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How Long Before Metformin Starts To Work

Metformin For The Treatment Of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Metformin For The Treatment Of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a disorder of body metabolism that affects 5-10% of women and can cause infrequent periods, weight gain, acne, unwanted hair growth and infertility. PCOS should not be confused with the incidental finding of polycystic ovaries on an ultrasound scan which occur in about 20% of the female population and usually do not cause any symptoms. The cause of PCOS is not fully understood but is thought to have a genetic component. The small cysts seen in the ovaries do not cause PCOS but are the result of the underlying disturbance of metabolism. Most women with PCOS do not have every symptom and the treatment that a doctor recommends is usually chosen to treat the symptoms that bother the woman. In recent years there has been a lot of interest in the use of Metformin to treat the symptoms of PCOS. This information sheet aims to answer many of the questions that women have about this treatment. What is Metformin? Metformin is a medicine that is taken by mouth. It is from a family of drugs known as biguanides and was developed to treat type 2 (late onset) diabetes. Why is it used to treat PCOS? There are a number of similarities between PCOS and adult-onset diabetes. In both conditions, people have a resistance to the effects of insulin with resulting high levels of insulin in their blood stream. These high insulin levels cause an increased production of androgens (male-type hormones that can cause acne and unwanted hair growth) in the ovaries and adrenal glands. This in turn affects the pituitary hormones (LH and FSH) that normally stimulate the ovaries to produce eggs. The result is often irregular infertile periods. Metformin increases the effectiveness of insulin, resulting in a lowering of blood insulin levels which in turn lowers the androg Continue reading >>

How Long Does Metformin Stay In Your System

How Long Does Metformin Stay In Your System

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Overactive Thyroid | Health Navigator Nz

Overactive Thyroid | Health Navigator Nz

An overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism) is a condition in which the thyroid gland makes too much thyroid hormone. It can cause symptoms such as weight loss, feeling anxious, rapid heartbeat, sleep problems and low energy. Possible treatments include medication, radioactive iodine or surgery. Possible treatments for overactive thyroid include medication, radioactive iodine or surgery. The thyroid is a small, butterfly-shaped gland in your neck. It produces two thyroid hormones: tri-iodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). Thyroid hormones help the body use energy, stay warm and keep the brain, heart, muscles, and other organs working as they should. If you have an overactive thyroid you may: Or you may have no symptoms at all; when your doctor is doing a test for another reason, they may discover that you have hyperthyroidism. Thyroid problems are more common in women than men. About 1 in every 8 women develop at least one type of thyroid disorder in their lifetime. Underactive thyroid ( hypothyroidism ) is the most common followed by overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism). Overactive thyroid can be caused by a number of conditions: The most common cause of overactive thyroid is a condition that is passed down in families (hereditary) called Graves' disease. Graves disease is an autoimmune disease in which the body's own immune system affects the thyroid gland causing it to produce too much thyroid hormone. Benign (non-cancer) tumours of the thyroid (called thyroid nodules ) or pituitary gland. Too much iodine in the body can be caused by taking iodine supplements such as kelp or seaweed. Inflammation of the thyroid gland, possibly caused by a virus or problem with the immune system. Some medicines such as lithium or amiodarone can cause an overactive thyroid. What are the Continue reading >>

Glimepiride Side Effects

Glimepiride Side Effects

What Is Glimepiride (Amaryl)? Glimepiride is the generic name of the prescription drug Amaryl, used to treat patients with type 2 diabetes. Glimepiride belongs to a class of drugs known as sulfonylureas. It stimulates the pancreas to produce insulin and helps the body use insulin more efficiently. The drug can also decrease the chances that someone will develop life-threatening complications of type 2 diabetes. The drug was approved by the FDA in 1995 and is manufactured by Sanofi-Aventis. Glimepiride comes in tablet form and is usually taken once a day. It may be used alone, or in combination with insulin or another oral medication such as metformin. Your doctor will probably start you on a low dose of the medication and gradually increase your dose if needed. If you've taken glimepiride for a long period of time, the drug may not control blood sugar as well as it did when you first started the treatment. Your doctor will adjust the dosage as needed. Glimepiride Warnings Glimepiride helps control blood sugar, but it will not cure your diabetes. You should continue to take glimepiride even if you feel well. This medication should not be used to treat patients with type 1 diabetes, a disease in which the body does not produce insulin. Glimepiride will only help lower blood sugar if your body produces insulin naturally. In one study, patients who took a medication similar to glimepiride to treat diabetes were more likely to die of heart problems than those who were treated with diet changes and insulin. Talk to your doctor about the risks of this treatment. While taking glimepiride, you should tell your doctor if you: Are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding Are having surgery, including dental surgery Have ever had G6PD deficiency (a genetic blood diso Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Use Metformin During Pregnancy?

