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How Long Can A Child Have Diabetes Without Knowing

9 Early Signs Of Diabetes You Must Know (#2 Is So Often Overlooked)

9 Early Signs Of Diabetes You Must Know (#2 Is So Often Overlooked)

Diabetes is sneaky. The early symptoms can go unnoticed for months or years. In fact, 1 in 3 people with type 2 diabetes don’t know they have it. 1 in 3. Most actually do experience the early signs but don’t realise or understand what they are. Early detection and treatment can have a profound impact on your long-term health. A 3-year delay in diagnosis increases your relative risk of heart disease by 29% (1). Therefore by knowing what to look for, you can take control of the situation before it takes control of you. Diabetes Symptoms In Adults and Children Diabetes is the term given to blood sugar (glucose) levels that are too high for a sustained period of time. The signs or symptoms of high blood sugar are typically the same for both children and adults. Patients with type 1 diabetes usually develop symptoms over a sudden, short period of time. The condition is often diagnosed in an emergency setting. Type 2 diabetes on the other hand progresses quite slowly. Symptoms tend to come on gradually, which is why they are often overlooked. Some don’t experience any early symptoms at all. The following early signs of diabetes are the most common: 1. Increased urination is arguably the most common A significant increase in how often you urinate (Polyuria) is a tell-tale symptom of high blood sugar. As a point of reference, the average person pees 4 to 7 times in a 24-hour period. Waking up during the night to go, even though you already went right before bed, is a common red flag. Why does this happen?: Your kidneys are working overtime to expel the excess sugar in your blood. Sugar that the kidneys are unable to absorb must be urinated out. Therefore high sugar levels leads to more urination. 2. Excessive thirst is one of the classic early signs of diabetes Drinking u Continue reading >>

If Your Child Is Diabetic... Will You Know?

If Your Child Is Diabetic... Will You Know?

vgajic via Getty Images As a parent, I sometimes nag — and I’ll bet that you do, too. For instance, how often do you say things like this? “I don’t want to hear your excuses. You’re not too tired — go take out the trash.” “You just went to the bathroom. You can hold it until the end of the movie.” “You don’t need a snack or another drink of water. Go back to bed.” “Don’t talk to me in that tone of voice. Go to your room.” I know I’ve said all these things at one time or another. But here’s the thing: If you’re saying them all the time, there’s a chance that your child isn’t simply being demanding, irritable, or lazy. Instead, your child may be displaying symptoms of diabetes. These days, we’re all aware that there’s an epidemic of diabetes in adults. But diabetes rates aren’t just soaring in grownups; they’re rising in kids, too. A recent study found that the incidence of Type 1 diabetes in kids up to 9 years of age jumped by 21 percent between 2001 and 2009. During the same time, the incidence of Type 2 diabetes among children between 10 and 19 rose by 30.5 percent. Currently, more than 200,000 American kids have diabetes — and if the trends continue, that number will keep rising. So if you’re a parent, diabetes definitely needs to be on your radar. Here’s a look at what this disease is and how to spot it. Understanding Diabetes There are two types of diabetes that kids or adults can develop. Here’s a quick look at each one. Type 1 diabetes — what we used to call “juvenile” diabetes — typically strikes kids, teens, and young adults. It causes insulin-producing cells in the pancreas to die, preventing the body from getting blood sugar into cells. Genes play a big role in Type 1diabetes, but rising rates als Continue reading >>

I Had Type 1 Diabetes And Didn’t Know It

I Had Type 1 Diabetes And Didn’t Know It

A young adult with diabetes describes how easy-to-recognize symptoms went unrecognized. In the summer of 2009, I was participating in a summer program for high schoolers at Georgetown University, and I could sense something was a little off. I explained away my insatiable thirst because of the summer heat, but I kept waking up in the middle of the night to use the bathroom. My face looked a little thinner in the photos from the end of the program than the photos from the first day. As I started my senior year in high school, my friends noticed that my weight had dropped. I figured it was from all the walking I did during the Georgetown program. About a week into classes, I was so weak that I couldn’t carry my backpack up the stairs. I was constantly leaving lectures to get a drink of water and go to the bathroom. My high school prohibited students from carrying water bottles, but I snuck one in my backpack because I was never not thirsty. Meanwhile, I continued to shed weight. I remember one time putting my mouth directly under my fridge’s water dispenser. I tried complaining to my pediatrician about my thirst, weakness, and constant fatigue. He noticed the weight loss and tested me for mono. When the test came back negative, he said I was just stressed with college applications. Next, I went to my mom’s general practitioner. By now, my tongue had turned white. She diagnosed me with thrush and sent me home with some tablets to chew. I went back to her a few days later, still feeling terrible, but she didn’t offer a new diagnosis. My nails became yellow and fragile. I stayed home from school because I was too weak to walk from class to class. My friends thought I was anorexic. In late August, a close family friend came to visit and I managed to peel myself off th Continue reading >>

