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How Long Does It Take For The Pancreas To Regenerate

[is There Pancreatic Regeneration? Morphological And Functional Certification After A Corporocaudal Splenopancreatectomy/].

[is There Pancreatic Regeneration? Morphological And Functional Certification After A Corporocaudal Splenopancreatectomy/].

[Is there pancreatic regeneration? Morphological and functional certification after a corporocaudal splenopancreatectomy/]. Servicio de Ciruga, Hospital de Clnicas Jos de San Martn, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Buenos Aires. [email protected] The process of pancreatic regeneration, well known and accepted, is less known than the hepatic and includes different mechanisms and factors. Pancreatic regeneration is better known in acute pancreatitis. After an extensive pancreatic necrosis, the morphological and functional regeneration is assessed by dynamic computed tomography associated with normalization of glycemia and the exocrine function. Different groups identified and evaluated experimentally and clinically the actions of multiple factors involved in the process of pancreatic regeneration. Even difficult to assess, pancreatic regeneration after partial pancreatectomy is well documented and of capital importance. A 57-year-old woman with discomfort in the upper-left abdominal quadrant. CT scans showed a tumor in the body and tail of the pancreas adherent to the spleen. Preoperative CA 19-9 was normal. She was operated on and the tumor resected en bloc with the spleen. Only the head of the pancreas was preserved. Intraoperative pathological examination of the specimen showed a mucinous cistoadenoma with no malignant degeneration. Postoperative course was uneventful and discharged at p.o. day 10, with ongoing diabetes. Four month later she presented pain in the upper-left quadrant with hyperamylasemia. CT scans showed a normal body and tail with an image of pseudocyst at the top of the pancreatic tail. One year after the initial surgery she remained asymptomatic, without diabetes and with no dietary restrictions. Further CT controls showed images of the Continue reading >>

Fasting Diet May Help Regenerate A Diabetic Pancreas

Fasting Diet May Help Regenerate A Diabetic Pancreas

"The pancreas can be triggered to regenerate itself through a type of fasting diet, say US researchers," BBC News reports. Research in mice found a low-calorie diet may help in cases of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The pancreas is an organ that uses specialised cells known as beta cells to produce the hormone insulin, which the body uses to break down sugars in the blood (glucose). In type 1 diabetes the pancreas stops producing insulin. In type 2 diabetes either not enough insulin is produced or cells in the body fail to respond to insulin (insulin resistance). Mice were fed for four days on a low-calorie, low-protein and low-carbohydrate but high-fat diet, receiving half their normal daily calorie intake on day one, followed by three days of 10% of their normal calorie intake. Researchers repeated this fast on three occasions, with 10 days of refeeding in between. They then examined the pancreas. They found in mice modelled to have both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, insulin production was restored, insulin resistance was reduced, and beta cells could be regenerated. Early lab study involving human cell samples showed similar potential. These are promising results, but further studies are needed to validate these findings in humans. If you have either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, you shouldn't attempt a fasting diet without first seeking medical advice. A sudden change in your calorie intake could have unpredictable effects and lead to complications. Where did the story come from? The study was carried out by researchers from the University of Southern California and the Koch Institute at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the US, and the IFOM FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology in Italy. It was funded by grants from the US National Institutes of Health (NI Continue reading >>

