diabetestalk.net

How Long Does Novolog Last In Your System

The Four Fast Acting Insulins Have Different Activity Curves

The Four Fast Acting Insulins Have Different Activity Curves

Fasting acting insulin is the insulin you inject to cover the rise in your blood sugar that occurs after you eat a meal. They are called "fast acting" because unlike the basal insulins, Lantus and Levemir, they are absorbed relatively quickly after injection. This is what makes it possible to use these fast acting insulins to cover a meal. In theory, if you can figure out how many grams of carbohydrate one unit of fast acting insulin will cover, and if you can figure out how to estimate the number of grams of carbohydrate on your plate, you can match the insulin to the meal and get normal blood sugars. In practice this is harder than it sounds. It's tough to figure out how many grams of carb one unit will cover, especially since this amount may be different at different times of day. It is also hard to estimate how many grams of carbohydrate are actually on your plate. We'll discuss both these issues in some future blog posting. What I want to discuss here is the speed and duration with which each of the fast acting insulins acts. This is what is called its "Activity Curve." The most important qualities of the activity curve are: 1. When the insulin reaches its fullest strength. This is also known as when the insulin "peaks." Ideally you would like the insulin to peak at the time when the carbohydrates from your meal hit your blood stream. That way most of the insulin meets most of the carbs. 2. How long the insulin stays active. Because insulin is being absorbed from the subcutaneous fat into which you injected it, it isn't all absorbed at once, so it typically takes anywhere from three to eight hours for the complete dose of a fast acting insulin to be used up. When you get a vial or pen full of insulin, it will usually include the Prescribing Information for the insu Continue reading >>

The Ups And Downs Of Meds And Diabetes (part 1): Steroids

The Ups And Downs Of Meds And Diabetes (part 1): Steroids

If you take any kind of medication for your diabetes management, whether that be metformin, sulfonylureas, exenatide (brand name Byetta), or insulin, for example, hopefully you’re familiar with how that drug works and what the effect is on your blood glucose control. But, just like people who don’t have diabetes, you’re going to come down with a cold or the flu every now and then. You may need to take steroids for a while. Maybe you take medicine for controlling your blood pressure or your cholesterol. How familiar are you with these drugs, particularly in terms of your blood glucose levels? Most of us are prescribed medicines for various reasons at one time or another. Unfortunately, we aren’t always told by our physician or pharmacist how they work and how they might interact with other medicines. And in the case of diabetes, chances are you’re not always given information on how a drug may affect your blood glucose level or how a it may interact with your diabetes medication—and many of them do. Your pharmacist should be your number one source for any questions you have about any drug that you take. But we can scratch the surface and take a look at this important area of diabetes management. We’ll look at steroids this week. Steroids Steroids (corticosteroids, glucocorticoids) are a potent class of medications (meds for short) that are known to raise blood glucose levels, often quite significantly. Steroids are given to help reduce inflammation that may occur with arthritis or asthma. People with certain immune disorders, such as lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, or sarcoidosis, usually need to take steroids as well. While steroids are very effective at doing what they’re supposed to do, one of the side effects is an increase in blood glucose levels. In fa Continue reading >>

Novo Nordisk Receives U.s. Fda Approval For Novolog® Flextouch® And Levemir® Flextouch®

Novo Nordisk Receives U.s. Fda Approval For Novolog® Flextouch® And Levemir® Flextouch®