Is It Safe To Use Metformin During Pregnancy?

Metformin is a commonly used drug for managing type 2 diabetes. It is considered an effective treatment option for many people with diabetes, but is it safe for pregnant women? Metformin is a drug that helps to lower blood sugar. It is considered one of the best first line treatments for type 2 diabetes. A review posted to Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome notes that metformin helps to lower blood sugar levels, strengthens the endocrine system, improves insulin resistance, and reduces fat distribution in the body. Before taking any drugs, including metformin, a pregnant woman has to be absolutely sure that the drugs will not affect her or her baby. Effects of metformin use during and after pregnancy Some people are concerned about using metformin during and after pregnancy because it crosses the placenta. This means that when a pregnant woman takes metformin, so does her baby. However, the results of the few studies that have been carried out so far into the effects of taking metformin during pregnancy have been positive. A 2014 review posted to Human Reproduction Update found that the drug did not cause birth defects, complications, or diseases. The researchers did note, however, that larger studies should be carried out to make this evidence more conclusive. Metformin and gestational diabetes A separate review posted to Human Reproduction Update noted that women who took metformin to treat gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) gained less weight than women who took insulin. A 2-year follow-up study found that babies born to the women treated with metformin had less fat around their organs, which could make them less prone to insulin resistance later in life. This could mean that children who are exposed to metformin at a young age could gain long-term benefi Continue reading >>

Metformin For Pcos: How It Works, Side Effects & Health Tips

Metformin For Pcos: How It Works, Side Effects & Health Tips

Metformin decreases insulin resistance and helps the body in utilizing insulin effectively. Given that PCOS is also associated with insulin resistance, doctors started prescribing Metformin for this hormonal disorder as well. Let’s understand the role of metformin for PCOS in detail. Insulin Resistance: The Reason Behind Prescribing Metformin For PCOS Insulin resistance is a common condition in a majority of PCOS patients. Experts believe it is a key reason behind this condition. If you’re experiencing insulin resistance, your body fails to respond to normal levels of insulin. As a result, glucose starts to accumulate in the blood. To tackle excess blood sugar, the pancreas produce more insulin. This condition is called hyperinsulinemia or the presence of excessive insulin in the blood. High levels of insulin in the body trigger the over-production of male hormones in the female body. Excess male hormones in the female body lead to symptoms of PCOS such as acne, excess body hair, male pattern baldness, and belly fat. Metformin For PCOS – How Does It Work? The USFDA approved metformin in 1994. Metformin for PCOS works in the following ways: Improving insulin sensitivity of cells, thus helping reduce insulin levels in the blood Curbing the production of glucose inside the liver Increasing the absorption of glucose by cells, and Inhibiting the use of fatty acids for production of energy. Doctors also figured out that prescribing metformin for PCOS helped patients in regularizing their periods. They also found that the drug helped in reducing the levels of male hormones in PCOS patients. PCOS patients have to undergo something called as “ovary stimulation” prior to IVF treatment. Doctors prescribe Metformin for PCOS to reduce the risk of a condition called ovarian Continue reading >>

