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How Long Does Novolog Last In Your System

Take A Closer Look At Novolog® Mix 70/30

Take A Closer Look At Novolog® Mix 70/30

Do not share your NovoLog® Mix 70/30 FlexPen® with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. Who should not take NovoLog® Mix 70/30? Do not take NovoLog® Mix 70/30 if: your blood sugar is too low (hypoglycemia) or you are allergic to any of its ingredients. Before taking NovoLog® Mix 70/30, tell your healthcare provider about all your medical conditions including, if you are: pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding. taking new prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including supplements. Talk to your health care provider about how to manage low blood sugar. How should I take NovoLog® Mix 70/30? Read the Instructions for Use and take exactly as directed. NovoLog® Mix 70/30 starts acting fast. If you have type 1 diabetes, inject within 15 minutes before you eat a meal. If you have type 2 diabetes, inject within 15 minutes before or after starting your meal. Do not mix NovoLog® Mix 70/30 with other insulin products or use in an insulin pump. Know the type and strength of your insulin. Do not change your insulin type unless your health care provider tells you to. Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should check them. Do not reuse or share your needles or syringes with other people. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. What should I avoid while taking NovoLog® Mix 70/30? Do not drive or operate heavy machinery, until you know how NovoLog® Mix 70/30 affects you. Do not drink alcohol or use medicines that contain alcohol. What are the possible side effects of NovoLog® Mix 70/30? Serious side effects can lead to death, includin Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In Type 1 Diabetes

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In Type 1 Diabetes

I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 1968, at the age of 8 years old. At the time, there were no fingerstick blood sugars available for use. One had to regulate diabetes by measuring urine sugars, a very imprecise way to monitor blood sugar control. I recently obtained copies of my medical records from that 12-day stay, and found the following comment in the discharge summary: “He had one mild episode of shocking without loss of consciousness or convulsion.” I remember that episode. I could not have known that it was to be the first of hundreds of low blood sugar reactions that I would experience over the next 46 years. Though a hypoglycemia episode is always disruptive and never a pleasant experience, most were mild, ones that I could treat myself. But occasionally they were severe, requiring assistance from family or co-workers, or 911 calls. I was driven to achieve ‘tight control’ and prevent the long-term complications of diabetes, which I have managed to do. But there was a high price. I felt like I was playing a game of Russian roulette with hypoglycemia. I could no longer tell when I was low. Hypoglycemia unawareness had developed. I was fortunate enough to have developed T1D at a time when treatment for it has steadily improved. I started on an insulin pump in January 1982, and that helped me to reduce my frequency of hypoglycemia. The availability of insulin glargine (Lantus) and insulin detemir (Levemir) were great advances over older basal insulins (NPH, lente, ultralente) that had more intense and less predictable peaks, a very real problem at night. While I have not used them, because they became available after I started on a pump, better basal insulins have helped many T1Ds reduce night time hypoglycemia. Faster insulins (insulin lispro/Humalog Continue reading >>

Novolog Flexpen (injection)

Novolog Flexpen (injection)

Ask a Question Where can I find information on the flexpen in spanish I am looking for instructions in spanish on how to use the novolog flexpen and the 70/30 novolin mix. Can someone please tell me where to find this information, Thank you Novoolog Flexpen - (penfill alternative) I have been using the Novolog Flexpen to deliver my insulin for the last few months. My prescriptionn refill arrived today and it is the penfill cartridges and not the disposable flexpen pens. How do I obtain the permanent device used to inject this i... by David in Minnesota, 08/29/2006 Dosage Intervals My husband just started with the Novolog Flexpen. He takes a dose right before breakfast around 9 and then before dinner around 6. Thus he has 9 hrs from the first dose to the second of a day. Then he has 15 hours overnight. I am wondering if it would... by R Carter in Mt. Pleasant, SC, 01/16/2006 Novolog FlexPen (Injection) Drug and Prescription Information Novolog FlexPen (Injection) Novolog FlexPen (Injection) Medication Classification INSULIN ASPART, HUMAN (Injection) Novolog FlexPen (Injection) is used for the Treatment Insulin Aspart, Recombinant (IN-su-lin AS-part, re-KOM-bi-nant) Treats diabetes mellitus (sugar diabetes). This type of insulin is similar to regular insulin, but acts in the body more quickly. When To Not Use Novolog FlexPen (Injection) Talk with your doctor before using this medicine if you have had an allergic reaction to insulin aspart or any other type of insulin. How Should You Use Novolog FlexPen (Injection) Injectable Your doctor will tell you how much medicine to use and how often. Do not change the brand or dose of your insulin unless your doctor tells you to. When you receive a new supply of insulin, check the label to be sure it is the correct insulin. If you a Continue reading >>

