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How Is Diabetes Spread

About Type 2 Diabetes

About Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Most of the people with diabetes in the United States have type 2 diabetes, and it is on the rise, especially in younger people. More preteens, teens, and young adults are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes than ever before. Causes Like type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes is inherited. This means a group of genes that can lead to type 2 is passed down from mothers and fathers to their children. Not everyone who inherits the genes will develop it, but if you have the genes for type 2 diabetes, you've got a greater chance of developing it. Your chances are even higher if you're also overweight and don't get much exercise. Having a sweet tooth won't cause type 2 diabetes, but a diet high in simple sugars and other unhealthy foods can cause you to gain weight. Most people who are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes are overweight. In addition to being overweight, there are some other factors that put a person at a higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes, including: Having a family history of diabetes. Being older than 40. Having gestational diabetes during a pregnancy. Giving birth to a baby weighing more than 9 pounds. Being African American, Hispanic American, Asian American, or Native American. Insulin Resistance and Impaired Fasting Glucose Insulin resistance is when cells have trouble using insulin. The cells resist insulin's message to open up, and don't work as fast to let the sugar in. When this happens, the pancreas works harder to make more insulin, which it releases into the blood to keep blood sugar levels normal. Insulin resistance can lead to a condition called impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose. This happens when the pancreas can't make enough insulin to keep blood sugar levels in a normal Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetes Spread?

How Does Diabetes Spread?

Toll of diabetes affected has been increasing at an exponential rate. Diabetes is spread by deregulated processes within the body, and is not contagious in any case. Individuals in Type 1 diabetic condition are unable to produce any insulin in their bodies, whereas Type 2 diabetes patients have resistance for its utilization within the body. Untreated insulin resistance leads to diabetes. The likelihood of getting diabetes becomes more when some of the organs respond slowly or stop responding due to damaged blood vessels. This leads to hardening of the arteries, which increases chances of a heart attack and stroke besides restricting streamlined circulation of blood within brain as well as heart. Effect of high blood sugar Sugar in the blood is moderated by insulin. In the process of digestion, insulin moves glucose into the cells where it gets broken down for energy. In the diabetic condition, body becomes unresponsive to insulin, with inability to utilise glucose. Blood sugar becomes too high and restricts conversion of food into energy. Thereafter, increased sugar in blood starves cells for energy. Ballooning of blood vessels due to inadequate blood circulation can cause severe complications to eyes and kidneys, and damage could be permanent. Moreover, weak arteries due to high blood sugar can also impact nerves. All in all, high blood sugar levels due to uncontrolled diabetes influence every mechanism of body. Sugar in blood damages blood vessels throughout the body by getting attached to proteins. Due to this, structure of the blood vessels gets weakened as they become thick and hard. Risk factors With increased number of diabetes cases over the years, risk factors to develop diabetes have also increased. Among most identified factors causing diabetes are obesity, Continue reading >>

How Is Diabetes Spread Among Humans?

How Is Diabetes Spread Among Humans?

Question Originally asked by Community Member victoria black How Is Diabetes Spread Among Humans? Answer There are two types of diabetes; the most common type - Type II is a metabolic disorder believed mostly to be due to a persons genes, obesity, poor diet, smoking and low exercise. People who are not overweight, and who exercise, do not smoke and drink moderately have about an 80% lower chance of getting Type II Diabetes. Check out Health Central’s Diabetes section for more. You should know Answers to your question are meant to provide general health information but should not replace medical advice you receive from a doctor. No answers should be viewed as a diagnosis or recommended treatment for a condition. Answered By: Cort Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Infectious? Condition May Spread Through Toxic Meat And Blood Transfusions Like Mad Cow Disease

Is Diabetes Infectious? Condition May Spread Through Toxic Meat And Blood Transfusions Like Mad Cow Disease

