diabetestalk.net

How Long Does It Take To Go From Prediabetes To Diabetes

Bariatric Surgery For People With Type 2 Diabetes And Prediabetes

Bariatric Surgery For People With Type 2 Diabetes And Prediabetes

Q: What is type 2 diabetes? What is prediabetes? Type 2 diabetes is a chronic, degenerative disease that develops when the body cannot make enough, or properly use, insulin – a hormone that helps regulate sugar (glucose) in the body. Prediabetes is a precursor to type 2 diabetes, defined by above-average glucose levels. Q: Do bariatric surgeries (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, adjustable gastric banding and vertical sleeve gastrectomy) cure type 2 diabetes? A: Patients are often told weight loss surgeries will cure diabetes. That’s simply not true. However, individuals with type 2 diabetes or prediabetes and obesity may benefit from the modest weight loss achieved through surgery. After a gastric bypass or a sleeve gastrectomy, patients experience weight loss and changes in their gastrointestinal tract. Weight loss surgery causes profound changes in the incretins -- hormones in the gastrointestinal tract that cause insulin to be released. These changes lead to significant improvement in type 2 diabetes and can cause long-term changes in the pancreas that causes diabetes to go away. These changes may help individuals: Achieve remission for type 2 diabetes Decrease the amount of medications they need on a daily basis Postpone the onset of diabetes (for individuals with prediabetes) Q: How can weight loss surgery affect diabetes treatment? A: Modest weight loss can postpone the onset of diabetes for people with prediabetes. If diabetes is in the early stages, the individual might be able to stop taking diabetes medications (such as metfromin or insulin) for many years. For people with longstanding diabetes, taking oral medications, the effects of surgery may allow sugar levels to be controlled with food restrictions only. If the diabetes has been present for more than 10 ye Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Early Diabetes: Five Risk Factors Putting You On Course For Type 2 Diabetes

Symptoms Of Early Diabetes: Five Risk Factors Putting You On Course For Type 2 Diabetes

Prediabetes is also referred to by medics as borderline diabetes, is a metabolic condition. If undiagnosed or untreated, prediabetes can develop into type 2 diabetes; which is treatable but not easily reversed. Experts said it is a ‘critical stage’ in the development of diabetes because lifestyle choices - such as changing diet and exercising - can return blood sugar levels to normal. It is therefore crucial to recognise it as early as possible, medics argue. The condition is considered to be a grey area between having normal blood sugar levels and those verging on diabetic levels. Diabetes.co.uk states : “Prediabetes is characterised by the presence of blood glucose levels that are higher than normal but not yet high enough to be classed as diabetes. “Prediabetes may be referred to as impaired fasting glucose (IFT), if you have higher than normal sugar levels after a period of fasting, or as impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), if you have higher than normal sugar levels following eating. “Each year in the UK, 5 to 10 per cent of people diagnosed with prediabetes go on to develop type 2 diabetes.” There are no clear symptoms of prediabetes, so people could be suffering with the condition without knowing it. However people with prediabetes might be suffering with similar symptoms to type 2 diabetes. These include urinating more frequently, feeling thirsty and feeling tired. Symptoms can also include itching around the penis or vagina as a result of thrush, cuts or wounds which heal slowly and blurred vision. Being overweight can also cause type 2 diabetes. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. The Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

In the U.S., diabetes — or diabetes mellitus (DM) — is full-blown epidemic, and that’s not hyperbole. An estimated 29 million Americans have some form of diabetes, nearly 10 percent of the population, and even more alarming, the average American has a one in three chance of developing diabetes symptoms at some point in his or her lifetime. (1) The statistics are alarming, and they get even worse. Another 86 million people have prediabetes, with up to 30 percent of them developing type 2 diabetes within five years. And perhaps the most concerning, about a third of people who have diabetes — approximately 8 million adults — are believed to be undiagnosed and unaware. That’s why it’s so vital to understand and recognize diabetes symptoms. And there’s actually good news. While there’s technically no known “cure” for diabetes — whether it’s type 1, type 2 or gestational diabetes — there’s plenty that can be done to help reverse diabetes naturally, control diabetes symptoms and prevent diabetes complications. The Most Common Diabetes Symptoms Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results from problems controlling the hormone insulin. Diabetes symptoms are a result of higher-than-normal levels of glucose (sugar) in your blood. With type 1 diabetes, symptoms usually develop sooner and at a younger age than with type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes also normally causes more severe symptoms. In fact, because type 2 diabetes signs and symptoms can be minimal in some cases, it sometimes can go diagnosed for a long period of time, causing the problem to worsen and long-term damage to develop. While it’s still not entirely known how this happens, prolonged exposure to high blood sugar can damage nerve fibers that affect the blood vessels, heart, e Continue reading >>

Prediabetes? What Does It Mean For Your Kidneys?

