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How Is Diabetes Transmitted

How Is Diabetes Spread Among Humans?

How Is Diabetes Spread Among Humans?

Question Originally asked by Community Member victoria black How Is Diabetes Spread Among Humans? Answer There are two types of diabetes; the most common type - Type II is a metabolic disorder believed mostly to be due to a persons genes, obesity, poor diet, smoking and low exercise. People who are not overweight, and who exercise, do not smoke and drink moderately have about an 80% lower chance of getting Type II Diabetes. Check out Health Central’s Diabetes section for more. You should know Answers to your question are meant to provide general health information but should not replace medical advice you receive from a doctor. No answers should be viewed as a diagnosis or recommended treatment for a condition. Answered By: Cort Continue reading >>

How Is Diabetes Transmitted?

How Is Diabetes Transmitted?

Diabetes mellitus is a condition of the endocrine system that limits the body's ability to manage the level of glucose in the blood. Diabetics may suffer from an excess of (hyperglycemia) or too little (hypoglycemia) blood sugar. The imbalances caused by the condition can lead to heart, vision and kidney, neurological or circulatory problems. Two forms of diabetes appear at different times in life. Type 1, or juvenile diabetes, appears in very early childhood and is a chronic condition requiring drug therapy. It results from a failure of the autoimmune system that limits the ability of the pancreas to produce insulin. It cannot be "caught" like a virus or bacteria. However, recent studies have confirmed that certain DNA triggers tend to be present in persons with diabetes. When mothers with diabetes have obese children, the children often appear to inherit the same DNA characteristic and develop diabetes. Children who have two parents with diabetes also appear to inherit the characteristic. This tendency to inherit has only been established with Type 1 diabetes. Since a Type 1 diabetic's pancreas will never produce insulin properly, it is important to diagnose and begin a treatment plan as early in life as possible. Type 2 diabetes develops after age 40 in persons who have certain risk factors, including obesity, a carbohydrate-rich diet and sedentary lifestyle. Adult-onset diabetes limits the ability of insulin to control blood glucose levels, rather than attacking the pancreas directly. No genetic triggers have been identified. Gestational diabetes, a temporary condition that resembles---and may develop into---Type 2 diabetes, primarily affects pregnant women who are obese or who may gain a great deal of weight with pregnancy. Both conditions can usually be managed us Continue reading >>

On The Mode Of Transmission Of Hereditary Diabetes

On The Mode Of Transmission Of Hereditary Diabetes

Summary Using the case records of 14000 diabetics followed up in the Antidiabetic Centre of Bucharest for 1–26 years, the authors have studied the problem of the mode of transmission of hereditary diabetes. The analysis, which takes into consideration four different aspects representing four stages of investigation, indicates a dominant transmission for diabetes. — 1.Consanguinity. In a group of 49 consanguine marriages, diabetes was found in 14 of 100 direct descendants. The probability of diabetes would have attained 24.6% if all had lived up to 80 years. This fact, to which we must add the late onset of diabetes in the offspring and the absence of a massive appearance of diabetes in siblings, raises doubts regarding the hypothesis of the recessive transmission of hereditary diabetes.- 2.Diabetic Couples. In 385 families in which both parents were diabetic there were 1,173 descendants; 326 of these suffered from diabetes (27.7%). The probability of diabetes calculated for a lifespan of 90 years for all the progeny would have been in the authors' material of 37.7%. This figure shows that the parents, who were diabetics of the hereditary type, could only have had heterozygotic genetic structures, pleading for the dominant transmission of hereditary diabetes mellitus. — 3.Diabetes in Multiple Successive Generations. In 113 of the 3,430 pedigrees studied, the disease could be noticed in 3 successive generations, which after the necessary corrections gives a proportion of 8.15%; in 4 pedigrees diabetes was found in 4 successive generations (1.19%). — 4.Anteposition presents a net statistical significance and upholds in the authors' opinion the dominant transmission of diabetes. — These findings (3 and 4) imply the dominant transmission of hereditary diabetes. Continue reading >>