Diabetes may be contagious and spread through meat or blood transfusions, new research suggests. Ingesting protein 'seeds' may be responsible for the condition's onset, similar to the spread of mad cow disease from cattle to humans via infected beef, the study author claims. When these 'seeds' were given to mice, all of the animals developed type 2 diabetes symptoms within months, the study found. Similar outcomes occurred when the 'seeds' were added to healthy human pancreatic tissue in the lab, the research adds. Yet, while other experts state the findings are intriguing, they add that more research is needed before diabetes can be considered an infectious disease. 'If one disease has the potential to be transmitted in this manner, it is diabetes.' Researchers from the University of Texas injected two-month-old mice in the abdomen with these 'seeds', known as islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP). IAPP are misshapen proteins that have been shown to accumulate in both human and animals with type 2 diabetes; sometimes before symptoms develop. The mice were genetically modified to produce the human form of IAPP. Results reveal that all of the mice developed symptoms of type 2 diabetes within three months. Similar outcomes occurred when IAPP was added to healthy human pancreatic tissue in the lab. Study author Dr Claudio Soto said: 'I don't want to scare anyone, but I can see this happening in diabetes more easily than it happens in brain diseases, because in brain diseases the spread is limited by the blood-brain barrier. 'If one disease has the potential to be transmitted in this manner, it is diabetes,' The Times reported. 'Treat with a great deal of caution' It is unclear if the same outcomes would occur in humans, however, the researchers believe their findings could have Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is the type of diabetes that typically develops in children and in young adults. In type 1 diabetes the body stops making insulin and the blood sugar (glucose) level goes very high. Treatment to control the blood glucose level is with insulin injections and a healthy diet. Other treatments aim to reduce the risk of complications. They include reducing blood pressure if it is high and advice to lead a healthy lifestyle. What is type 1 diabetes? What is type 1 diabetes? Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. Diabetes mellitus (just called diabetes from now on) occurs when the level of sugar (glucose) in the blood becomes higher than normal. There are two main types of diabetes. These are called type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes usually first develops in children or young adults. In the UK about 1 in 300 people develop type 1 diabetes at some stage. With type 1 diabet Continue reading >>

Diabetics Must Spread Carbohydrates Throughout The Day

Diabetics Must Spread Carbohydrates Throughout The Day

With diabetes, it’s important to spread your food, especially your daily carbohydrates, over time. Spreading your carbohydrates minimizes blood glucose spikes and gives your body an opportunity to bring levels down. The same holds true for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Spreading your meals out also is associated with successful weight loss. That means, don’t skip meals. It also means that breakfast and lunch give you two new opportunities each day to incorporate foods into your eating habits that benefit your health. So, are you? Or are you hitting the drive-through in the morning for your driving entertainment and picking up a sandwich and chips for lunch? The truth is that breakfast and lunch can sabotage your best efforts at managing diabetes if you don’t treat those meals with the same consideration as dinner. Breakfast and lunch are the perfect times to work healthy dairy foods into your day, like low-fat milk or yogurt. And, what other time are you likely to enjoy the benefits of the soluble fiber in oatmeal? Canned fish, like tuna packed in water, and portable fruits are perfect to grab and go for lunch, and whole-wheat bread gives healthy grains a place to shine. Breakfast and lunch do take some planning, but many people find they’re perfectly happy to eat the same thing every day for these meals, or rotate a few favorites. If that’s the case with you, the planning for these meals into the foreseeable future requires an incredibly small investment of your time. By the way, if you’re thinking you can find a way to make takeout food work well for these meals, think again. Continue reading >>

About Type 1 Diabetes

About Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is less common than type 2 diabetes. In the past, type 1 diabetes was called juvenile diabetes, juvenile-onset diabetes, or insulin-dependent diabetes. Today we realize those terms aren't accurate. People can develop type 1 as adults, children can develop type 2, and people with type 2 might need to take insulin shots. Causes Type 1 diabetes is known as an autoimmune disease. It happens because a person's immune system destroys the body's beta cells, which make insulin and release it into the blood stream. These cells are located in an organ called the pancreas. When the immune system destroys the beta cells, the body stops being able to make insulin. Signs of type 1 diabetes start to show up when half or more of the beta cells have been destroyed. People who have type 1 diabetes will begin to take insulin shots right away, to replace the insulin their bodies no longer make. Type 1 diabetes is inherited, which means a group of genes that can lead to type 1 diabetes is passed down from mothers and fathers to their children. A person with a parent, brother, or sister with type 1 diabetes has a greater chance of also developing type 1 diabetes. Genes play an important role in determining who gets type 1 diabetes and who doesn't. But they might not be the only influence. Environmental factors, including viruses and allergies, appear to trigger type 1 diabetes in some people who have inherited the genes. These factors can trigger type 1 diabetes at any point in a person's life. That's why some people don't develop type 1 diabetes until they're adults, while others develop it when they're children. Symptoms The symptoms for type 1 diabetes usually show up over a few days or even a few weeks and are caused by high levels of sugar in the blood. Symptoms include: Continue reading >>

