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How Is Diabetes Diagnosed In Adults

1 In 5 Cases Of Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosed In The Over-40s

1 In 5 Cases Of Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosed In The Over-40s

Save for later More than one in five cases of Type 1 diabetes are diagnosed in people aged over 40, according to new figures announced today at Diabetes UK’s annual Diabetes Professional Conference. The figures, which are based on analysis from the National Diabetes Audit data, shows that in the year 2011–12, 8,952 people were diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. This included 2,035 people who were aged over 40 at the time of their diagnosis, of who more than 500 were aged over 69. The research confirms what Diabetes UK has always said that, though most cases are commonly diagnosed between the ages of 10–14, Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age. The charity pointed to Home Secretary Theresa May’s Type 1 diagnosis last year as a high profile example of this. The charity’s announcement comes as new research from the Royal Gwent Hospital in Wales suggests that lack of awareness about late onset Type 1 diabetes is leading to some people not being diagnosed early enough and in some cases people can become seriously ill before the condition is identified. Signs and symptoms This research highlights the need for healthcare professionals not to rule out Type 1 diabetes just because a patient is older. It is also important for the public to be aware of the main signs and symptoms of Type 1 diabetes, which include being tired, thirsty, losing weight and going to the toilet a lot, especially at night. People also need to understand that they should contact their GP if they have any of these symptoms. Simon O’Neill, Director for Health Intelligence and Professional Liaison for Diabetes UK, said, "This study highlights that Type 1 diabetes is not just a condition that strikes the young. We hear of reports where people who develop the condition later in life are only diagnosed Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes In Adults: Diagnosis And Management

Type 1 Diabetes In Adults: Diagnosis And Management

Excerpt Type 1 diabetes affects over 370,000 adults in the UK, representing approximately 10% of adults diagnosed with diabetes. Given the complexity of its treatment regimens, successful outcomes depend, perhaps more than with any other long-term condition, on full engagement of the adult with type 1 diabetes in life-long day-by-day self-management. In order to support this, the health service needs to provide informed, expert support, education and training as well as a range of other more conventional biomedical services and interventionsfor the prevention and management of long term complications and disability. The number of adults with type 1 diabetes means that, while the condition is certainly not rare, it is not common enough to provide and maintain all the necessary skills in its management for all healthcare professionals who will deal with it. The aim of this guideline is, therefore, to provide evidence-based, practical advice on the steps necessary to support adults with type 1 diabetes to live full, largely unrestricted, lives and avoid the acute and long-term complications of both the disease and of its treatment. NICE last produced such a guideline in 2004. The present guideline is an update of many sections of that guideline, focusing on areas where new knowledge and new treatment opportunities have arisen in the last decade. There have been many such developments, resulting in improving outcomes for adults with type 1 diabetes, but also presenting more challenges in the diversity and complexity of the tools they now have to achieve these outcomes. Continue reading >>

