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How Long Can A Cat Live With Diabetes Untreated

Diabetes In Cats

Diabetes In Cats

This article is about diabetes mellitus in cats. For other uses, see Diabetes (disambiguation). Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease in cats, whereby either insufficient insulin response or insulin resistance lead to persistently high blood glucose concentrations. Diabetes could affect up to 1 in 230 cats,[1] and may be becoming increasingly common. Diabetes mellitus is less common in cats than in dogs. 80-95% of diabetic cats experience something similar to type-2 diabetes, but are generally severely insulin-dependent by the time symptoms are diagnosed. The condition is treatable, and treated properly, the cat can experience a normal life expectancy. In type-2 cats, prompt effective treatment may lead to diabetic remission, in which the cat no longer needs injected insulin. Untreated, the condition leads to increasingly weak legs in cats, and eventually malnutrition, ketoacidosis and/or dehydration, and death. Symptoms[edit] Cats will generally show a gradual onset of the disease over a few weeks or months, and it may escape notice for even longer.[citation needed] The first outward symptoms are a sudden weight loss (or occasionally gain), accompanied by excessive drinking and urination; for example, cats can appear to develop an obsession with water and lurk around faucets or water bowls. Appetite is suddenly either ravenous (up to three-times normal) or absent. These symptoms arise from the body being unable to use glucose as an energy source. A fasting glucose blood test will normally be suggestive of diabetes at this point. The same home blood test monitors used in humans are used on cats, usually by obtaining blood from the ear edges or paw pads. As the disease progresses, ketone bodies will be present in the urine, which can be detected with the same urine stri Continue reading >>

How Long Can A 14 Year Old Diabetic Cat Survive Without Insulin? | Yahoo Answers

How Long Can A 14 Year Old Diabetic Cat Survive Without Insulin? | Yahoo Answers

How long can a 14 year old diabetic cat survive without insulin? I love my cat and I'm willing to do anything for him to survive and be ok. Cost doesn't matter.About a month ago he was very weak and ill and the vets suspected diabetes (his test was very high, but they said this could just be stress). We took him back for another test, it was again very high - high... show more I love my cat and I'm willing to do anything for him to survive and be ok. Cost doesn't matter. About a month ago he was very weak and ill and the vets suspected diabetes (his test was very high, but they said this could just be stress). We took him back for another test, it was again very high - high enough to have diabetes, but they AGAIN told us that its common for the result to be very high if the cat is stressed out (which he was, he loves his home and hates being at the vets). They put him on a drip overnight, and he got better and better - we feed him good foods too. However now he has went back to being really weak - and has started peeing a lot inside (which he never did,) as well as eating constantly and drinking loads of water. I always thought it was diabetes - now I'm almost convinced. We have an appointment for next Tuesday, but I'm sick of the waiting and messing around. Will he be ok until then? And does it sound like diabetes? Also, it's not his age because he was very very healthy until about a month ago Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: It depends. Without complications, he would survive but would be feeling rotten, and may lose weight. and will pee a lot. may get dehydrated. would be at higher risk of urinary tract infection due to sugar in the urine. But I can't say for sure he'll survive, because for an untreated diabetic, there's the risk he could go Continue reading >>