Jci -regeneration Of The Pancreatic Cell

Jci -regeneration Of The Pancreatic Cell

Division of Immunogenetics, Department of Pediatrics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Childrens Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. Address correspondence to: Massimo Trucco, Division of Immunogenetics, Childrens Hospital of Pittsburgh, Rangos Research Center, 3460 5th Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213-3205, USA. Phone: (412) 692-6570; Fax: (412) 692-5809; E-mail: [email protected] . Find articles by Trucco, M. in: JCI | PubMed | Google Scholar First published January 3, 2005- More info Published in Volume 115, Issue 1 (January 3, 2005) J Clin Invest.2005;115(1):512.doi:10.1172/JCI23935. Copyright 2005, The American Society for Clinical Investigation. Type 1 diabetes is the result of an autoimmune attack against the insulin-producing cells of the endocrine pancreas. Current treatment for patients with type 1 diabetes typically involves a rigorous and invasive regimen of testing blood glucose levels many times a day along with subcutaneous injections of recombinant DNAderived insulin. Islet transplantation, even with its substantially improved outcome in recent years, is still not indicated for pediatric patients. However, in light of the fact that some regenerative capabilities of the endocrine pancreas have been documented and recent research has shown that human ES cell lines can be derived in vitro, this review discusses whether it is practical or even possible to combine these lines of research to more effectively treat young diabetic patients. In vertebrates, the process of gastrulation takes place very early during the development of the embryo. This process reorganizes the embryos cells into 3 layers: ectoderm, endoderm, and mesoderm. The ectoderm forms the skin and the central nervous system; the mesoderm gives rise to the cells Continue reading >>

Can The Body Repair Its Own Pancreas?

Can The Body Repair Its Own Pancreas?

Can the body repair its own pancreas? While the imagery that comes to mind might seem like something out of a science-fiction novel, the truth is that real science is outsmarting the fiction here. All indicators, according to a recent study, are that if we set up the right environment, the body can likely repair its own damaged pancreatic cells. Damaged pancreatic cells can lead to diabetes, and this is a key focus in the researchif the body can repair its own pancreas, do we have a potential treatment for diabetes? Before I discuss the study, lets review the pancreas and diabetes. The pancreas is roughly a tadpole-shaped organ (with a head, body, and tail) that lives behind our stomach. Its head nestles into the inner curve of our duodenum (the first part of the small intestine that our stomach contents empty into) where it connects via the pancreatic duct. Its body and tail span the width of our stomach, ending on the left side of our abdomen at the spleen. The pancreas functions of part of both the gastrointestinal, or digestive, system and the endocrine system. Though it has other functions, most people know it best, by far, as the gland that releases the hormone insulin to help keep our blood sugar levels under control. And the reason they know it is because when the pancreas isnt releasing insulin properly, this can lead to diabetes, an extremely prevalent disease in the United States. On its website, the American Diabetes Association provides the following 2012 statistics on Diabetes in the U.S.: 29.1 million (9.3%) Americans have diabetes 1.4 million are newly diagnosed each year 86 million age 20 and older have prediabetes Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the U.S. The specific cells within the pancreas that produce, store, and secrete insulin are Continue reading >>

Fasting Diet 'regenerates Diabetic Organ'

Fasting Diet 'regenerates Diabetic Organ'

The pancreas can be triggered to regenerate itself through a type of fasting diet, say US researchers. Restoring the function of the organ - which helps control blood sugar levels - reversed symptoms of diabetes in animal experiments. The study, published in the journal Cell, says the diet reboots the body. Experts said the findings were "potentially very exciting" as they could become a new treatment for the disease. People are advised not to try this without medical advice. In the experiments, mice were put on a modified form of the "fasting-mimicking diet". It is like the human form of the diet when people spend five days on a low-calorie, low-protein, low-carbohydrate but high unsaturated-fat diet. It resembles a vegan diet with nuts and soups, but with around 800 to 1,100 calories a day. Then they have 25 days eating what they want - so overall it mimics periods of feast and famine. Previous research has suggested it can slow the pace of ageing. Diabetes therapy? But animal experiments showed the diet regenerated a special type of cell in the pancreas called a beta cell. These are the cells that detect sugar in the blood and release the hormone insulin if it gets too high. Dr Valter Longo, from the University of Southern California, said: "Our conclusion is that by pushing the mice into an extreme state and then bringing them back - by starving them and then feeding them again - the cells in the pancreas are triggered to use some kind of developmental reprogramming that rebuilds the part of the organ that's no longer functioning." There were benefits in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in the mouse experiments. Type 1 is caused by the immune system destroying beta cells and type 2 is largely caused by lifestyle and the body no longer responding to insulin. Further t Continue reading >>