Why You Could Have Diabetes And Not Know It: Doctors Warn Five Million Britons Are At Risk - And It's Not Just The Overweight Who Should Worry

Why You Could Have Diabetes And Not Know It: Doctors Warn Five Million Britons Are At Risk - And It's Not Just The Overweight Who Should Worry

When Jo Jones was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at the age of 33, she admits she didn't take it that seriously. 'It wasn't something like cancer. I thought I'd just have to cut back on sugar,' she says. Today, she realises how wrong she was - the disease has cost her her job and her independence. Two years ago, she had to have her left leg amputated below the knee due to complications of the condition. Her eyesight is deteriorating and she risks blindness in the future. Scroll down for video For anyone who thinks, as she did, that type 2 diabetes is a lifestyle disease - a less dangerous form of diabetes than type 1, which requires daily doses of insulin - Jo's story is a salutary lesson. Now, rather than slipping on her high heels and dashing off to work, the first thing Jo does on waking is put on her prosthetic leg. It's not a simple process and can take her five minutes or more - and even then it causes discomfort. 'I still can't walk more than a few steps without it becoming painful,' she says. 'Every morning I wake up hoping that my leg has grown back.' Unable to get upstairs, she has to sleep on a sofa-bed in the sitting room. Her husband, Keith, a finance arranger, puts it away and dresses her before he leaves for work. Once he's gone, Jo, a former accountant, has little to look forward to for the rest of the day. 'I'll often sit for hours because it's too painful to move,' she says. 'I miss working. I used to manage a team of six and loved the responsibility.' Yet when Jo, 50, who lives with Keith, 48, in Stockport, Cheshire, was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 1998, she didn't have any of the common symptoms, such as increased thirst or fatigue, and was, in her own words, 'quite active'. 'I was at the doctor's for something else and, as my mum had just been Continue reading >>

Despite Diabetes – Living With Type 1 Diabetes – Advocating For A Cure

Despite Diabetes – Living With Type 1 Diabetes – Advocating For A Cure

A week ago today, a 13-year old boy who lives in a normal middle class town and has smart, caring parents and who is surrounded by teachers and nurses and coaches a friends, died of the complications of undiagnosed Type 1 Diabetes. And it happens all the time. When it happens, people say all kinds of things. Why didn’t the parents know the symptoms? Didn’t the doctor do a test at his annual check up? How could the school not see? But here’s the stark truth: We are not properly equipped as a society to keep this from happening. And happening again. And listen: we are America. We have free internet just about everywhere and fresh cupcakes out of kiosks. Yet we don’t have even a basic system of information that alerts parents, teachers, nurses, doctors and just plain everyone to what the signs and symptoms of Type 1 diabetes can be. Think it only happens to the clueless? Look, I’m not Einstein, but I’m relatively smart. I read lots of parenting books and even edited a parenting publication. I’ve sat down and interviewed T Berry Brazelton and yes, even Dr. Spock (not the Star Wars one, silly!) before he died. I’ve met Fred Rogers and talked parenting, and I always had a mom group for discussions as my kids grew up. But undiagnosed diabetes very well could have killed my daughter. I shared our diagnosis story HERE but I’ll remind you of this: Lauren had almost all the classic symptoms of Type 1. Excessive thirst. Urination issues. Weight loss. Irritability. Now let me tick those off in the head of the average parent who has never been educated about the signs of Type 1 Diabetes. *Excessive thirst: It was the end of summer and a hot one at that. Lauren and her friends were always running around and playing. Yes, she was drinking a ton, but to me, it was the Continue reading >>