About Type 1 Diabetes

About Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is less common than type 2 diabetes. In the past, type 1 diabetes was called juvenile diabetes, juvenile-onset diabetes, or insulin-dependent diabetes. Today we realize those terms aren't accurate. People can develop type 1 as adults, children can develop type 2, and people with type 2 might need to take insulin shots. Causes Type 1 diabetes is known as an autoimmune disease. It happens because a person's immune system destroys the body's beta cells, which make insulin and release it into the blood stream. These cells are located in an organ called the pancreas. When the immune system destroys the beta cells, the body stops being able to make insulin. Signs of type 1 diabetes start to show up when half or more of the beta cells have been destroyed. People who have type 1 diabetes will begin to take insulin shots right away, to replace the insulin their bodies no longer make. Type 1 diabetes is inherited, which means a group of genes that can lead to type 1 diabetes is passed down from mothers and fathers to their children. A person with a parent, brother, or sister with type 1 diabetes has a greater chance of also developing type 1 diabetes. Genes play an important role in determining who gets type 1 diabetes and who doesn't. But they might not be the only influence. Environmental factors, including viruses and allergies, appear to trigger type 1 diabetes in some people who have inherited the genes. These factors can trigger type 1 diabetes at any point in a person's life. That's why some people don't develop type 1 diabetes until they're adults, while others develop it when they're children. Symptoms The symptoms for type 1 diabetes usually show up over a few days or even a few weeks and are caused by high levels of sugar in the blood. Symptoms include: Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes mellitus is a condition that results when the pancreas produces little or no insulin, or when the cells of the body cannot use the insulin produced effectively. When insulin is absent or ineffective, the cells of the body cannot absorb glucose (sugar) from blood to provide the body with energy. KEYWORDS for searching the Internet and other reference sources Carbohydrate metabolism Insulin resistance Polyuria Melinda's Story Melinda had just turned twelve and felt hungry all the time. Her stomach growled in class and her after-school snack no longer held her until dinner. No matter how many trips she made to the school water fountain, she was always thirsty. Even worse, she could not believe how often she needed to go to the bathroom. One of her teachers, after signing Melinda's seventh bathroom pass for the day, suggested that Melinda ask her parents to take her to the doctor. She thought that Melinda might have diabetes, and she was right. What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is a group of related diseases characterized by elevated levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. It is caused by the failure of the pancreas to produce sufficient insulin, or any insulin at all. It can also be caused by the failure of the body's cells to make proper use of the insulin that is produced. * hormones are chemicals that are produced by different glands in the body. Hormones are like the body's ambassadors: they are created in one place but are sent through the body to have specific regulatory effects in different places. The pancreas, the site of insulin production, is a large gland near the stomach. It contains groups of cells that function like tiny factories, producing different hormones * at exactly the right time and in the right amount. These groups (or "islands") of cells are cal Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Micronesia

Diabetes In Micronesia

Diabetes is one of the most serious health threats in the islands today. It is now the main cause of death in Kosrae and in the Marshalls, the number two cause of death in Pohnpei, and the number three cause of death in Chuuk. It is rampant in other parts of Micronesia as well. Even apart from the deaths it causes, the disease has crippled and blinded many islanders. About one out of every five middle-aged Micronesians suffers from this disease. In some places, particularly Kosrae and the Marshalls, the diabetes rate is much higher, with as many as a third or a half of all older people suffering from the disease. This is far higher than the rate in the US or other countries around the world. Micronesians seem to be especially susceptible to the disease. What is even worse, diabetes appears to be on the rise. What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is called a non-communicable disease–that is, one that can not be spread from one person to another. It is a disease that takes many years to develop. Diabetes is a defect in the way that our bodies process sugar, impairing the removal of sugar from the bloodstream. Sugar and carbohydrates (rice, breadfruit, taro and other starches) are a major source of energy for the body, but too much of them is a danger to our health. High levels of sugar in our bloodstream increases the risk of heart attack and stroke and can cause kidney disease. In fact, an excessive sugar level can interfere with many of the bodily systems, leading to blindness and death. Why Has It Become Such a Problem Today? In the past, islanders did not seem to suffer from a high diabetes rate even though their body was capable of storing sugar for a long period of time. In fact, the current theory is that Micronesians and other Pacific islanders could retain body sugar much Continue reading >>