You Get The Beer, And I'll Get The Lantus

You Get The Beer, And I'll Get The Lantus

The other day, Steph and I were divvying up the shopping that we had to do. I was running low on Lantus, and our refrigerator was also running low on beer, so it was pretty obvious that someone had to get the refills. She also suggested that she would pick up some takeout pizza for supper. And I went to the pharmacy and picked up the insulin. The concept of beer, pizza, and insulin all being part of a tight-control diabetes program might strike some people as unreasonable. But let me assure you that it can work. My tight-control program consists of Novolog given immediately after most meals plus Lantus as basal insulin. Since starting this program a bit over a year ago, I’ve averaged 110 mg/dl on my blood glucose levels, and had normal A1cs, most recently 5.9 You might ask: do I have any restrictions on what I eat? Yup, but they have nothing to do with diabetes. If I eat too much, I’ll gain weight, and like most other people, I have no need to gain any more weight. How can such a program work? 1) Zillions of blood glucose measurements. For example, I always check my BG before driving. To be sure, once in a while, I’ll do only two BGs a day, but if things are exceptional, I have no hesitation to check 6-10 times in a day. 2) Figuring out how much insulin is needed for my routine foods. For me,** 1** slice of pizza takes 4 units of Novolog; 1 bottle of beer is 3 units; 1 English muffin with peanut butter is 3 units. 3) Counting carbs and taking the Novolog after eating. I simply add up the number of units of insulin I’ll need as I go, from salad (no insulin coverage needed) to main course to dessert. Then I pop the total number of units right then and there, using an insulin pen. 4) Injecting through clothing. I discussed this a while back at my other blog, in an Continue reading >>

Novolog

Novolog

Novolog is a prescription medication used to treat type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Novolog is a fast-acting form of insulin. It is usually given with a long-acting insulin to provide a steady amount of insulin to control blood glucose (sugar) levels. This medication comes in an injectable form available in vials and prefilled pens. Novolog should be injected just under the skin 5 to 10 minutes before meals. It may also be injected directly into a vein (IV) by a healthcare provider or by an insulin pump. Common side effects of Novolog include low blood sugar, reaction at the injection site, and weight gain. Novolog is a prescription medication used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Serious side effects may occur. See "Novolog Precautions" section. Common side effects of Novolog include weight gain, reaction at the injection site, and low blood sugar. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is the most common side effect seen with Novolog use. Symptoms of low blood sugar may include: sweating dizziness or lightheadedness shakiness hunger fast heart beat tingling of lips and tongue trouble concentrating or confusion blurred vision slurred speech anxiety, irritability or mood changes headache Severe low blood sugar can cause unconsciousness (passing out), seizures, and death. Know your symptoms of low blood sugar. Follow your healthcare provider’s instructions for treating low blood sugar. Talk to your healthcare provider if low blood sugar is a problem for you. Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Especially tell your doctor if you tak Continue reading >>

Unlocking The Basal Mystery

Unlocking The Basal Mystery

We all know about bolus, but do you know how basal insulin works? Here’s the inside story. Any person with diabetes on insulin therapy knows that you need insulin when you eat a meal. Using a see-saw as an analogy, food and insulin balance each other out. Too much food and not enough insulin, you have hyperglycemia. Too much insulin and not enough food, and you have hypoglycemia. But most people who use insulin also realize that it’s not just for when you eat. Folks with a pump use insulin nearly 24 hours a day, taking only short breaks for showering, swimming, or sex. Also, people who manage with multiple daily injections (MDIs) have to take two types of insulin, a short-acting bolus insulin (Humalog, Novolog or Apidra) for their meals as well as a long-acting basal insulin (Levemir or Lantus). There’s a big difference between the two, but many people with diabetes don’t understand what basal insulin is and what it means to them. They either follow doctor’s orders and take long-acting insulin without understanding exactly what’s going on in their bodies or, worse, they don’t follow doctor’s orders. Let’s look at basal insulin, what it does, and how to test your basal rate, since a little knowledge can bring an outsized peace of mind: Managing Spontaneous Sugar Basal literally means “background”, and basal insulin is the background insulin that has to be constantly infused or active in our bodies or our blood sugar spikes. Unlike previous long-acting insulins that would peak, basal insulin is programmed to keep our blood sugars stable in the absence of food. But how many of us actually understand the biology behind the basal? I’ve had Type 1 diabetes for almost 20 years, but it wasn’t until I took an Anatomy & Physiology class and spoke with se Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Basics - Taking Medications