General Diabetes Facts And Information

General Diabetes Facts And Information

What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease in which the body is unable to properly use and store glucose (a form of sugar). Glucose backs up in the bloodstream — causing one’s blood glucose (sometimes referred to as blood sugar) to rise too high. There are two major types of diabetes. In type 1 (fomerly called juvenile-onset or insulin-dependent) diabetes, the body completely stops producing any insulin, a hormone that enables the body to use glucose found in foods for energy. People with type 1 diabetes must take daily insulin injections to survive. This form of diabetes usually develops in children or young adults, but can occur at any age. Type 2 (formerly called adult-onset or non insulin-dependent) diabetes results when the body doesn’t produce enough insulin and/or is unable to use insulin properly (insulin resistance). This form of diabetes usually occurs in people who are over 40, overweight, and have a family history of diabetes, although today it is increasingly occurring in younger people, particularly adolescents. How do people know if they have diabetes? People with diabetes frequently experience certain symptoms. These include: being very thirsty frequent urination weight loss increased hunger blurry vision irritability tingling or numbness in the hands or feet frequent skin, bladder or gum infections wounds that don't heal extreme unexplained fatigue In some cases, there are no symptoms — this happens at times with type 2 diabetes. In this case, people can live for months, even years without knowing they have the disease. This form of diabetes comes on so gradually that symptoms may not even be recognized. Who gets diabetes? Diabetes can occur in anyone. However, people who have close relatives with the disease are somewhat more likely to develop it. Continue reading >>

How Long Can You Go With Having Diabetes Before Knowing You Have It?

How Long Can You Go With Having Diabetes Before Knowing You Have It?

To reiterate and emphasize what others have answered: Type I diabetes, not very long before the symptoms would land you in hospital where it would be diagnosed, hopefully but not necessarily before extensive permanent damage to the body or even death occurred; Type II diabetes: any number of months up to many years, depending on things like body weight, diet, exercise, remaining ability to produce insulin, degree of insulin resistance, and etc. Diabetic symptoms can therefore range from deceptively mild to debilitating. Symptoms of diabetes can include: excessive and/or frequent thirst, frequent urination, episodes of visual distortion, especially blurry vision, unexplained fatigue, a sweet or “fruity” odor to the breath and/or the urine, thrush (particularly but not exclusively in women), dental problems including gum disease, numbness, tingling or pain in the extremities, especially the feet, and a number of less common ailments. Diabetes is a very serious but also very treatable disease. If you have the slightest concern that you or a loved one may have either type of diabetes, please have your blood level of HbA1c checked immediately! This test is widely available practically everywhere in the world and can be obtained from any physician. In some countries, you can even purchase a home testing kit directly from your pharmacist to be interpreted by a medical professional. If for some reason you are unable to do that, at least have your blood sugar level checked after fasting for 8–12 hours, even if you have to borrow a diabetic friend’s home test kit to do so, and report the results to your physician. When untreated, diabetes causes significant problems with blood circulation, which can lead to heart, kidney, and liver failure, blindness, nerve damage, amputa Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It?

Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It?

Diabetes is a disease that affects how the body uses glucose , the main type of sugar in the blood. Our bodies break down the foods we eat into glucose and other nutrients we need, which are then absorbed into the bloodstream from the gastrointestinal tract. The glucose level in the blood rises after a meal and triggers the pancreas to make the hormone insulin and release it into the bloodstream. But in people with diabetes, the body either can't make or can't respond to insulin properly. Insulin works like a key that opens the doors to cells and lets the glucose in. Without insulin, glucose can't get into the cells (the doors are "locked" and there is no key) and so it stays in the bloodstream. As a result, the level of sugar in the blood remains higher than normal. High blood sugar levels are a problem because they can cause a number of health problems. The two types of diabetes are type 1 and type 2. Both make blood sugar levels higher than normal but they do so in different ways. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas loses its ability to make insulin because the body's  immune system attacks and destroys the cells that produce insulin. No one knows exactly why this happens, but scientists think it has something to do with genes. But just getting the genes for diabetes isn't usually enough. A person probably would then have to be exposed to something else — like a virus — to get type 1 diabetes. In type 2 diabetes , the pancreas still makes insulin but the body doesn't respond to it normally. Glucose is less able to enter the cells and do its job of supplying energy (a problem called insulin resistance ). This raises the blood sugar level, so the pancreas works hard to make even more insulin. Eventually, this strain can make the pancreas unable to produce enough ins Continue reading >>

The Stages Of Type 1 Diabetes (it Starts Earlier Than We Thought)

The Stages Of Type 1 Diabetes (it Starts Earlier Than We Thought)

