diabetestalk.net

How Long Does It Take To Regulate A Cat On Insulin

Cat Insulin | Ask The Cat Doctor

Cat Insulin | Ask The Cat Doctor

Cat insulin is a frustrating topic. Cat diabetes has practically become an epidemic in the U.S. for many of the same reasons adult onset diabetes in people has risen dramatically - obesity and, in the case of cats, a diet that is too rich in carbohydrates. However, unlike human diabetes who have many different types of insulin to chose from, the selection of insulin for cats has a history of being mainly unsatisfactory. That's because most insulin is made for people and when insulin is made specifically for animals, it has traditionally been directed at dogs. When it comes to insulin, a cat's own natural insulin is most like beef insulin. Cats have also been successfully treated using beef-pork insulin because it is 10 percent pork and 90 percent beef. Unfortunately, I have seen such types of insulin that are most appropriate for cats come and go over the last 20 years. Just as a patient would get well-regulated on one type of insulin, it would be discontinued and we would have to start a different type. It has been a frustrating situation. That's not to say that you cannot treat your diabetic cat successfully with insulin. Currently, due to a lack of animal-source insulins, most cats are started on human recombinant insulin. Even in the field of human insulin where there have been dozens of different insulins available, so many have been discontinued - it's enough to make your head spin. At the moment, there is an insulin developed just for cats. It's called PROZINC. Will it still be around a year from now? Who knows. Is it the best insulin? No. Does it work well in all cats? No. For that reason, your veterinarian will discuss with you the available types of insulin if your cat is diagnosed with diabetes and he will, no doubt, have his own preference. ProZinc stands f Continue reading >>

What You Should Know When Your Cat Has Diabetes - Care Of Your Diabetic Cat -

What You Should Know When Your Cat Has Diabetes - Care Of Your Diabetic Cat -

Some Information About Your Cats Pancreas Your cats pancreas is a small, pinkish organ that is nestled in the folds of its small intestine. You can see it if you enlarge the fanciful image I put at the top of this page. Although it is quite small, the pancreas has two very important functions. One is to produce enzymes that allow your cat to digest food. The other is to produce a hormone (insulin) that regulates how your cats body utilizes sugar (glucose). Glucose is the main fuel of all animal cells. Most of it is manufactured in the pets liver or released from recent carbohydrate meals. The process by which the pancreas regulates your cats blood sugar level is actually much more complicated than my explanation and not yet fully understood. But my explanation should do for this article. Should you wish to know more, go here . Many types of cells form the pancreas. The ones that are important in understanding diabetes occur in small islands scattered throughout the pancreas ( islets of Langerhans ). These particular insulin-secreting cells are called (beta) cells. There are several forms of diabetes. But the one affecting your cat is almost certainly the one known as diabetes mellitus, also called Type 2 (Type II, DM) diabetes. In this form of diabetes, your cats cells have lost some of their ability to respond to the insulin your cats pancreas is still producing. In some cases, less insulin is also being produced than should be. When this occurs, blood sugar can not move out of the cats blood and into all of its body cells that rely on the sugar for energy. When this occurs, a number of things happen. The cats blood sugar level skyrockets up (hyperglycemia) , some of the excess sugar spills out the kidneys and into the urine (glycosuria) and the cats body shifts to al Continue reading >>