Adults Can Get Type 1 Diabetes, Too

Adults Can Get Type 1 Diabetes, Too

Type 1 diabetes used to be called "juvenile diabetes," because it's usually diagnosed in children and teens. But don't let that old-school name fool you. It can start when you're a grownup, too. Many of the symptoms are similar to type 2 diabetes, so it's sometimes tricky to know which kind you've got. But it's important to learn the differences and figure out what's going on so you can get the treatment that's right for you. Causes Doctors aren't sure exactly what causes type 1 diabetes. They believe your genes may play a role. Researchers are also checking to see if there are things that trigger the disease, like your diet or a virus that you caught. What experts do know is that when you have type 1 diabetes, something goes wrong with your immune system -- the body's defense against germs. It destroys beta cells in your pancreas that are responsible for making a hormone called insulin. Insulin allows glucose -- or sugar -- to get into your cells, where it's turned into energy. But if you have type 1 diabetes, your body doesn't make insulin. Glucose builds up in your bloodstream and, over time, can cause serious health problems. Symptoms If you have type 1 diabetes, you may get similar symptoms as your friends who have type 2. You may notice that you: Get extremely thirsty or hungry Need to pee often Feel unusually tired or weak Lose weight suddenly Get blurred vision or other changes in the way you see Get vaginal yeast infections Have breath that smells fruity Can't breathe well Sometimes, type 1 diabetes could even make you lose consciousness. Who's Most Likely to Get It as an Adult? People of all races and ethnic groups can get type 1 diabetes, but it's most common among those of northern European descent. *CGM-based treatment requires fingersticks for calibration, Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Diagnosis To diagnose type 2 diabetes, you'll be given a: Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells. The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates you have diabetes. A result between 5.7 and 6.4 percent is considered prediabetes, which indicates a high risk of developing diabetes. Normal levels are below 5.7 percent. If the A1C test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions — such as if you're pregnant or have an uncommon form of hemoglobin (known as a hemoglobin variant) — that can make the A1C test inaccurate, your doctor may use the following tests to diagnose diabetes: Random blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken at a random time. Blood sugar values are expressed in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Regardless of when you last ate, a random blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or higher suggests diabetes, especially when coupled with any of the signs and symptoms of diabetes, such as frequent urination and extreme thirst. Fasting blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken after an overnight fast. A fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. If it's 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or higher on two separate tests, you have diabetes. Oral glucose tolerance test. For this test, you fast overnight, and the fasting blood sugar level is measured. Then you drink a sugary liquid, and blood s Continue reading >>

Adults Can Get Type 1 Diabetes, Too

Adults Can Get Type 1 Diabetes, Too

David Lazarus had just moved to Los Angeles to start a new job as a business and consumer columnist for the Los Angeles Times when he suddenly developed some of the classic signs of diabetes: extreme thirst, fatigue and weight loss. He dropped close to 15 pounds in two weeks. Lazarus was in his early 40s. "The weight loss was the first big red flag. It happened really fast," he says. He consulted a physician, who diagnosed him with Type 2 diabetes and recommended a "monastic" low-carb, macrobiotic diet. When he continued to feel lousy a few days later, Lazarus spoke with another physician. That doctor suggested that Lazarus might have Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune condition in which the insulin-making cells in the pancreas are attacked and destroyed. But that physician didn't take insurance. Finally Lazarus made his way to the diabetes center at the University of California, Los Angeles. There, an endocrinologist diagnosed him with Type 1 diabetes and immediately put him on the correct treatment, insulin. Without insulin injections or infusion via a pump, people with Type 1 diabetes typically fall into a coma and die within days to weeks, although sometimes adults may have a small amount of reserve insulin that keeps them going longer. Still, eventually all people with Type 1 diabetes must receive insulin. Lazarus' story is not uncommon. It has long been thought that Type 1 diabetes arises primarily in childhood or adolescence and only rarely in adulthood. In fact, Type 1 diabetes was formerly called "juvenile" diabetes, and that term is still widely used, even though the terminology was officially changed in 1997. Across the ages Now, it looks as if not only can Type 1 diabetes occur in adults, it's just as likely to appear in adulthood as in childhood or adolescence. Continue reading >>

Support For Newly-diagnosed Adults

Support For Newly-diagnosed Adults

We know this can be a very difficult time in your life, but we’re here to give you the support and information you need. These pages contain information that you will find helpful in getting to grips with the condition, links to find help and support from others living with type 1, and an overview of our research programme and the progress we are making in efforts to cure, treat and prevent type 1. Continue reading >>

Study: Most U.s. Adults With Diabetes Are Properly Diagnosed

Study: Most U.s. Adults With Diabetes Are Properly Diagnosed

The proportion of diabetes cases that go undiagnosed in the U.S. may be just 11%, much lower than previous, widely accepted estimates of one-quarter to one-third, a new study suggested. The previous estimates were based on an analysis of national survey data that used only a single test to identify undiagnosed diabetes, but the new study used a second confirmatory test, as per guidelines from the American Diabetes Association (ADA), explained Elizabeth Selvin, PhD, of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, and colleagues. The proportion of undiagnosed diabetes cases has also decreased over time, from 16% in 1988-1994 to the 11% figure in 2011-2014, they reported online in the Annals of Internal Medicine. "Establishing the burden of undiagnosed diabetes is critical to monitoring public health efforts related to screening and diagnosis," Selvin's group wrote. "When a confirmatory definition is used, undiagnosed diabetes is a relatively small fraction of the total diabetes population; most U.S. adults with diabetes (about 90%) have received a diagnosis of the condition." "If we're thinking about screening programs, these findings suggest that healthcare providers are doing a good job at diagnosing people when they're coming in contact with the healthcare system," Selvin said in a statement. "It's those people who are not coming in contact with the healthcare system that need to be a focus of our efforts to ensure cases of diabetes are not missed." Selvin's group analyzed the same data that was used for the previous estimates, which were published by the CDC: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) results for 1988-1994 and 1999-2014. The earlier data set included 7,385 U.S. adults, and the more recent set included 17,045. The previous estimates relied Continue reading >>