My daughter Bisi was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes three years ago at the age of six. The first night after she was diagnosed, once she finally fell asleep in her hospital bed, tossing and turning despite the IV in her arm, I remember standing outside in the hall with my husband and a couple of medical residents, talking with them about her diagnosis. “Could this have been coming on for a while?” we asked them. I described how for a couple of years, Bisi had been almost unbearably cranky when she was hungry—to the point where I’d asked her pediatrician more than once if something might be wrong. No, the residents told us. Type 1 diabetes comes on very suddenly, in a matter of weeks, as the body’s beta cells suddenly die out under attack from the immune system. Every doctor or nurse we spoke with during the three days in the hospital (except for one, who said that our instincts were probably right), echoed what the two residents, fresh from medical school, told us. But it turns out they were wrong. JDRF and the American Diabetes Association, supported by other organizations in the field, recently put forth a new staging system for type 1 diabetes, where full-blown disease, like what landed Bisi in the hospital, is characterized as stage 3, part of an extended auto-immune process that often starts in infancy. This fall, Dr. Richard Insel, JDRF’s Chief Scientific Officer, explained the classification system to a group of reporters, talking through the importance of early diagnosis, and the hope that diagnosing the disease at an earlier stage could lead to breakthroughs in stopping the beta-cell destruction process—essentially, stopping the disease before it starts. Insel explained that stage 1 is when people test positive for multiple pancreatic islet auto-a Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Children And Teens: Signs And Symptoms

Diabetes In Children And Teens: Signs And Symptoms

With more than a third of diabetes cases in the United States occurring in people over the age of 65, diabetes is often referred to as an age-related condition. But around 208,000 children and adolescents are estimated to have diabetes, and this number is increasing. Type 1 diabetes is the most common form of the condition among children and adolescents. A 2009 report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revealed that type 1 diabetes prevalence stands at 1.93 in every 1,000 children and adolescents, while type 2 diabetes affects 0.24 in every 1,000. In 2014, Medical News Today reported that, based on a study published in JAMA, rates of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes have increased significantly among American children and teenagers. The study found that incidence of type 1 diabetes in children aged up to 9 years increased by 21 percent between 2001 and 2009, while incidence of type 2 diabetes among youths aged 10-19 years rose by 30.5 percent. The researchers note: "The increases in prevalence reported herein are important because such youth with diabetes will enter adulthood with several years of disease duration, difficulty in treatment, an increased risk of early complications and increased frequency of diabetes during reproductive years, which may further increase diabetes in the next generation." Contents of this article: Here are some key points about diabetes in children. More detail and supporting information is in the main article. Type 1 and 2 diabetes are both increasing in the youth of America Often, the symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children develop over just a few weeks If type 1 diabetes is not spotted, the child can develop diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) What is diabetes in children? Type 1 diabetes in children, previously called juve Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 1 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 1 diabetes develops gradually, but the symptoms may seem to come on suddenly. If you notice that you or your child have several of the symptoms listed below, make an appointment to see the doctor. Here’s why symptoms seem to develop suddenly: something triggers the development of type 1 diabetes (researchers think it’s a viral infection—read this article on what causes type 1 diabetes, and the body loses its ability to make insulin. However, at that point, there’s still insulin in the body so glucose levels are still normal. Over time, a decreasing amount of insulin is made in the body, but that can take years. When there’s no more insulin in the body, blood glucose levels rise quickly, and these symptoms can rapidly develop: Extreme weakness and/or tiredness Extreme thirst—dehydration Increased urination Abdominal pain Nausea and/or vomiting Blurry vision Wounds that don’t heal well Irritability or quick mood changes Changes to (or loss of) menstruation There are also signs of type 1 diabetes. Signs are different from symptoms in that they can be measured objectively; symptoms are experienced and reported by the patient. Signs of type 1 diabetes include: Weight loss—despite eating more Rapid heart rate Reduced blood pressure (falling below 90/60) Low body temperature (below 97º F) There is an overall lack of public awareness of the signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes. Making yourself aware of the signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes is a great way to be proactive about your health and the health of your family members. If you notice any of these signs or symptoms, it’s possible that you have (or your child has) type 1 diabetes. A doctor can make that diagnosis by checking blood glucose levels. Continue reading >>