Your Cat And Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

Your Cat And Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

Diabetes is a very serious issue – and not just in people either. That’s right, this chronic and potentially debilitating condition also affects cats (and dogs). And while it’s difficult to know the exact incidence of diabetes in cats, best estimates put it somewhere in the range of 1 cat in every 100-200 cats will become diabetic. What’s even sadder is that this incidence seems to be on the increase. Fortunately, armed with some good information, important tips, and a good working relationship with your veterinarian, you can give your cats the best chance at avoiding this frustrating condition. And if they’ve already developed it, know that these same tools can help you best manage your cat’s diabetic state; avoiding the potential complications and perhaps even getting them into diabetic remission. What is diabetes? In the most basic sense, diabetes mellitus is a disorder where blood sugar, or glucose, cannot be effectively utilized and regulated within the body. There are several hormones within the body that play important roles in glucose metabolism. Insulin is one of the most important, if not the most important, and it’s the hormone most central to the development and control of the diabetic state. Glucose fuels the body and insulin is the hormone that helps to get it into most cells within the body. Diabetes is often easily diagnosed and controllable. However, when undiagnosed or poorly managed, diabetes can be devastating. Diabetes can absolutely be managed and your cat can still lead a long and happy life. Routine veterinary care and evaluation are important, as is achieving and maintaining an appropriate weight in your cat and feeding him an appropriate diet. There are two types of diabetes – Type I and Type II. In Type I diabetes, the pancreas Continue reading >>

Can A Cat With Diabetes Be Treated With Food And Diet?

Can A Cat With Diabetes Be Treated With Food And Diet?

If your cat is diagnosed withdiabetes mellitus, it means that his pancreas is not producing enough insulin to regulate the amount of sugar in his bloodstream. In most cases of feline diabetes, insulin is the treatment of choice. The thought of giving insulin injections daily is a scary prospect for many cat owners. As a result, if your cat is diagnosed withdiabetes, you may be wondering if there is an alternative to treating yourcat without having to give him insulin shots. There may be other treatment options that are worth exploring in a situation where your cat's personality is not conducive to receiving daily or twice daily injections of insulin or where you are physically incapable of giving the insulin injections. Oral hypoglycemic medications such as Glipizide and Acarbose are one such option. These medications act to help lower blood glucose levels. They are given by mouth and are most effective for cats with mild diabetes. They are effective for some, but not all, diabetic cats. Strictly Controlled Diet As Possible Alternative A strictly controlled diet can be useful in controlling blood glucose levels in cats with diabetes. Feeding your cat special food by itself may or may not be completely effective,and it is most likely to work for cats who do not have severe diabetes. The most commonly recommended food for a cat with diabetes is a diet containing high levels of protein and low levels of carbohydrates. If you are feeding your cat commercial food, canned cat foods are preferred (as opposed to kibble or dry food). A high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet can be combined with one of the oral hypoglycemic medications to further help regulate your cat's blood glucose levels. It is possible that this may be more effective than using diet or medication alone. Other Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Cats

Diabetes In Cats

This article is about diabetes mellitus in cats. For other uses, see Diabetes (disambiguation). Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease in cats, whereby either insufficient insulin response or insulin resistance lead to persistently high blood glucose concentrations. Diabetes could affect up to 1 in 230 cats,[1] and may be becoming increasingly common. Diabetes mellitus is less common in cats than in dogs. 80-95% of diabetic cats experience something similar to type-2 diabetes, but are generally severely insulin-dependent by the time symptoms are diagnosed. The condition is treatable, and treated properly, the cat can experience a normal life expectancy. In type-2 cats, prompt effective treatment may lead to diabetic remission, in which the cat no longer needs injected insulin. Untreated, the condition leads to increasingly weak legs in cats, and eventually malnutrition, ketoacidosis and/or dehydration, and death. Symptoms[edit] Cats will generally show a gradual onset of the disease over a few weeks or months, and it may escape notice for even longer.[citation needed] The first outward symptoms are a sudden weight loss (or occasionally gain), accompanied by excessive drinking and urination; for example, cats can appear to develop an obsession with water and lurk around faucets or water bowls. Appetite is suddenly either ravenous (up to three-times normal) or absent. These symptoms arise from the body being unable to use glucose as an energy source. A fasting glucose blood test will normally be suggestive of diabetes at this point. The same home blood test monitors used in humans are used on cats, usually by obtaining blood from the ear edges or paw pads. As the disease progresses, ketone bodies will be present in the urine, which can be detected with the same urine stri Continue reading >>