Feline Diabetes: Symptoms, Treatments, Prevention, And Diet Tips

Feline Diabetes: Symptoms, Treatments, Prevention, And Diet Tips

An alarming number of cats are developing diabetes mellitus, which is the inability to produce enough insulin to balance blood sugar, or glucose, levels . Left untreated, it can lead to weight loss, loss of appetite, vomiting , dehydration, severe depression, problems with motor function, coma, and even death. To find out why so many cats are being diagnosed with diabetes, and what owners can do, WebMD talked to Thomas Graves, a former feline practitioner who is associate professor and section head of small animal medicine at the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine. Graves’ research focus is on diabetes and geriatric medicine. Q: How common is feline diabetes? A: The true incidence isn’t known, but it’s estimated at 0.5% to 2% of the feline population. But it’s also probably under diagnosed. Q: What are the signs of diabetes in cats? A: The main symptoms are increased thirst and increased urination. And while we do see it in cats with appropriate body weight, it’s more common in obese cats. Some cats with diabetes have a ravenous appetite because their bodies cannot use the fuel supplied in their diet. Q: What’s the treatment for a cat with feline diabetes? A: Diet is certainly a component. It’s felt that a low-carbohydrate diet is probably best for cats with diabetes. Treatment is insulin therapy. There are some oral medications, but they have more side effects and are mainly used when insulin can’t be used for some reason. There are blood and urine tests, physical examinations, and behavioral signals, which are used to establish insulin therapy. This is done in conjunction with your veterinarian. We don’t recommend owners adjust insulin therapy on their own because it can be sort of complicated in cats. Most patients come in every t Continue reading >>

Untreated Diabetes In Cats

Untreated Diabetes In Cats

If you notice your cat eating like there's no tomorrow but losing weight, don't be jealous of his ability to keep a slim figure. Odds are your skinny kitty actually has feline diabetes, a serious health condition that prevents his body from absorbing glucose properly. What is Diabetes Feline diabetes sounds like a dieter's dream, as it prevents the body from absorbing glucose, or blood sugar. No sugar means no fat gain, which is good, right? Not really, as your cat needs that glucose to give his body enough energy to stay healthy and metabolize his food properly. Diabetes occurs when your cat doesn't produce enough insulin, which helps his body's cells absorb the glucose in his blood. Not enough insulin means the glucose stays in the bloodstream until it works through his kidneys and is eliminated through his urine. Symptoms Your cat will not simply wake up one day and have full-blown diabetes. It's a slow progression with various seemingly unrelated symptoms that all stem from the excess sugar in his body. Because he can't absorb the glucose from his food, he'll feel hungry more often and eat much more than usual. Despite this increase in appetite, he may lose weight. You may notice more frequent trips to the water dish as he tries to remove the excess sugar in his bloodstream by flushing it out through his kidneys. You may also find yourself needing to clean his litter boxes more often as his trips there increase. Complications When it comes to diabetes, ignorance is not bliss and your cat will not eventually get better if you just buy him the right high-priced specialized food from the pet store. Serious complications can develop if your cat's diabetes is left untreated, causing a decrease in his quality of life and even an early death. As his condition worsens, his Continue reading >>

Just Learned My Cat Is Diabetic...

Just Learned My Cat Is Diabetic...

First I will introduce myself, since I'm "new" to this forum. (I usually hang out at Organizing the Home, and lurk at The Kitchen Table). I am Maura and have been a cat-lover all my life. Growing up, we always had a cat (or cats) in my home - but they were indoor/outdoor cats, and sadly, they usually met their demise when hit by a car. As an adult, reading that first paragraph, that sounds harsh and irresponsible - but I was a kid in that household. Currently, I own an indoor-only cat whom I love dearly. She is a brown tabby, going on 12 years old in March. I suspected she may have diabetes, took her to the vet yesterday, and just received a call that confirmed my suspicion. Perhaps this is not the forum to address this - but I am going to be brutally honest. I cannot invest the personal commitment or the financial expense that will be required to care for her. Now that probably sounds harsh and irresponsible too - but it is the truth. My life, as-it-stands, cannot accommodate the needs of a diabetic cat. Tears literally come to the surface as I type this. I've never owned a cat this age -- so this is new territory for me. I guess what I am wondering from the folks at this forum is three-fold:: How long can my cat live comfortably with this disease? As of now, she is the same smart, energetic cat, responsive cat she's always been. (My suspicions were based on the fact that she is drinking and urinating excessively.) What is the progression of untreated diabetes? And to what extent and expense do you offer medical care for your pet? I realize that this varies from person to person based on many factors. I guess I am hoping to alleviate the guilt I may feel for not treating this disease. Finally, I've never had to make a decision to put an animal down (Is that the right Continue reading >>