® (insulin aspart [rDNA origin] injection) FlexTouch® and Levemir® (insulin detemir [rDNA origin] injection) FlexTouch®. FlexTouch® is a new prefilled insulin delivery system from Novo Nordisk. To view the multimedia assets associated with this release, please click: (Photo: When a dose is dialed with traditional prefilled pens, the push button extends, and at larger doses this can present challenges for the patient. The unique dosing mechanism of FlexTouch® ensures the push-button does not extend at any dose and allows insulin to be administered by pressing the low dose force button. "Novo Nordisk is committed to continuously introducing new solutions that can improve the lives of people with diabetes," said Mads Krogsgaard Thomsen, executive vice president and chief scientific officer of Novo Nordisk. "This approval marks another advancement in insulin delivery and an important milestone for Novo Nordisk." Novo Nordisk plans to make NovoLog® FlexTouch® and Levemir® FlexTouch® available in the U.S. within the next year. FlexTouch® was approved by the European Commission in July 2011 and has launched in several countries, including the United Kingdom, Canada, Denmark and Japan. For more information on Novo Nordisk products, please visit www.novonordisk-us.com. About NovoLog® FlexTouch® NovoLog® FlexTouch® is a prefilled insulin pen containing 300 units of insulin aspart. The pen doses in 1 unit increments, from 1 to 80 units and is compatible with both NovoFine® and the latest NovoTwist® needles. NovoTwist® comes in 5 mm (32G Tip) and 8 mm (30G) versions. An audible and tactile 'click' confirms attachment of the needle. Indications and Usage What is NovoLog® (insulin aspart [rDNA origin] injection)? NovoLog® is a man-made insulin used to control high Continue reading >>

5 Types Of Insulin And How They Work

5 Types Of Insulin And How They Work

If you have to take insulin to treat diabetes, there’s good news: You have choices. There are five types of insulin. They vary by onset (how soon they start to work), peak (how long they take to kick into full effect) and duration (how long they stay in your body). You may have to take more than one type of insulin, and these needs may change over time (and can vary depending on your type of diabetes). Find out more about the insulin types best for you. What it’s called: Humalog (lispro), NovoLog (aspart), Apidra (glulisine) Rapid-acting insulin is taken just before or after meals, to control spikes in blood sugar. This type is typically used in addition to a longer-acting insulin. It often works in 15 minutes, peaks between 30 and 90 minutes, and lasts 3 to 5 hours. “You can take it a few minutes before eating or as you sit down to eat, and it starts to work very quickly,” says Manisha Chandalia, MD, director of the Stark Diabetes Center at the University of Texas Medical Branch, in Galveston. What it’s called: Humulin R, Novolin R Short-acting insulin covers your insulin needs during meals. It is taken about 30 minutes to an hour before a meal to help control blood sugar levels. This type of insulin takes effect in about 30 minutes to one hour, and peaks after two to four hours. Its effects tend to last about five to eight hours. “The biggest advantage of short-acting insulin is that you don't have to take it at each meal. You can take it at breakfast and supper and still have good control because it lasts a little longer,” Dr. Chandalia says. What it’s called: Humulin N (NPH), Novolin N (NPH) Intermediate-acting insulin can control blood sugar levels for about 12 hours or longer, so it can be used overnight. It begins to work within one to four hours, Continue reading >>

Insulin Aspart - Injection, Novolog

Insulin Aspart - Injection, Novolog

insulin aspart - injection, NovoLog GENERIC NAME: INSULIN ASPART - INJECTION (IN-su-lin AS-part) BRAND NAME(S): NovoLog USES: Insulin aspart is used with a proper diet and exercise program to control high blood sugar in people with diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke.Insulin aspart is a man-made product that is similar to human insulin. It replaces the insulin that your body would normally make. Insulin aspart starts working faster and lasts for a shorter time than regular insulin. It works by helping blood sugar (glucose) get into cells so your body can use it for energy. This medication is usually used with a medium- or long-acting insulin product. Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis, Treatment, Medication HOW TO USE: Read the Patient Information Leaflet provided by your pharmacist before you start using this medication and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor, diabetes educator, or pharmacist.Learn all preparation and usage instructions from your health care professional and the product package.Before using, check this product visually for particles or discoloration. If either is present, do not use the insulin. Insulin aspart should be clear and colorless.Before injecting each dose, clean the injection site with rubbing alcohol. Change the injection site each time to lessen injury under the skin and to avoid developing problems under the skin (lipodystrophy). Insulin aspart may be injected in the stomach area, the thigh, the buttocks, or the back of the upper arm. Do not inject into skin that is red, swollen, or itchy. Do not inject cold insulin because this ca Continue reading >>

