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How Is Diabetes Spread Among Humans

How Is Diabetes Spread Among Humans?

How Is Diabetes Spread Among Humans?

Question Originally asked by Community Member victoria black How Is Diabetes Spread Among Humans? Answer There are two types of diabetes; the most common type - Type II is a metabolic disorder believed mostly to be due to a persons genes, obesity, poor diet, smoking and low exercise. People who are not overweight, and who exercise, do not smoke and drink moderately have about an 80% lower chance of getting Type II Diabetes. Check out Health Central’s Diabetes section for more. You should know Answers to your question are meant to provide general health information but should not replace medical advice you receive from a doctor. No answers should be viewed as a diagnosis or recommended treatment for a condition. Answered By: Cort Continue reading >>

About Type 2 Diabetes

About Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Most of the people with diabetes in the United States have type 2 diabetes, and it is on the rise, especially in younger people. More preteens, teens, and young adults are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes than ever before. Causes Like type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes is inherited. This means a group of genes that can lead to type 2 is passed down from mothers and fathers to their children. Not everyone who inherits the genes will develop it, but if you have the genes for type 2 diabetes, you've got a greater chance of developing it. Your chances are even higher if you're also overweight and don't get much exercise. Having a sweet tooth won't cause type 2 diabetes, but a diet high in simple sugars and other unhealthy foods can cause you to gain weight. Most people who are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes are overweight. In addition to being overweight, there are some other factors that put a person at a higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes, including: Having a family history of diabetes. Being older than 40. Having gestational diabetes during a pregnancy. Giving birth to a baby weighing more than 9 pounds. Being African American, Hispanic American, Asian American, or Native American. Insulin Resistance and Impaired Fasting Glucose Insulin resistance is when cells have trouble using insulin. The cells resist insulin's message to open up, and don't work as fast to let the sugar in. When this happens, the pancreas works harder to make more insulin, which it releases into the blood to keep blood sugar levels normal. Insulin resistance can lead to a condition called impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose. This happens when the pancreas can't make enough insulin to keep blood sugar levels in a normal Continue reading >>

Sex And Diabetes

Sex And Diabetes

Diabetes has a bit of bad reputation for affecting people's sex lives. But if you are diabetic, there's no need to be alarmed. The probability is that you'll be able to continue a happy and healthy sexual life far into old age. It's been known for a century that diabetes can sometimes interfere with a person's enjoyment of sex. However, little research has been done into sexual problems in diabetics – and particularly in women with diabetes. Don't be alarmed by any sweeping statements you may read about the incidence of sex difficulties among diabetics. The fact is that no reliable large-scale study of sexual problems among the diabetic population has yet been carried out. What we can say with absolute certainty is that sex difficulties are rather more common in diabetic people than they are in the rest of the population. Nevertheless, where these problems do occur, there's a high chance that they can be treated. What problems does diabetes cause? Problems in men There are several sex-related difficulties that may occur in diabetic males. Erectile dysfunction (ED), which was formerly known as 'impotence', is certainly commoner in diabetic men than it is in the rest of the population. This is probably because deterioration of the vessels (ie tubes) that supply blood to the penis, occurs more rapidly than normal in men who have diabetes. Also, some experts believe that the deterioration in nerve supply to the genitals (neuropathy) in diabetics may adversely affect erectile function. Retrograde ejaculation. In addition, some US doctors claim that diabetic men are more liable than men without diabetes to develop retrograde ejaculation – a phenomenon in which the seminal fluid tends to shoot backwards into the bladder at the moment of climax. It is subsequently passed ou Continue reading >>

Could Diabetes Spread Like Mad Cow Disease?

Could Diabetes Spread Like Mad Cow Disease?

Prions are insidious proteins that spread like infectious agents and trigger fatal conditions such as mad cow disease. A protein implicated in diabetes, a new study suggests, shares some similarities with these villains. Researchers transmitted diabetes from one mouse to another just by injecting the animals with this protein. The results don’t indicate that diabetes is contagious like a cold, but blood transfusions, or even food, may spread the disease. The work is “very exciting” and “well-documented” for showing that the protein has some prionlike behavior, says prion biologist Witold Surewicz of Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, who wasn’t connected to the research. However, he cautions against jumping to the conclusion that diabetes spreads from person to person. The study raises that possibility, he says, but “it remains to be determined.” Prions are misfolded proteins that can cause normally folded versions of the same protein to misfold themselves. When this conversion occurs in the brain, the distorted proteins bunch up inside cells and kill them. Although prion diseases are rare in people, they share some similarities with more common illnesses. In Alzheimer’s disease, for instance, globs of a misshapen protein known as β amyloid build up in the brain. Parkinson’s disease and Huntington disease, two other brain maladies, also feature aggregates, or lumps of misfolded proteins. Get more great content like this delivered right to you! By signing up, you agree to share your email address with the publication. Information provided here is subject to Science's privacy policy. At first glance, type 2 diabetes, in which people lose the ability to control their blood glucose levels, doesn’t seem to have any connection to prions Continue reading >>

How Is Diabetes Transmitted?

How Is Diabetes Transmitted?

