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How Long Can You Live With Diabetes Type 1?

Your Child Can Live An Active Life With Type 1 Diabetes

Your Child Can Live An Active Life With Type 1 Diabetes

Editor’s note: This article was originally published on Apr 15, 2015. When Kristen’s parents were given the diagnosis that their daughter, about to turn 4, had Type 1 Diabetes, they were overwhelmed with questions. What is this disease? How can we keep her healthy and safe? Will Kristen be able to maintain a lifestyle similar to other children? With the help of a diabetes team (including a nutritionist and doctors), Kristen is now 10-years-old and is one of the most outgoing and active children I know. She swims, plays on her school basketball and volleyball teams, and she participates in gymnastics, cheerleading, and horse jumping. She has also met many other children with diabetes through attending diabetes camp, which has helped normalize the disease for her. Kristen is so comfortable with her condition that not only does she speak openly with her classmates about diabetes but they accompany her when she tests her blood sugar levels and takes her insulin. According to the Canadian Diabetes Association, Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a disease in which the pancreas does not produce any insulin, a hormone that helps your body to control the level of glucose (sugar) in your blood. Without insulin, glucose builds up in your blood instead of being used for energy. Being active is an important component in anyone’s life, but for those with T1D exercise is important in maintaining cardiovascular health and lowering blood glucose levels. Missy Foy is an elite marathon runner who has been ranked in the top 10 in the world at the 80 kms distance Being active with T1D, though, comes with unique challenges. But having T1D does not mean your child’s active lifestyle cannot lead to great sporting success (see sidebar above for successful athletes living with T1D). Marian Flanner Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Type 1

Diabetes - Type 1

Description An in-depth report on the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of type 1 diabetes. Alternative Names Type 1 diabetes; Insulin-dependent diabetes; Juvenile diabetes Highlights Type 1 Diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not produce insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is involved in regulating how the body converts sugar (glucose) into energy. People with type 1 diabetes need to take daily insulin shots and carefully monitor their blood glucose levels. Type 1 diabetes is much less common than type 2 diabetes. It accounts for 5 - 10% of all diabetes cases. Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age, but it usually first develops in childhood or adolescence. Symptoms of Diabetes Symptoms of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes include: Frequent urination Excessive thirst Extreme hunger Sudden weight loss Extreme fatigue Irritability Blurred vision In general, the symptoms of type 1 diabetes come on more abruptly and are more severe than those of type 2 diabetes. Warning Signs of Hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) occurs when blood sugar (glucose) levels fall below normal. All patients with diabetes should be aware of these symptoms of hypoglycemia: Sweating Trembling Hunger Rapid heartbeat Confusion It is important to quickly treat hypoglycemia and raise blood sugar levels by eating sugar, sucking on hard candy, or drinking fruit juice. Patients who are at risk for hypoglycemia should carry some sugar product, or an emergency glucagon injection kit, in case an attack occurs. In rare and worst cases, hypoglycemia can lead to coma and death. Regular blood sugar monitoring throughout the day can help you avoid hypoglycemia. Patients are also encouraged to wear a medical alert ID bracelet or necklace that states they have diabetes and that they take insulin. Pati Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetics Thriving And Living Longer

Type 1 Diabetics Thriving And Living Longer

People who have thrived with Type 1 diabetes for 50 years or more are inspiring doctors in Toronto to investigate why and how they've accomplished the feat in order to help other patients. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that stops the pancreas from producing the hormone we need to use carbohydrates as fuel. People with Type 1 diabetes must inject insulin to prevent serious illness or death. The life expectancy for those with Type 1 diabetes may be shortened by as much as 15 years, according to the Canadian Diabetes Association. "In the 1940s, roughly half of people with Type 1 diabetes were getting end-stage kidney disease in their 40s and dying in their 40s," said Dr. Bruce Perkins, an endocrinologist at Toronto’s Mount Sinai Hospital. Diabetes longevity A U.S. modelling estimate based on data from the Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications suggests that the life expectancy at birth for someone diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes between 1965 and 1980 was estimated to be 68.8 years compared to 72.4 years for the general population. In comparison, for someone diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes between 1950 and 1964, the estimated life expectancy at birth was 53.4 years. Most Canadian provinces lack diabetes registries. That’s why researchers aren’t able to identify the type of diabetes someone has using billing codes and administrative databases. Perkins is leading the Diabetes Longevity Study — the first Canadian study of its kind looking at the personal experiences of Canadians who have lived with Type 1 diabetes for 50 years or more. Perkins attributes their success to "relentless vigilance of taking care of their diabetes." "These are people who’ve managed that vigilance to take such good care of themselves to manage that fine balance of blood Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Patients Live Longer With Immediate Blood Glucose Control Following Diagnosis