Diagnosing Type 2 Diabetes In Adults

Diagnosing Type 2 Diabetes In Adults

NYU Langone doctors are experts at identifying people with type 2 diabetes, a condition in which a person has chronically high levels of blood sugar. It occurs when the body lacks or is resistant to insulin, a hormone that helps the body use glucose, or sugar. As a result, the body is unable to convert glucose into energy. In prediabetes, a person has higher-than-normal levels of blood sugar, which increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. To help the body use some of the excess blood sugar levels, the pancreas produces more insulin. Over time, prediabetes may progress into type 2 diabetes. In most people, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes develop gradually. If you have prediabetes and take steps to prevent type 2 diabetes, you may be able to avoid it altogether. Risk Factors Being overweight, especially if you are age 45 or older, is the biggest risk factor for type 2 diabetes. In particular, people who are “apple-shaped”—meaning they carry more fat around the abdomen—have a higher risk. Experts believe excess belly fat produces hormones that increase inflammation, which can lead to insulin resistance. Being sedentary also raises the risk of type 2 diabetes. It can lead to weight gain and lower muscle mass, which is required to help use glucose efficiently. People with a family history of type 2 diabetes have a greater chance of developing the condition than those who don’t. The condition can also occur in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome, a hormone disorder associated with weight gain and insulin resistance. Conditions that harm insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, such as pancreatic cancer and pancreatitis, also increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Metabolic Syndrome Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of conditions that puts Continue reading >>

What Pain Meds Can Be Used For Severe Fibromyalgia?

What Pain Meds Can Be Used For Severe Fibromyalgia?

Hello, I'll try to do my best to help anyone reading this through my experiences with Fibromyalgia and different types of medications that worked, didn't work or I felt was too dangerous to stay on. I was diagnosed with Fibromyalgia in 2012. I was put on a handful of scripts to put it under control but it turned out I was allergic to all of them. After that I was on a .75mcg. Fenynal patch, for over two years but they can be very dangerous if not used with extreme care and by following the directions to a "T", the Fentynal patch can cause blood clots and kill you if not used correctly!! I got rid of mine after my brother died, I then had ultra sound tests done on my arms & legs to make sure I was clot free because I was in an extreme amount if pain like my brother was. My brother 49, was five years younger than me, he died of a blood clot to the heart, which caused a severe heart attack. Prince also died from the Fentynal drug, he had for pain. And about 2 months ago or so (October 2016), there was over 300 people died in Cincinnati, Ohio within a few weeks because someone made Heroin and laced it with Fentynal, everyone that tried it, died!! They may be legal scripts for people suffering with a painful illness but you need to read the directions, the precautions, the allergic reactions, all warnings are there for a reason, take it as it was prescribed or it will cause you seriously problems or even take your life!!!! Be very careful, like I said they may be legal but they are still DRUGS!!!! Now I take Percocet-Oxycodone. I take these meds with a small fiber gel cap to prevent constipation, they work perfectly, I've never had any problems. But more important than the pain pill, you need keep moving!! If you stop being active you'll loose your muscles quickly, then when Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Overview Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar (glucose) level to become too high. The hormone insulin, produced by the pancreas, is responsible for controlling the amount of glucose in the blood. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 – where the pancreas doesn't produce any insulin type 2 – where the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin or the body's cells don't react to insulin These pages are about type 1 diabetes. Other types of diabetes are covered separately (read about type 2 diabetes, and gestational diabetes, which affects some women during pregnancy). Symptoms of diabetes Typical symptoms of type 1 diabetes are: feeling very thirsty passing urine more often than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk The symptoms of type 1 diabetes usually develop very quickly in young people (over a few days or weeks). In adults, the symptoms often take longer to develop (a few months). Read more about the symptoms of type 1 diabetes. These symptoms occur because the lack of insulin means that glucose stays in the blood and isn’t used as fuel for energy. Your body tries to reduce blood glucose levels by getting rid of the excess glucose in your urine. It's very important for diabetes to be diagnosed as soon as possible, because it will get progressively worse if left untreated. Find your local GP service Read about how type 1 diabetes is diagnosed. Causes of type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition, which means your immune system attacks healthy body tissue by mistake. In this case, it attacks the cells in your pancreas. Your damaged pancreas is then unable to produce insulin. So, glucose cannot be moved out of your bloodstream and into your cells. Type 1 diabetes is o Continue reading >>

