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How Is Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosed

Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis & Tests

Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis & Tests

XIAFLEX® is a prescription medicine used to treat adults with Dupuytren's contracture when a "cord" can be felt. It is not known if XIAFLEX® is safe and effective in children under the age of 18. Do not receive XIAFLEX® if you have had an allergic reaction to collagenase clostridium histolyticum or any of the ingredients in XIAFLEX®, or to any other collagenase product. See the end of the Medication Guide for a complete list of ingredients in XIAFLEX®. XIAFLEX® can cause serious side effects, including: Tendon rupture or ligament damage. Receiving an injection of XIAFLEX® may cause damage to a tendon or ligament in your hand and cause it to break or weaken. This could require surgery to fix the damaged tendon or ligament. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have trouble bending your injected finger (towards the wrist) after the swelling goes down or you have problems using your treated hand after your follow-up visit Nerve injury or other serious injury of the hand. Call your healthcare provider right away if you get numbness, tingling, increased pain, or tears in the skin (laceration) in your treated finger or hand after your injection or after your follow-up visit Hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis. Severe allergic reactions can happen in people who receive XIAFLEX® because it contains foreign proteins. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these symptoms of an allergic reaction after an injection of XIAFLEX®: hives swollen face breathing trouble chest pain low blood pressure dizziness or fainting Increased chance of bleeding. Bleeding or bruising at the injection site can happen in people who receive XIAFLEX®. Talk to your healthcare provider if you have a problem with your blood clotting. XIAFLEX® may not b Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes In Children

Type 2 Diabetes In Children

Type 2 diabetes used to be seen as a condition affecting adults, or an adult onset disease. However, type 2 diabetes is increasingly found in children and teenagers, and experts believe this is linked to an increase in childhood obesity and a lack of exercise. Most children with diabetes have the type 1 kind that is not linked to obesity. There are now over 500 children and young people in England and Wales with type 2 diabetes. A survey of under-17s in the UK published by Public Health England found that 95% of those diagnosed with type 2 diabetes were overweight and 83% were obese. Children from minority ethnic groups also had a higher chance of developing type 2 diabetes than caucasian children. Data from the National Child Measurement Programme in English schools shows that 9.1% of 4 and 5 year olds and 19.1% of 10 and 11 year olds are obese. What is type 2 diabetes in children? In a child with type 2 diabetes cells in their body are resistant to the effects of the hormone insulin that helps the body process sugars, so glucose builds up in the bloodstream. These high levels can cause damage and complications over time, including heart disease, blindness and kidney failure. What are the risk factors for type 2 diabetes in children? A child's chances of developing type 2 diabetes may be increased if they: Are overweight or obese Have a family history of diabetes Have hormone-related conditions Are from some ethnic groups, including Asian and African Caribbean Consume an unhealthy diet Don’t do much exercise. Being overweight or obese is the major type 2 diabetes risk factor for children – doubling their chances of developing the condition. What are the symptoms of type 2 diabetes in children? The symptoms of type 2 diabetes in a child may develop over time, but se Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms, And Diagnosis

Type 2 Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms, And Diagnosis

Type 2 diabetes is more common than type 1 diabetes. It used to be called adult-onset diabetes or non-insulin dependent, and you may still hear it called that—but type 2 diabetes is more correct and current. The main issue in type 2 diabetes is that your body can't use insulin effectively. Insulin is a hormone made in your pancreas that's necessary for processing glucose, which our bodies use for energy. Insulin allows the glucose to travel from the blood into the cells that need that it. If your body can't use insulin well, then it'll be more difficult for glucose to pass into the cells. Not being able to use insulin well is called insulin resistance. Some people with type 2 diabetes are insulin resistant; other people with type 2 diabetes don't produce enough insulin to handle the glucose in their blood, so they also have insulin deficiency. Regardless of whether you're insulin resistant or simply don't have insulin, the end result is the same in type 2 diabetes: glucose builds up in the blood, leading to hyperglycemia and possible long-term damage from hyperglycemia and poor blood glucose control. Type 2 Diabetes Causes Type 2 diabetes generally develops gradually. Over time, your body becomes less capable of using insulin, or it starts producing less insulin. Type 2 diabetes is caused by a combination of factors, including genetics and lifestyle choices. Genetics: There is a genetic component to type 2 diabetes, but that doesn't mean that just because your mother or grandfather has type 2 diabetes, you will develop it. It's better to think of it this way: if type 2 diabetes runs in your family, you're at a greater risk of developing it. Lifestyle: Lifestyle choices play a sizable role in the development of type 2 diabetes. If type 2 diabetes runs in your family, y Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2