Prediabetes? What Does It Mean For Your Kidneys?

Prediabetes describes the condition of someone who is on their way to developing diabetes. Before having diabetes, people usually have “pre-diabetes.” This is a new name for a condition in which blood glucose (sugar) levels are higher than normal but not yet high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. A person with prediabetes cannot handle sugar as well as they should. Even though diabetes is not full blown, high sugar levels in prediabetes can be causing problems throughout the body. One of the main organs that can be damaged is the kidney. People with prediabetes often have unrecognized chronic kidney disease (CKD), according to new research. In this large study, more than one third of the people with prediabetes were found to have two signs of kidney disease: protein in the urine (called albuminuria). Albuminuria is not normal. reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). This is a measure of how well the kidneys work; the eGFR tells the stage of kidney disease. In the people with prediabetes, the stage of chronic kidney disease was just as advanced as people with diabetes. Many people with either prediabetes or diabetes were found to have stage 3 or 4 chronic kidney disease. There are 5 stages of chronic kidney disease. When the disease reaches stage 5, the person will need kidney replacement therapy, either transplantation or dialysis. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services estimates that about one in four U.S. adults aged 20 years or older—or 57 million people—have pre—diabetes. Without patients and their doctors taking action, prediabetes is likely to become type 2 diabetes in 10 years or less. People with prediabetes should know that the long—term damage to their body—especially to the heart, kidneys and blood vessels — may alread Continue reading >>

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Olivia Yang was stunned when she learned she had type 2 diabetes six years ago, when she was 19. Her doctor was shocked, too. In fact, her physician tested her twice to be sure there wasn’t some mistake. Yang was young, had a normal weight for her 5-foot-2-inch frame, and didn’t consider herself a particularly bad eater. She certainly didn’t seem like someone at risk. Now a new study may hint at why some patients end up with type 2 diabetes or prediabetes even when they don’t appear to have all of the typical risk factors such as age, obesity, and an unhealthy diet. Yang learned of her condition sophomore year of college. She’d gone for a physical — a requirement in order to begin working out with a fitness trainer — but her A1C blood test came back abnormally high, indicating diabetes. An A1C test tells a person’s average blood sugar level over the past few months. More specifically, an A1C test measures what percentage of your hemoglobin — a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen — is coated with sugar. It’s used to diagnose type 1 and type 2 diabetes and to keep tabs on how a person is managing their condition over time. Normal readings land below 5.7 percent. The range for someone with prediabetes falls between 5.7 and 6.4 percent and indicates a high risk of developing diabetes. Anything higher is considered diabetes. Unexpected diagnosis Yang, now 25 and an account executive at an advertising agency in Boston, told CBS News, “It was a shock for me. Type 2 runs in my family. But it happened when my parents were older so it was kind of a shock that I would get it at such a young age.” After the diagnosis, though, she realized she’d had symptoms for a while. “Looking back, I fell asleep a lot. I was tired a lot after I ate, a sym Continue reading >>

What Is Prediabetes? New Quiz Reveals Your Risk

What Is Prediabetes? New Quiz Reveals Your Risk

By taking a 1-minute quiz, you can find out if you're at risk for prediabetes. The quiz is part of a new public service campaign that aims to increase awareness of the condition. The government-backed campaign also includes TV ads that let people take the quiz in real time. The goal is to give people an idea of their prediabetes risk, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which put together the campaign in partnership with the American Diabetes Association, the American Medical Association, and the Ad Council. More than 1 in 3 U.S. adults (86 million people) have prediabetes — meaning their blood sugar levels are abnormally high, but not high enough to be classified as diabetes. However, just 10 percent of these people are aware that they have the condition. Prediabetes can be reversed with weight loss and changes in diet and exercise, the CDC says. But up to 30 percent of people whose prediabetes goes untreated will go on to develop type 2 diabetes within five years, and they also may be at increased risk of a heart attack or stroke, according to the CDC. "I think the scary thing is that this really touches everyone — 1 in 3 could be your brother or sister, your best friend or partner," Lisa Sherman, president and CEO of the Ad Council, said in a statement. "Our hope is that this online test and other campaign materials make it easy for people to know where they stand and will motivate them to take steps to reverse their condition." [The Best Way to Lose Weight Safely] People can take the prediabetes quiz online, or by texting "RISKTEST" to 97779. The quiz has seven questions, including the following: "Are you a man or a woman?", "Do you have a mother, father, sister or brother with diabetes?" and "How old are you?" People who are older or ma Continue reading >>

