More | Novolog (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml

Faqs About Novolog, Flexpen, And More | Novolog (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml

Selected Important Safety Information for NovoLog Do not share your NovoLogFlexPen, NovoLogFlexTouch, PenFillcartridge or PenFillcartridge compatible insulin delivery device with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. your blood sugar is too low (hypoglycemia) or you are allergic to any of its ingredients. Read the Instructions for Use and take exactly as directed. NovoLog is fast-acting. Eat a meal within 5 to 10 minutes after taking it. Know the type and strength of your insulin. Do not change your insulin type unless your health care provider tells you to. Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should check them. Do not reuse or share your needles with other people. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. What is NovoLog (insulin aspart injection) 100 U/mL? NovoLogis a man-made insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. Important Safety Information for NovoLog Do not share your NovoLogFlexPen, NovoLogFlexTouch, PenFillcartridge or PenFillcartridge compatible insulin delivery device with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. your blood sugar is too low (hypoglycemia) or you are allergic to any of its ingredients. Before taking NovoLog, tell your health care provider about all your medical conditions including, if you are: pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding. taking new prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including supplements. Talk to your health care provider about how to manage low blo Continue reading >>

How Long Should Insulin Be Used Once A Vial Is Started?

How Long Should Insulin Be Used Once A Vial Is Started?

Editor’s comment: The commentary by Dr. Grajower has such important clinical relevance that responses were invited from the three pharmaceutical companies that supply insulin in the U.S. and the American Diabetes Association, and all of these combined in this commentary. The commenting letter and individual responses were authored separately and are completely independent of each other. Diabetic patients treated with insulin, whether for type 1 or type 2 diabetes, are prone to often unexplained swings in their blood glucose. These swings can vary from dangerously low to persistently high levels. Most diabetic patients, and most physicians, will adjust insulin regimens so as to avoid hypoglycemia at the expense of hyperglycemia. Among the “textbook” reasons for variable glucose responses to any given insulin regimen are 1) site of administration, 2) exercise, 3) bottles not adequately mixed before drawing the insulin (for NPH, Lente, or Ultralente), and 4) duration of treatment with insulin (1). A new insulin was marketed by Aventis Pharmaceuticals about 1 year ago, insulin glargine (Lantus). The manufacturer seemed to stress that patients not use a started bottle of this insulin for >28 days (2). Two patients of mine highlighted this point. L.K. is a 76-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes, diagnosed at 55 years of age, and treated with insulin since age 56. Her insulin regimen was changed to Lantus at night together with Novolog before meals. She monitors her blood glucose four times a day. She used a bottle of Lantus until it ran out; therefore, a bottle lasted for 2 months. Her recent HbA1c was 7.6%. I retrospectively analyzed her home glucose readings by averaging her fasting blood glucose levels for the first 15 days of a new bottle and the last 15 days of tha Continue reading >>

How Long Does Your Insulin Take To Work..?

How Long Does Your Insulin Take To Work..?

How Long Does Your Insulin Take To Work..? Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. How Long Does Your Insulin Take To Work..? Hey.. Was just wondering how long it takes for everyones insulin to kick in. Mine seems to take about 5 hours and was just wondering if anyone else took this long. Oh and I mean fast-acting.. At the moment i'm on Novorapid and if this is not 'normal' what I could do to improve the time taken Sounds like your insulin is not working properly. This is a "fast-acting" insulin and should be kicking in right after you meal. Check the product insert data sheet included with the insulin for specifics. Talk with your medical professional ASAP and/or get another fresh vial of insulin. I take Novolog and it begins to work within several minutes after injection. The product insert warns me to make certain to eat within 5 to 10 minutes after injection. It peaks within 3 hours of injection. Good luck and check your problem out ASAP. It isn't just one cartridge of it :\ Its been taking that long for a while. Have spoken to Diabetic Nurse and she was supposed to phone back last Tuesday, but she hasnt yet :\ I was okaay with it before and it worked quickly, until about 8 months ago. :S How much of the injection are you taking, Where are you injecting yourself and what are you eatting. Taking 5 hours almost tells me you are not taking enough for what you are eatting. I take Novorapid as well, and a typical meal say 8oz meat, mixed greens, 1/2 a small bake potato and 2 glasses of water i will take 8 units and my 2 hour reading will be just about the same as my premeal. I know one evening my wife ordered pizza so i i splurged a Continue reading >>

Measuring Your Results

Measuring Your Results

By now you probably already know a lot about NovoLog®. It is a fast-acting insulin taken at mealtime proven to help control blood sugar, and it is changed slightly so that it acts more quickly than regular human insulin. That is why it is called analog insulin. And you may even know that controlling your blood sugar at mealtime, your postprandial blood sugar, can help lower your A1C. But you may not be sure how well your NovoLog® therapy is working for you right now. Remember, even though NovoLog® is a “fast-acting insulin,” that term refers to how fast it works at mealtime. It will take time and effort to bring down your overall blood sugar. But you will want to know how it’s working. How can you tell? One of the best ways to know how well your insulin is working is to check your blood sugar. Checking your blood sugar, as instructed by your diabetes care team, is the only way to know if your diabetes care plan is working. Even if you feel great, your blood sugar can be higher or lower than it should be. Blood Sugar Diary Many people find using a Blood Sugar Diary to be very helpful in finding out what their blood sugar patterns are. A Blood Sugar Diary will tell you: If your insulin or other diabetes medicine is working How physical activity and the foods you eat affect your blood sugar Keeping track of your blood sugar is a very important part of reaching your A1C goal. Use these guidelines from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) to help see if you’re on the right track. Time Goals for people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes FPG (at least 8 hours since you’ve eaten, usually when you wake up) 80 to 130 mg/dL PPG or postprandial blood sugar (1 to 2 hours after you eat) Less than 180 mg/dL A1C Less than 7% If you’ve recently started on NovoLog®, please Continue reading >>