Diabetes Continues To Spread Around The World

Diabetes Continues To Spread Around The World

On World Diabetes Day, news about the disease's global impact is dire. An estimated 382 million people worldwide have diabetes, according to a new report from the International Diabetes Federation. The IDF expects that number to rise to 592 million by 2035, when one in every 10 people will have the disease. "Diabetes in all its forms imposes unacceptably high human, social and economic costs on countries at all income levels," the report authors begin in the executive summary. They go on to say that this latest edition of the Diabetes Atlas "carries a bitter but unavoidable message: despite the array of tools at our disposal to tackle the disease... the battle to protect people from diabetes and its disabling, life-threatening complications is being lost." Epidemiologist Leonor Guariguata, project coordinator for IDF's Diabetes Atlas, wasn't surprised by the report's findings. In fact, she says the estimates are conservative, and that diabetes may be a much bigger problem than we think. "The thing that strikes me is that we keep saying the same thing again," she said. "Every time we produce new estimates, they are above and beyond what we had projected from past estimates." There are three types of diabetes: Type 1, Type 2 and gestational diabetes. People who have Type 1 diabetes do not produce insulin, a hormone the body needs to convert sugar and starches into energy. Type 1 diabetes used to be called juvenile onset diabetes because it is usually diagnosed in adolescence. Around 5% of the diabetic population in the United States has Type 1 diabetes. People with Type 2 diabetes have developed a resistance to the insulin their body produces. Most people who develop Type 2 diabetes are adults, although experts worry about the increasing number of young people being diagn Continue reading >>

Diabetes Health Advice

Diabetes Health Advice

Is Diabetes Transferable? Diabetes is characterized by increased blood sugar or blood glucose levels. Glucose is obtained from the food that is consumed. The glucose gives the cells the energy they need to perform various functions. The hormone insulin aids in this process. In type 1 diabetes, the body is unable to produce insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the body either does not produce or cannot use the insulin properly. Type 2 diabetes is also known as diabetes mellitus and is the more common of both types. When there is an inadequate amount of insulin in the body, the glucose remains in the blood, thereby elevating blood sugar levels. Diabetes health risks are many. If the glucose remains in the blood over time, many serious complications such as kidney, eye and nerve damage can occur. Gestational diabetes is another type of diabetes that occurs in pregnant women due to the effect of hormonal changes. Diabetes health problems can occur in any type of diabetes. These problems develop when an individual is unable to manage diabetes properly. A common complication that occurs in diabetic individuals is hyperglycemia which is characterized by excessively high blood sugar levels. If left untreated, conditions such as kidney failure, nerve damage and blindness can occur. Unmanaged diabetes can also lead to high cholesterol and elevated blood pressure. This contributes to circulation disorders and heart disease. Diabetes often leads to frequent infections since the immune system is affected. Intake of too much insulin can lead to hypoglycemia wherein dizziness, headache, sweating and fainting can occur. The diabetes health plan involves proper diet, lifestyle modifications and medication. Type 2 diabetes is initially treated with dietary changes, regular exercise and weight re Continue reading >>

How Is Diabetes Transmitted?

How Is Diabetes Transmitted?

Diabetes mellitus is a condition of the endocrine system that limits the body's ability to manage the level of glucose in the blood. Diabetics may suffer from an excess of (hyperglycemia) or too little (hypoglycemia) blood sugar. The imbalances caused by the condition can lead to heart, vision and kidney, neurological or circulatory problems. Two forms of diabetes appear at different times in life. Type 1, or juvenile diabetes, appears in very early childhood and is a chronic condition requiring drug therapy. It results from a failure of the autoimmune system that limits the ability of the pancreas to produce insulin. It cannot be "caught" like a virus or bacteria. However, recent studies have confirmed that certain DNA triggers tend to be present in persons with diabetes. When mothers with diabetes have obese children, the children often appear to inherit the same DNA characteristic and develop diabetes. Children who have two parents with diabetes also appear to inherit the characteristic. This tendency to inherit has only been established with Type 1 diabetes. Since a Type 1 diabetic's pancreas will never produce insulin properly, it is important to diagnose and begin a treatment plan as early in life as possible. Type 2 diabetes develops after age 40 in persons who have certain risk factors, including obesity, a carbohydrate-rich diet and sedentary lifestyle. Adult-onset diabetes limits the ability of insulin to control blood glucose levels, rather than attacking the pancreas directly. No genetic triggers have been identified. Gestational diabetes, a temporary condition that resembles---and may develop into---Type 2 diabetes, primarily affects pregnant women who are obese or who may gain a great deal of weight with pregnancy. Both conditions can usually be managed us Continue reading >>

Could Diabetes Spread Like Mad Cow Disease?

