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How Long Can You Live With Diabetes Without Knowing

Type 2 Diabetes: Could You Have It And Not Even Know?

Type 2 Diabetes: Could You Have It And Not Even Know?

Do any of these sound like you? You feel sluggish or have a little less “get up and go” than previously, but you attribute it to high stress levels or increased age. You’ve had gradual weight gain and chalk it up to age. You have an increased desire for carbohydrates and never really feel full after eating. People close to you wonder how you can always eat at the drop of a hat. If so, you could you be one of the 7 million people in the U.S. with undiagnosed Type 2 diabetes. Type 2 or adult-onset diabetes does not normally come on like a lightning bolt or an earthquake, but silently develops over years. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, type two diabetes affects more than 25.8 million people or 8.3 percent of the U.S population. Experts predict a whopping 10 percent increase in adult diabetes in the next decade. Anne Peters, M.D., a leading diabetologist and researcher at University of Southern California (USC), believes that the average person diagnosed with type two diabetes actually had it for seven years prior to diagnosis! How can this happen? Or better yet, how can you monitor whether you are a type two diabetic or at risk for diabetes? 1. Get a physical every year and monitor your fasting glucose (blood sugar) levels. The ideal number is less than 95. If your numbers are consistently above 100 or are in the 100-115 range, you could be pre-diabetic or diabetic. 2. Ask your physician yearly to monitor a blood test called glycosylated hemoglobin A1C. This simple test measures what your blood sugar has been averaging over the previous three months. The number (depending on the laboratory) should be between 4-6. If it is over six, you could be diabetic. If you have a parent or sibling with type two or adult onset diabetes, this test is Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Symptoms Develop Suddenly?

Can Diabetes Symptoms Develop Suddenly?

I haven't experienced any symptoms of diabetes in the past, but just in the last week or so, I have seen a dramatic increase in my urination frequency: I have to go about once an hour. And I seem to be constantly thirsty. Is it possible that symptoms of diabetes could materialize virtually overnight? Continue reading >>

Insulin And Type 2 Diabetes: What You Should Know

Insulin And Type 2 Diabetes: What You Should Know

Insulin and Type 2 Diabetes If your health care provider offered you a medication to help you feel better and get your blood sugar under control, would you try it? If so, you might be ready to start taking insulin. Does insulin immediately make you think of type 1 diabetes? Think again. Between 30 and 40 percent of people with type 2 diabetes take insulin. In fact, there are more people with type 2 diabetes who take insulin than type 1 because of the much larger number of people with type 2. Experts believe even more people with type 2 should be taking insulin to control blood sugar -- and the earlier, the better. With an increase in people developing type 2 at a younger age and living longer, more and more people with type 2 will likely be taking insulin. "If you live long enough with type 2 diabetes, odds are good you'll eventually need insulin," says William Polonsky, Ph.D., CDE, associate clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego; founder and president of the Behavioral Diabetes Institute; and author of Diabetes Burnout: What to Do When You Can't Take It Anymore (American Diabetes Association, 1999). Producing Less Insulin Naturally Over Time Research has shown that type 2 diabetes progresses as the ability of the body’s pancreatic beta cells to produce insulin dwindles over time. Your beta cells -- the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin -- slowly lose function. Experts believe that by the time you're diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, you've already lost 50-80 percent of your beta cell function and perhaps the number of beta cells you had. And the loss continues over the years. "About six years after being diagnosed, most people have about a quarter of their beta cell function left," says Anthony McCall, M.D., Ph.D., endocri Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is the type of diabetes that typically develops in children and in young adults. In type 1 diabetes the body stops making insulin and the blood sugar (glucose) level goes very high. Treatment to control the blood glucose level is with insulin injections and a healthy diet. Other treatments aim to reduce the risk of complications. They include reducing blood pressure if it is high and advice to lead a healthy lifestyle. What is type 1 diabetes? What is type 1 diabetes? Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. Diabetes mellitus (just called diabetes from now on) occurs when the level of sugar (glucose) in the blood becomes higher than normal. There are two main types of diabetes. These are called type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes usually first develops in children or young adults. In the UK about 1 in 300 people develop type 1 diabetes at some stage. With type 1 diabet Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Overview Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar (glucose) level to become too high. The hormone insulin, produced by the pancreas, is responsible for controlling the amount of glucose in the blood. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 – where the pancreas doesn't produce any insulin type 2 – where the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin or the body's cells don't react to insulin These pages are about type 1 diabetes. Other types of diabetes are covered separately (read about type 2 diabetes, and gestational diabetes, which affects some women during pregnancy). Symptoms of diabetes Typical symptoms of type 1 diabetes are: feeling very thirsty passing urine more often than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk The symptoms of type 1 diabetes usually develop very quickly in young people (over a few days or weeks). In adults, the symptoms often take longer to develop (a few months). Read more about the symptoms of type 1 diabetes. These symptoms occur because the lack of insulin means that glucose stays in the blood and isn’t used as fuel for energy. Your body tries to reduce blood glucose levels by getting rid of the excess glucose in your urine. It's very important for diabetes to be diagnosed as soon as possible, because it will get progressively worse if left untreated. Find your local GP service Read about how type 1 diabetes is diagnosed. Causes of type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition, which means your immune system attacks healthy body tissue by mistake. In this case, it attacks the cells in your pancreas. Your damaged pancreas is then unable to produce insulin. So, glucose cannot be moved out of your bloodstream and into your cells. Type 1 diabetes is o Continue reading >>