Sex And Type 1 Diabetes

Sex And Type 1 Diabetes

When a person is diagnosed with diabetes, their doctor will typically walk them through the steps of how to deal with this medical issue in the following years; however, sex is rarely addressed, often leaving the patient feeling left in the dark. The journal Diabetes Care found that only half of all men and 19 percent of women with diabetes had broached the topic of sex with their doctors.1 It is crucial that individuals with Type I Diabetes become aware of the sexual problems associated with this health condition because certain symptoms can be assumed an effect of Type 1 diabetes, but be caused from an unrelated medical condition. For people that already have diabetes, sexual problems can indicate nerve damage, blocked arteries, and irregular hormone patterns.2 People who keep their diabetes under control can lower their risk of developing these sexual and urologic problems in the future. Talk to Your Partner Establishing a strong system of communication with your partner is a crucial component of every relationship. Along with discussing sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and contraception usage, Type 1 diabetics should express how diabetes affects their sex life. Many Type 1 diabetics may feel self conscious about their condition and try to hide it from their partners. If you do this, however, you may not feel comfortable asking your partner for a break from sex in the case of a low blood sugar and put yourself in a dangerous situation. Sex is an intense physical activity and as any Type 1 diabetic knows, this can cause a fast drop in blood glucose level. Make sure your partner knows how to care for you in case you experience a severe low blood sugar level and are unable to care for yourself. It is your responsibility as a diabetic to protect yourself and give t Continue reading >>

Transmission Of A Protein Could Cause Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

Transmission Of A Protein Could Cause Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

Symptoms of type 2 diabetes can be induced following the transmission of a misfolded type of protein, according to new research. US researchers have reported a type of pancreatic protein is capable of inducing lost beta cell function and elevated blood glucose levels, both symptoms of type 2 diabetes. The study also found some similarities to a form of diseases known as prion diseases, which include Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (mad cow disease) and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. "Until now, this concept has not been considered," said study author Claudio Soto, McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. Soto stressed, however, that there is no strong evidence to suggest type 2 diabetes is an infectious condition. Over 90 per cent of people with type 2 diabetes have abnormal protein deposits in their insulin-producing pancreatic islets. These deposits mainly consist of aggregates of a particular protein: islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP). While type 2 diabetes is linked to genetic, environmental and lifestyle risk factors, its cause is not wholly understood. Similarly, the precise role of IAPP in type 2 diabetes is unclear. The researchers hypothesise that IAPP kills pancreatic islets in a similar way to diseases caused by other misfolded protein aggregates, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's. When a protein becomes misfolded its structure changes which prevents it from functioning as expected. Soto and colleagues found that injecting small amounts of misfolded IAPP aggregated the formation of protein deposits in the pancreases of mice. Within weeks these mice developed type 2 diabetes symptoms. They believe small amounts of misfolded IAPP could induce similar levels of deposits of protein aggregates in pancreatic islets Continue reading >>

Diabetes Health Advice

Diabetes Health Advice

Is Diabetes Transferable? Diabetes is characterized by increased blood sugar or blood glucose levels. Glucose is obtained from the food that is consumed. The glucose gives the cells the energy they need to perform various functions. The hormone insulin aids in this process. In type 1 diabetes, the body is unable to produce insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the body either does not produce or cannot use the insulin properly. Type 2 diabetes is also known as diabetes mellitus and is the more common of both types. When there is an inadequate amount of insulin in the body, the glucose remains in the blood, thereby elevating blood sugar levels. Diabetes health risks are many. If the glucose remains in the blood over time, many serious complications such as kidney, eye and nerve damage can occur. Gestational diabetes is another type of diabetes that occurs in pregnant women due to the effect of hormonal changes. Diabetes health problems can occur in any type of diabetes. These problems develop when an individual is unable to manage diabetes properly. A common complication that occurs in diabetic individuals is hyperglycemia which is characterized by excessively high blood sugar levels. If left untreated, conditions such as kidney failure, nerve damage and blindness can occur. Unmanaged diabetes can also lead to high cholesterol and elevated blood pressure. This contributes to circulation disorders and heart disease. Diabetes often leads to frequent infections since the immune system is affected. Intake of too much insulin can lead to hypoglycemia wherein dizziness, headache, sweating and fainting can occur. The diabetes health plan involves proper diet, lifestyle modifications and medication. Type 2 diabetes is initially treated with dietary changes, regular exercise and weight re Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sex