Regulating & Monitoring A Diabetic Cat Using Insulin

Regulating & Monitoring A Diabetic Cat Using Insulin

Share with us any comments or suggestions, to help us build the best service for you and your pet Download our free app today and access verified vets, trainers, nutritionists and other pet experts anywhere, anytime Regulating & Monitoring a Diabetic Cat Using Insulin Not all cats with diabetes will need to be treated with insulin (some cats with mild diabetes may respond to and dietary change), but a majority of them will. The goal of treatment is to resolve the signs of the disease, maintain proper body weight, eliminate or reduce the likelihood of any complications, and provide the cat with a good quality of life. This can be accomplished by maintaining the blood glucose at an acceptable level (100-290 mg/dL; normal is 55-160 mg/dL). In addition to treating the diabetes, any other concurrent diseases such as pancreatic exocrine insufficiency , hyperthyroidism , Cushing's disease, and infections need to be treated as well. What should an owner know before trying to 'regulate' a cat with diabetes? Before treatment is started, it is important that the owner be well-informed and have the time necessary to make the correct decision since regulating a diabetic cat requires commitment. Owners should know: The cat will need to be hospitalized for a number of days and one or more blood glucose profiles (described below) will need to be performed. The initial regulation of a cat on insulin generally takes 2-8 weeks. The process of getting a cat regulated can be costly. Insulin must usually be given twice a day, every day at specific times, probably for the life of the cat. Insulin must be handled properly (refrigerated, not shaken, etc). There is a proper technique for administering insulin to a cat that must be followed. The type of insulin and insulin syringe that are used Continue reading >>

How Long Does It Take To Regulate A Cat On Insulin?

How Long Does It Take To Regulate A Cat On Insulin?

How long does it take to regulate a cat on insulin? My cat has been on insulin for two months now and consistently comes back with high glucose levels. The vet says it will take a while to regulate the cat. How long is "a while?" Are you sure you want to delete this answer? You are not going to get your cat regulated if you are depending on the vet. He cannot do it. The tests he takes at the office are very inaccurate and can be off well more then 100- 200 points or more. The only one that can regulate the cat is you. You must do the testing at home as it is the only way to know if it is safe to give insulin as well as giving you the info to treat this correctly at home. I can teach you how If you do what is needed it can take 3-6 months to get this totally under control but you can see good results much sooner I work with diabetic cat owners from all over the world and if you want, will work with you everyday to get this under control. If interested, email me directly at [email protected] and let me know which insulin how much you give and how many times a day you give it as well as what food you feed. Also let me know if there are any other health problems including back leg problems. Feline diabetes is rough. I live with a 12.5 year old cat who has been up and down over the last few years. He'll have spurts where he's regulated and doing well, then all of a sudden he'll have problems. Then he'll be fine and won't need any insulin for several months. Then he'll have problems again. We have him well regulated now at about 1 unit twice a day and he's been good for several months. Hopefully he'll stay that way (knock on wood). Some cats can regulate quickly, others will always be up and down. I've been there. I feel your pain. Good luck. I have a diabetic cat that Continue reading >>

Diabetic Remission In Cats

Diabetic Remission In Cats

To grasp diabetic remission in cats, it helps to have an understanding of feline diabetes, so here is a quick review. Diabetes is a complex disease involving a hormone called insulin. When a cat does not make enough insulin or cannot properly use the insulin it does make, diabetes results. Why is insulin important? Insulin keeps the body’s engine working properly. The body is like a well-tuned machine and needs fuel to run properly. The fuel for a cat is food that contains fats, carbohydrates, and proteins. But this fuel needs to be broken down into smaller parts that the body can utilize. One of these usable fuel components is glucose. Without glucose, the body’s engine stalls. Glucose must enter the body’s individual cells to keep the engine running. That is where insulin comes in to play. Insulin regulates the flow of glucose from the blood stream into the cells where it is needed to sustain life. When there is not enough insulin produced by the pancreas, or the cat does not use it effectively, glucose cannot enter the cells and high levels of glucose build up in the bloodstream. This condition is called diabetes. "The common signs of diabetes include increases in appetite, water consumption, and urination, along with weight loss." Without insulin to steer glucose into the cells, the cat's body looks for alternative sources of fuel and breaks down reserves of fat and protein stored in the body. Fueling the body is not efficient without the insulin/glucose team, so the cat loses weight despite eating more. Meanwhile, the accumulation of glucose in the blood stream is eliminated in the urine. The cat urinates more which makes him thirsty and he drinks more water. The common signs of diabetes include increases in appetite, water consumption, and urination, along w Continue reading >>