Management Of Type 1 Diabetes In Older Adults

Management Of Type 1 Diabetes In Older Adults

Abstract In Brief Older adults with type 1 diabetes are at high risk for severe hypoglycemia and may have serious comorbid conditions. Problems with cognition, mobility, dexterity, vision, hearing, depression, and chronic pain interfere with the ability to follow complex insulin regimens. With the development of geriatric syndromes, unpredictable eating, and frailty, treatment regimens must be modified with the goal of minimizing hypoglycemia and severe hyperglycemia and maximizing quality of life. Challenges in the Management of Type 1 Diabetes in Older Adults There is a paucity of data related to glycemic management and control of type 1 diabetes later in life. The Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) Exchange clinic registry reported characteristics of older adults with type 1 diabetes who are followed in diabetes centers across the United States.17 Of those ages 50 to < 65 years (n = 2,066), mean A1C was 7.7% (27% had an A1C < 7.0%, 46% had an A1C < 7.5%, and 11% had an A1C ≥ 9.0%), and mean self-reported blood glucose testing was 5.5 times daily. Of those ≥ 65 years of age (n = 683), mean A1C was 7.4% (34% had an A1C < 7.0%, 52% had an A1C < 7.5%, and 8% had an A1C ≥ 9.0%) and mean self-reported blood glucose testing was 5.6 times daily. Greater frequency of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) was associated with lower A1C levels in both those who used an insulin pump and those who administered insulin via injections.18 Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) was lower with increasing age and was not associated with duration of diabetes.19 DKA was more likely in those with higher A1C levels and lower socioeconomic status. No relationship was found between DKA and pump versus injection use. Longstanding diabetes in older adults has been associated with increased risks of severe hypo Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes In Adults: Diagnosis And Management.

Type 1 Diabetes In Adults: Diagnosis And Management.

Excerpt Type 1 diabetes affects over 370,000 adults in the UK, representing approximately 10% of adults diagnosed with diabetes. Given the complexity of its treatment regimens, successful outcomes depend, perhaps more than with any other long-term condition, on full engagement of the adult with type 1 diabetes in life-long day-by-day self-management. In order to support this, the health service needs to provide informed, expert support, education and training as well as a range of other more conventional biomedical services and interventionsfor the prevention and management of long term complications and disability. The number of adults with type 1 diabetes means that, while the condition is certainly not rare, it is not common enough to provide and maintain all the necessary skills in its management for all healthcare professionals who will deal with it. The aim of this guideline is, therefore, to provide evidence-based, practical advice on the steps necessary to support adults with type 1 diabetes to live full, largely unrestricted, lives and avoid the acute and long-term complications of both the disease and of its treatment. NICE last produced such a guideline in 2004. The present guideline is an update of many sections of that guideline, focusing on areas where new knowledge and new treatment opportunities have arisen in the last decade. There have been many such developments, resulting in improving outcomes for adults with type 1 diabetes, but also presenting more challenges in the diversity and complexity of the tools they now have to achieve these outcomes. Copyright © 2015 National Clinical Guideline Centre. Continue reading >>

Clarifying Lada (type 1 Diabetes In Adults)

Clarifying Lada (type 1 Diabetes In Adults)

