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How Is Type 1 Diabetes Spread?

How Does Diabetes Spread?

How Does Diabetes Spread?

Toll of diabetes affected has been increasing at an exponential rate. Diabetes is spread by deregulated processes within the body, and is not contagious in any case. Individuals in Type 1 diabetic condition are unable to produce any insulin in their bodies, whereas Type 2 diabetes patients have resistance for its utilization within the body. Untreated insulin resistance leads to diabetes. The likelihood of getting diabetes becomes more when some of the organs respond slowly or stop responding due to damaged blood vessels. This leads to hardening of the arteries, which increases chances of a heart attack and stroke besides restricting streamlined circulation of blood within brain as well as heart. Effect of high blood sugar Sugar in the blood is moderated by insulin. In the process of digestion, insulin moves glucose into the cells where it gets broken down for energy. In the diabetic condition, body becomes unresponsive to insulin, with inability to utilise glucose. Blood sugar becomes too high and restricts conversion of food into energy. Thereafter, increased sugar in blood starves cells for energy. Ballooning of blood vessels due to inadequate blood circulation can cause severe complications to eyes and kidneys, and damage could be permanent. Moreover, weak arteries due to high blood sugar can also impact nerves. All in all, high blood sugar levels due to uncontrolled diabetes influence every mechanism of body. Sugar in blood damages blood vessels throughout the body by getting attached to proteins. Due to this, structure of the blood vessels gets weakened as they become thick and hard. Risk factors With increased number of diabetes cases over the years, risk factors to develop diabetes have also increased. Among most identified factors causing diabetes are obesity, Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Butter: Is Butter Good For Diabetes?

Diabetes And Butter: Is Butter Good For Diabetes?

Despite the fact that health professionals for years have recommended reducing its intake, butter intake is still quite high, at 23 sticks per American per year. Its creamy delicious goodness just has not gone away. But is butter making a comeback in the nutrition science world? Is it really not as bad as we once thought? Although it was vilified in the 1980’s and 1990’s, has it been pardoned from its unhealthy label? History Butter has always been a staple in the American diet. In the 1920’s, Americans consumed approximately 72 sticks (18 pounds) of butter per year. The Great Depression hit and then World War II, with these events causing a steep decline in butter consumption with a concurrent rise in margarine use. Butter continued to decrease in the American diet throughout the 1950’s – 1980’s. At that point, the role of butter stayed fairly steady at around 20 sticks (5 pounds) per year. Rising intake just recently started in the 2010’s decade. Nutritional Content Butter is 100% fat, meaning all of the calories that butter provides are in the form of fat. One tablespoon of butter contains 102 calories, all from the 11 grams of total fat. Looking at the fat content more closely, that tablespoon of butter contains 7 grams of saturated fat and 3 grams of monounsaturated fat, as well as approximately 31 mg of cholesterol. Is Butter Recommended for Diabetics? For years, saturated fats in butter and other foods were discouraged because of the strong association with cardiovascular diseases. Eating a diet high in saturated fat raises blood lipids, increasing the likelihood that arteries will be occluded by the lipids and eventually lead to serious complications such as heart attack and stroke. This is a known scientifically proven fact. The American Heart Ass Continue reading >>

Sepsis And Diabetes

Sepsis And Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic (life-long) autoimmune disease that has a significant impact on your life. Having diabetes means you must work to control your blood glucose (sugar) levels to be sure that they don’t get too high or too low. The amount of glucose in your blood is important. Your body needs glucose for energy, but too much of it can destroy body tissues and too little can starve your body of nutrients. People who have diabetes are also at risk of developing wounds and sores that don’t heal well. While the wounds are present, they are at high risk of developing infection. And, again because of the diabetes, the infections can get severe quickly. When infection overwhelms the body, the body can respond by developing sepsis and going into septic shock. Sometimes incorrectly called blood poisoning, sepsis is the body’s often deadly response to infection. Sepsis kills and disables millions and requires early suspicion and rapid treatment for survival. Sepsis and septic shock can result from an infection anywhere in the body, such as pneumonia, influenza, or urinary tract infections. Worldwide, one-third of people who develop sepsis die. Many who do survive are left with life-changing effects, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), chronic pain and fatigue, organ dysfunction (organs don’t work properly) and/or amputations. What is diabetes? Your pancreas is a small organ (about 6” by 1.5”) that is part of your digestive system. It is connected to your small intestine and it lies just below your stomach towards the back. Your pancreas has a few roles, one is to help digest the food you eat and another is to secrete (send out) insulin, which stimulates your cells to use the glucose in the food and drink you consume. When a person has diabetes, the pancre Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Utis