Could Diabetes Spread Like Mad Cow Disease?

Prions are insidious proteins that spread like infectious agents and trigger fatal conditions such as mad cow disease. A protein implicated in diabetes, a new study suggests, shares some similarities with these villains. Researchers transmitted diabetes from one mouse to another just by injecting the animals with this protein. The results don’t indicate that diabetes is contagious like a cold, but blood transfusions, or even food, may spread the disease. The work is “very exciting” and “well-documented” for showing that the protein has some prionlike behavior, says prion biologist Witold Surewicz of Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, who wasn’t connected to the research. However, he cautions against jumping to the conclusion that diabetes spreads from person to person. The study raises that possibility, he says, but “it remains to be determined.” Prions are misfolded proteins that can cause normally folded versions of the same protein to misfold themselves. When this conversion occurs in the brain, the distorted proteins bunch up inside cells and kill them. Although prion diseases are rare in people, they share some similarities with more common illnesses. In Alzheimer’s disease, for instance, globs of a misshapen protein known as β amyloid build up in the brain. Parkinson’s disease and Huntington disease, two other brain maladies, also feature aggregates, or lumps of misfolded proteins. Get more great content like this delivered right to you! By signing up, you agree to share your email address with the publication. Information provided here is subject to Science's privacy policy. At first glance, type 2 diabetes, in which people lose the ability to control their blood glucose levels, doesn’t seem to have any connection to prions Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Micronesia

Diabetes In Micronesia

Diabetes is one of the most serious health threats in the islands today. It is now the main cause of death in Kosrae and in the Marshalls, the number two cause of death in Pohnpei, and the number three cause of death in Chuuk. It is rampant in other parts of Micronesia as well. Even apart from the deaths it causes, the disease has crippled and blinded many islanders. About one out of every five middle-aged Micronesians suffers from this disease. In some places, particularly Kosrae and the Marshalls, the diabetes rate is much higher, with as many as a third or a half of all older people suffering from the disease. This is far higher than the rate in the US or other countries around the world. Micronesians seem to be especially susceptible to the disease. What is even worse, diabetes appears to be on the rise. What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is called a non-communicable disease–that is, one that can not be spread from one person to another. It is a disease that takes many years to develop. Diabetes is a defect in the way that our bodies process sugar, impairing the removal of sugar from the bloodstream. Sugar and carbohydrates (rice, breadfruit, taro and other starches) are a major source of energy for the body, but too much of them is a danger to our health. High levels of sugar in our bloodstream increases the risk of heart attack and stroke and can cause kidney disease. In fact, an excessive sugar level can interfere with many of the bodily systems, leading to blindness and death. Why Has It Become Such a Problem Today? In the past, islanders did not seem to suffer from a high diabetes rate even though their body was capable of storing sugar for a long period of time. In fact, the current theory is that Micronesians and other Pacific islanders could retain body sugar much Continue reading >>

Sex And Diabetes

Sex And Diabetes

Diabetes has a bit of bad reputation for affecting people's sex lives. But if you are diabetic, there's no need to be alarmed. The probability is that you'll be able to continue a happy and healthy sexual life far into old age. It's been known for a century that diabetes can sometimes interfere with a person's enjoyment of sex. However, little research has been done into sexual problems in diabetics – and particularly in women with diabetes. Don't be alarmed by any sweeping statements you may read about the incidence of sex difficulties among diabetics. The fact is that no reliable large-scale study of sexual problems among the diabetic population has yet been carried out. What we can say with absolute certainty is that sex difficulties are rather more common in diabetic people than they are in the rest of the population. Nevertheless, where these problems do occur, there's a high chance that they can be treated. What problems does diabetes cause? Problems in men There are several sex-related difficulties that may occur in diabetic males. Erectile dysfunction (ED), which was formerly known as 'impotence', is certainly commoner in diabetic men than it is in the rest of the population. This is probably because deterioration of the vessels (ie tubes) that supply blood to the penis, occurs more rapidly than normal in men who have diabetes. Also, some experts believe that the deterioration in nerve supply to the genitals (neuropathy) in diabetics may adversely affect erectile function. Retrograde ejaculation. In addition, some US doctors claim that diabetic men are more liable than men without diabetes to develop retrograde ejaculation – a phenomenon in which the seminal fluid tends to shoot backwards into the bladder at the moment of climax. It is subsequently passed ou Continue reading >>

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