How To Know If You Have Diabetes

How To Know If You Have Diabetes

Expert Reviewed Four Parts:Recognizing the Risk Factors for Different Types of DiabetesWatching for the Symptoms of DiabetesGetting Tested for DiabetesTreating DiabetesCommunity Q&A Diabetes is a metabolic disorder that affects your body's ability to either use or produce insulin, which how your body can use blood sugar for energy.[1] When your cells become resistant to insulin or your body doesn’t make enough of it, your blood sugar levels rise, causing many of the short-term and long-term symptoms of diabetes. There are four different types of “sugar” diabetes: pre-diabetes, type 1, type 2, and gestational, although the majority of cases diagnosed each year are type 2 diabetes.[2] In each of these types, there are both similar symptoms and symptoms that distinguish each type from the others. Continue reading >>

Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

Almost a third of people who have diabetes do not know it. That number comes from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Additionally, most people with prediabetes — a condition that puts people at increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes — don’t know they have it. So my diabetes story, which began in ignorance, was not so unusual. I had prediabetes for a long time before the complications caused by high blood sugar led to a stroke. This is the reason I made a list of warning signs for Type 2 diabetes. Perhaps you or someone you love will see how important it is to get a simple blood sugar test. If this sneaky condition is caught early, you can avoid serious complications. The symptoms of Type 2 are well known but are easy to miss. Two of them are increased thirst and frequent urination. The word “diabetes” comes from the Greek word for “siphon.” If the beta cells in your pancreas are working, insulin is pumping into your blood to help your body digest carbohydrates like sugar and bread and noodles. But in Type 2 diabetes (or prediabetes) your cells are resistant to insulin, which leaves much of that glucose, or simple sugar, in the bloodstream. When blood glucose levels are above 250 mg/dl, the ability of the kidneys to reabsorb fluids is blocked, leading to the release of large amounts of liquid (and sugar) into the bladder. (A urine test would show high sugar content. This is why for thousands of years, diabetes was called the “sweet urine disease.”) This process uses lots of water, leading to increased thirst. Another sign of prediabetes or Type 2 diabetes is fatigue. Since your muscle cells are resisting insulin, they are not getting fed the glucose from your blood supply. It makes you tired. The problem with using fatigue as a warnin Continue reading >>

Can You Live Long With Type 2 Diabetes?