Taking Insulin During Pregnancy

Taking Insulin During Pregnancy

When your blood glucose levels stay raised despite meal planning and physical activity, insulin must be added to your management plan to keep you and your baby healthy. Pregnancy requires that your body produce extra amounts of insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is made by the pancreas. If your pancreas does not make enough insulin, injections can help you meet the need. Your health care provider and diabetes educator will teach you how to inject insulin safely and comfortably. Determining the right insulin and dosage Tip Keep a record of the type and amount of insulin you take. It is important that you know and remember your insulin type every time you speak with a health care provider. Your health care provider will decide what kind of insulin is right for you, how much to use and when you should take it, based on: your weight (which changes weekly) how far along your pregnancy is your meal plan your most recent blood glucose levels Sometimes, you may need more than one type of insulin. Different types of insulin work at different speeds, and your health care provider may combine insulins to achieve the best results for you. Time-action of different insulins Insulins Starts working Peaks Stops working Rapid acting: Humalog® (lispro) NovoLog® (aspart) Apidra® (glulisine) 5 to 15 minutes 1 to 2 hours 2 to 4 hours Intermediate acting: NPH (N) 2 to 4 hours 4 to 8 hours 10 to 16 hours Basal*: Lantus® (glargine) Levemir® (detemir) 2 hours No peak 24 hours *Lantus® and Levemir® cannot be mixed with any other insulin. How to help insulin work best Take your insulin at the same times each day as directed. Talk with your health care provider if you feel sick. Follow any instructions your health care provider gives you. Don't change your meal plan, physical activity, pres Continue reading >>

Ask D'mine: Discovering Your Active Insulin Time

Ask D'mine: Discovering Your Active Insulin Time

Happy Saturday, and welcome back to our weekly advice column, Ask D'Mine! hosted by veteran type 1, diabetes author and educator Wil Dubois. Just last week, Wil looked at how long we PWDs (people with diabetes) could generally survive without insulin in our systems. Today, he explores how long a bolus dose of this BG-lowering elixir might last in your system once given. Hint: it's not cut-and-dry! {Got your own questions? Email us at [email protected]} Amanda, type 1 from Oregon, writes: Wil, First off, I love your advice and really appreciate everything you do! I've had a Medtronic pump for about 4 years now and I have a question about the active insulin time. I have mine set at 4 hours and my endocrinologist says that's pretty standard for most of his patients. However, sometimes I think this is too long. If I test and have a blood sugar of, say 150 and it has been 3 hours since I gave myself insulin and ate, my pump says that I should take 0 units because I still have insulin on board. Sometimes I'll go ahead and give myself a unit to bring it down because I just think my blood sugar is probably not going to come down considerably in the next hour, and may actually go up. I actually have a CGM now, so I can now see better when I have peaked after a meal, and whether I am coming down or going up still. My question is, is there a good way to figure out what your actual active insulin time should be? I'm sure it varies from person to person. I think I may need a shorter time but I can't think of a good way to test this. [email protected] D'Mine answers: Thank you! Actually, there are several good ways you can figure out your active insulin time, each variations of the same theme—but first a little background. For those of you not in the know, active insulin time (also c Continue reading >>

How Long Should Insulin Be Used Once A Vial Is Started?

How Long Should Insulin Be Used Once A Vial Is Started?