Diabetes mellitus is a condition of the endocrine system that limits the body's ability to manage the level of glucose in the blood. Diabetics may suffer from an excess of (hyperglycemia) or too little (hypoglycemia) blood sugar. The imbalances caused by the condition can lead to heart, vision and kidney, neurological or circulatory problems. Two forms of diabetes appear at different times in life. Type 1, or juvenile diabetes, appears in very early childhood and is a chronic condition requiring drug therapy. It results from a failure of the autoimmune system that limits the ability of the pancreas to produce insulin. It cannot be "caught" like a virus or bacteria. However, recent studies have confirmed that certain DNA triggers tend to be present in persons with diabetes. When mothers with diabetes have obese children, the children often appear to inherit the same DNA characteristic and develop diabetes. Children who have two parents with diabetes also appear to inherit the characteristic. This tendency to inherit has only been established with Type 1 diabetes. Since a Type 1 diabetic's pancreas will never produce insulin properly, it is important to diagnose and begin a treatment plan as early in life as possible. Type 2 diabetes develops after age 40 in persons who have certain risk factors, including obesity, a carbohydrate-rich diet and sedentary lifestyle. Adult-onset diabetes limits the ability of insulin to control blood glucose levels, rather than attacking the pancreas directly. No genetic triggers have been identified. Gestational diabetes, a temporary condition that resembles---and may develop into---Type 2 diabetes, primarily affects pregnant women who are obese or who may gain a great deal of weight with pregnancy. Both conditions can usually be managed us Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetes Spread?

How Does Diabetes Spread?

Toll of diabetes affected has been increasing at an exponential rate. Diabetes is spread by deregulated processes within the body, and is not contagious in any case. Individuals in Type 1 diabetic condition are unable to produce any insulin in their bodies, whereas Type 2 diabetes patients have resistance for its utilization within the body. Untreated insulin resistance leads to diabetes. The likelihood of getting diabetes becomes more when some of the organs respond slowly or stop responding due to damaged blood vessels. This leads to hardening of the arteries, which increases chances of a heart attack and stroke besides restricting streamlined circulation of blood within brain as well as heart. Effect of high blood sugar Sugar in the blood is moderated by insulin. In the process of digestion, insulin moves glucose into the cells where it gets broken down for energy. In the diabetic condition, body becomes unresponsive to insulin, with inability to utilise glucose. Blood sugar becomes too high and restricts conversion of food into energy. Thereafter, increased sugar in blood starves cells for energy. Ballooning of blood vessels due to inadequate blood circulation can cause severe complications to eyes and kidneys, and damage could be permanent. Moreover, weak arteries due to high blood sugar can also impact nerves. All in all, high blood sugar levels due to uncontrolled diabetes influence every mechanism of body. Sugar in blood damages blood vessels throughout the body by getting attached to proteins. Due to this, structure of the blood vessels gets weakened as they become thick and hard. Risk factors With increased number of diabetes cases over the years, risk factors to develop diabetes have also increased. Among most identified factors causing diabetes are obesity, Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Transferable?

Is Diabetes Transferable?

First of all, diabetes is definitely not contagious. There a two types of diabetes. Both of them aren't curable, but with the right treatment, people can live just about as long as any other healthy person. Type 1: ... is an autoimmune disorder. The immune system destroys the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreasas as an overreaction, so that for people suffering from type 1 diabetes, insulin is essential for survival. Most likely, type 1 diabetes is diagnosed in the childhood. Though it's rare, it's also possible to develope it about the age of thirty. The patients need to inject insulin several times of the day, every time they eat or their blood sugar appears to be too high. Plus, they need to consider very different things, challenging their lifestyle. Type 2: ... begins with an insulin resistance one can manage at first by dietary changes and by increasing exercise. If that isn't successful anymore, one gets oral anti diabetics, and if that on the other hand isn't successful enough anymore, one starts slowly with injecting insulin, still taking the oral anti diabetics. The treatment consistently gets adjusted on the state of health of the particular patient by their doctors. Though you have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, if your ancestors suffered from it, the chance of getting ill are only highly increased, if you get overweight and if you underexercise. If you know that, you can avoid further increasing the risk. If there is only one side if ancestors in which someone had a type 2 diabetes, your chances to get it are at approximately 10%, if that is the case on both sides, there is a 30% - if you're overweight. One could also add a type 3 and a type 4 to that list, if one considers gestational diabetes, a condition in which the insulin re Continue reading >>

Diabetes Health Advice

Diabetes Health Advice

Is Diabetes Transferable? Diabetes is characterized by increased blood sugar or blood glucose levels. Glucose is obtained from the food that is consumed. The glucose gives the cells the energy they need to perform various functions. The hormone insulin aids in this process. In type 1 diabetes, the body is unable to produce insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the body either does not produce or cannot use the insulin properly. Type 2 diabetes is also known as diabetes mellitus and is the more common of both types. When there is an inadequate amount of insulin in the body, the glucose remains in the blood, thereby elevating blood sugar levels. Diabetes health risks are many. If the glucose remains in the blood over time, many serious complications such as kidney, eye and nerve damage can occur. Gestational diabetes is another type of diabetes that occurs in pregnant women due to the effect of hormonal changes. Diabetes health problems can occur in any type of diabetes. These problems develop when an individual is unable to manage diabetes properly. A common complication that occurs in diabetic individuals is hyperglycemia which is characterized by excessively high blood sugar levels. If left untreated, conditions such as kidney failure, nerve damage and blindness can occur. Unmanaged diabetes can also lead to high cholesterol and elevated blood pressure. This contributes to circulation disorders and heart disease. Diabetes often leads to frequent infections since the immune system is affected. Intake of too much insulin can lead to hypoglycemia wherein dizziness, headache, sweating and fainting can occur. The diabetes health plan involves proper diet, lifestyle modifications and medication. Type 2 diabetes is initially treated with dietary changes, regular exercise and weight re Continue reading >>

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