Diabetes mellitus type 2 (also known as type 2 diabetes) is a long-term metabolic disorder that is characterized by high blood sugar, insulin resistance, and relative lack of insulin.[6] Common symptoms include increased thirst, frequent urination, and unexplained weight loss.[3] Symptoms may also include increased hunger, feeling tired, and sores that do not heal.[3] Often symptoms come on slowly.[6] Long-term complications from high blood sugar include heart disease, strokes, diabetic retinopathy which can result in blindness, kidney failure, and poor blood flow in the limbs which may lead to amputations.[1] The sudden onset of hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state may occur; however, ketoacidosis is uncommon.[4][5] Type 2 diabetes primarily occurs as a result of obesity and lack of exercise.[1] Some people are more genetically at risk than others.[6] Type 2 diabetes makes up about 90% of cases of diabetes, with the other 10% due primarily to diabetes mellitus type 1 and gestational diabetes.[1] In diabetes mellitus type 1 there is a lower total level of insulin to control blood glucose, due to an autoimmune induced loss of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas.[12][13] Diagnosis of diabetes is by blood tests such as fasting plasma glucose, oral glucose tolerance test, or glycated hemoglobin (A1C).[3] Type 2 diabetes is partly preventable by staying a normal weight, exercising regularly, and eating properly.[1] Treatment involves exercise and dietary changes.[1] If blood sugar levels are not adequately lowered, the medication metformin is typically recommended.[7][14] Many people may eventually also require insulin injections.[9] In those on insulin, routinely checking blood sugar levels is advised; however, this may not be needed in those taking pills.[15] Bariatri Continue reading >>

A Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis On Black-ish

A Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis On Black-ish

I always say that diabetes is more easily managed with a sense of humor. In the fall finale of the TV show black-ish, Dre is diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Anthony Anderson, who plays Dre, also lives with diabetes. Right away the show lists some of the common symptoms of type 2 diabetes — excessive thirst, hunger, fatigue, frequent urination, and erectile dysfunction — and states that diabetes is manageable, you just have to make some adjustments like exercising, changing your diet, monitoring your blood sugar, and starting to take medication. I laughed when the doctor and Bow were talking about learning how to give injections during med school and he asked, “Did you practice on oranges?” Bwah! Didn’t we all practice on oranges at diagnosis?! As a long-time fan of the show and a caregiver to someone with diabetes, I personally loved this black-ish episode. Of course there were some stereotypes, but they did a really good job of highlighting the symptoms, trying to cure yourself, being afraid to use the lancing device, etc. And they threw in some fun diabetes lingo like “diabuddy” and “dia-beat-this.” Also, the opening sequence was fantastic in talking about the higher incidence of diabetes in African Americans, that some T2D is genetic, that some of it is obesity/diet related, and the barriers that African Americans may face to having a healthier lifestyle. While the conference table banter is usually offensive on so many levels, it did put out there the many diabetes myths including losing feet and that it takes years off your life. (Someone who doesn’t watch the show regularly might not understand that the horrible comments that are made during the conference table banter each episode are actually highlighting how out of touch the coworkers are… Continue reading >>

How Is Diabetes Diagnosed – Lab Tests For Type 2 Diabetes

How Is Diabetes Diagnosed – Lab Tests For Type 2 Diabetes

What Tests Confirm Diabetes? Let’s being by understanding the diabetes diagnosis criteria. The 2016 guidelines of the American Diabetes Association (ADA) specify that a person who fulfills any of these criteria is classified as a diabetic: Fasting blood glucose is more than 125 mg/dL (7.0 mmol/L). Fasting is defined as no food or drink (other than water) for at least 8 hours. OR 2-hour post-glucose-load blood sugar levels are 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or more during an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test. This test involves consuming a powder of 75 grams of anhydrous glucose dissolved in water. OR HbA1C (average blood glucose of 2-3 months) of 6.5% (48 mmol/mol) or more. OR In a patient with classic symptoms of hyperglycemia, a random blood glucose level of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or more. What Tests Confirm Prediabetes? The latest guidelines from ADA also lay down the basis on which doctors should decide if a person is at high risk of developing diabetes. This condition is called prediabetes. Fasting blood glucose between 100 mg/dL to 125 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L to 6.9 mmol/L) OR 2-hours after consuming a powder of 75 grams of anhydrous glucose dissolved in water, your blood sugar levels are between 140 mg/dL to 199 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L to 11.0 mmol/L). This test is called Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT). OR HbA1C (average blood glucose of 2-3 month is between 5.7-6.4 (39-46 mmol/mol) Are These The Only Diagnostic Tests to Know About? Doctors of “functional medicine” often like to be more aggressive and catch the problem earlier. Functional Medicine doctors are those who have completed a full medical degree – such as M.D or N.D – and then gone on to further study how the body “functions” as a whole system. They often use diet, nutrition and lifestyle to fix the root caus Continue reading >>