Editor’s comment: The commentary by Dr. Grajower has such important clinical relevance that responses were invited from the three pharmaceutical companies that supply insulin in the U.S. and the American Diabetes Association, and all of these combined in this commentary. The commenting letter and individual responses were authored separately and are completely independent of each other. Diabetic patients treated with insulin, whether for type 1 or type 2 diabetes, are prone to often unexplained swings in their blood glucose. These swings can vary from dangerously low to persistently high levels. Most diabetic patients, and most physicians, will adjust insulin regimens so as to avoid hypoglycemia at the expense of hyperglycemia. Among the “textbook” reasons for variable glucose responses to any given insulin regimen are 1) site of administration, 2) exercise, 3) bottles not adequately mixed before drawing the insulin (for NPH, Lente, or Ultralente), and 4) duration of treatment with insulin (1). A new insulin was marketed by Aventis Pharmaceuticals about 1 year ago, insulin glargine (Lantus). The manufacturer seemed to stress that patients not use a started bottle of this insulin for >28 days (2). Two patients of mine highlighted this point. L.K. is a 76-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes, diagnosed at 55 years of age, and treated with insulin since age 56. Her insulin regimen was changed to Lantus at night together with Novolog before meals. She monitors her blood glucose four times a day. She used a bottle of Lantus until it ran out; therefore, a bottle lasted for 2 months. Her recent HbA1c was 7.6%. I retrospectively analyzed her home glucose readings by averaging her fasting blood glucose levels for the first 15 days of a new bottle and the last 15 days of tha Continue reading >>

Novolog

Novolog

Novolog is a prescription medication used to treat type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Novolog is a fast-acting form of insulin. It is usually given with a long-acting insulin to provide a steady amount of insulin to control blood glucose (sugar) levels. This medication comes in an injectable form available in vials and prefilled pens. Novolog should be injected just under the skin 5 to 10 minutes before meals. It may also be injected directly into a vein (IV) by a healthcare provider or by an insulin pump. Common side effects of Novolog include low blood sugar, reaction at the injection site, and weight gain. Novolog is a prescription medication used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Serious side effects may occur. See "Novolog Precautions" section. Common side effects of Novolog include weight gain, reaction at the injection site, and low blood sugar. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is the most common side effect seen with Novolog use. Symptoms of low blood sugar may include: sweating dizziness or lightheadedness shakiness hunger fast heart beat tingling of lips and tongue trouble concentrating or confusion blurred vision slurred speech anxiety, irritability or mood changes headache Severe low blood sugar can cause unconsciousness (passing out), seizures, and death. Know your symptoms of low blood sugar. Follow your healthcare provider’s instructions for treating low blood sugar. Talk to your healthcare provider if low blood sugar is a problem for you. Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Especially tell your doctor if you tak Continue reading >>

Just How Quick Is Fiasp, Novo Nordisk’s Faster-acting Insulin?

Just How Quick Is Fiasp, Novo Nordisk’s Faster-acting Insulin?

Fiasp, a new, faster-acting insulin from Novo Nordisk, is generating a lot of interest and carries with it much potential for improved diabetes care. A sort of acronym for faster acting insulin asparte, Fiasp starts working within two minutes of injection and can even be effective in lowering blood sugar when taken up to 20 minutes after a meal. Existing fast-acting insulin formulations such as Humalog, Apidra and Novo Nordisk’s own NovoLog (called NovoRapid in Europe and Canada), take 10 to 20 minutes to begin lowering blood sugar after injection. According to Novo Nordisk, Fiasp, “has its maximum effect between 1 and 3 hours after the injection and the effect lasts for 3 to 5 hours.” “Our goal in developing Fisap was to try and get closer to mimicking the body’s own insulin response to food,” says Michael Bachner, Associate Director for Product Communications for Novo Nordisk. “Doing that creates a lot of opportunities for how this might be applied to improve care.” Fiasp was approved for use in Europe in January and approved in Canada in late March. Approval in the United States is pending with Novo Nordisk expecting to hear back form the FDA in the fourth quarter of this year, Bachner says. (The FDA application is the Danish pharmacy giant’s second attempt at U.S. approval.) Interest in the new insulin is keen, according to chat boards and as reported by Mike Hoskins for the DiabetesMine team in late April. Tim Street, a diabetes writer, reports an uptick in views to his site since he started reporting on Fiasp. His website diabettech.com—“Where diabetes and technology meet”—says when he started writing about Fiasp visits to his site went from between 200 and 500 per day to between 500 and 1,000 per day. To date, Street has penned six artic Continue reading >>