Type 1 Diabetes And Utis

WRITTEN BY: Georgina Cunningham It’s my second trip to the hospital in a month. I’ve already missed five days of work. I’ve been poked and prodded, I have no good veins left. I’m already covered in bruises from last time and I just don’t want to be here again. I’m putting on a brave face, but everything inside me is telling me to scream at the top of my lungs. I’m doubled over with back pain, a migraine, a horrible fever, tachycardia, and to top it off I have constant low blood sugar. “You again,” says the emergency department doctor. We both know the drill — fluids, intravenous antibiotics and a nice four-night stay in the Acute Ward. I would consider myself a healthy person. I eat a balanced diet, I walk everywhere and my blood sugar levels are even “better than a person not living with Type 1 diabetes” (according to my endocrinologist). I’m hygienic and I had never had a UTI up until this moment. So, to be honest, I couldn’t tell you how I got here. While a UTI might typically be something that is easily treated, it can become dangerous for someone with Type 1 diabetes. It can spread easily through your blood and your kidneys can become damaged. Our bodies can’t fight infections as well as they should, so it’s important to know the signs and make sure you advocate for your own body. Everyone’s bodies are different, even amongst the Type 1 community. When I had the initial infection my sugars were generally stable, so long as I ate. But as soon as the infection spread and I incorporated antibiotics, a small appetite and my normal insulin dosage, my sugars went spiraling down. I’d wake up sitting at 2.3, sometimes even 1.8, in the middle of the night. I’d be tired and grumpy and the last thing I want to do is down some Carbotest (a Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age. It is most often diagnosed in children, adolescents, or young adults. Insulin is a hormone produced in the pancreas by special cells, called beta cells. The pancreas is below and behind the stomach. Insulin is needed to move blood sugar (glucose) into cells. Inside the cells, glucose is stored and later used for energy. With type 1 diabetes, beta cells produce little or no insulin. Without enough insulin, glucose builds up in the bloodstream instead of going into the cells. This buildup of glucose in the blood is called hyperglycemia. The body is unable to use the glucose for energy. This leads to the symptoms of type 1 diabetes. The exact cause of type 1 diabetes is unknown. Most likely, it is an autoimmune disorder. This is a condition that occurs when the immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys healthy body tissue. With type 1 diabetes, an infection or another trigger causes the body to mistakenly attack the cells in the pancreas that make insulin. The tendency to develop autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes, can be passed down through families. Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Type 1

Diabetes - Type 1

Description An in-depth report on the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of type 1 diabetes. Alternative Names Type 1 diabetes; Insulin-dependent diabetes; Juvenile diabetes Highlights Type 1 Diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not produce insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is involved in regulating how the body converts sugar (glucose) into energy. People with type 1 diabetes need to take daily insulin shots and carefully monitor their blood glucose levels. Type 1 diabetes is much less common than type 2 diabetes. It accounts for 5 - 10% of all diabetes cases. Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age, but it usually first develops in childhood or adolescence. Symptoms of Diabetes Symptoms of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes include: Frequent urination Excessive thirst Extreme hunger Sudden weight loss Extreme fatigue Irritability Blurred vision In general, the symptoms of type 1 diabetes come on more abruptly and are more severe than those of type 2 diabetes. Warning Signs of Hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) occurs when blood sugar (glucose) levels fall below normal. All patients with diabetes should be aware of these symptoms of hypoglycemia: Sweating Trembling Hunger Rapid heartbeat Confusion It is important to quickly treat hypoglycemia and raise blood sugar levels by eating sugar, sucking on hard candy, or drinking fruit juice. Patients who are at risk for hypoglycemia should carry some sugar product, or an emergency glucagon injection kit, in case an attack occurs. In rare and worst cases, hypoglycemia can lead to coma and death. Regular blood sugar monitoring throughout the day can help you avoid hypoglycemia. Patients are also encouraged to wear a medical alert ID bracelet or necklace that states they have diabetes and that they take insulin. Pati Continue reading >>