What If I Do Nothing? - Vin

What If I Do Nothing? - Vin

A month ago my sister wanted to know if her Jack Russell Terrier could be sick because he was drinking and peeing all the time. I told her he needed to go to the vet; he could have a simple urinary tract infection or he could have more going on. Inside my head, I was screaming “diabetes” as polyuria/polydipsia (drinks a lot and pees a lot), or PU/PD as medical types call it, is a hallmark for diabetes mellitus  in dogs, cats, and people. In dogs, diabetes mellitus rarely responds to dietary changes - unlike some people and some cats - and almost always requires twice daily insulin injections to control the disease. Having seen clients react to a diagnosis of diabetes, I wondered how my sister and her husband would react if they had to take care of this chronic condition that requires significant planning and scheduling. It’s not for every owner: while it’s not expensive, it requires insulin injections every 12 hours, 7 days a week for the rest of the pet’s life, with no time off for good behavior. It requires considerable commitment, which can be particularly difficult for people like my sister and her husband who work outside the home and can’t drop everything to give a pet medication at the appropriate times. I wondered what they would choose to do if their dog did have diabetes rather than a urinary tract infection. Receiving a diagnosis of a chronic disease can be difficult to wrap your mind around. During my years in practice, I noticed that there are some pretty universal questions most clients ask. “What are my options and what will happen if I do nothing?” When I hear this, I translate this into: a. How will the disease progress? Will this be a disease that progresses quickly or is it going to be something that is a nagging problem for years to Continue reading >>

Feline Diabetes

Feline Diabetes

Definition: Diabetes mellitus is an endocrine disease in which the blood sugar level rises because of failure of insulin to control it. This occurs either because the pancreas has lost its ability to manufacture insulin (known as Type I diabetes) or that mechanisms of insulin release and tissue responsiveness are dysfunctional (Type II diabetes). Without proper insulin regulation, the body is unable to transport glucose (a simple sugar obtained from digested food) into cells. Because glucose remains trapped in the bloodstream, the tissues of the body are deprived of the energy needed to function normally. Risk factors: In many cases, the cause for why a cat has developed diabetes cannot be determined. However, it is known that obesity predisposes cats for Type II diabetes. Other causes or factors include: damage to the pancreas caused by inflammation, infection, immune mediated disease, tumors, genetic predisposition, and exposure to certain drugs. Cats receiving steroids are also predisposed to diabetes. Symptoms: The most common symptoms of diabetes are weight loss (often with a healthy appetite), excessive water consumption and excessive urine output. Because so much urine is being produced, some diabetic cats will urinate in unusual places (i.e., outside of the litter box). Owners may notice that litter has suddenly begun to stick to their cat’s paws because of the excess volume of urine being produced. Some cats will also show weakness, lethargy, vomiting, abnormal gait, poor grooming habits and changes in behavior. Diagnosis: Physical examination may show poor body condition, dehydration, jaundice, and an enlarged liver. Laboratory testing is essential to diagnose diabetes. Blood tests show hyperglycemia (high blood sugar, usually above 300 mg/dl), and often the Continue reading >>

Life Expectancy For Cats With Diabetes

Life Expectancy For Cats With Diabetes

I recently was forced to put my cat down because her diabetes got too bad. I first learned of her diabetes when she was 5 and had it pretty under control for 9 years. She found it well, but with her again her body could not maintain it anymore and she became very weak and a failing liver. My vet told me that only option would be to put her down, and even though I tried to push for some kind of medicine or surgery, but the vet said nothing would help, so I put her down. If correctly treated and maintained, the cat can live a long life with diabetes. I've got a 17.5 year old cat who has lived with diabetes for the past twelve years. He's near the end - in too much pain from osteoarthritis and neuropathy - but with twice daily insulin (it took several tries to get him on a kind that worked) and diet changes, he's been my happiest, most long-lived cat to date. I watched him being born in April 2000, so we have a special attachment...not sure what I'll do without him. But this goes to show that with loving care (and, alas, a lot of money and time) a diabetic cat can thrive and be happy. Please don't put your cat down or worse, leave the diabetes untreated (a slow, painful death). If you can't afford or commit to treatment, you might be able to find someone who is willing to care for a diabetic kitty. Best of luck. Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Untreated Diabetes In Cats