5 Things Everyone Taking Diabetes Medications Should Do

5 Things Everyone Taking Diabetes Medications Should Do

Diabetes can definitely be a challenging condition to manage, especially when it comes to medications. If you are diabetic, there are five key things you need to do to get the most health benefits from your prescriptions. Guest post by: Mike Shelley Fourth Year Pharmacy Student Northeast Ohio Medical University As I approach the start of my career as a pharmacist at a community pharmacy, I look forward to the opportunity to help people understand and use their medications as wisely as possible. If you or someone you love is diabetic, I’d like to offer these tips, guidelines and recommendations for managing this condition. #1 — Keep a list of your medications with you. Keeping track of your medications can be a difficult task. Making a list is a great way to help you remember which medications you are taking and how you take them. Here are some things you should include for each medication on your list: Medication name (brand and/or generic) Medication strength Directions Prescriber For example, you might write down: Metformin (Glucophage) 500 mg, 1 tablet twice a day, Dr. Smith; or Lantus insulin, inject 30 units daily at bedtime, Dr. Wheeler. You may also want to add your emergency contact information, as well as the pharmacies you go to in case of an emergency. Also, make sure you update your list as changes are made to your medications! #2 — Be familiar with the medications you take. There are many medication options available to help lower your blood sugar; your doctor decides which medications are best for you based on your lifestyle, physical condition, how you respond to medications, and insurance coverage. Below are examples of each class of oral anti-diabetes medications and generic and brand names of each. Medication Class Medications Sulfonylureas Chlor Continue reading >>

When You Can't Afford The Insulin That You Need To Survive | How To Use The Cheap

When You Can't Afford The Insulin That You Need To Survive | How To Use The Cheap "old-school" Insulin

Note: BootCamp for Betics is not a medical center. Anything you read on this site should not be considered medical advice, and is for educational purposes only. Always consult with a physician or a diabetes nurse educator before starting or changing insulin doses. Did you know that all type 1 diabetics and some type 2 diabetics need injectable insulin in order to live? Put another way, if a diabetic needs insulin in order to live, and the diabetic does not get insulin, the diabetic will die. Diabetic death from Diabetic Ketoacidosis is a grisly process, during which acid starts running through your bloodstream, searing your vessels and organs while your body shrivels up in dehydration as it tries to push the acid out of your body through your urine and lungs, and, left untreated, the condition shuts down your organs one by one until you are dead. If you're lucky, your brain will be the first thing to swell itself into a coma and you'll be unconscious for the remainder of the organ failures. In some cases, this grisly diabetic death can take a few days or weeks to complete its process. Or, if you're one of the luckier less-resistant insulin-dependent type 2 diabetics, you may actually get away with staying alive for quite a few years and suffer only some heart disease, stroke, kidney damage/failure, neuropathy, limb amputations and blindness. (my intent in describing how lack of insulin leads to death is not to cause fear in people with diabetes or their loved ones; rather, my intent is to make clear the reality that injectable insulin is absolutely vital to diabetics who depend on injectable insulin to live) While I'd love to go off on a political rant about how insulin should be a basic human right for all insulin-dependent diabetics (and why the hell isn't it?), that' Continue reading >>