You Can Have Diabetes & Not Know It

You Can Have Diabetes & Not Know It

You Can Have Diabetes & NOT Know It By Ted Twietmeter 5-18-12 Can you be a diabetic for years and believe you're healthy without ever knowing you are seriously ill? As someone who cares for a family member who has diabetes, I've learned a few things about the disease along the way and would like to share them with you. I am not a doctor or a health care professional, but encourage everyone I know to have their blood glucose (sugar) level checked at least once if it's never been done. Glucose is most accurately checked in the morning after fasting overnight which is the standard method. The reason for this is to see how low your glucose level gets each day, which is in the morning. One doctor we know said it this way: "Diabetes is basically glucose circulating in your bloodstream, and your body cannot neutralize it to be rid of it." I wrote this as it seems that no one addresses the basics of this silent, deadly but treatable disease. I'll provide a URL at the end to read far more detailed advice written by medical professionals later. First, there are two basic types of diabetic patients: 1. Type 1 diabetics are born with the disease and are usually diagnosed these days within the first few years of life, or even at birth if symptoms appear in routine blood tests. Type 1 patients are usually on insulin injections throughout their life, starting as a child to self-inject as needed. Some of these patients may require an insulin pump or simply have one for convenience. 2. Type 2 diabetics acquire it later in life. The disease can start at most any age and even reach their mid-life years before being diagnosed as a type 2. This type is often characterized by either insufficient insulin production in the pancreas (like a type 1) or a condition known as insulin resistance. We Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Symptoms Develop Suddenly?

Can Diabetes Symptoms Develop Suddenly?

I haven't experienced any symptoms of diabetes in the past, but just in the last week or so, I have seen a dramatic increase in my urination frequency: I have to go about once an hour. And I seem to be constantly thirsty. Is it possible that symptoms of diabetes could materialize virtually overnight? Continue reading >>

How Did You Know Your Child Had Type 1 Diabetes? Know The Symptoms (it Could Save A Life)

How Did You Know Your Child Had Type 1 Diabetes? Know The Symptoms (it Could Save A Life)

How Did You Know Your Child Had Type 1 Diabetes? Know The Symptoms (It Could Save a Life) By: Rachelle Stocum / Blog Parents of children with diabetes will hear this question asked a million times. And each time you tell your story the story gets shorter and shorter. You begin to leave out details. Details that may one day save another child’s life. I wrote this for a couple of reasons. The first reason was to document the details and help other families who are searching for answers to unexplained symptoms. The second reason was to really get my emotions off my chest, and reflect. December 30, 2016 is a day I will never forget. This date will now be forever know to us as Carter’s “dia-versary.” This was the day my seven year old son Carter was diagnosed with Type one Diabetes. I still tear up when I say or even write those words… my son was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes. The week before Christmas my son Carter had so many complaints. He’s not a whiny kid by any means so this was unusual for him. He’s actually the most compliant child I know. When I ask him to do something he does it. So when he first complained of a stomach ache I thought he was coming down with the flu. It seems reasonable that a child would get sick in December. So I tried to wake him up but it was really hard. He was groggy and didn’t want to wake up. Once he was finally woke up I told him that I didn’t want him to eat anything until I was able to get grandma’s monitor and test his blood sugar. He drank some water but understood what I was asking of him. He didn’t complain or cry even though he was hungry. I knew that was bad because when I was pregnant with him I had gestational diabetes. My blood glucose only ran about 120 from what I can recall, and I knew normal was around Continue reading >>

Could You Have Diabetes And Not Know It?

Could You Have Diabetes And Not Know It?

Would you know if you were diabetic? According to Diabetes South Africa over 3 million South Africans are living with diabetes, and many more are undiagnosed. Could you have diabetes and not know it? According to Diabetes South Africa, over 3 millionSouth Africansare living with diabetes.However, it is thought that many moreSouth Africans couldbediabetic without knowing it. Afurther five million people have pre-diabetes , a condition where blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not high enough yet for diagnosis of diabetes. If left uncontrolled, pre-diabetes will eventually lead to type 2 diabetes. Worldwide, approximately 366 million people have diabetes - a number which is expected to rise to 552 million by 2030.The global number of people with pre-diabetes is currently around 280 million, and is expected to grow to 398 million by 2030. Diabetes is a chronic health condition where the body is unable to produce enough insulin and properly break down glucose in the blood. Glucose comes from food and is used by the cells for energy. Without this energy, we cannot live. Diabetes affects everyone not only the patient, but also the families and communities at large. Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to serious complications such heart disease, stroke, blindness, amputations, kidney failure and death. The majority of people suffer from type 2 diabetes, a condition which in most cases could be avoided altogether by following a healthy diet and exercising regularly and going for routine blood glucose tests. Obesity is one of the strongest precursors of type 2 diabetes, so keeping your weight in check is crucial. Some people, however,also have a strong genetic predisposition to develop diabetes, such asour Indian population. Knowingthe risk factors for diabetes is there Continue reading >>

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