Type 1 Diabetes Patients Live Longer With Immediate Blood Glucose Control Following Diagnosis

Type 1 diabetes affects only five percent of all diabetics, but that in no way means it’s less important. In fact, the disease, which develops from a total lack of insulin, requires just as much care and attention as type 2 diabetes, its later-onset cousin. But not everyone who is diagnosed with the disease immediately begins treatment, which instantly puts them at risk of living a shorter life, according to two new studies. Both studies, one of which was funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), while the other was from the University of Dundee, Scotland, found basically the same thing: People who don’t immediately begin treatment for type 1 diabetes, which includes daily administration of insulin, are more likely to live shorter lives. According to the Scottish study, that reduction amounts to about 11 years and 13 years for men and women, respectively. Led by Dundee’s Shona Livingstone, the Scottish study simply looked at a national registry of patients aged 20 and older with type 1 diabetes, and compared their life expectancies to those of the general population. Between 2008 and 2010, over 24,000 type 1 diabetics were followed, and by the end 1,043 had died. The researchers found that 76 percent of men and 83 percent of women in the general population survived to age 70, while only 47 percent of men and 55 percent of women with type 1 diabetes reached the same age. They also estimated that from 20 years old, a man with type 1 diabetes could expect another 46.2 years of life compared to 57.3 years for a man without it. Twenty-year-old women could expect another 48.1 years if they had the disease, while those without it could expect 61 years more to live. The most common causes of death, the researchers found, were from ischemic heart disease and diabe Continue reading >>

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

By some estimates, diabetes cases have increased more than 700 percent in the last 50 years. One in four Americans now have either diabetes or pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose) Type 2 diabetes is completely preventable and virtually 100 percent reversible, simply by implementing simple, inexpensive lifestyle changes, one of the most important of which is eliminating sugar (especially fructose) and grains from your diet Diabetes is NOT a disease of blood sugar, but rather a disorder of insulin and leptin signaling. Elevated insulin levels are not only symptoms of diabetes, but also heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, stroke, high blood pressure, cancer, and obesity Diabetes drugs are not the answer – most type 2 diabetes medications either raise insulin or lower blood sugar (failing to address the root cause) and many can cause serious side effects Sun exposure shows promise in treating and preventing diabetes, with studies revealing a significant link between high vitamin D levels and a lowered risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome By Dr. Mercola There is a staggering amount of misinformation on diabetes, a growing epidemic that afflicts more than 29 million people in the United States today. The sad truth is this: it could be your very OWN physician perpetuating this misinformation Most diabetics find themselves in a black hole of helplessness, clueless about how to reverse their condition. The bigger concern is that more than half of those with type 2 diabetes are NOT even aware they have diabetes — and 90 percent of those who have a condition known as prediabetes aren’t aware of their circumstances, either. Diabetes: Symptoms of an Epidemic The latest diabetes statistics1 echo an increase in diabetes ca Continue reading >>

What Is Type 1 Diabetes?

What Is Type 1 Diabetes?

Type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented but it can be managed through a combination of medication, healthy food choices and exercise. How many people have type 1 diabetes? Of all the people with diabetes it is estimated that about 10% of them have type 1 diabetes. Diabetes is the result of the body not creating enough insulin to keep blood glucose (sugar) levels in the normal range. Everyone needs some glucose in their blood, but if it’s too high it can damage your body over time. Type 1 diabetes is an ‘auto-immune’ condition. Basically the body sets up an attack against the cells within it that make insulin. These cells are called beta cells and are isolated in the pancreas. The result is that the body does not produce any insulin (or very little). When does type 1 diabetes normally occur? Type 1 diabetes most often occurs in childhood, often in children aged 7 – 12 years. However it can occur at any age – from tiny babies to very old people. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes Thirst Passing more urine Weight loss Very tired Mood changes May also have: Abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting Skin infections, thrush Extreme hunger Poor concentration and performance Diagnosis and treatment Diabetes is diagnosed by blood tests which can be organised through your doctor. If you are very unwell you should seek medical assistance immediately. If you have type 1 diabetes, you will need to manage your blood glucose levels with insulin. Healthy eating and physical activity will also help you stay well. Click here to learn more about taking insulin. Does it run in families? If you have a blood relative with diabetes you are more likely to develop Type 1 diabetes. However Type 1 diabetes often occurs in people who have no one in their family with the condition. Is there any cure for type Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes 'takes 12 Years Off Your Life': Alarming Figures Reveal Life Expectancy Has Not Improved In Two Decades