Ymca's Diabetes Prevention Program

Ymca's Diabetes Prevention Program

More than 200 Ys across the country help thousands of people reduce their risk for developing type 2 diabetes with YMCA’s Diabetes Prevention Program. This small-group program helps people with prediabetes eat healthier, increase their physical activity and lose weight, which can delay or even prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes. What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a chronic disease that causes blood sugar levels to rise higher than normal. Diabetes affects more than 29 million people. A condition called prediabetes occurs when blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough for a type 2 diabetes diagnosis. More than 86 million Americans have prediabetes and are at risk of developing diabetes. Diabetes has no cure, but prediabetes can be reversed. Chances are you know at least one person with diabetes and probably more than one with prediabetes. To find out if you are at risk, take this quick test. Then share the test with friends and family. The Y Can Help If you find out you or someone you know is at risk for developing diabetes, the YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Program can help. Find out if a Y near you runs the program. Continue reading >>

Living With Prediabetes

Living With Prediabetes

Wouldn’t it be nice if the human body had an “early alert system” that advised us when something was about to go wrong with our health? Prediabetes offers a warning and gives us a chance to change the future. Prediabetes refers to blood glucose (sugar) levels that are higher than normal, but not yet high enough to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes (i.e. a fasting plasma glucose level of 7.0 mmol/L or higher). Although not everyone with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes, many people will. It is important to know if you have prediabetes, because research has shown that some long-term complications associated with diabetes – such as heart disease and nerve damage – may begin during prediabetes. Risk factors Like type 2 diabetes, prediabetes can occur without you knowing it, so being aware of your risks and getting tested are important. This is especially true if you have prediabetes as part of the “metabolic syndrome,” meaning you also have high blood pressure, high levels of LDL cholesterol (the “bad” cholesterol) and triglycerides, low levels of HDL cholesterol (the “good” cholesterol) and excess fat around the waist. The risk for type 2 diabetes is higher as you grow older, so Diabetes Canada recommends screening by testing fasting plasma glucose for everyone once they reach age 40 and every three years after that. If you have risk factors that increase the likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes, you should be tested more frequently or start regular screening earlier. The good news Research has shown that if you take steps to manage your blood glucose when you have prediabetes, you can delay or prevent type 2 diabetes from developing. You may be able to reduce blood glucose (sugar) levels with simple lifestyle changes, such as increasing you Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Diagnosis?

Prediabetes Diagnosis?

Turn things around before diabetes occurs In 2012, 86 million Americans over age 20 had prediabetes – a nearly 9 percent increase over 2010 stats, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. If you’re among the 86 million with prediabetes, you need to know there are steps you can take to manage your condition and avoid developing type 2 diabetes. The risks are real Prediabetes occurs when your fasting blood glucose, or sugar, level is above normal. Prediabetes can progress to type 2 diabetes, in which the body does not produce or use enough of the hormone insulin to turn glucose into energy. Diabetes is linked to high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, nerve damage, eye problems and other serious health conditions. “One of the biggest things to remember with prediabetes is that it does not automatically turn into type 2 diabetes or heart disease,” explained Novant Health Diabetes Center Diabetes Educator Cathy Thomas, MSN, RN, CDE. People with prediabetes are definitely at a much higher risk of developing either one or both, though. People with prediabetes have nearly double the risk of developing cardiovascular disease than people with normal glucose levels. And those who have diabetes have a two to four times greater risk of cardiovascular disease. “The risks are very real, especially if you ignore your diagnosis,” Thomas said. “But there’s no reason to panic. Prediabetes acts as a really good early warning system for the body, signaling people to make some lifestyle changes to avoid more serious conditions.” An “early warning system” “I found out about my prediabetes two years ago when I was diagnosed with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), which puts me at greater risk for diabetes,” said Regan White, 33, Continue reading >>