Diabetes: The Basics - Taking Medications

Listen to Diabetes: The Basics—Taking Medications Audio General Information About Diabetes Medicines Most people with diabetes take diabetes medicines medication to help control it. Everyone who has Type 1 diabetes must take insulin to live. Some people who have Type 2 diabetes can control diabetes without medicines for a while, using only healthy eating and exercise. This happens most often right after someone is first diagnosed. For some people, this time may last only a short time. Or it may last several years. Usually, with Type 2 diabetes, the longer you have diabetes the less insulin the body makes. Therefore, after a while, most people need to start using a diabetes medicine. There are many medicines that can be used for type 2 diabetes. Different types of medicines work in different ways. Sometimes one medicine is enough to control type 2 diabetes. But you may get better control if you use two (2) or more that work in different ways. For example, many people use a medicine that helps the body make more insulin along with one that helps the body use insulin more efficiently. Some people who have Type 2 diabetes cannot make much of their own insulin at all, or there may be reasons they cannot use diabetes pills. If you are one of these people, you will need to use insulin. Insulin can be a very effective way to control diabetes when it is used correctly. For any diabetes medicine, there are a few things you should know: What are the brand name and the generic name of the medicine? When and how much should you take? Should you take this medicine with food or by itself? How does this medicine work? What are the most common side effects? Does this medicine have "peaks" —times when it works most strongly to lower blood sugar? Can it cause hypoglycemia? If you are Continue reading >>

Insulin Overdose

Insulin Overdose

Tweet Taking too much insulin can lead to hypoglycemia. This can become particularly serious if your insulin dose was significantly more than it should have been. If you are worried that you have overdosed on insulin, take ample fast-acting carbohydrate immediately and seek advice from your health team, or the out-of-hours service at your local hospital, if applicable. Symptoms of an insulin overdose The list of symptoms below are symptoms of hypoglycemia which can result from an insulin overdose: Depressed mood Drowsiness Headache Hunger Inability to concentrate Irritability Disorientation Nausea Nervousness Personality changes Rapid heartbeat Restlessness Sleep disturbances Slurred speech Pale skin Sweating Tingling Tremor Unsteady movements Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar. The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they have to do to stay well. If you can keep your blood sugar lower by avoiding dietary sugar, likely you will never need long-term medication. Type 2 diabetes was formerly known as non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset diabetes due to its occurrence mainly in people over 40. However, type 2 Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Insulin Prescription Assistance

Diabetes & Insulin Prescription Assistance

If you or your loved one are one of the millions of Americans living with a chronic disease like diabetes while struggling to pay for costly insulin and assorted medications—you’re not alone. Simplefill Prescription Assistance can provide valuable diabetes help by assisting with Lantus, Humalog or Novolog and additional types of insulin. We help hundreds of diabetes patients receive the diabetes insulin assistance they need so they can focus on living well. We also advocate on our patients’ behalf through grant services, communicating with doctors, filling prescriptions, and keeping up to date on the changes to Medicare and Medicaid. What is Diabetes? Diabetes is split into different types: type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, typically called juvenile diabetes, effects mostly children and young adults. As you eat, your pancreas breaks down the sugar and starches in food and converts them into energy with the help of a hormone called insulin. Everything we do requires energy—from waking up in the morning to brushing our teeth to even just simply blinking. In type 1 diabetes patients, their bodies don’t produce insulin. In order to live healthfully, type 1 diabetes patients must take insulin to give their pancreas the hormone it needs to break down food properly. Through insulin injections, exercise and a balanced diet, type 1 diabetes patients can live long, full lives. In type 2 diabetes patients, insulin is produced, but patients’ bodies cannot keep up with the demand. The excess sugar, instead of being converted into energy, becomes free floating in the blood stream. There are numerous causes for this including genetics, weight, cell communication problems and more. Part of managing type 2 diabetes for most patients involves much of the same recom Continue reading >>