What’s Invokana? 10 Things You Need To Know

What’s Invokana? 10 Things You Need To Know

Invokana (canagliflozin) is one of the new oral medications for adult onset diabetes. It’s expensive but has many upsides. Taken usually in combination with metformin it is a rising star in the treatment of diabetes. Here is what you need to know to help you decide: worth it or not? Invokana is taken as a 100 mg tablet once daily before breakfast, increasing to a 300 mg tablet once a day if you have normal kidney function. Invokana can be taken with or without food. Invokana is not yet recommended for use alone in the treatment of diabetes; it should be given as a second agent in addition to metformin or as a third-line treatment. Invokana works on the kidneys and tells the proximal tubule to resorb approximately 90 percent of the filtered glucose load. So, Invokana promotes dumping of glucose from the kidneys to the urine. Invokana used alone doesn’t lower blood sugars (measured by the A1C blood test) enough to make it effective as a single agent for diabetes. In studies it lowers A1C by 0.5 to 0.7 percentage points, making it a relatively weak glucose lowering agent. When should Invokana be added? It has been shown to be effective in lowering A1C when metformin alone is not achieving the goal A1C of < 7.0. Invokana 300 mg compared to Januvia 100 mg mixed with metformin was better at lowering blood sugar and helped with weight loss. Will I lose weight on Invokana? Yes, in most studies Invokana (used with metformin) resulted in a 6.5 pound weight loss at 12 weeks and an almost 10 pound weight loss at the end of a year. That’s quite a plus. The huge downside of Invokana is the frequency of genital fungal infections, which are almost sixfold higher. This means there is an increased risk of genital yeast infections: vulvovaginal candidiasis (vaginal yeast infections) Continue reading >>

Pcos: Insulin And Metformin

Pcos: Insulin And Metformin

Young women with PCOS often have elevated insulin levels and are more likely to develop diabetes. Metformin is a medication often prescribed for women with PCOS to help prevent diabetes. A lifestyle that includes healthy nutrition and daily exercise is the most important part of a PCOS treatment plan. What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone made by an organ in the body called the pancreas. The food you eat is broken down into simple sugar (glucose) during digestion. Glucose is absorbed into the blood after you eat. Insulin helps glucose enter the cells of the body to be used as energy. If there’s not enough insulin in the body, or if the body can’t use the insulin, sugar levels in the blood become higher. What is insulin resistance? If your body is resistant to insulin, it means you need high levels of insulin to keep your blood sugar normal. Certain medical conditions such as being overweight or having PCOS can cause insulin resistance. Insulin resistance tends to run in families. What can insulin resistance do to me? High insulin levels can cause thickening and darkening of the skin (acanthosis nigricans) on the back of the neck, axilla (under the arms), and groin area. In young women with PCOS, high insulin levels can cause the ovaries to make more androgen hormones such as testosterone. This can cause increased body hair, acne, and irregular or few periods. Having insulin resistance can increase your risk of developing diabetes. How can I lower my insulin levels? You can help lower your insulin levels naturally by eating fewer starches and sugars, and more foods that are high in fiber and low in refined carbohydrates. Low glycemic foods, on the other hand, don’t raise your blood sugar or insulin levels as much as foods that are high in sugar or refined carbohydr Continue reading >>

Act Metformin

Act Metformin

How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Metformin belongs to the class of medications called oral hypoglycemics, which are medications that lower blood sugar. It is used to control blood glucose (blood sugar) for people with type 2 diabetes. It is used when diet, exercise, and weight reduction have not been found to lower blood glucose well enough on their own. Metformin works by reducing the amount of glucose made by the liver and by making it easier for glucose to enter into the tissues of the body. Metformin has been found to be especially useful in delaying problems associated with diabetes for overweight people with diabetes. This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. What form(s) does this medication come in? 500 mg Each white-to-off-white, round, film-coated, biconvex tablet with logo on one side and "M" over "M" on the other contains 500 mg of metformin HCl. Nonmedicinal ingredients: crospovidone, magnesium stearate, polyethylene glycol, polyvinyl alcohol, povidone, talc, and titan Continue reading >>