Type 1 Diabetes 'takes 12 Years Off Your Life': Alarming Figures Reveal Life Expectancy Has Not Improved In Two Decades

Type one diabetes knocks 12 years off a person’s life, according to a major new study. The shocking toll of the condition, which 78,000 children worldwide are diagnosed with every year, has not improved since the 1990s. Researchers examined the life expectancy of type one diabetic patients in Australia from 1997 to 2010. Although life expectancy improved marginally throughout the period, it rose no more than life expectancy for the rest of the population, meaning the gap stayed the same. The team, from the Diabetes Institute in Melbourne, found that people with type one diabetes had a life expectancy of 68.6 years, which was 12.2 years less than the general population. Type one diabetes is an irreversible autoimmune disease which usually strikes in childhood, and stops the body producing insulin. Its cause is unclear, but it is thought to be genetic. Unlike type two diabetes, type one, has nothing to do with lifestyle. The authors, writing in the journal Diabetologia, said: ‘Early onset of diabetes tended to be a predictor of premature mortality. ‘Deaths from circulatory disease and endocrine and metabolic disease contributed most to early mortality in type one diabetes. ‘For improvements in life expectancy, greater attention must therefore be paid to both the acute metabolic and chronic cardiovascular complications of type one diabetes. ‘A failure to address either one will continue to leave type one diabetic patients at risk of premature mortality.’ They added: ‘As this is a contemporary nationwide registry-based cohort study of type one diabetes, the results are likely to be applicable to other similar Western countries.’ In a linked comment article, Dr Lars Stene, of the Norwegian Institute of Public Health in Oslo, said: ‘It seems that the gap in Continue reading >>

Insulin And Type 2 Diabetes: What You Should Know

Insulin And Type 2 Diabetes: What You Should Know

Insulin and Type 2 Diabetes If your health care provider offered you a medication to help you feel better and get your blood sugar under control, would you try it? If so, you might be ready to start taking insulin. Does insulin immediately make you think of type 1 diabetes? Think again. Between 30 and 40 percent of people with type 2 diabetes take insulin. In fact, there are more people with type 2 diabetes who take insulin than type 1 because of the much larger number of people with type 2. Experts believe even more people with type 2 should be taking insulin to control blood sugar -- and the earlier, the better. With an increase in people developing type 2 at a younger age and living longer, more and more people with type 2 will likely be taking insulin. "If you live long enough with type 2 diabetes, odds are good you'll eventually need insulin," says William Polonsky, Ph.D., CDE, associate clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego; founder and president of the Behavioral Diabetes Institute; and author of Diabetes Burnout: What to Do When You Can't Take It Anymore (American Diabetes Association, 1999). Producing Less Insulin Naturally Over Time Research has shown that type 2 diabetes progresses as the ability of the body’s pancreatic beta cells to produce insulin dwindles over time. Your beta cells -- the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin -- slowly lose function. Experts believe that by the time you're diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, you've already lost 50-80 percent of your beta cell function and perhaps the number of beta cells you had. And the loss continues over the years. "About six years after being diagnosed, most people have about a quarter of their beta cell function left," says Anthony McCall, M.D., Ph.D., endocri Continue reading >>

General Diabetes Facts And Information

General Diabetes Facts And Information

What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease in which the body is unable to properly use and store glucose (a form of sugar). Glucose backs up in the bloodstream — causing one’s blood glucose (sometimes referred to as blood sugar) to rise too high. There are two major types of diabetes. In type 1 (fomerly called juvenile-onset or insulin-dependent) diabetes, the body completely stops producing any insulin, a hormone that enables the body to use glucose found in foods for energy. People with type 1 diabetes must take daily insulin injections to survive. This form of diabetes usually develops in children or young adults, but can occur at any age. Type 2 (formerly called adult-onset or non insulin-dependent) diabetes results when the body doesn’t produce enough insulin and/or is unable to use insulin properly (insulin resistance). This form of diabetes usually occurs in people who are over 40, overweight, and have a family history of diabetes, although today it is increasingly occurring in younger people, particularly adolescents. How do people know if they have diabetes? People with diabetes frequently experience certain symptoms. These include: being very thirsty frequent urination weight loss increased hunger blurry vision irritability tingling or numbness in the hands or feet frequent skin, bladder or gum infections wounds that don't heal extreme unexplained fatigue In some cases, there are no symptoms — this happens at times with type 2 diabetes. In this case, people can live for months, even years without knowing they have the disease. This form of diabetes comes on so gradually that symptoms may not even be recognized. Who gets diabetes? Diabetes can occur in anyone. However, people who have close relatives with the disease are somewhat more likely to develop it. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Facts