Novolog

Novolog

Novolog is a fast-acting insulin used to control high blood sugar in people with diabetes. Novolog is available as a prefilled pen, vial, and a cartridge. How does this medication work? Your body needs insulin to turn sugar into energy. Diabetes develops when your body does not make enough insulin or does not properly use the insulin it makes. Novolog may help control your blood sugar levels by allowing blood sugar to move from your bloodstream into your cells for energy. What are the beneficial effects of this medication and when should I begin to have results? What: Lowering your blood sugar to a normal level may prevent or delay potential complications associated with diabetes, such as blindness, kidney failure, or heart problems. Novolog works by controlling the rise in blood sugar when you eat. Using mealtime insulin in combination with a long- or intermediate-acting insulin will help you to balance out your blood sugar throughout the day. When: Novolog acts quickly and may manage your blood sugar at mealtime. How do I know it is working? Check your blood sugar regularly and as your healthcare provider tells you to. Your healthcare provider will also do regular blood tests to measure your blood sugar levels and your hemoglobin A1C (measures your average blood sugar levels over a 2- to 3-month period). Stay on your prescribed diet and exercise program, as this will also affect the results of your blood tests. The following is not a full list of side effects. Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, tell your healthcare provider as soon as possible. Only your healthcare provider can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking this medication. More common side effects may include: low blood sugar, injection-site reactions (incl Continue reading >>

Novolog

Novolog

NovoLog® (insulin aspart) is a prescription form of insulin used to treat type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. It is a rapid-acting insulin, used to help control the spike in blood sugar that occurs after meals. It is typically used in combination with a long-acting insulin. NovoLog can also be used in an insulin pump and can be given intravenously (by IV). This article refers to plain NovoLog. NovoLog is also available in combination with an intermediate-acting insulin (NovoLog Mix 70/30 or NovoLog Mix 50/50). (Click NovoLog Uses for more information, including possible off-label uses.) Who Makes NovoLog? How Does It Work? NovoLog is a form of insulin, which is a hormone that is naturally produced by the pancreas. This hormone is important for several functions, such as controlling blood sugar. Insulin helps the cells of your body remove glucose ("sugar") from your bloodstream. This sugar fuels your body's cells, giving them the energy they need to work properly. You may need to take insulin if your pancreas has trouble making enough insulin, which is the case in people with type 1 diabetes and in some people who have type 2 diabetes. Normally, your body is able to maintain proper levels of sugar in your blood and inside your cells. However, in people with type 1 diabetes (and sometimes type 2 diabetes), the pancreas has trouble making insulin. This causes too much sugar to accumulate in the blood. Too much sugar can also accumulate in the blood if your body has trouble responding to normal levels of insulin, as is common in type 2 diabetes. Over time, high levels of sugar in the blood can lead to serious health problems in the eyes, feet, hands, kidneys, and heart. NovoLog is a rapid-acting insulin medication. It starts working quickly, produces a sharp peak in insul Continue reading >>

Novolog (insulin Aspart)

Novolog (insulin Aspart)

NovoLog is the brand name for the synthetic analog called insulin aspart. It is designed to help adults and children (at least two years old) with type 1 diabetes to lower their blood sugar levels. Adults with type 2 diabetes may also take NovoLog, but it should never be taken by children with type 2 diabetes of any age. NovoLog is almost identical to regular human insulin, except for one amino acid substitution. It is produced by recombinant DNA technology using baker’s yeast. There is currently no generic insulin aspart available because manufacturing generic NovoLog products in the United States is currently prohibited. How Does NovoLog Work NovoLog is a bolus insulin (also known as a mealtime insulin). Bolus insulin in a body without diabetes would be a burst of insulin released in response to food. It is designed to handle the blood sugar spikes that happen when you eat. NovoLog is one of three fast-acting or rapid-acting insulins approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (the others are Apidra and Humalog). It takes effect very quickly and starts to bring your blood sugars down within five to fifteen minutes. You need to make sure you eat very soon after taking NovoLog so you don’t experience a blood sugar crash (aka hypoglycemia episode). NovoLog’s peak blood sugar lowering action is at about the one hour mark after injection. It’s usually out of the system within two to four hours after injection. Because NovoLog is a fast-acting insulin, it is normally prescribed in conjunction with a longer-acting insulin (also known as basal insulin). This way, your insulin needs are covered between meals and while you sleep by the long-acting variety, and the fast-acting NovoLog controls the mealtime spikes. Insulin pumps use fast-acting insulin only, dispens Continue reading >>