What Is Prediabetes? Stage Before Type 2 Diagnosis Is Warning Sign To Change Lifestyle

What Is Prediabetes? Stage Before Type 2 Diagnosis Is Warning Sign To Change Lifestyle

Pre diabetes - or borderline diabetes - is the stage before a type 2 diabetes diagnosis. If undiagnosed or left untreated, prediabetes can develop into type 2, according to Diabetes.co.uk. The condition is where blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not yet high enough to be categorised as diabetes. It is estimated that around seven million - or one in three - people in the UK have prediabetes. Art the moment five to ten per cent of people with prediabetes go on to develop type 2 diabetes each year. According to Diabetes.co.uk it is thought that prediabetes is on the rise. Currently each year five to ten per cent of people with the condition go on to develop type 2. It is believed sufferers are at a critical stage since at this point they could potentially make lifestyle changes that could prevent or slow down the onset of type 2 diabetes. While treatable, type 2 diabetes is currently not fully reversible. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. The condition can lead to complications such as increased risk of heart disease, kidney problems and even amputation. Prediabetes can often develop without any symptoms, making it easy to miss. Risk factors for the condition include being overweight or obese, having a high blood pressure and being over the age of 40 years. Additionally, if you have a family history or are of Afro-Caribbean, South Asian or Native American ancestry you may be more prone. In the same way as diabetes, prediabetes can be diagnosed with a fasting plasma glucose test or an HbA1c test. It is possible to avoid a type 2 diabetes diagnosis if you have prediabetes. Changing your diet Continue reading >>

5 Tips: Newly Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes

5 Tips: Newly Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes

You’ve worked hard for your life. Children have left home. Now it’s your time. Time to be footloose and fancy free. You’ve gained a bit of weight over the years. Things ache more than they used to. Energy, what’s that? Whenever you go to the doctor you’re given warnings about what could go wrong, but you’ve got time, it isn’t urgent. Or, is it? Finally the shoe drops. You visit the doctor and it’s no longer a warning–you are actually sick. You are sent off with a diet sheet and a prescription. Shell-shocked would be the best way to describe how you are feeling at the moment. This wasn’t how it was supposed to be. You knew you were getting older but you still thought you were invincible. This kind of thing happens to other people not to you. You don’t even want to talk to your friends about it. They might think you brought it on yourself. This isn’t what you had planned for your future. This is something that 100,000’s of people around the world experience everyday. This disease claims a life every 7 seconds. It doesn’t have to be this way. Have you just been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes? Here are 5 things to do right now: 1. Don’t be Fooled As shocking as it is to be told you’re diabetic–it can often feel like nothing has changed. Most people still feel well and have no outward signs that they are diabetic. The fact that Type 2 diabetes is common can also mean it’s not taken as seriously as it should be. The doctors and nurses can sometimes be blasé about the diagnosis. They give out a prescription and a diet sheet and tell people to come back in 12 months. All of this can mean it’s seen as a mild condition and that the medication means people can carry on as normal. Don’t be fooled. Diabetes is a serious disease and means that Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Diagnosis To diagnose type 2 diabetes, you'll be given a: Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells. The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates you have diabetes. A result between 5.7 and 6.4 percent is considered prediabetes, which indicates a high risk of developing diabetes. Normal levels are below 5.7 percent. If the A1C test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions — such as if you're pregnant or have an uncommon form of hemoglobin (known as a hemoglobin variant) — that can make the A1C test inaccurate, your doctor may use the following tests to diagnose diabetes: Random blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken at a random time. Blood sugar values are expressed in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Regardless of when you last ate, a random blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or higher suggests diabetes, especially when coupled with any of the signs and symptoms of diabetes, such as frequent urination and extreme thirst. Fasting blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken after an overnight fast. A fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. If it's 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or higher on two separate tests, you have diabetes. Oral glucose tolerance test. For this test, you fast overnight, and the fasting blood sugar level is measured. Then you drink a sugary liquid, and blood s Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a lifelong condition in which the body is unable to properly regulate the amount of glucose in the blood. It develops when the body doesn't respond to the natural hormone insulin. It often occurs as a result of being overweight but there can also be other factors, including genetics. However, lifestyle changes and medicines can help you manage type 2 diabetes. Quick links Type 2 diabetes is also known as non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Glucose and insulin Glucose is a simple form of sugar found in foods and sugary drinks - it's absorbed as a natural part of digestion. One function of your blood is to carry glucose around your body. When glucose reaches body tissues, such as muscle cells, it's absorbed and converted into energy. Insulin helps with the absorption process so it's critical for regulating the glucose concentration. If you have a shortage of insulin, glucose can build up in your blood. Insulin is secreted into the blood by your pancreas - a gland that also produces digestive juices and is found behind your stomach. If your cells don't respond properly to insulin, this can cause glucose to build up in your blood. This is called insulin resistance. You can develop this if you're overweight or type 2 diabetes runs in your family. Having insulin resistance means your pancreas needs to produce more and more insulin to control blood glucose levels. Eventually your body can't produce enough insulin so your levels rise and diabetes develops. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Almost 900,000 Australians have diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is more common, affecting about 90 percent of Australians with diabetes. Many people with type 2 diabetes have no symptoms, and it's often discovered accidentally after routine medical che Continue reading >>