How Novolog® Works

How Novolog® Works

Remember that although there is only one NovoLog® insulin, you might hear your health care providers refer to it by a few other names. As an insulin that you take at mealtime, NovoLog® is often called “mealtime” or "bolus" insulin. Because it goes to work quickly, it is also sometimes called “rapid-acting” or “fast-acting” insulin. And, because it is a slightly changed man-made version of insulin, it is also called analog insulin. NovoLog® helps control mealtime blood sugar spikes Mealtime insulin therapy with NovoLog® tries to mimic the normal pattern of how the body responds to rising blood sugar after meals. In a person who doesn't have diabetes, the pancreas releases a short burst, or "bolus," of insulin to handle the increase in blood sugar from each meal. As a bolus, or fast-acting, insulin, NovoLog® closely mimics these bursts, helping to control mealtime blood sugar spikes that happen in people with diabetes. Besides bolus insulin, there is also basal insulin. In fact, you may already be taking “long-acting” basal insulin. Maybe at night or in the morning—sometimes both. In people without diabetes, a steady amount of basal insulin is released into the blood day and night. This insulin helps control blood sugar between meals and during sleep. In some people with type 2 diabetes, especially those whose bodies are still naturally producing some insulin, replacing the natural basal insulin release with a man-made long-acting insulin is enough to control their blood sugar throughout the day. However, as the pancreas produces less insulin, stops producing insulin altogether, or the body has more trouble using it correctly, adding a bolus (mealtime) insulin may become necessary. Long-acting basal insulin plus a fast-acting bolus insulin, such as Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: How Long Does It Take For Insulin To Work?

Type 2 Diabetes: How Long Does It Take For Insulin To Work?

If you have been living with type 2 diabetes for a while, then you may be on a medication regimen that includes insulin. You’ve probably noticed that your type 2 diabetes is a bit different from other people’s. Every person’s body is different, and this is just one reason why the response to insulin treatments can vary from person to person. Read on to ease your confusion about insulin and learn how it supports blood sugar management on the individual level. How insulin works in the body Insulin is produced naturally in the body by the pancreas. The pancreas contains millions of beta cells, and these cells are responsible for making insulin. Whenever you eat food with carbohydrates, your beta cells release insulin so that other cells in the body can use the blood glucose it gets from food for energy. In a sense, insulin acts as a key, letting glucose into the cells. How insulin works without diabetes Under normal circumstances, the body produces insulin after digestion. The presence of insulin triggers cells to take in the glucose and use it as energy. The ability of your cells to respond to insulin is called insulin sensitivity. What happens to insulin when you have diabetes? If you have type 2 diabetes, your body either can’t produce any or enough insulin, or is resistant to its presence. That means glucose is not able to get into your body’s cells effectively. The inability for the cells to absorb the glucose in the blood causes elevated blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels will be high after meals, and even between meals, since the liver makes glucose when we are between meals or sleeping. People who have type 2 diabetes often take diabetes pills or insulin shots to improve their blood sugar levels. Characteristics of insulin Insulin exists in suspension Continue reading >>

Novolog, Novolog Flexpen, Novolog Penfill

Novolog, Novolog Flexpen, Novolog Penfill

What is NovoLog? NovoLog (insulin aspart)is a fast-acting insulin that starts to work about 15 minutes after injection, peaks in about 1 hour, and keeps working for 2 to 4 hours. Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. NovoLog is used to improve blood sugar control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. This medicine is sometimes used together with a long-acting or intermediate-acting insulin. NovoLog is used to treat type 2 diabetes in adults. NovoLog is also used to treat type 1 diabetes in adults and children who are at least 2 years old. Important information NovoLog is a fast-acting insulin that begins to work very quickly. After using it, you should eat a meal within 5 to 10 minutes. Never share an injection pen or cartridge with another person. Sharing injection pens or cartridges can allow disease such as hepatitis or HIV to pass from one person to another. You should not use NovoLog if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Before taking this medicine You should not use NovoLog if you are allergic to insulin aspart, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). NovoLog is not approved for use by anyone younger than 2 years old. This medicine should not be used to treat type 2 diabetes in a child of any age. To make sure NovoLog is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: liver or kidney disease; or low levels of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia). Tell your doctor if you also take pioglitazone or rosiglitazone (sometimes contained in combinations with glimepiride or metformin). Taking certain oral diabetes medicines while you are using insulin may increase your risk of serious heart problems. Follow your doctor's instructions about using insulin if you are pregn Continue reading >>

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