Feeding Tips For A Cat With Diabetes

Feeding Tips For A Cat With Diabetes

When Randy Frostig took his cat, Bill, to the veterinarian six years ago, he was seriously worried. “He was lethargic and he wasn’t eating, and his urine was sticking to his paws,” Frostig recalls. The diagnosis -- diabetes -- surprised Frostig. “I didn’t even know that a cat could have diabetes. I didn’t know what it meant,” he says. He was concerned about having to give his cat regular shots of insulin, and how the disease might affect his pet’s life. In reality, a diagnosis of feline diabetes is not a death sentence, and caring for a cat with the disease is far easier than Frostig had envisioned. “Giving him insulin is like brushing your teeth. It’s no big deal,” he says. Thanks to regular doses of insulin and a special diet, the gray tabby started acting more like his old self. “He was running around, and he gained his appetite again.” Why Do Cats Get Diabetes? Cats aren’t so different from people when it comes to diabetes. The disease affects insulin -- a hormone that helps the body move sugar (glucose) from the bloodstream into the cells. Feline diabetes tends to more closely resemble type 2 diabetes in humans, in which the body makes insulin but becomes less sensitive to the hormone. Sugar builds up in the bloodstream, leading to symptoms like increased urination and thirst. If it’s left untreated, eventually diabetes can lead to life-threatening complications. Although the exact cause of feline diabetes isn’t known, it’s more likely to affect overweight cats, because obesity makes the cat’s body less sensitive to the effects of insulin. Diabetes is also more common in older cats. Diseases like chronic pancreatitis and hyperthyroidism, as well as medications such as corticosteroids, may also make cats more prone to develop diab Continue reading >>

Glucose Curves For Cats | Vetsulin

Glucose Curves For Cats | Vetsulin

Veterinarians commonly adjust the insulin dose based on a blood glucose curve. When creating a glucose curve, remember that stress can affect the reliability of results, and the glucose curve is only one tool among others that can help diagnose and monitor diabetes mellitus. Your veterinarian will take clinical signs (or lack thereof) into account when contemplating any change in insulin therapy. The ultimate goal in regulating a cat with diabetes is to control the clinical signs adequately so your pet can enjoy a good quality of life. The procedure is as follows: shortly after your cat has been given its first meal (preferably at home), the first blood sample is taken just before the morning insulin is given. Blood samples are then collected every 2 hours throughout the day, for 12 hours if possible. This data is then plotted on a graph to generate a curve. Veterinarians will use the blood glucose curve to determine if any adjustments need to be made to the insulin dosage and feeding regimens. The aim of treatment is to alleviate clinical signs of diabetes. To achieve this goal, veterinarians aim to keep blood glucose concentrations below the renal threshold and avoid hypoglycemia. They do this by maintaining blood glucose concentrations roughly between 120 to 300 mg/dL in cats for the majority of the day.3 The duration of insulin action is measured from the time of Vetsulin (porcine insulin zinc suspension) injection, followed by a fall in blood glucose concentration, to the time that blood glucose exceeds the renal threshold concentration of 200 to 280 mg/dL in cats. Because stress can falsely increase the blood glucose values in cats, sometimes other blood tests are utilized to help manage the diabetic cat. Blood samples can be taken to measure blood glucose or blo Continue reading >>