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

It's important for diabetes to be diagnosed early so treatment can be started as soon as possible. If you experience the symptoms of diabetes, visit your GP as soon as possible. They'll ask about your symptoms and may request blood and urine tests. Your urine sample will be tested for glucose. Urine doesn't normally contain glucose, but glucose can overflow through the kidneys and into your urine if you have diabetes. If your urine contains glucose, a specialised blood test known as glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) can be used to determine whether you have diabetes. Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) In people who have been diagnosed with diabetes, the glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) test is often used to show how well their diabetes is being controlled. The HbA1c test gives your average blood glucose levels over the previous two to three months. The results can indicate whether the measures you're taking to control your diabetes are working. If you've been diagnosed with diabetes, it's recommended you have your HbA1c measured at least twice a year. However, you may need to have your HbA1c measured more frequently if: you've recently been diagnosed with diabetes your blood glucose remains too high your treatment plan has been changed Unlike other tests, such as the glucose tolerance test (GTT), the HbA1c test can be carried out at any time of day and doesn't require any special preparation, such as fasting. However, the test can't be used in certain situations, such as during pregnancy. The advantages associated with the HbA1c test make it the preferred method of assessing how well blood glucose levels are being controlled in a person with diabetes. HbA1c can also be used as a diagnostic test for diabetes and as a screening test for people at high risk of diabetes. HbA1c as a diagno Continue reading >>

Tom Hanks On What Led To Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis: 'i Was A Total Idiot'

Tom Hanks On What Led To Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis: 'i Was A Total Idiot'

He's funny, charming and talented, but Tom Hanks is also "a total idiot" — according to the star himself. That's because, despite being clever in many ways, he ignored medical advice and chose to live a lifestyle that he now believes led to his type 2 diabetes diagnosis. We apologize, this video has expired. Radio Times. “I was heavy. You've seen me in movies, you know what I looked like," he continued. "I was a total idiot." Back in 2013, Hanks first revealed his ailment, telling then-"Late Show" host David Letterman, "I went to the doctor, and he said, 'You know those high blood sugar numbers you've been dealing with since you were 36? Well, you've graduated! You've got type 2 diabetes, young man,'" It seems the 59-year-old's previous attempts to bring those elevated blood sugar numbers down by dieting just weren't working. "I thought I could avoid it by removing the buns from my cheeseburgers," he told RadioTimes. "Well, it takes a little bit more than that." But it's not too late to turn things around. "My doctor says if I can hit a target weight, I will not have type 2 diabetes anymore," he adeed. But in 2013, he explained to Letterman that his teen-like target weight was one he might not be able to hit. "Well, I'm going to have type 2 diabetes then, because there is no way I can weigh [what I weighed] in high school," he said with a laugh. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms And Diagnosis