Diabetes Continues To Spread Around The World

Diabetes Continues To Spread Around The World

On World Diabetes Day, news about the disease's global impact is dire. An estimated 382 million people worldwide have diabetes, according to a new report from the International Diabetes Federation. The IDF expects that number to rise to 592 million by 2035, when one in every 10 people will have the disease. "Diabetes in all its forms imposes unacceptably high human, social and economic costs on countries at all income levels," the report authors begin in the executive summary. They go on to say that this latest edition of the Diabetes Atlas "carries a bitter but unavoidable message: despite the array of tools at our disposal to tackle the disease... the battle to protect people from diabetes and its disabling, life-threatening complications is being lost." Epidemiologist Leonor Guariguata, project coordinator for IDF's Diabetes Atlas, wasn't surprised by the report's findings. In fact, she says the estimates are conservative, and that diabetes may be a much bigger problem than we think. "The thing that strikes me is that we keep saying the same thing again," she said. "Every time we produce new estimates, they are above and beyond what we had projected from past estimates." There are three types of diabetes: Type 1, Type 2 and gestational diabetes. People who have Type 1 diabetes do not produce insulin, a hormone the body needs to convert sugar and starches into energy. Type 1 diabetes used to be called juvenile onset diabetes because it is usually diagnosed in adolescence. Around 5% of the diabetic population in the United States has Type 1 diabetes. People with Type 2 diabetes have developed a resistance to the insulin their body produces. Most people who develop Type 2 diabetes are adults, although experts worry about the increasing number of young people being diagn Continue reading >>

A Visual Guide To Type 1 Diabetes

A Visual Guide To Type 1 Diabetes

What Is It? When you have type 1 diabetes, your pancreas can’t make insulin. This vital hormone helps your body's cells convert sugar into energy. Without it, sugar builds up in your blood and can reach dangerous levels. To avoid life-threatening complications, people with type 1 diabetes must take insulin for their entire lives. The symptoms of type 1 diabetes tend to come on suddenly and may include: Feeling more thirsty than usual Dry mouth Fruity breath Peeing a lot As blood sugar levels remain high, type 1 diabetes often leads to: Weight loss Bigger appetite Lack of energy, drowsiness Many people with type 1 diabetes get uncomfortable skin conditions, including: Bacterial infections Fungal infections Itching, dry skin, poor circulation Girls with type 1 diabetes are more likely to have genital yeast infections. Babies can get candidiasis, a severe form of diaper rash caused by yeast. It can easily spread from the diaper area to the thighs and stomach. When blood sugar isn't controlled, type 1 diabetes can cause more serious symptoms, like: Numbness or tingling in the feet Blurred vision Low blood sugar (called hypoglycemia) Passing out If your blood sugar gets too high or too low, you could go into a diabetic coma. You may not have any warning signs before this happens. You will need to get emergency treatment. Without treatment, type 1 diabetes deprives your cells of the sugar they need for energy. Your body starts burning fat instead, which causes ketones to build up in the blood. These are acids that can poison your body. This plus other changes in your blood can trigger a life-threatening condition called diabetic ketoacidosis. This is an emergency that must be treated quickly. You may need to go to the ER. In type 1 diabetes, your immune system destroys cell Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is a disorder characterized by abnormally high blood sugar levels. In this form of diabetes, specialized cells in the pancreas called beta cells stop producing insulin. Insulin controls how much glucose (a type of sugar) is passed from the blood into cells for conversion to energy. Lack of insulin results in the inability to use glucose for energy or to control the amount of sugar in the blood. Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age; however, it usually develops by early adulthood, most often starting in adolescence. The first signs and symptoms of the disorder are caused by high blood sugar and may include frequent urination (polyuria), excessive thirst (polydipsia), fatigue, blurred vision, tingling or loss of feeling in the hands and feet, and weight loss. These symptoms may recur during the course of the disorder if blood sugar is not well controlled by insulin replacement therapy. Improper control can also cause blood sugar levels to become too low (hypoglycemia). This may occur when the body's needs change, such as during exercise or if eating is delayed. Hypoglycemia can cause headache, dizziness, hunger, shaking, sweating, weakness, and agitation. Uncontrolled type 1 diabetes can lead to a life-threatening complication called diabetic ketoacidosis. Without insulin, cells cannot take in glucose. A lack of glucose in cells prompts the liver to try to compensate by releasing more glucose into the blood, and blood sugar can become extremely high. The cells, unable to use the glucose in the blood for energy, respond by using fats instead. Breaking down fats to obtain energy produces waste products called ketones, which can build up to toxic levels in people with type 1 diabetes, resulting in diabetic ketoacidosis. Affected individuals may begin breathin Continue reading >>