Diabetes And Sex

Tweet Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes can lead to complications. In some cases, sexual performance can be affected by diabetes. Up to 50% of men and 25% of women may experience some kind of sexual problems or a loss of sexual desire as a result of diabetes. I am a diabetic man, what kind of problems could diabetes cause to my sex life? For men, diabetes can cause damage to the nervous system over a sustained period of time, also known as diabetic neuropathy. One aspect of this is the potential for diabetes to damage the erectile tissue leaving it impossible for a man to achieve or maintain an erection. Almost 1 in 3 men with diabetes suffer from erectile dysfunction. Erectile dysfunction can be the way in which men discover that they have diabetes. However, through strict management if the disease through diet, exercise, pills and insulin injections, minor sexual problems usually recede and it is possible for the man to achieve and erection. I am a diabetic woman, what kind of problems could diabetes cause to my sex life? For some women with diabetes, vaginitis (inflammation of the vagina) can be recurrent. Vaginitis can be brought on by a number of different ways including bacterial inbalance of the vagina (bacterial vaginitis) yeast infections (thrush) or from chemical irritation, such as from soaps or fabric conditioners. This can make sex painful, and is heralded by itching or burning sensations. Cystitis can also be a recurrent problem for women with diabetes. Furthermore, some evidence indicates that, in a similar way to men being unable to maintain an erection, the woman’s clitoris may fail to respond to stimulation. Hypoglycemia and sex Hypoglycemia can occur during sex. You may also suffer from a night time hypo as the physical exertions of sex mean that in s Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Genetically Transmitted Or Through Eating Unhealthy?

Is Diabetes Genetically Transmitted Or Through Eating Unhealthy?

You have to be specific: How type 1 diabetes develops: Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease, which means it results from the immune system mistakenly attacking parts of the body. In the case of type 1 diabetes, the immune system incorrectly targets insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Nobody knows why this occurs, or how to stop it. The immune systems of people with type 1 diabetes continue to attack beta cells until the pancreas is incapable of producing insulin. People with type 1 diabetes need to inject themselves with insulin to compensate for the death of their beta cells. Everyone with type 1 diabetes is insulin-dependent. How type 2 diabetes develops: Type 2 diabetes is different. The autoimmune systems of people with type 2 diabetes don't attack beta cells. Instead, type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body losing its ability to respond to insulin. This is known as insulin resistance. The body compensates for the ineffectiveness of its insulin by producing more, but it can't always produce enough. Over time, the strain placed on the beta cells by this level of insulin production can destroy them, diminishing insulin production. Type 2 diabetes is linked to obesity; sugars, and particularly the problem of added sugars, have been linked with increased risks of the following health problems: Weight gain and obesity Type 2 diabetes Tooth decay Heart disease Having said that, the genetic risk is as follows. Type 1 diabetes and genetics - average risks: Mother with diabetes increases risk of diabetes by 2% Father with diabetes increases risk of diabetes by 8% Both parents with diabetes increases risk by 30% Brother or sister with diabetes increases risk by 10% Non-identical twin with diabetes increases risk by 15% Identical twin with diabetes increases Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes occurs mostly in people aged over 40 years. However, an increasing number of younger people, even children, are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The first-line treatment is diet, weight control and physical activity. If the blood sugar (glucose) level remains high despite these measures then tablets to reduce the blood glucose level are usually advised. Insulin injections are needed in some cases. Other treatments include reducing blood pressure if it is high, lowering high cholesterol levels and also using other measures to reduce the risk of complications. Although diabetes cannot be cured, it can be treated successfully. If a high blood sugar level is brought down to a normal level, your symptoms will ease. You still have some risk of complications in the long term if your blood glucose level remains even mildly high - even if you have no symptoms in the short term. However, studies have shown that people who have better glucose control have fewer complications (such as heart disease or eye problems) compared with those people who have poorer control of their glucose level. Therefore, the main aims of treatment are: To keep your blood glucose level as near normal as possible. To reduce any other risk factors that may increase your risk of developing complications. In particular, to lower your blood pressure if it is high and to keep your blood lipids (cholesterol) low. To detect any complications as early as possible. Treatment can prevent or delay some complications from becoming worse. Type 2 diabetes is usually initially treated by following a healthy diet, losing weight if you are overweight, and having regular physical activity. If lifestyle advice does not control your blood sugar (glucose) levels then medicines are used to help lower your Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Communicable?

Is Diabetes Communicable?