Five Things You Should Know About Prediabetes

Five Things You Should Know About Prediabetes

After announcing the expansion of Diabetes Stops Here and asking you which topics you’d like covered, we received a specific request for more information about prediabetes. A staggering 79 million Americans deal with this condition, and while it can lead to crippling health consequences, it can be avoided. Here are five things you should know about prediabetes: 1. What is prediabetes? Before people develop type 2 diabetes, they almost always have prediabetes, a health condition where your blood glucose is higher than normal but not as high as if you had diabetes. 2. How can I find out if I have it? Your doctor can give you a blood test to tell if you have prediabetes (the same test that’s used to test for diabetes). At your next doctor visit, ask if you should be tested for prediabetes. 3. What can I do if I have prediabetes? If you have prediabetes, there are important steps you can, and should, take. Early intervention can turn back the clock and return elevated blood glucose levels to the normal range. Losing weight is an important step for most people with prediabetes, and the amount doesn’t have to be huge to make a difference. A weight loss of just 10 to 15 pounds can really stack the odds in your favor. Coupled with 30 minutes of exercise each day and healthy food choices, you’ll be on your way. Talk with your doctor and visit our website to learn more about other ways you can prevent or reverse the condition. 4. Does this mean I’m going to develop type 2 diabetes? Prediabetes can lead to type 2 diabetes…but it doesn’t have to. Scientific studies show taking the above steps can often halt or at least slow down the progression of prediabetes so it doesn’t take a turn for the worse. 5. Where can I find help? You are not alone. It’s never too late Continue reading >>

7 Silent Symptoms Of Pre-diabetes

7 Silent Symptoms Of Pre-diabetes

A little fatigue. An extra five pounds you can’t shake. A bruise that just won’t heal. None of these symptoms are especially eyebrow-raising on their own. But taken together, they could be signs of a silent epidemic that’s affecting more and more women across the country: pre-diabetes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says that at least 86 million Americans—more than one in three—have the condition, which is marked by blood sugar levels that are higher than normal, but not high enough to qualify as diabetic. But as many as nine in 10 sufferers don’t know they have it, says Ashita Gupta, M.D., an endocrinologist at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. “That’s because it’s common for people to feel perfectly normal and healthy while the disease is progressing,” she explains. Still, there are signs and symptoms you can watch out for. And you should, since pre-diabetes can be treated and reversed through dietary tweaks and healthy lifestyle changes when it’s caught earlier. But the longer it goes undiagnosed and untreated, the greater the chance of it turning into full-blown diabetes, which is much harder to rebound from. So in honor of November, which is American Diabetes Month, we asked Gupta to share some of the most common red flags of pre-diabetes. If you’ve experienced any of the symptoms on the slides ahead, ask your doctor to test you as soon as possible. Sudden spikes and dips in your blood sugar (which are common in those with pre-diabetes) can impair your eye’s ability to bend and focus, leading to blurred vision, says Gupta. The blurriness should go away once you get your sugar levels back into normal range. (Here are 10 other Surprising Things Your Eyes Reveal About Your Health.) One of the more well-known sig Continue reading >>

The 4 Common Mistakes All Prediabetics Must Avoid To Prevent Diabetes

The 4 Common Mistakes All Prediabetics Must Avoid To Prevent Diabetes

Just a “little touch of sugar?” iStock/stocksnapper If you’re among the 79 million Americans with prediabetes—higher-than-normal levels of blood sugar, which boost your risk for full-blown diabetes and related health problems—don’t shrug it off. New research published in the journal The Lancet found that prediabetic patients who had at least one normal blood sugar reading, even for a short period of time, were 56 percent more likely to avoid progressing to diabetes during nearly six years of follow-up after the study. In other words, “This is your chance to take control,” says Matt Longjohn, MD, MPH, senior director of chronic disease prevention for the YMCA-USA. “Research proves that some simple, daily lifestyle changes can dramatically cut the risk for developing diabetes over the next couple of years by 58 percent, which is better than what is seen with frequently prescribed medications like metformin.” The key? Avoid these four roadblocks between you and a healthier future. iStock/martinedoucet The landmark Diabetes Prevention Program study, which followed 3,234 people with prediabetes for three years, revealed that everyday changes—switching up their eating habits and adding more physical activity—helped participants lose a little weight. Trimming just 5 percent to 7 percent of their body weight (that’s 12.5 pounds for a 180 pound person) and exercising slashed the odds for developing full-blown diabetes by a whopping 58 percent. This helps trim abdominal fat—the deep belly fat that settles in your torso, wraps itself around your internal organs, and even invades your liver. It messes with your liver’s ability to regulate blood sugar by pumping out inflammation-boosting compounds that make your body stop obeying insulin. Smart Move: St Continue reading >>

Glycohemoglobin (hba1c, A1c)

Glycohemoglobin (hba1c, A1c)