Pancreatic Regeneration Models, Mechanisms, And Inconsistencies

Pancreatic Regeneration Models, Mechanisms, And Inconsistencies

Pancreatic Regeneration Models, Mechanisms, and Inconsistencies Mairobys Socorro(1)and Farzad Esni(1,2,3,4,5) 1 Department of Surgery, Division of Pediatric General and Thoracic Surgery, Childrens Hospital of Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 152442 Department of Developmental Biology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 152443 Department of Microbiology & Molecular Genetics, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 152614 University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, 151235 University of Pittsburgh, Department of Surgery, John G. Rangos Research Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15224, While skin, liver and gut are capable to regenerate and heal, other organs such as heart and brain do not display similar regenerative capacities. The adult pancreas displays a limited capacity to regenerate, although this regenerative capacity declines with age (17, 74-76, 83). Thus, with respect to the pancreas, the uncertainty is not about the overall ability of the adult pancreas to regenerate, but rather which cells may act as cell(s) of origin in this process. For example, it is widely accepted that under physiologic conditions -cell regeneration in the adult mouse pancreas originates from -cell self-duplication (21, 77). However, depending on the type of injury model, it appears that new -cells can arise from cells either residing within the ducts (1, 4, 18, 35, 91), in proximity to the ductal network (88), or from other pancreatic endocrine cells (15, 16, 78, 90). This uncertainty regarding the types of cells that may potentially give rise to new -cells comes in part from the fact that in each experimental model of regeneration, the exact target cells and the severity of the injury are different. Here, we will first review some of the inj Continue reading >>

Fasting Diet Could Regenerate Pancreas And Reverse Diabetes, Researchers Say

Fasting Diet Could Regenerate Pancreas And Reverse Diabetes, Researchers Say

A fasting diet has the ability to regenerate the pancreas and could potentially reverse diabetes, researchers have found. A US study, published in scientific journal Cell, tested a modified version of the fasting-mimicking diet (FMD) on both mice and human cells. The findings showed cycles of the diet could regenerate pancreatic cells to restore insulin in type 1 diabetes patients and could also reverse both type 1 and 2 diabetes in mice. The study's co-author, Dr Valter Longo from the University of Southern California, told the ABC the findings were "potentially very exciting" because they could lead to cures for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, unlike type 2, is an autoimmune condition for which there is no known cause or cure. In patients with type 1 diabetes, the pancreas stops producing insulin. Dr Longo also said a FMD could also regenerate other organs because their research had shown similar effects for blood cells. "They show that extreme diets with very specific compositions can trigger self repair and regeneration processes in the mouse and possibly humans," Dr Longo said. Taking into account the challenges and side-effects of fasting in humans, Dr Longo and his team developed a modified low-calorie, low-protein and low-carbohydrate but high-fat four-day FMD. The diet caused changes in the levels of specific growth factors, glucose, and ketone bodies and reduced the blood glucose on pre-diabetic patients. Mice receiving the FMD showed improved glucose tolerance and insulin tolerance. The pancreas helps to control blood sugar levels and restoring the organ can reverse the symptoms of diabetes. The diet can regenerate the pancreas by reprogramming cells into "beta cells" that make insulin. The study found cycles of the FMD could promote the gen Continue reading >>