Metformin Er

Metformin Er

What Is Metformin ER? Metformin ER (Glucophage XR®, Glutametz®, and Fortamet®) is a prescription medication licensed to treat type 2 diabetes (also known as noninsulin-dependent diabetes or adult-onset diabetes). The drug is a long-acting, extended-release version of metformin. (Click Metformin Uses for more information on what metformin ER is used for, including possible off-label uses.) Who Makes Metformin ER? Generic metformin ER is made by several manufacturers. Glucophage and Glucophage XR are manufactured by Bristol-Myers Squibb. Glutametz is made by Depomed Inc., and Fortamet is made by Andrx Labs. How Does Metformin ER Work? Metformin ER works in several ways. For example, it decreases the amount of sugar (glucose) made by the liver. Metformin ER can also decrease the amount of sugar absorbed into the body (from the diet) and can decrease insulin resistance, helping the body to use insulin better. Because metformin ER does not increase the amount of insulin produced by the body, it is less likely to cause dangerously low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), as many other diabetes medications can do (see Alternatives to Metformin). There have been several studies looking at the effects of metformin ER for type 2 diabetes. In these studies, metformin ER has been shown to decrease fasting blood sugar and to decrease hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). HbA1c is a test used to measure long-term blood sugar control in people with diabetes. Normal HbA1c levels are usually less than 6 percent in people without diabetes; people with diabetes usually have higher HbA1c results. Studies have shown that the higher the HbA1c, the greater the chance for developing long-term problems related to diabetes. This includes problems such as heart disease, diabetic retinopathy, diabetic neuropathy, and Continue reading >>

How Long Does It Take For Metformin To Start Working

How Long Does It Take For Metformin To Start Working

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Blood-sugar-busting Berberine: A Diabetes Solution

Blood-sugar-busting Berberine: A Diabetes Solution

Type 2 Diabetes (and its root cause: insulin resistance) is truly an epidemic in our society. Thus it’s only a matter of time before every practitioner has at least a handful of clients with blood sugar control issues. The good news is that Type 2 diabetes is absolutely reversible! Long-term healing requires a client to change their diet and lifestyle substantially. And, as you know, some of them just aren’t ready emotionally for that change. It takes time. But in the interim, these clients absolutely need help alleviating the toxic effects of elevated sugar on their organs and glands. As a scientist at heart, I am inherently skeptical of claims of seemingly “magical” effects of herbal remedies. Some are absolutely true, but many are overblown (just as we see with pharmaceutical remedies, marketing claims can be predatory and irresponsible). I want to introduce you, however, to an herbal solution that holds up very well to scrutiny: berberine. Like another herbal powerhouse curcumin, berberine is a plant phytonutrient, specfically an alkaloid. It’s been used for eons as a natural antibiotic. I’ve used it successfully in my practice to help people who choose natural treatment (as opposed to prescription antibiotics) for all sorts of unwelcome microbial infections…bacteria, viruses, yeast, parasites. Berberine is extracted from a number of medicinal herbs, most commonly oregon grape root, barberry, and goldenseal (what you see in the picture above). But that’s only the beginning of berberine’s power. A couple of ground-breaking 2008 clinical studies found that berberine regulates blood sugar in Type 2 diabetes just as well as the blockbuster drug Metformin (and with no measured side effects). No, I am not exaggerating. In peer-reviewed studies in the med Continue reading >>

How Long Does It Take To Reverse Diabetes?

How Long Does It Take To Reverse Diabetes?