A A A Test Overview Glycohemoglobin (A1c) is a blood test that checks the amount of sugar (glucose) bound to the hemoglobin in the red blood cells. When hemoglobin and glucose bond, a coat of sugar forms on the hemoglobin. That coat gets thicker when there's more sugar in the blood. A1c tests measure how thick that coat has been over the past 3 months, which is how long a red blood cell lives. People who have diabetes or other conditions that increase their blood glucose levels have more glycohemoglobin than normal. An A1c test can be used to diagnose prediabetes or diabetes. The A1c test checks the long-term control of blood glucose levels in people with diabetes. Most doctors think checking an A1c level is the best way to check how well a person is controlling his or her diabetes. A home blood glucose test measures the level of blood glucose only at that moment. Blood glucose levels change during the day for many reasons, including medicine, diet, exercise, and the level of insulin in the blood. It is useful for a person who has diabetes to have information about the long-term control of blood sugar levels. The A1c test result does not change with any recent changes in diet, exercise, or medicines. Glucose binds to hemoglobin in red blood cells at a steady rate. Since red blood cells last 3 to 4 months, the A1c test shows how much glucose is in the plasma part of blood. This test shows how well your diabetes has been controlled in the last 2 to 3 months and whether your diabetes treatment plan needs to be changed. The A1c test can also help your doctor see how big your risk is of developing problems from diabetes, such as kidney failure, vision problems, and leg or foot numbness. Keeping your A1c level in your target range can lower your chance for problems. Why It Is Continue reading >>

Many Miss Prediabetes Wake-up Call

Many Miss Prediabetes Wake-up Call

Type 2 diabetes doesn’t usually appear all of a sudden. Many people have a long, slow, invisible lead-in to it called prediabetes. During this period, blood sugar levels are higher than normal. However, they’re not high enough to cause symptoms or to be classified as diabetes. It’s still possible at this stage to prevent the slide into full-blown diabetes. Think of prediabetes as a wake-up call. Unfortunately, few people ever hear the alarm. A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that among Americans age 20 and older, only 10% of those with prediabetes know they have it. Given that as many as 73 million Americans have prediabetes, that’s a lot of missed opportunities to prevent the ravages of diabetes. One reason many people don’t know that they may be headed toward diabetes is they’ve never had their blood sugar tested. This simple test isn’t part of routine preventive care. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends blood sugar “screening” only in individuals with high blood pressure. (Screening means hunting for hidden disease in the absence of any outward signs or symptoms.) That’s important, because recommendations from the Task Force, an independent panel of experts, are used by many health-care organizations to determine preventive care. In addition, Task Force recommendations will help determine what services are covered under the Affordable Care Act. Expanding the net The American Diabetes Association and other organizations recommend routine blood sugar testing in people at high risk for developing diabetes. These include: everyone over age 45 younger people who are overweight and who also have one of these diabetes risk factors: little or no physical activity family history of diabetes high blood pre Continue reading >>

How One Woman With Prediabetes Uses Diet And Exercise To Prevent Diabetes

How One Woman With Prediabetes Uses Diet And Exercise To Prevent Diabetes

Kathy Lawrence lost 15 pounds when she started exercising 45 minutes a day.(KATHY LAWRENCE)If you have prediabetes, two of the most important things you can do to avoid diabetes are change your diet and increase your exercise. In a study published in 2002 by the Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group, people with prediabetes slashed their risk of diabetes by more than half if they lowered the fat and calories in their diet, boosted exercise, and lost weight. Kathy Lawrence, who is 61 and lives in Austin, developed some worrying symptoms in her late 50s. She had cat scratches on her feet that refused to heal. Slow-healing wounds are a sign of diabetes, so she visited her doctor and had her blood sugar tested. Lawrence had a fasting blood glucose of 119 mg/dL, just short of the level that signifies diabetes (over 126 mg/dL). Although she technically had prediabetes, not diabetes, her doctor told her: "We're going to count you as having it." More about diabetes Alter your diet She started by making some changes in her diet. "You ate your way into this disease, and you can eat your way out of it," her gynecologist once told her. That's not entirely true; she had some type 2 diabetes risk factors she couldn't changeher age, a family history of the disease and gestational diabetes during pregnancy. However, she did have some risk factors she could change, including her weight (she knew she could lose a few pounds in her midsection) and her activity level. She first looked at the types of carbohydrates she was eating. Carbohydrates are a key part of the human diet, but some raise blood sugar more than others. Next Page: Sticking with the diet [ pagebreak ]She focused on getting carbohydrates from fruits, vegetables, and whole-grain foods, which are rich in nutrients and fi Continue reading >>

More in diabetes