Fasting Regenerates Your Pancreas

Fasting Regenerates Your Pancreas

Weekly Health Quiz: Vitamin D, Cherries and Concussions Research involving lab mice shows a fasting-mimicking diet not only can help your pancreas regenerate itself, but it can also reverse diabetes symptoms Other animal studies suggest restricting calories to a six-hour window can significantly reduce levels of a particular mutant protein known to play a role in Huntington's disease Fasting has been shown to be beneficial in lowering your risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes; it also boosts your bodys immune system and antiaging potential Three fasting methods I encourage you to consider are: the fasting-mimicking diet, intermittent fasting or water-only fasting I personally have experienced great results with both intermittent fasting and water-only fasting, and I believe fasting is one of the best tools you can use in the fight against chronic disease Fasting is a powerful tool nearly anyone can use to take control of their health. Animal research indicates a fasting-mimicking diet not only can help your pancreas regenerate itself, but it can also reverse diabetes symptoms. In another study, also involving lab mice, restricting daily calories to a six-hour window significantly reduced levels of a particular mutant protein known to play a role in Huntington's disease. Given these results, as well as other research, the tremendous benefits of fasting continue to emerge. If you haven't yet considered how fasting can make a positive difference to your health, I encourage you to keep reading and also consider one of three methods: the fasting-mimicking diet, intermittent fasting or water-only fasting. Fasting is one of the best tools you can use in the fight against chronic disease. Fasting-Mimicking Regenerates Pancreas, Eliminates Diabetes in Lab Mice In Continue reading >>

Turmeric Can Regenerate Damaged Pancreas Cells In Type 1 Diabetes

Turmeric Can Regenerate Damaged Pancreas Cells In Type 1 Diabetes

Turmeric Can Regenerate Damaged Pancreas Cells In Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes also called juvenile diabetes is a condition in which enough insulin is not produced. Insulin is a hormone which regulates blood sugar levels and maintains them at healthy levels. Pancreas is an organ in the body that produces insulin, particularly its beta cells called islets of Langerhans. Genetic factors, environmental factors and autoimmune reactions (when body attacks its own tissues) lead o destruction of these cells which results in reduced production of insulin. There is no treatment for type 1 diabetes apart from insulin therapy. Turmeric and its bioactive ingredient curcumin are found to very therapeutic in diabetes. It has a multi-modal action- anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-obesity, targets various diabetic complications but most of the focus is on turmeric/curcumins hypoglycaemic action. Curcumin lowers blood sugar and normalizes insulin activity. This animal study published in Diabetology and Metabolic Syndrome, November 2013 focuses on a new therapeutic action of curcumin in diabetes. The effect of curcumin derivative (a compound that is derived from curcumin) on pancreatic islet cells that produce insulin is studied. Animal model of diabetes were developed. Some were treated with curcumin derivative while some were given no treatment. The novel curcumin derivative was water soluble and used to overcome the bioavailability issue of curcumin. The study lasted for 10 months but the treatment with curcumin was for 40 days. Glucose and insulin levels were monitored. Even changes in pancreas cells were assessed after treatment. In the diabetes rats, the blood sugar levels increased compared to basal level and continued to increase for 40 days. After that there was a gradua Continue reading >>

Beta Cell Regeneration

Beta Cell Regeneration

Beta cell dysfunction is a characteristic of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, beta cells — insulin-producing cells found in the pancreas — are destroyed, while in type 2 diabetes, they may not produce enough insulin. Since it's not possible today to generate new, patient-specific, functional beta cells, people with type 1 diabetes need insulin therapy. People with type 2 diabetes often need medications, with some people requiring insulin therapy. Focus areas Center for Regenerative Medicine researchers, led by Yasuhiro Ikeda, D.V.M., Ph.D., and Yogish C. Kudva, M.B.B.S., both of Mayo Clinic's campus in Rochester, Minnesota, are taking two related approaches to beta cell regeneration that may lead to new treatments for diabetes. In the laboratory. In vitro beta cell regeneration uses induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, a type of bioengineered stem cell that acts like an embryonic stem cell. Using a person's own skin cells or blood cells as a starting point, Mayo researchers have successfully generated patient-specific iPS cells and subsequently converted them into glucose-responsive, insulin-producing cells in the laboratory. Once fully optimized, such cells may enable a novel cell therapy for beta cell dysfunction in diabetes. And since the transplanted cells are derived from the patient's own cells, there would be no need to give the patient any immunosuppressive drugs, which are necessary for pancreas and islet cell transplants today. In a patient's own pancreas. Mayo researchers are working to enhance a person's natural ability to regenerate beta cells using gene therapy, which involves delivering to the pancreas cellular factors known to enhance beta cell growth and regeneration. Investigators have developed pancreatic beta cell- and exocri Continue reading >>