If you have diabetes, are your loved ones more likely to get it? Science has always said no; diabetes is “noncommunicable.” But a new study raises the scary possibility that spouses and partners may be at increased risk. The study reviewed the records of over 3 million Kaiser members in Northern California. Researchers looked at life partners of people newly diagnosed with diabetes. Partners and spouses were twice as likely as the general population to develop diabetes in the following year. Male spouses were at even higher risk, about 2.5 times the national average. Females were slightly less vulnerable than men, but still close to double the average. There were some same-sex partners in the sample, but too few to draw meaningful conclusions, according to researcher Dr. Mohammed K. Ali of Emory University. The data, which were reported at the 75th Scientific Sessions of the American Diabetes Association, didn’t specify what type of diabetes people had. The newly diagnosed subjects were aged 18–79, so most probably had Type 2. Dr. Ali said that, “The implications of this are huge. It might be important to…talk to the spouses or partners about their own risks. We know that health-related risks tend to occur among people who are socially connected.” What’s going on here? Is this effect real, and if so, what could have caused it? Partners might not be getting sicker. It might just be that people whose partners get diagnosed ask their doctor for a test. Then doctors will discover diabetes in people who already had it but didn’t know. However, there are several possible ways that diabetes could spread in a household. If you move in with somebody, you may adopt his food and exercise habits. If the new patterns are unhealthy, your health may suffer. If you st Continue reading >>

Yeast, Diabetes, And Sex

Yeast, Diabetes, And Sex

Vaginal yeast infections are annoying, not dangerous, but they can seriously hamper your sex life, especially if you have diabetes. What’s the connection, and what can you do to prevent and treat yeast infections? According to Chris Illiades, MD, on the website Everyday Health, “Normally, Candida albicans, the fungus that causes yeast infection, lives in balance with the other microorganisms in your body…. But anything that upsets this normal balance can lead to an overgrowth of yeast and can cause a yeast infection.” Diabetes is one of the things that can upset the normal balance because yeast love to eat sugar, especially glucose. In fact, they help make beer by eating sugar and turning it into alcohol, and they are crucial in bread-making because after eating sugar, they produce a gas that makes dough rise. When there’s extra sugar in your blood, there is likely to be more in your vagina and other tissues, so yeast grow better there. Yeast irritating the inside of your vagina is called “vaginitis.” In the tissues around the vagina – the vulva – such irritation is called “vulvitis.” Both are far more common in women with diabetes. There are many causes of yeast infections. One is the use of antibiotics, which can change the balance in the vagina by killing bacteria, thus allowing yeast to grow unchecked. A common pattern is for a woman to treat a bladder infection with antibiotics, only to wind up with a yeast infection that is just as annoying. According to Dr. Illiades, other causes of vaginitis include stress, illness, menstrual periods, pregnancy, and other medications. Diabetes Health writer Linda von Wartburg wrote that menopause may also increase the risk of vaginitis. Preventing Yeast Infections You can reduce your risk of vaginitis by ma Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

The Facts Diabetes is a condition where people don't produce enough insulin to meet their body's needs and/or their cells don't respond properly to insulin. Insulin is important because it moves glucose, a simple sugar, into the body's cells from the blood. It also has a number of other effects on metabolism. The food that people eat provides the body with glucose, which is used by the cells as a source of energy. If insulin isn't available or doesn't work correctly to move glucose from the blood into cells, glucose will stay in the blood. High blood glucose levels are toxic, and cells that don't get glucose are lacking the fuel they need. There are two main kinds of diabetes: type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. More than 90% of all people with diabetes have type 2. A 2015 Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) report estimated that about 3.4 million Canadians have diabetes. Only about two-thirds of people with type 2 diabetes are aware of it and are receiving treatment because, for many people, early symptoms are not noticeable without testing. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the pancreas cannot make insulin. Everyone with type 1 diabetes requires insulin injections. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the pancreas does not make enough insulin or the body does not use insulin properly. It usually occurs in adults, although in some cases children may be affected. People with type 2 diabetes usually have a family history of this condition and are most often overweight. People with type 2 diabetes may eventually need insulin injections. This condition occurs most commonly in people of First Nations descent, Hispanics, and North Americans of African descent. Another less common form is gestational diabetes, a temporary condition that occurs during pregnancy. According to the CDA, depend Continue reading >>

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