It’s Difficult To Regulate Diabetics

It’s Difficult To Regulate Diabetics

I recently euthanized a sweetheart of a diabetic cat. I’ll call him “Hans.” Hans had been diagnosed about three years ago, very early in the course of his disease, and his owner and primary care veterinarian were able to put him into remission with dietary changes and a short course of insulin injections. Unfortunately, he recently relapsed and this time around his caregivers were unable to manage the disease, primarily because Hans fought his insulin injections with every ounce of his being. His owner decided, rightfully so in my opinion, that Hans’s quality of life was so degraded by having to put up with twice daily injections that euthanasia was in his best interest. This case got me thinking about the reasons (other than behavior) why diabetic cats can become difficult to regulate. These patients end up on unusually high doses of insulin (greater than one unit per pound) but still suffer from the typical symptoms of diabetes mellitus, including: increased thirst and urination weight loss despite a good appetite weakness The first step in figuring out what is going on with a difficult to regulate diabetic is to examine the care the animal receives at home. Is the cat eating an appropriate amount of a low carbohydrate diet? Canned foods are best. Is the owner using good injection technique? Oftentimes it is best to avoid injecting around the nape of the neck and use the flank areas instead. Are appropriate insulin and insulin syringes being used? A mismatch can lead to under or overdosing. Is the insulin handled appropriately (refrigerated, replaced every three months or so)? Are any other medications being given? Some (e.g., corticosteroids) interfere with glucose regulation. Once home care has been validated, it’s time to look at the cat itself. Concurren Continue reading >>

About Glucose Curves

About Glucose Curves

Go to site For Pet Owners The glucose curve is a great tool to differentiate between an insufficient insulin dose and the Somogyi effect. It helps to determine insulin effectiveness and the maximum and minimum levels of glycemia, which ideally should be between 120–300 mg/dL (5.6–16.7mmol/L) for cats for most of the day.8 Try our online glucose curve generator. Veterinarians commonly adjust the insulin dose based on a blood glucose curve. When creating a glucose curve, remember that stress can affect the reliability of results, and the glucose curve is only one tool among others that can help diagnose and monitor diabetes mellitus. Take clinical signs (or lack thereof) into account when contemplating any change in the insulin therapy. The ultimate goal in regulating the diabetic cat is to control the clinical signs adequately so that the patient enjoys a good quality of life. How to complete a glucose curve The procedure is as follows: shortly after the animal has been given its first meal (preferably at home), the first blood sample is taken just prior to the insulin injection in the morning. Thereafter, blood samples are collected every 2 hours throughout the day for 12 hours, if possible. These data are then plotted on a graph to generate a curve. Veterinarians can determine based on the nadir whether the dose needs to be increased or decreased (or remain as is). How to interpret a glucose curve The aim of treatment is to alleviate clinical signs of diabetes. To achieve this goal, keep blood glucose concentrations below the renal threshold and avoid hypoglycemia. Thus, the goal is to maintain blood glucose concentrations roughly between 120 to 300 mg/dL in cats for the majority of the day.8 The duration of insulin action is measured from the time of Vetsulin® (p Continue reading >>

Discovering The Reasons Underlying Difficult-to-control Diabetes In Cats

Discovering The Reasons Underlying Difficult-to-control Diabetes In Cats

Diabetes mellitus is a common endocrinopathy in feline practice. Cats with diabetes can be challenging to monitor and treat because of the complex pathophysiology of the disease and cats' propensity for stress-related hyperglycemia. In addition, the small size of feline patients makes insulin dosing more difficult. This article will review reasons for poor diabetic regulation and outline a logical approach to the difficult-to-treat diabetic cat. In general, problems with diabetic control can be categorized as insulin-related, client-related, or patient-related. Although patient-related problems are more common, it is wise to carefully exclude insulin- and client-related issues first, since these are often easily identified and addressed. When insulin- and client-related issues have been ruled out, we then start to look for patient-related problems. Insulin-related problems Sudden loss of regulation in a previously well-controlled diabetic may be due to problems with the insulin itself. Even if you have no specific reason to suspect a loss of biologic activity with the insulin, it is always wise to just discard the present bottle and start a new one. Insulin is a peptide and, therefore, can be damaged by exposure to heat or extreme cold. With some insulin types, agitation during shipping can also damage the molecule and alter its biologic effects. Another consideration is bacterial contamination; this can occur quickly and result in degradation of the insulin molecules and loss of potency. And lastly, dilution of the insulin can cause problems as the product may behave differently or become unstable. Before conducting an exhaustive and expensive search to identify patient-related problems leading to insulin resistance, it may be worthwhile to replace an older insulin via Continue reading >>