Sex And Type 1 Diabetes

Sex And Type 1 Diabetes

When a person is diagnosed with diabetes, their doctor will typically walk them through the steps of how to deal with this medical issue in the following years; however, sex is rarely addressed, often leaving the patient feeling left in the dark. The journal Diabetes Care found that only half of all men and 19 percent of women with diabetes had broached the topic of sex with their doctors.1 It is crucial that individuals with Type I Diabetes become aware of the sexual problems associated with this health condition because certain symptoms can be assumed an effect of Type 1 diabetes, but be caused from an unrelated medical condition. For people that already have diabetes, sexual problems can indicate nerve damage, blocked arteries, and irregular hormone patterns.2 People who keep their diabetes under control can lower their risk of developing these sexual and urologic problems in the future. Talk to Your Partner Establishing a strong system of communication with your partner is a crucial component of every relationship. Along with discussing sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and contraception usage, Type 1 diabetics should express how diabetes affects their sex life. Many Type 1 diabetics may feel self conscious about their condition and try to hide it from their partners. If you do this, however, you may not feel comfortable asking your partner for a break from sex in the case of a low blood sugar and put yourself in a dangerous situation. Sex is an intense physical activity and as any Type 1 diabetic knows, this can cause a fast drop in blood glucose level. Make sure your partner knows how to care for you in case you experience a severe low blood sugar level and are unable to care for yourself. It is your responsibility as a diabetic to protect yourself and give t Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms, (type 1 And Type 2)

Diabetes Symptoms, (type 1 And Type 2)

Diabetes type 1 and type 2 definition and facts Diabetes is a chronic condition associated with abnormally high levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Insulin produced by the pancreas lowers blood glucose. Absence or insufficient production of insulin, or an inability of the body to properly use insulin causes diabetes. The two types of diabetes are referred to as type 1 and type 2. Former names for these conditions were insulin-dependent and non-insulin-dependent diabetes, or juvenile onset and adult onset diabetes. Symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes include increased urine output, excessive thirst, weight loss, hunger, fatigue, skin problems slow healing wounds, yeast infections, and tingling or numbness in the feet or toes. Some of the risk factors for getting diabetes include being overweight or obese, leading a sedentary lifestyle, a family history of diabetes, hypertension (high blood pressure), and low levels of the "good" cholesterol (HDL) and elevated levels of triglycerides in the blood. If you think you may have prediabetes or diabetes contact a health-care professional. Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by high blood sugar (glucose) levels that result from defects in insulin secretion, or its action, or both. Diabetes mellitus, commonly referred to as diabetes (as it will be in this article) was first identified as a disease associated with "sweet urine," and excessive muscle loss in the ancient world. Elevated levels of blood glucose (hyperglycemia) lead to spillage of glucose into the urine, hence the term sweet urine. Normally, blood glucose levels are tightly controlled by insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin lowers the blood glucose level. When the blood glucose elevates (for example, after eating food Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Transferable?

Is Diabetes Transferable?