Foods That Will Heal The Pancreas

Foods That Will Heal The Pancreas

The pancreas plays a crucial role in digestion. When food empties from your stomach into the small intestine, it mixes with digestive enzymes from the pancreas that neutralize stomach acid, preventing damage to the intestine. These enzymes also break down your food so that it can be absorbed by your body. The pancreas produces insulin, which reduces blood sugar levels and allows your body to store food energy for future use. Eating the right foods can heal and nourish your pancreas. It may also help you avoid pancreatitis, a painful inflammation of the pancreas. Video of the Day Blueberries and cherries are both good sources of antioxidants, which help prevent cell damage. Broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables like Brussels sprouts, cabbage and cauliflower contain powerful chemicals which may help prevent cancer. Garlic, along with its other allium relative, onions, is a good source of beneficial nutrients for pancreas health and for the prevention of cancer. Red grapes are a good source of resveratrol, a powerful antioxidant. Avoid red wine if you have pancreatitis, and eat a handful of red grapes instead. Red reishi mushrooms can help reduce inflammation and are used in Chinese medicine to restore balance to the body. Spinach is a good source of iron and vitamin B, both of which your pancreas needs. Try a spinach salad, or spinach stir-fried with garlic. Other leafy greens, like kale, mustard and Swiss chard are also beneficial for your pancreas. Sweet potatoes along with other orange and yellow vegetables like carrots, corn and squash contain nutrients which are beneficial for the pancreas and may help prevent cancer. Tofu is an excellent source of low-fat protein. You need protein in your diet for healing, but too much fat will exacerbate any pancreas problems. Continue reading >>

Pancreatic Cells Could Regenerate And Produce Insulin Again In Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Pancreatic Cells Could Regenerate And Produce Insulin Again In Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

In type 1 diabetes, the body’s own immune system attacks cells in the pancreas, known as beta-cells, which produce the hormone insulin. Insulin is needed for moving glucose out of the blood stream and into muscles and other tissues. The condition is usually diagnosed after around 70 per cent of the beta-cells cease to function and type 1 diabetics need to inject a synthetic form of insulin to replace the missing hormone. In type 2 diabetes, too, insulin production tends to decline, with the beta-cells dying off faster than normal. Several different factors appear to be involved in this, including high blood sugar and blood fat levels, inflammatory compounds and high levels of the hormone leptin. More people with type 2 diabetes now inject insulin than those with type 1. At one time, it was thought that losing the ability to produce insulin was permanent and irreversible. But as I wrote here, scientists have discovered recently that beta-cell function can come back – in animal models of diabetes, at least. Now, a study published in the journal Nature on 20 August has shown just how remarkable this capacity for regeneration could be. The pancreas looks to be even more adaptable and to possess a greater potential for self-healing than was previously assumed. The researchers, at the University of Geneva in Switzerland, are the first to reveal a mechanism by which other cells in the pancreas called delta-cells, (which produce somatostatin, another pancreatic hormone) revert to a precursor-like cell state before being ‘reborn’ as beta-cells in diabetic mice.1 Although this only appears to happen in young mice with type 1 diabetes, it provides further evidence that loss of beta-cell function might not be the end of the story. Science is moving ahead fast in this area. Continue reading >>

Can Beta Cells Be Healed?

Can Beta Cells Be Healed?