Can You Live Long With Type 2 Diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes mellitus. Unfortunately, it still has no cure. Once you’re diagnosed with it, you will have it for the rest of your life. But although it’s chronic and incurable condition, it’s manageable. The chance to live long with it is pretty good, too! Type-2 diabetes develops gradually You body needs hormone called insulin to help regulate blood sugar. This hormone is made by special cells called beta cells in the pancreas (an organ behind and below stomach). It is required to help move glucose (sugar) from bloodstream into cells of the body. Diabetes occurs when something goes awry with your insulin. There are several types of diabetes; type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes (it only occurs in pregnancy, as the name suggests). In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas doesn’t produce adequate insulin or the body cannot use insulin effectively (insulin resistance)! As a result, blood sugar level is more difficult to manage and easier to fluctuate abnormally. Making the diagnosis of the disease as early as possible is important. Early diabetes is easier to manage. On the other hand advanced diabetes, especially when it has caused its complications, is more difficult to treat. If you experience some of the following diabetes symptoms, see a doctor promptly: Frequent urination (you pass urine more often than usual). Increased thirst. See also the reasons of why diabetics can get so thirsty in this post! Frequent infections and difficult (slow) to heal. Changes in appetite, which may also be followed with weight changes especially unplanned weight loss. Unfortunately, there is usually no early sign of the disease. People with type 2 may not have the symptoms for many years. Typically, type 2 develops more slowly than type 1. There Continue reading >>

General Diabetes Facts And Information

General Diabetes Facts And Information

What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease in which the body is unable to properly use and store glucose (a form of sugar). Glucose backs up in the bloodstream — causing one’s blood glucose (sometimes referred to as blood sugar) to rise too high. There are two major types of diabetes. In type 1 (fomerly called juvenile-onset or insulin-dependent) diabetes, the body completely stops producing any insulin, a hormone that enables the body to use glucose found in foods for energy. People with type 1 diabetes must take daily insulin injections to survive. This form of diabetes usually develops in children or young adults, but can occur at any age. Type 2 (formerly called adult-onset or non insulin-dependent) diabetes results when the body doesn’t produce enough insulin and/or is unable to use insulin properly (insulin resistance). This form of diabetes usually occurs in people who are over 40, overweight, and have a family history of diabetes, although today it is increasingly occurring in younger people, particularly adolescents. How do people know if they have diabetes? People with diabetes frequently experience certain symptoms. These include: being very thirsty frequent urination weight loss increased hunger blurry vision irritability tingling or numbness in the hands or feet frequent skin, bladder or gum infections wounds that don't heal extreme unexplained fatigue In some cases, there are no symptoms — this happens at times with type 2 diabetes. In this case, people can live for months, even years without knowing they have the disease. This form of diabetes comes on so gradually that symptoms may not even be recognized. Who gets diabetes? Diabetes can occur in anyone. However, people who have close relatives with the disease are somewhat more likely to develop it. Continue reading >>

What Is The Life Expectancy For Diabetics?

What Is The Life Expectancy For Diabetics?

Diabetes is recognized as one of the leading causes of disability and death worldwide. There was a time when Type 2 diabetes was common in people in their late forties and fifties. However, thanks to the easy availability of processed foods, sedentary lifestyles, poor sleep and a host of other unfavorable factors, type 2 diabetes affects millions of young adults throughout the globe today. A report was commissioned in 2010 by the National Academy on an Aging Society. It showed that diabetes cut off an average of 8.5 years from the lifespan of a regular, diabetic 50-year-old as compared to a 50-year-old without the disease. This data was provided by the Health and Retirement Study, a survey of more than 20,000 Americans over the age of 50, done every two years by the University of Michigan. Characterized by high blood glucose levels, T2D can be the result of a combination of genes, obesity and an unhealthy lifestyle. If left untreated, diabetes can be life-threatening. Complications of this disease can take a serious toll on a patient’s health and well-being. So, how long do diabetics live, you ask? Does having diabetes shorten one’s life? Let’s address these questions, one by one. MORE: Decoding The Dawn Phenomenon (High Morning Blood Sugar) How Long Do Diabetics Live? Diabetes is a system-wide disorder which is categorized by elevated blood glucose levels. This blood travels throughout the human body and when it is laden with sugar, it damages multiple systems. When the condition is left unchecked or is managed poorly, the lifespan of diabetic patients is reduced due to constant damage. Early diagnosis and treatment of diabetes for preventing its long-term complications is the best coping strategy. So, don’t ignore your doctor’s advice if you’re pre-diabeti Continue reading >>

On World Diabetes Day 2017, What Is Diabetes, What’s The Difference Between Types 1 And 2 And What Are The Signs?