First of all, diabetes is definitely not contagious. There a two types of diabetes. Both of them aren't curable, but with the right treatment, people can live just about as long as any other healthy person. Type 1: ... is an autoimmune disorder. The immune system destroys the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreasas as an overreaction, so that for people suffering from type 1 diabetes, insulin is essential for survival. Most likely, type 1 diabetes is diagnosed in the childhood. Though it's rare, it's also possible to develope it about the age of thirty. The patients need to inject insulin several times of the day, every time they eat or their blood sugar appears to be too high. Plus, they need to consider very different things, challenging their lifestyle. Type 2: ... begins with an insulin resistance one can manage at first by dietary changes and by increasing exercise. If that isn't successful anymore, one gets oral anti diabetics, and if that on the other hand isn't successful enough anymore, one starts slowly with injecting insulin, still taking the oral anti diabetics. The treatment consistently gets adjusted on the state of health of the particular patient by their doctors. Though you have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, if your ancestors suffered from it, the chance of getting ill are only highly increased, if you get overweight and if you underexercise. If you know that, you can avoid further increasing the risk. If there is only one side if ancestors in which someone had a type 2 diabetes, your chances to get it are at approximately 10%, if that is the case on both sides, there is a 30% - if you're overweight. One could also add a type 3 and a type 4 to that list, if one considers gestational diabetes, a condition in which the insulin re Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Infectious? Condition May Spread Through Toxic Meat And Blood Transfusions Like Mad Cow Disease

Is Diabetes Infectious? Condition May Spread Through Toxic Meat And Blood Transfusions Like Mad Cow Disease

Diabetes may be contagious and spread through meat or blood transfusions, new research suggests. Ingesting protein 'seeds' may be responsible for the condition's onset, similar to the spread of mad cow disease from cattle to humans via infected beef, the study author claims. When these 'seeds' were given to mice, all of the animals developed type 2 diabetes symptoms within months, the study found. Similar outcomes occurred when the 'seeds' were added to healthy human pancreatic tissue in the lab, the research adds. Yet, while other experts state the findings are intriguing, they add that more research is needed before diabetes can be considered an infectious disease. 'If one disease has the potential to be transmitted in this manner, it is diabetes.' Researchers from the University of Texas injected two-month-old mice in the abdomen with these 'seeds', known as islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP). IAPP are misshapen proteins that have been shown to accumulate in both human and animals with type 2 diabetes; sometimes before symptoms develop. The mice were genetically modified to produce the human form of IAPP. Results reveal that all of the mice developed symptoms of type 2 diabetes within three months. Similar outcomes occurred when IAPP was added to healthy human pancreatic tissue in the lab. Study author Dr Claudio Soto said: 'I don't want to scare anyone, but I can see this happening in diabetes more easily than it happens in brain diseases, because in brain diseases the spread is limited by the blood-brain barrier. 'If one disease has the potential to be transmitted in this manner, it is diabetes,' The Times reported. 'Treat with a great deal of caution' It is unclear if the same outcomes would occur in humans, however, the researchers believe their findings could have Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is the type of diabetes that typically develops in children and in young adults. In type 1 diabetes the body stops making insulin and the blood sugar (glucose) level goes very high. Treatment to control the blood glucose level is with insulin injections and a healthy diet. Other treatments aim to reduce the risk of complications. They include reducing blood pressure if it is high and advice to lead a healthy lifestyle. What is type 1 diabetes? What is type 1 diabetes? Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. Diabetes mellitus (just called diabetes from now on) occurs when the level of sugar (glucose) in the blood becomes higher than normal. There are two main types of diabetes. These are called type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes usually first develops in children or young adults. In the UK about 1 in 300 people develop type 1 diabetes at some stage. With type 1 diabet Continue reading >>

Could Diabetes Spread Like Mad Cow Disease?

Could Diabetes Spread Like Mad Cow Disease?

Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading! sciencehabit quotes Science magazine:Prions are insidious proteins that spread like infectious agents and trigger fatal conditions such as mad cow disease. A protein implicated in diabetes, a new study suggests, shares some similarities with these villains. Researchers transmitted diabetes from one mouse to another just by injecting the animals with this protein. The results don't indicate that diabetes is contagious like a cold, but blood transfusions, or even food, may spread the disease. The work is "very exciting" and "well-documented" for showing that the protein has some prionlike behavior, says prion biologist Witold Surewicz of Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, who wasn't connected to the research. However, he cautions against jumping to the conclusion that diabetes spreads from person to person. The study raises that possibility, he says, but "it remains to be determined." Continue reading >>

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