Type 1 Diabetes Facts

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease that occurs when a person’s pancreas stops producing insulin, the hormone that controls blood-sugar levels. T1D develops when the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells are mistakenly destroyed by the body’s immune system. The cause of this attack is still being researched, however scientists believe the cause may have genetic and environmental components. There is nothing anyone can do to prevent T1D. Presently, there is no known cure. Who T1D affects Type 1 diabetes (sometimes known as juvenile diabetes) affects children and adults, though people can be diagnosed at any age. With a typically quick onset, T1D must be managed with the use of insulin—either via injection or insulin pump. Soon, people who are insulin dependent may also be able to use artificial pancreas systems to automatically administer their insulin. How T1D is managed Type 1 diabetes is a 24/7 disease that requires constant management. People with T1D continuously and carefully balance insulin intake with eating, exercise and other activities. They also measure blood-sugar levels through finger pricks, ideally at least six times a day, or by wearing a continuous glucose monitor. Even with a strict regimen, people with T1D may still experience dangerously high or low blood-glucose levels that can, in extreme cases, be life threatening. Every person with T1D becomes actively involved in managing his or her disease. Insulin is not a cure While insulin therapy keeps people with T1D alive and can help keep blood-glucose levels within recommended range, it is not a cure, nor does it prevent the possibility of T1D’s serious effects. The outlook for treatments and a cure Although T1D is a serious and challenging disease, long-term management options cont Continue reading >>

People With Type 1 Diabetes Are Living Longer

People With Type 1 Diabetes Are Living Longer

Better blood sugar control may be the key to longer survival Ninety years ago, type 1 diabetes was a death sentence: half of people who developed it died within two years; more than 90% were dead within five years. Thanks to the introduction of insulin therapy in 1922, and numerous advances since then, many people with type 1 diabetes now live into their 50s and beyond. But survival in this group still falls short of that among people without diabetes. A Scottish study published this week in JAMA shows that at the age of 20, individuals with type 1 diabetes on average lived 12 fewer years than 20-year-olds without it. A second study in the same issue of JAMA showed that people with type 1 diabetes with better blood sugar control lived longer than those with poorer blood sugar control. Types of diabetes There are three main types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. The immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys cells in the pancreas that make insulin. This usually happens before age 20. Insulin is needed to get blood sugar (glucose) into cells for energy. Without insulin, glucose builds up in the bloodstream. This damages cells and tissues throughout the body. People who develop type 1 diabetes need to take insulin via shots or a pump for life. Type 2 diabetes tends to occur later in life, usually among individuals who are overweight or inactive. It accounts for about 90% of all diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes often make enough insulin, at least at first, but their cells don’t respond to it. As with type 1 diabetes, glucose builds up in the bloodstream, damaging cells and tissues throughout the body. Type 2 diabetes is initially treated with lifestyle changes such as weight loss, more exercise, and a healthier diet. Medications that make the Continue reading >>

How To Live A Healthy Life As A Diabetic

How To Live A Healthy Life As A Diabetic

Edit Article If you have diabetes, you'll be looking into improving and maintaining your health for the long run. You control your diabetes successfully, by eating well, exercising and keeping informed about developments for better treatment. Your quality of life is also about finding ways to be happy, share with others and have fun in your life. While you've got a condition which will affect you medically, it is possible to start each day afresh and take control of your health rather than let it dictate your routine. 1 Make an appointment to discuss your overall health with your trusted health team. This is important, both so that you understand what will help you and you don't feel alone dealing with this disease. In particular: Always seek medical advice for any questions or concerns you may have. Do not let small things go unnoticed––even little changes can mean something significant and the sooner you bring it to the attention of your doctor, the better. If you have not been following your recommended diet, or taking your medications as directed, you need to see your doctor. 2 Follow your recommended diet with care. Your doctor or dietitian should have given you a diet to follow; diet is key to maintaining wellness when you have diabetes. Every diabetic individual has differing needs, so it's likely that your doctor has tailored the diet suggestion to your specific needs. If you haven't been given a recommended diet, ask for one. Ask questions about what special needs you have and where you can source healthful options from if they're hard to obtain in your area. Remember to drink carefully too––many commercial and homemade drinks contain sugar and other additions that may spoil a carefully followed diet if not accounted for. A food diary can be helpful if Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Life Expectancy: What Effect Does Type 2 Diabetes Have?