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms And Diagnosis

Because type 2 diabetes develops slowly, and symptoms generally come on gradually, they may go unnoticed for a long time, or they may be attributed to something else. For example, increased thirst may be chalked up to a hot summer, or fatigue may be interpreted as a sign of aging or stress. This is unfortunate, because even short-term high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) diminishes your quality of life. And if high blood sugar persists for a long time, it can eventually cause complications such as diabetic retinopathy or kidney disease (diabetic nephropathy) that cannot be completely reversed with improved blood sugar control. Type 2 diabetes can cause a wide range of signs and symptoms, including: Fatigue Dry mouth Thirst Excessive urination Hunger Weight loss Blurry vision Cloudy thinking Irritability Wounds that won't heal Infections associated with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes include gum infections, urinary tract infections (particularly in women), slowly healing wounds with subsequent infections, and infections of the feet. Symptoms in Men Type 2 diabetes symptoms are generally the same for men and women. However, urological problems such as erectile dysfunction (ED) — the inability to achieve or maintain an erection — have been associated with all forms of diabetes, including type 2. According to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse, 20 to 75 percent of men with any type of diabetes have ED. Researchers believe diabetes causes sexual function problems in men due to damage to the body's autonomic nervous system, which controls circulation. If you have the symptoms of ED, it may be a sign you have diabetes. Another urological problem associated with diabetes in men is retrograde ejaculation, or the release of semen into the bladder during ejaculation. Sym Continue reading >>

Diabetes Tests & Diagnosis

Diabetes Tests & Diagnosis

Your health care professional can diagnose diabetes, prediabetes, and gestational diabetes through blood tests. The blood tests show if your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Do not try to diagnose yourself if you think you might have diabetes. Testing equipment that you can buy over the counter, such as a blood glucose meter, cannot diagnose diabetes. Who should be tested for diabetes? Anyone who has symptoms of diabetes should be tested for the disease. Some people will not have any symptoms but may have risk factors for diabetes and need to be tested. Testing allows health care professionals to find diabetes sooner and work with their patients to manage diabetes and prevent complications. Testing also allows health care professionals to find prediabetes. Making lifestyle changes to lose a modest amount of weight if you are overweight may help you delay or prevent type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes Most often, testing for occurs in people with diabetes symptoms. Doctors usually diagnose type 1 diabetes in children and young adults. Because type 1 diabetes can run in families, a study called TrialNet offers free testing to family members of people with the disease, even if they don’t have symptoms. Type 2 diabetes Experts recommend routine testing for type 2 diabetes if you are age 45 or older are between the ages of 19 and 44, are overweight or obese, and have one or more other diabetes risk factors are a woman who had gestational diabetes1 Medicare covers the cost of diabetes tests for people with certain risk factors for diabetes. If you have Medicare, find out if you qualify for coverage . If you have different insurance, ask your insurance company if it covers diabetes tests. Though type 2 diabetes most often develops in adults, children also ca Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes - Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes - Symptoms

A A A Type 2 Diabetes (cont.) Endocrinologists are the medical specialists that manage problems with hormones and glands. In many cases endocrinologists manage patients with diabetes. In other cases, primary care providers (including internists and family practice specialists), treat type 2 diabetes. A fasting blood glucose measurement (fasting blood sugar test) is the preferred way to diagnose diabetes. A sample of blood is analyzed after a period of at least 8 hours of fasting. Typically these measurements are taken in the morning prior to breakfast. Normal values for fasting glucose are less than 100 mg/dl. Having fasting blood glucose levels of 126 mg/dl or greater on two or more tests on different days confirms the presence of diabetes. A random (non-fasting) blood glucose test can also be used to diagnose diabetes. A non-fasting blood glucose level of 200 mg/dl or higher indicates diabetes. Other tests may also be performed such as: The oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) involves a series of blood glucose measurements taken at intervals after consumption of a sugary solution. This test is no longer commonly used to diagnose type 2 diabetes, but it is often used to establish a diagnosis of gestational diabetes. The hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, glycated hemoglobin) test is a blood test that measures hemoglobin that is bound to blood sugar. This test is indicative of the level of blood glucose over the past 3 months and is often measured in people with diabetes to determine the extent of disease control. An HbA1c level of 6.5% or higher is indicative of diabetes. Continue Reading A A A Type 2 Diabetes (cont.) The goal (and essential parts) of a treatment plan for type 2 diabetes is to maintain blood glucose levels under control to prevent complications of the disease, main Continue reading >>

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