Symptoms Of Untreated Diabetes In Cats

Diabetes in cats, if left untreated, can be fatal. There are a number of symptoms you can look for and alert your vet to the potential of diabetes. The faster you get a diagnosis, the faster you can put together a treatment plan and help your cat feel better. While, diabetes is a serious condition, if diagnosed and treated quickly, your cats diabetes can be controlled through diet and activity levels. Even if your cat is suffering from a more difficult stage of diabetes, you can treat your cat with daily injections, much as humans with diabetes. After a diagnosis speak with your vet about the best treatment methods for your cat and work your cat into a routine that includes these treatments. Your cat may be resistant to his new routine at first, but will start feeling better almost immediately. Excessive Thirst in Diabetic cats When your cat's body over produces insulin it causes the kidneys to work over time trying to flush the excess out. This means your cat needs to replenish fluids more often than usual. If you notice your cat is drink more water than usual, this may be a symptom of diabetes. Diabetes in Cats and Weight Loss Because the excess or shortage of insulin can cause changes in your cats appetite, you cat can lose weight whether they experience and increased or decreased appetite. Weight loss from a decrease in appetite is cause by lack of nutrients. If you notice an increase in appetite and your cat is still losing weight this is a definite red flag for diabetes. Diabetic Cat Lethargy When you're cat is experiencing the symptoms mentioned and the spikes in blood sugar, they often feel lethargic or seem depressed. Think about how you feel when your dizzy, have fluctuations in appetite and are experiencing other symptoms. If your cat is sleeping more than us Continue reading >>

Life Span Of A Cat With Diabetes

Life Span Of A Cat With Diabetes

A diabetes diagnosis is not a death sentence for your cat. Most diabetic cats who receive proper veterinary care and good quality home treatment enjoy essentially normal lives, their longevity the same as non-diabetic cats. He'll have a shortened life as a direct result of diabetes only if you fail to manage the diabetes properly. According to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, the average indoor cat lives for 13 to 17 years. Properly medicated diabetic cats have the same average longevity as healthy non-diabetic cats. But cats with untreated diabetes may succumb sooner, due to health problems that can develop as side effects of diabetes. Insulin, a pancreatic hormone, breaks down the sugars your cat consumes and turns them into the energy he needs to function. Diabetes either inhibits insulin production or inhibits produced insulin's effectiveness. Further, diabetes is either "insulin-dependent" or non-insulin-dependent -- cats with insulin-dependent diabetes require frequent insulin injections. Cats under 7 years of age rarely get diabetes. Overweight cats are more prone to become diabetic than cats of healthy weight; males are slightly more likely to become diabetic than females. Each cat's diabetes is an specific condition; your veterinarian will provide individualized treatment for your pet based on his symptoms. Feline diabetes is not classified into stages beyond the general classification of type, but untreated feline diabetes has a series of progression, starting with symptoms of lethargy; increased eating, drinking and urinating; and weight loss. It progresses to leg weakness, poor skin and coat, and bacterial infection; then to wasting, ketoacidosis, neuropathy, and kidney disease. Your veterinarian will diagnose the type of diabet Continue reading >>