Diabetes And Life Expectancy: What Effect Does Type 2 Diabetes Have?

Diabetes can cause serious health complications and have an impact on life expectancy. How much a person's life is reduced depends on a combination of factors, such as the severity of the case, additional complications, and response to treatment. After being diagnosed, most people with diabetes want to know how the condition will affect the length and quality of their life. Each individual varies, but maintaining healthy blood sugar levels often has the largest influence on life expectancy. Relatively few studies have examined the link between diabetes and life expectancy, especially on a large scale. As a result, doctors aren't entirely sure how diabetes relates to how long people with the condition will live. This article will explore more. Fast facts on diabetes and life expectancy: While some estimates exist, there is no way to know exactly how diabetes will affect life expectancy. Type 2 diabetes is thought to have less of an effect on life expectancy than type 1 because people typically develop the condition much later in life. Generally, anything that helps maintain or contribute to healthy blood sugar levels can reduce the toll diabetes takes. What is the life expectancy of people with type 2 diabetes? A 2010 report by Diabetes UK claims type 2 diabetes reduces life expectancy by roughly 10 years. The same report states that type 1 diabetes may reduce life expectancy by at least 20 years. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the average life expectancy in 2014 for American men was 76.4 years and women 81.2 years. A 2012 Canadian study found that women aged 55 years and over with diabetes lost on average 6 years of life while men lost 5 years. Also, a 2015 study concluded that the risk of death associated with type 2 diabetes could b Continue reading >>

Life Expectancy Increases For People With Type 1

Life Expectancy Increases For People With Type 1

An Australian study finds people with Type 1 are living longer, but not as long as the average population. A new study on life expectancy and Type 1 diabetes has brought results that can be seen as glass half-empty or glass half-full. The bad news is that life expectancy for people with Type 1 is still shorter than that of the average population; the good news is that people with Type 1 are living longer than ever before. For the study, Australian researchers used government data to measure the life expectancy of people with Type 1 from 1997 to 2010, according to a report in Diabetes in Control. By the end of the study period, men with Type 1 had gained an average of 1.9 years in life expectancy, while women with Type 1 had gained 1.5 years in the same time period. People with Type 1 still had a life expectancy that was 12 years shorter, on average, than that of the average population, however. Researchers attribute the gains in lifespan to rapid medical advances, emerging research, and deepening understanding of Type 1 diabetes. When it comes to children with Type 1, more children are being diagnosed earlier, and intensive insulin therapy is beginning at a younger age to get blood sugar levels under control. Also, insulin pump and blood sugar monitoring technology has improved greatly in the 21st century, creating the possibility for better long-term blood sugar control. With the promise of the development of new therapeutic techniques and smarter pumps, there’s hope that the gap in life expectancy between those with and without Type 1 can continue to close. Thanks for reading this Insulin Nation article. Want more Type 1 news? Subscribe here. Have Type 2 diabetes or know someone who does? Try Type 2 Nation, our sister publication. Continue reading >>

What It’s Like To Live With Type 1 Diabetes

What It’s Like To Live With Type 1 Diabetes

What It’s Like To Live With Type 1 Diabetes By: Valeria Guerrero What’s it like? It’s pricking your finger endlessly throughout the day. It’s not being afraid of blood because you get used to seeing so much of it. It’s no longer feeling tremor to a needle because you’ve had no choice than to be poked by them every day. It’s being woken up countless times throughout the night to fix blood sugars that just won’t become stable. It’s waking up feeling hung over because your sugars were high all night no matter the amount of corrections you gave yourself. It’s not being able to eat whatever you want before carb counting and analyzing how it will affect your sugars later. It’s having to put on a fake smile every time you have to explain to someone that type 1 and type 2 diabetes are NOT the same thing. It’s not being able to go a single work out without stressing if you’re going to go too low, drop too fast or go high. It’s seeing all the scars all over our tummy, arms and legs from all the site changes and pokes and just cry. It’s people staring at you while you poke yourself and watching you like something is wrong with you. It’s people telling you “you can’ t have that” or “should you be eating that?” It’s people assuming you have type 2 when you say you have diabetes. It’s watching people look at you like you’re breaking the law by having a candy. It’s asking yourself what you did wrong because you got this disease even when they say it isn’t your fault. It’s remembering what it was like before being diagnosed and feeling nostalgic. It’s struggling with money and possibly going into debt because supplies are just so expensive. It’s wanting to cry whenever you hear a representative say “your insurance doesn’t co Continue reading >>

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