Timing Is Everything | Pet Diabetes Care

Timing Is Everything | Pet Diabetes Care

A friend recently told me that she always comes up with the perfect comeback. Her problem is that she thinks of it 20 minutes too late. Yep, sometimes timing is everything. When it comes to diabetes care of our pets, timing can make the difference between a well regulated diabetic pet and a “mostly” regulated diabetic pet. Routines may not be exciting, but routines make for a well-regulated diabetic pet! After two plus decades practicing veterinary medicine, I sometimes think I have heard it all. Then a client comes along and proves me wrong. Recently one of my own veterinary clients told me he routinely gave his cat the insulin then waited an hour before feeding his pet. I don’t know where this client got this notion as I had told him what I tell all my clients, to feed and give insulin at the same time every 12 hours. Now, whether one waits to see if Fluffy is eating before giving the injection is another story. For folks who have a pet with a hearty appetite that couldn’t imagine missing a meal, they may give the injection as the pet dives into dinner. A feeding frenzy is definitely a distraction to the quick poke of an insulin needle. For folks who have a finicky eater, they might watch to make sure the pet truly eats before giving the injection. Nonetheless, I would feed the pet essentially at the same time as the injection rather than waiting any length of time. The insulin needs something to work with. If food is not given with the insulin the pet could become hypoglycemic. How about the timing of meals? Does it matter if a pet eats in between insulin injections? Yes. Just as giving insulin without food can cause a low blood glucose reading, giving food without insulin will cause an elevated blood glucose test result. If you give a snack in the middle of Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Curves Help Keep Diabetic Pets On The Straight And Narrow - Vetzinsight - Vin

Blood Glucose Curves Help Keep Diabetic Pets On The Straight And Narrow - Vetzinsight - Vin

Blood Glucose Curves Help Keep Diabetic Pets on the Straight and Narrow The results of a blood glucose curve. Photo by Dr. Teri Ann Oursler Diabetes is not one of those diseases that you get to set it and forget it; it requires constant monitoring and evaluation of the insulin dose to give us control of the disease and decrease its symptom and side effects. After a few decades, people with unregulated (uncontrolled) diabetes tend to end up with retinal problems, blood vessel damage, kidney problems, etc. Because of their shorter life spans, dogs and cats with unregulated diabetes dont usually face the same long-term consequences it causes in human diabetics. Normally their short life spans cause us grief, but in the case of a diabetic sometimes that short span can be a boon. Pets who are unregulated diabetics will have symptoms that can be irritating, like urinating frequently (I want in, I want out, I want in, I want outoh hey, can I come in now?) or urinating in inappropriate places, such as your new couch or your bedroom pillow. They also can have symptoms that threaten their health, like too much weight loss. Our primary goal with diabetic dogs and cats is to give them a good quality of life: their body weight is stable, they dont have to hover over the water dish all day, and their potty habits are normal in that they prefer to pee outside rather than on the couch. Accurate monitoring of your pet's diabetes can help to maintain a good quality of life for both you and your pet. After all, who wants to curl up and watch a movie on a pee-soaked couch? Exactly how does monitoring help us to accomplish this higher quality of life? By regulating their blood sugar (glucose) levels. Normal blood glucose levels in dogs and cats are similar to those in humans, about 80-120 Continue reading >>

More in diabetes