Consider This Case: An Uncontrolled Diabetic Cat

Consider This Case: An Uncontrolled Diabetic Cat

Ann Della Maggiore, DVM, Diplomate ACVIM University of California—Davis Sugar, a 12-year-old spayed female Maine Coon cat, presented for poorly controlled diabetes and diabetic neuropathy. HISTORY Sugar was diagnosed with diabetes mellitus 2 years prior to presentation. Initially, her diabetes was moderately controlled on 5 to 6 units of recombinant human protamine zinc insulin (PZI) (40 U/mL; ProZinc, bi-vetmedica.com), but over the year prior to presentation the insulin dose had been progressively increased with no improvement in glycemic control. Upon presentation, Sugar was receiving 14 units of recombinant human PZI. The owner was performing blood glucose curves at home, but struggling to maintain Sugar’s blood glucose below 300 mg/dL. In addition to diabetes mellitus, Sugar had concurrent hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and chronic rhinitis, and persistent polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia, and weakness. Key Points: Feline Diabetes Mellitus Diabetes is a disease of insulin deficiency. Diabetes in cats is most commonly classified as type 2-like diabetes—a disease process in which insufficient insulin production from beta cells takes place in the setting of insulin resistance. Insulin requirements can be altered by obesity, inflammation, or concurrent endocrine disease, such as hypersomatotropism (acromegaly) or hyperadrenocorticism. Some refer to a subclass of diabetic cats with secondary diabetes—patients in which diabetes occurs subsequent to (1) another endocrine disease (eg, acromegaly, hyperadrenocorticism) or (2) administration of diabetogenic drugs (eg, glucocorticoids).1 PHYSICAL EXAMINATION Physical examination revealed a symmetrically muscled cat, weighing 7.7 kg, with a body condition score of 6/9. Sugar had an unkempt hair coat, mild prognathia infer Continue reading >>

10 Good Things About Owning A Diabetic Cat

10 Good Things About Owning A Diabetic Cat

Many people hear the news their cat is a diabetic and they think it’s a death sentence. This is not true. Don’t panic. On the positive side: 1. It’s a treatable disease. A diagnosis of diabetes means your cat can get treatment. When an older cat is presented to me with the common symptoms of drinking lots of water, urinating tons and losing weight, a diagnosis of diabetes can actually be good news. It’s often better news than kidney or liver failure in many cases. If your cat seems very thirsty, this is not normal. Get the cat to the vet. Early intervention with diabetes, as with so many other diseases, gives your cat the best chance of a better life, and possible remission. 2. Sometimes diabetes is reversible; it goes away. With proper diet and the correct insulin therapy, a significant number of cats can go into remission, or have their diabetes reversed. We don’t completely understand this, but we are getting better treatment results with low-carb/high-protein diets and early insulin intervention. Diabetes is more common in male cats, and the statistics show that males have a slightly better chance of reversing their diabetes. 3. Better diets are helping diabetics live healthier lives. A poor diet may have brought on your cat’s diabetes in the first place. Now it’s time to get back on the right track. Most experts recommend a diet with about 7 percent carb content. Fancy Feast Chunky Chicken or Turkey is a good choice for a diabetic. Friskies and 9 Lives have some options too. Evo95 Duck or Venison is great protein, low in carbs. Some of these “regular” cat foods are probably better than the prescription diets, in my opinion. If your cat is addicted to dry foods, the Evo dry diets are probably the best. I still wish you could convert Mr. Mug to a we Continue reading >>

Cat Diabetes – Symptoms, Diagnosis And Treatment

Cat Diabetes – Symptoms, Diagnosis And Treatment

Like their human owners, cats can be diabetic. Luckily, just as humans are able to medically control their diabetes, it can be controlled in our pets, too. Amazingly, in some cases, after a while, a cat’s pancreas may even heal or regenerate and start producing insulin again. The vital thing is to get your cat to the vet the minute you notice any potential symptoms. Feline diabetes can be treated, but if your cat doesn’t get care quickly, the disease will kill him. Symptoms When cats aren’t feeling well, their instinct is to try to hide it, which means cat owners have to be vigilant. One of the major early signs of feline diabetes is drinking excessive amounts of water. Because it can no longer process glucose, your cat’s body just expels it, along with water – which leads to another sign of feline diabetes: excessive urination. Other early symptoms of feline diabetes are increasingly lethargic behavior, a dull coat, dandruff, extreme changes in appetite, and extreme changes in weight. Even if your cat is only experiencing one of these symptoms, take him to the vet. If feline diabetes is left untreated, you’ll start seeing more symptoms, including impaired movement of back legs, vomiting, and breath that smells fruity or like nail polish remover. Without treatment, a cat will fall into a diabetic coma, and soon die. How do cats get diabetes? There’s no definite answer to this question. We know that some cats are at higher risk than others: the disease tends to attack older, neutered male cats who live indoors and are overweight. Burmese cats also show a higher rate of diabetes. But diabetes can affect any cat, regardless of age, weight, gender, or breed. If you have the slightest suspicion that your cat is diabetic, don’t think it’s impossible just bec Continue reading >>