Novolog

Novolog

Last reviewed on RxList 11/13/2017 NovoLog (insulin aspart [rDNA origin] injection) is a form of insulin, a hormone that is produced in the body, used to treat type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes in adults and children who are at least 2 years old. NovoLog is usually given together with another long-acting insulin. The most common side effect of NovoLog is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Symptoms of low blood sugar may include headache, nausea, hunger, confusion, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, blurred vision, fast heartbeat, sweating, tremor, trouble concentrating, confusion, or seizure (convulsions). Other common side effects of NovoLog include: injection site reactions (e.g., pain, redness, irritation). Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects of NovoLog including: signs of low potassium level in the blood (such as muscle cramps, weakness, or irregular heartbeat). The dosage of NovoLog is individualized. The total daily insulin requirement may vary and is usually between 0.5 to 1.0 units/kg/day. NovoLog may interact with albuterol, clonidine, reserpine, guanethidine, or beta-blockers. There are many other medicines that can increase or decrease the effects of insulin. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant before using NovoLog. Tell your doctor if you become pregnant. Your doctor may switch the type of insulin you use during pregnancy. This medication does not pass into breast milk. Your insulin needs may change while breastfeeding. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding. Our NovoLog (insulin aspart [rDNA origin] injection) Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehens Continue reading >>

A 93-year-old Drug That Can Cost More Than A Mortgage Payment Tells Us Everything That's Wrong With American Healthcare

A 93-year-old Drug That Can Cost More Than A Mortgage Payment Tells Us Everything That's Wrong With American Healthcare

A person administers an injection of insulin. AP Insulin has been around since 1923, so it came as a surprise in July 2015 when Cole LePere's doctor told his mother, Janine, to prepare to pay a lot at the pharmacy for it. Cole, who was 10, had just been found to have Type 1 diabetes. But even the pharmacist was shocked to see the price. Over and over, the pharmacist told Janine LePere, "This is really expensive." Each time she would respond, "I know, thanks, but I still need the medicine." The pharmacist finally gave the LePeres the supplies — and a bill for $1,550. That was after a $350 coupon. As lawmakers and the public scrutinize dramatic price increases for other old drugs — most recently with the Mylan-owned EpiPen, which saw its cost go up by 500% in the past nine years — the next flash point may be insulin, a drug both ubiquitous and complicated. And the story of why the LePeres are now paying as much as their mortgage payment on insulin, even though they have insurance and even though there are competing drugs on the market, is really the story of what has happened to the healthcare industry in America since the start of the century. The need for insulin The human body produces its own insulin. Some people can't. When he got the diagnosis, Cole LePere found himself one of nearly 29.1 million Americans known to have one of the two types of diabetes. Cole's kind, known as Type 1, is an autoimmune disease. His body mistakenly kills so-called beta cells that are supposed to make the body's insulin, a hormone that helps people absorb and process the sugar in food. The roughly 1.25 million people in the US who have Type 1 diabetes need to inject insulin to live. Type 2 diabetes, the more common form, is something that develops either based on genetic or lifesty Continue reading >>

Rapid-acting Versus Long-acting Insulin: What’s The Difference?

Rapid-acting Versus Long-acting Insulin: What’s The Difference?

For people who need to take insulin, there are a couple of different types—long-acting, short-acting, rapid-acting, intermediate-acting, etc. That’s a lot of options! One question I see most often is the difference between rapid-acting and long-acting insulins. So, let’s get into it. What is rapid-acting insulin? Rapid-acting, or meal-time insulin, is a type of insulin that’s usually taken before, during, or after a meal to lower your blood sugar levels associated with meals. How long does it take rapid-acting insulin to begin working? The onset of action varies between rapid-acting insulin products, but can begin working in as little as 5 minutes, or could take as long as 30 minutes, depending on the insulin. The following are the typical onset of action times for each individual rapid-acting insulin products. What is long-acting insulin? Long-acting, or basal insulin, is a type of insulin that gives you a slow steady release of insulin that helps control your blood sugar between meals, and overnight. How long does long-acting insulin last? The duration of action varies between long-acting products but should last anywhere between 22-24 hours. The following are the typical duration of action times for each individual long-acting insulin product: Do I need more than one insulin? Maybe. It’s up to your doctor to determine the best medication regimen for you. Some type 2 diabetes patients may only need to use a long-acting insulin to get their blood sugar control on track; whereas others may need a combination of meal-time and long-acting insulin to best control their blood sugar. If you are using an insulin pump, you will only need to use a rapid or short-acting insulin. The pump is able to give you a slow and steady amount of insulin to cover you all day like Continue reading >>

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