On World Diabetes Day 2017, What Is Diabetes, What’s The Difference Between Types 1 And 2 And What Are The Signs?

DIABETES is a life-long health condition which affects around 3.5 million people in the UK alone. Today is World Diabetes Day, and experts estimate there are up to 549,000 people living with diabetes who don't know it yet. But what is it exactly and what are the difference between the two types? Getty Images What is diabetes? It is a condition caused by high levels of glucose - or sugar - in the blood. Glucose levels are so high because the body is unable to properly use it. In people diagnosed with diabetes, their pancreas doesn't produce any insulin, or not enough insulin. Getty Images Insulin is a hormone typically produced by the pancreas and allows glucose to enter the cells in the body, where it's used for energy. What are the signs to look out for with diabetes? The common signs you may have diabetes include: going to the toilet a lot, especially at night being really thirsty feeling more tired than usual losing weight, without trying to genital itching or thrush cuts and wounds that take longer to heal blurred vision The symptoms are caused by high levels of glucose remaining in the blood, where it cannot be used as energy. These signs are common in children and adults alike. But, adults suffering type 1 diabetes can find it harder to recognise their symptoms. Diabetes UK's four T's campaign aims to raise awareness of the key signs. What is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? All types of diabetes cause blood glucose levels to be higher than normal, but the two different types do this in different ways. The distinction lies in what is causing the lack of insulin - often described as the key, that allows glucose to unlock the door to the cells. With type 1 diabetes, a person’s pancreas produces no insulin, but in type 2 cells in the body become r Continue reading >>

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

By some estimates, diabetes cases have increased more than 700 percent in the last 50 years. One in four Americans now have either diabetes or pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose) Type 2 diabetes is completely preventable and virtually 100 percent reversible, simply by implementing simple, inexpensive lifestyle changes, one of the most important of which is eliminating sugar (especially fructose) and grains from your diet Diabetes is NOT a disease of blood sugar, but rather a disorder of insulin and leptin signaling. Elevated insulin levels are not only symptoms of diabetes, but also heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, stroke, high blood pressure, cancer, and obesity Diabetes drugs are not the answer – most type 2 diabetes medications either raise insulin or lower blood sugar (failing to address the root cause) and many can cause serious side effects Sun exposure shows promise in treating and preventing diabetes, with studies revealing a significant link between high vitamin D levels and a lowered risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome By Dr. Mercola There is a staggering amount of misinformation on diabetes, a growing epidemic that afflicts more than 29 million people in the United States today. The sad truth is this: it could be your very OWN physician perpetuating this misinformation Most diabetics find themselves in a black hole of helplessness, clueless about how to reverse their condition. The bigger concern is that more than half of those with type 2 diabetes are NOT even aware they have diabetes — and 90 percent of those who have a condition known as prediabetes aren’t aware of their circumstances, either. Diabetes: Symptoms of an Epidemic The latest diabetes statistics1 echo an increase in diabetes ca Continue reading >>