Many Cats With Diabetes Can Achieve Remission

Many Cats With Diabetes Can Achieve Remission

If your cat seems to be thirstier than usual, is urinating frequently, is hungry all the time but also losing weight, you should have him checked by your veterinarian for feline diabetes. Other signs to watch for include urinating outside the litter box, sweet-smelling breath, lethargy, dehydration, poor coat condition, and urinary tract infections. Left untreated, diabetes can cause your kitty to lose his appetite and a significant amount of weight, and develop muscle weakness. Uncontrolled, the disease can ultimately result in diabetic neuropathy, a condition in which there is profound rear limb weakness and a plantigrade walk, meaning the ankles are actually on the ground as the cat walks. Feline Diabetes Mellitus Diabetes mellitus is a common disease in older cats, and is especially prevalent in kitties fed dry food diets. In fact, a study published in the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery concluded that high-protein, low-carb diets are as or more effective than insulin at causing remission of diabetes in cats. The pancreas produces insulin based on the level of glucose in the blood. Insulin is necessary in order for glucose to enter the cells of the body. When glucose levels are high (which normally occurs after a meal), insulin is released. When there is not enough insulin being released from the pancreas, or there is an abnormal release of insulin coupled with an inadequate response of the body’s cells to the insulin, diabetes mellitus is the result. Sugar in the bloodstream cannot get into the cells of the body, so the body starts breaking down fat and protein stores to use as energy. As a result, no matter how much the cat eats, she loses weight. In addition, the glucose builds up in the bloodstream and is eliminated through urination. This leads to exce Continue reading >>

Why I'm Letting My Cat Die

Why I'm Letting My Cat Die

(Comments are now closed. Zoe is doing fine; a change in diet has done wonders. Thanks, everyone!) I just found out that my 13-year-old cat, Zoe, has diabetes. Zoe and I go way back; I adopted her from the Anti-Cruelty Society when she was 2 and she has been a constant presence. But now she's old. She is a cat. I'm not willing to spend thousands of dollars on medical care and I don't have the time or energy to give her a daily insulin shot and monitor her blood glucose level. The vet said she's not suffering, so I'm going to let nature take its course. After I confessed this at today's weekly Q staff meeting, my colleague Heidi Stevens nodded knowingly. "I hate my cat," she said. We all gasped. She added: "I took in my cat from a friend who found him at 4 weeks old, too young for a shelter to keep him, I was told. He was a cute kitten, but is a joyless, mean-spirited, weak-stomached 8-year-old cat now. "I've also developed an allergy to him, which makes my eyes swell and turn red. I find myself longing for the day when he's no longer with us, but I can't bring myself to take him to a shelter because I know no one would adopt him, and I couldn't live with myself knowing that I, in effect, ended his life. So I just go through life resenting him and his various messes." Do you have pet resentment? Or tips on how to give a cat hospice care? Kristine Timpert's quirky little book "If Babies Did Crunches" tries to sugarcoat an important message for adults: Beware of crunches. The not-just for-kids book stresses that if you really want to banish tummy flab or back pain, clean up your diet and mimic your child's natural play patterns, which includes squatting, pushing, pulling, balancing and lunging. One of the biggest mistakes new moms make, for example, is they start doing cru Continue reading >>

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