Novolog Vial

Novolog Vial

Uses Insulin aspart is used with a proper diet and exercise program to control high blood sugar in people with diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Insulin aspart is a man-made product that is similar to human insulin. It replaces the insulin that your body would normally make. Insulin aspart starts working faster and lasts for a shorter time than regular insulin. It works by helping blood sugar (glucose) get into cells so your body can use it for energy. This medication is usually used with a medium- or long-acting insulin product. How to use Novolog Vial Read the Patient Information Leaflet provided by your pharmacist before you start using this medication and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor, diabetes educator, or pharmacist. Learn all preparation and usage instructions from your health care professional and the product package. Before using, check this product visually for particles or discoloration. If either is present, do not use the insulin. Insulin aspart should be clear and colorless. Before injecting each dose, clean the injection site with rubbing alcohol. Change the injection site each time to lessen injury under the skin and to avoid developing problems under the skin (lipodystrophy). Insulin aspart may be injected in the stomach area, the thigh, or the back of the upper arm. Do not inject into skin that is red, swollen, or itchy. Do not inject cold insulin because this can be painful. The insulin container you are currently using can be kept at room temperature. Inject this medication under the skin as directed by your doctor. Some bran Continue reading >>

Rapid Insulins

Rapid Insulins

Humalog® and Novolog® Insulins by John Walsh, P.A., C.D.E. and Ruth Roberts, M.A. See also Kinetics vs. Dynamics, Humalog & Heat and Users' Reports Like Regular, Humalog and Novolog are used to cover meals and snacks. Most meals raise the blood sugar for only 2 to 3 hours afterwards. Once injected, Regular insulin takes 30 minutes to begin working, peaks between 2 and 4 hours and hangs on for 6 to 8 hours, long after the meal stopped raising the blood sugar. Humalog and Novolog, on the other hand, begin working in about 10 minutes, peaks at one to one and a half hours and are gone in about three and a half to four hours. Many people who've tried these faster insulins report that their control is improved and that they feel better. The great advantage of fast insulins are that they match the "action time" for most meals. You can take them as you begin eating, rather than the 30 to 45 minutes prior to eating required of Regular. No longer do you need to accurately anticipate when you (or your young child with diabetes) will begin eating. In addition, Humalog and Novolog leave your body faster so you don't have residual insulin causing low blood sugars in the late afternoon or, even worse, in the middle of the night. For most meals, fast insulins will be lowering the blood sugar at the same time the food is raising it. The rise in the blood sugar seen in the couple of hours after eating is much lower, especially with Novolog, and by the end of three hours the blood sugar is often back to its starting point. With Humalog or Novolog, you're better equipped to prevent spiking blood sugar between meals, while avoiding the lows that result from the combined buildup of Regular and long-acting insulins. The new Lantus insulin is an excellent choice when using these fast insulin Continue reading >>

Novolog, Novolog Flexpen, Novolog Penfill

Novolog, Novolog Flexpen, Novolog Penfill

What is NovoLog? NovoLog (insulin aspart)is a fast-acting insulin that starts to work about 15 minutes after injection, peaks in about 1 hour, and keeps working for 2 to 4 hours. Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. NovoLog is used to improve blood sugar control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. This medicine is sometimes used together with a long-acting or intermediate-acting insulin. NovoLog is used to treat type 2 diabetes in adults. NovoLog is also used to treat type 1 diabetes in adults and children who are at least 2 years old. Important information NovoLog is a fast-acting insulin that begins to work very quickly. After using it, you should eat a meal within 5 to 10 minutes. Never share an injection pen or cartridge with another person. Sharing injection pens or cartridges can allow disease such as hepatitis or HIV to pass from one person to another. You should not use NovoLog if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Before taking this medicine You should not use NovoLog if you are allergic to insulin aspart, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). NovoLog is not approved for use by anyone younger than 2 years old. This medicine should not be used to treat type 2 diabetes in a child of any age. To make sure NovoLog is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: liver or kidney disease; or low levels of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia). Tell your doctor if you also take pioglitazone or rosiglitazone (sometimes contained in combinations with glimepiride or metformin). Taking certain oral diabetes medicines while you are using insulin may increase your risk of serious heart problems. Follow your doctor's instructions about using insulin if you are pregn Continue reading >>

More in diabetes