How Type 2 Diabetes Affects Life Expectancy

How Type 2 Diabetes Affects Life Expectancy

Type 2 diabetes typically shows up later in life, although the incidence in younger people is increasing. The disease, which is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar), or hyperglycemia, usually results from a combination of unhealthy lifestyle habits, obesity, and genes. Over time, untreated hyperglycemia can lead to serious, life-threatening complications. Type 2 diabetes also puts you at risk for certain health conditions that can reduce your life expectancy. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, diabetes is the 7th most common cause of death in the United States. However, there is no defining statistic to tell you how long you’ll live with type 2 diabetes. The better you have your diabetes under control, the lower your risk for developing associated conditions that may shorten your lifespan. The top cause of death for people with type 2 diabetes is cardiovascular disease. This is due to the fact that high blood sugar levels can damage blood vessels, and also because people with type 2 diabetes often have high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, and other factors that increase the risk of heart disease. When you have type 2 diabetes, there are many factors that can increase your risk of complications, and these complications can impact your life expectancy. They include: High blood sugar levels: Uncontrolled high blood sugar levels affect many organs and contribute to the development of complications. High blood pressure: According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), 71 percent of people with diabetes have high blood pressure. High blood pressure increases the risk of kidney disease, stroke, cardiovascular disease, and other complications. Lipid disorders: According to the ADA, 65 percent of those with diabetes have high low- Continue reading >>

Could You Have Diabetes And Not Know It?

Could You Have Diabetes And Not Know It?

Could you have diabetes and not know it? According to Diabetes South Africa, over 3 million South Africans are living with diabetes. However, it is thought that many more South Africans could be diabetic without knowing it. A further five million people have pre-diabetes, a condition where blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not high enough yet for diagnosis of diabetes. If left uncontrolled, pre-diabetes will eventually lead to type 2 diabetes. Worldwide, approximately 366 million people have diabetes - a number which is expected to rise to 552 million by 2030. The global number of people with pre-diabetes is currently around 280 million, and is expected to grow to 398 million by 2030. Diabetes is a chronic health condition where the body is unable to produce enough insulin and properly break down glucose in the blood. Glucose comes from food and is used by the cells for energy. Without this energy, we cannot live. So, why should you care? Diabetes affects everyone – not only the patient, but also the families and communities at large. Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to serious complications such heart disease, stroke, blindness, amputations, kidney failure and death. The majority of people suffer from type 2 diabetes, a condition which in most cases could be avoided altogether by following a healthy diet and exercising regularly and going for routine blood glucose tests. Obesity is one of the strongest precursors of type 2 diabetes, so keeping your weight in check is crucial. Some people, however, also have a strong genetic predisposition to develop diabetes, such as our Indian population. Knowing the risk factors for diabetes is therefore very important. The initial symptoms of type 2 diabetes (such as fatigue, increased thirst and urination, frequent i Continue reading >>

Can You Live With Diabetes Without Knowing It

Can You Live With Diabetes Without Knowing It

So can you tell us how your weight is, have you lost weight in the last It s certainly possible to live for quite a while without knowing you have .In some cases, there are no symptoms this happens at times with type diabetes. In this case, people can live for months, even years without knowing they have the disease. This form of diabetes comes on so gradually that symptoms may not even be recognized..Can you be a diabetic for years and believe you re healthy without ever knowing you are seriously ill? As someone who cares for a family .Does anybody know how long it takes for Type diabetes to develop? Thanks to this forum you can see from my previous posts I got myself .A young adult with diabetes describes how easy to recognize When she somehow isn t at work, you can find Meredith at Soul Cycle in .Here is our guide to diabetes and how to detect if you are a hidden sufferer million people in the UK have the condition without realising it, says Sally Wright. Why not be the first to send us your thoughts, or debate this issue live on our .Why you could have diabetes and not know it Doctors warn five million Britons are I still can t walk more than a few steps without it becoming painful, she says. . LIVE. Mute. . Current Time . . Duration Time ..By doing so, you too can live a long and healthy life. It s great to know so many have overcome their and managed their illness so well. I can do jumping jacks now, in a row, without losing my breath or having a heart .”The main thing about early diabetes is that you can have abnormal blood sugar for The body needs insulin to survive it s secreted into the Jordan said many people can have diabetes for years without knowing it, but .It is very possible to have diabetes for years and not know it. Many diabetics do not have sympto Continue reading >>

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