“And by the third day, I got this burst of energy,” says Mr. Garlin. “I felt as good as I did when I was in high school. And all this without taking any medications… just eating healthy and exercising. That’s all it was!” Not everyone’s blood sugar (glucose) tumbles as quickly as Mr. Garlin’s, but there is plenty of research affirming that a healthy diet like the Pritikin Eating Plan combined with daily exercise can profoundly reduce blood sugar levels in just two to three week’s time. Prevention of Diabetes There is also strong science showing that a healthy lifestyle like Pritikin can prevent pre-diabetes from developing into full-blown diabetes. (Pre-diabetes is defined as having a fasting glucose between 100 and 125. Diabetes is a fasting glucose of 126 or higher.) Foods That Fight Diabetes Pritikin eating means focusing on whole foods that are naturally rich in fiber and naturally low in fats, sugars, and industrial refinement. Pritikin foods are vegetables, whole fruits (not juice), whole grains, legumes such as beans and peas, nonfat dairy foods, and moderate servings of lean meat such as fish, skinless chicken breast, and game meat like bison and venison. How Long Does It Take To Reverse Diabetes? | The Science About 20 years ago, scientists began discovering how quickly diabetes could be reversed. Researchers at UCLA tracked1 men and women with type 2 diabetes who had attended the Pritikin Longevity Center, where they learned and adopted healthy Pritikin food and fitness habits. Three Weeks Among the 652 people studied, 240 were “new diabetics,” that is, they had only recently been diagnosed with the disease; they were not yet taking any medications. Within an average of three weeks at Pritikin, the blood sugar (glucose) levels of these ne Continue reading >>

Pcos And Metformin – Is This Treatment Right For You?

Pcos And Metformin – Is This Treatment Right For You?

Here at Flo Living headquarters I speak with many women suffering with PCOS who have either been offered Metformin and decided against it or have tried Metformin and it’s not worked for them. If you have a diagnosis of PCOS it’s very likely that at some point your doctor has suggested Metformin. I personally was what would be considered the “perfect” candidate for this treatment when I was in my 20s and suffering with PCOS – overweight, struggling with acne and a complete lack of periods. However, I never tried it myself – instead I created a protocol for myself that became Flo Living. I’ve since helped many women manage their PCOS successfully with this protocol, just as I did my own diagnosis. That said, I speak with women so often about the Metformin option that I want to share my perspective with you. Although I do not dismiss the option completely, I do have some caveats and concerns. What is Metformin? Metformin is a first-line medication for those suffering with type 2 diabetes. It is also presented as a treatment for PCOS sufferers who are also overweight or obese. Not all PCOS sufferers have weight gain as a symptom, it depends on the kind of PCOS. Women with the kind of PCOS that causes weight gain are usually insulin resistant. Metformin reduces overall insulin levels. Insulin resistance is when the cells of your body become resistant to the hormone insulin, preventing glucose from entering your cells to be used for energy, and instead causing soaring levels of sugar blood stream bringing about diabetes, pre-diabetes or insulin-resistant PCOS. The connection between insulin and PCOS is blood sugar regulation. We hear about this most commonly with diabetes, but it’s also very important with PCOS. An unstable, constantly spiking and crashing, bl Continue reading >>

Metformin/ovulation? - Babyandbump

Metformin/ovulation? - Babyandbump

I've been taking metformin for pcos, for around 2 months (been on my full dose of 1g twice a day for a month) and recently had my af..1st since January anyway was it a induced bleed or an ovulation bleed? thanks everyone is different but I have been taking 1500mg of metformin since the end of february and had a period every 28 days ( this was amazing for me normaly anywhere from 50/100 days) but as far as i am aware i didnt ovulate with it. had lap n dye, hystereoscopy and ovarian drilling done 25th june and pretty positive I actually ovulated for the first time last week x I was going to ask the same question. I too have just been put on Metformin taken my second pill in the morning. It has not effected me yet. It may be too soon. Im on it for PCOS. My Gynecologist thinks this will do the trick in help me to conceive, because apparently I have the hormonal id of PCOS. In other words from my ultrasound scan my Ovaries don't look PCOS at they look healthy... Apparently the reason im not ovulating or having AF is because my LH hormone is unbalanced. I have three months to try the Metformin on my own. And im hoping I will ovulate. Im starting at 500mg for one week, the second week up to 1000mg and third week 1500mg and continue on that dose. Did anyone else on Metformin ovulate? How long did it take to kick and work? Did you conceive? It would be lovely to see some success for it.. And hopefully will give me some hope back too i'm also curious!!! Last month I had a period with metformin and a positive opk but still BFN, so i don't know if it was truly a postive opk or my pcos was making it wacky. I did 2 opks and they were both positive... so i'm wondering if i need more than just metformin to get ovulating!! I have PCOS as well and I've been on Metformin now for almost a Continue reading >>

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