Can Type 2 or Type 1 diabetes be not only reversed, but cured? Can beta cells start producing enough insulin? Can the liver store glucose better, and can body cells learn to handle glucose more efficiently? We always hear that diabetes is incurable, and so far it has been. But people are trying. Diabetes affects so many organs; we’ll have to investigate them one at a time. This week we’ll look at beta cells in the pancreas. If you have Type 1 or 2 diabetes or prediabetes, you have damaged beta cells. So you don’t have enough insulin, and what you have may not be released when it’s needed. If the cells were healed, diabetes would pretty much go away. But is this possible, and how could it be done? In Type 1 diabetes, cells from the immune system attack and destroy beta cells. Type 1.5 diabetes or LADA (latent autoimmune diabetes of adults) probably involves a similar process. So restoring beta cells in Type 1 or 1.5 will probably require changing the immune system. Reducing the need for insulin by eating a healthy diet helps, but I don’t know of any Type 1s or people with LADA who recovered normal beta cell function by diet alone. Many are looking at surgically replacing beta cells. Hundreds of experimental “islet cell transplants” have been done. But the results aren’t great. This approach will only work if we could also “turn off” whatever process is killing beta cells in the first place. But there’s a lot of money in it, so I’m sure the research will continue. Research is going on into drugs that might stop the immune system’s attack. A drug called teplizumab is being studied and shows promise. But as a person with an immune disease of my own, I’m pretty sure this progress will be slow. The immune system is not well understood yet. Beta cel Continue reading >>

Can The Pancreas Regenerate | Diabetic Connect

Can The Pancreas Regenerate | Diabetic Connect

I have been on insulin for 4 years now and in the last few weeks my glocouse has been in normal rage without taking any shots. Can anyone help me understand if this is normal? I am following a plan very similar to jayabee's. There are foods I avoid because of my body's reaction, but I can handle with moderation. I have read that both the liver and pancreas can regenerate depending on when in the degenerative process we wise up enough to stop overtaxing them. Don't know if that's medically correct or not. I still had pancreatic function when diagnosed and have never used insulin. I am type 2. I have been on oral diabetes meds, and then on insulin for a while. But lately I had been motivated to attempt to manage my condition without diabetes meds simply through what I eat and don't eat. I have been on this plan since Feb 2011, and have maintained good control. My May A1c was 5.5. and I have lost about 50 lbs on the plan. My pancreas was still putting out its own insulin, and my weight loss reduced my insulin resistance, so if I am careful about what I put in my mouth, what my pancreas puts out balances with the load I put on my body by my eating. So far so good! So you might be one of the fortunate ones who has enough pancreatic output to support a carefully controlled meal plan. It does take a bit of discipline, but for me going without meds is worth it. I would be happy to share what I do should you be interested. But talk to your Dr about trying this out before you do anything. You can always fall back to diabetes meds should it not work for you. Thanks, and I would like you to give me your advice on on your controlled diet and I do feel my pancreas has jumprd back on line. Thanks again I have discontinued eating bread of any kind (biscuits, buns, tortillas cornbread, Continue reading >>

Breaking News – Your Pancreas Can Regenerate Itself!

Breaking News – Your Pancreas Can Regenerate Itself!

Diabetes is beatable. But don’t wait around for doctors to tell you how. The bottom line is that current medical treatments for diabetes do not reverse or control the disease. To do that, you have to approach it naturally. In diabetes, it’s the beta cells of the pancreas that are in low numbers. The beta cells are important because they make insulin. Degeneration of the beta cells is the main cause of type I diabetes. Exclusive Bonus: Download the 3-point checklist which shows you EXACTLY how to regenerate your beta cells naturally using this scientifically-proven method. Over 2000 medical studies have reported on the topic of pancreas regeneration. Yet you probably haven’t heard about them on television or radio. This may be for several reasons. But the main reason could be that pancreas regeneration is most effectively achieved by herbs, not medical procedures. Much stem cell research has focused on the transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells to diabetic animals to see what happens. These studies all show the same thing: a significant reduction in blood glucose level, plus regeneration of the pancreas cells. The regeneration is determined by seeing an increase in the total number of islet cells and insulin-producing cells of the pancreas. That’s all well and good. But finding donors of pancreas cells is still quite difficult. Everyone needs their pancreas for their own health and no one wants to donate it. Embryonic stem cells, a potential source of new pancreatic cells, are big in the news right now with the latest Planned Parenthood scam of selling aborted baby parts for research. So their source is quite ethically questionable. Delta-cells in the Pancreas Researchers at the University of Geneva in Switzerland revealed a mechanism by which other cells in t Continue reading >>

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