When I met fellow D-writer Catherine Price for coffee recently, I immediately gushed about everything we had in common: two brunette journalist-types living in the SF Bay Area, both diagnosed a few years ago with LADA (or so I thought). Catherine gave me a sideways look, and then began grilling me about the formal definition of LADA. I had to admit, it's pretty fuzzy. Today, I gratefully present you with the results of her investigation into this mysterious acronym: A Guest Post by Catherine Price, of ASweetLife Having had Type 1 diabetes for nearly ten years now, I can handle most diabetic terms and acronyms thrown my way. Hemoglobin A1c? Got it. Carb ratios? Insulin sensitivity? No problem. But one term has continued to confuse me: LADA. Short for Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults, it's also known as Slow-Onset Type 1 Diabetes, Type 1.5 Diabetes or, occasionally, Late-Onset Autoimmune Diabetes of Adulthood. Four names for the same thing? That's never a good sign. Until recently, the most common definition I'd heard for LADA was that it was a Type 1-like form of diabetes diagnosed in adulthood. But I didn't understand the details. Does being diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes as an adult automatically mean you have LADA? Is there a difference between LADA and the classical definition of Type 1? To answer these questions, I spoke with Marie Nierras, the program officer of the genetics programs at Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. She cut right to the chase. "There is a lot of confusion about LADA," she told me, "but Type 1 diabetes and LADA are not the same thing." Here, to get us started, is how JDRF's Adults With Type 1 toolkit defines LADA: "Type 1 diabetes diagnosed in adults over 30 may be Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults (LADA), sometimes known as Type 1.5 Continue reading >>

Diagnosis And Management Of Type 1 Diabetes In Adults: Summary Of Updated Nice Guidance

Diagnosis And Management Of Type 1 Diabetes In Adults: Summary Of Updated Nice Guidance

Offer all adults with type 1 diabetes a structured education programme in self management of diabetes six to 12 months after diagnosis or, if this was not achieved, at any time that is clinically appropriate and suitable for the person Support adults to aim for a target glycated haemoglobin 48 mmol/mol (6.5%) or lower, to minimise risk of vascular complications; ensure that aiming for the target is not accompanied by problematic hypoglycaemia, and support four to 10 daily self monitoring blood tests as routine Offer all adults daily basal-bolus insulin injection regimens, with twice daily insulin detemir as basal insulin therapy and rapid acting insulin analogues injected before meals for mealtime insulin “boluses” Assess awareness of hypoglycaemia at least annually using a scoring system Patients were involved at every stage of creating the guideline. Patient groups and individuals contributed to the scoping of the update and at the consultation stage. Lay members were active in the Guideline Development Group, contributing to the formulation of the recommendations summarised here, and were instrumental in setting the new treatment targets. Having type 1 diabetes reduces the life expectancy of adults in the United Kingdom by as much as 13 years.1 Despite incontrovertible evidence that good care reduces the risk of complications such as blindness, renal failure, and premature cardiovascular disease and death,2 as well as complications of treatment such as severe hypoglycaemia,3 fewer than 30% of UK adults with type 1 diabetes achieve current national treatment targets for glucose control.4 The challenges of managing type 1 diabetes do not lessen after the age of 18 years. Since the publication of the 2004 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guid Continue reading >>

For Adults

For Adults

For Adults Being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D) as an adult can be difficult. People often don’t know much about T1D, and don’t expect an adult to be diagnosed with the disease. As an adult, you already have responsibilities and tasks that you need to perform each day, and you may be feeling that diabetes will get in the way of what you want to do. A diagnosis of diabetes is somewhat like starting a journey on a new and unfamiliar road. If you developed T1D as a child, your parents most likely played an active role in helping you learn to manage your diabetes. Transitioning to adulthood brings a whole series of new responsibilities to you, and a whole series of new questions; however, you will notice that, over the past several decades, living with T1D has gotten easier and easier. Still, it remains a far distance away from being easy. At home, we’ve gone from measuring glucose levels through urine tests that told you roughly where you might have been hours ago to home blood glucose tests that tell you in as little as five seconds exactly where you are right now. Insulin is no longer derived from pigs or cows, but is made in laboratories to resemble and act like human insulin as closely as possible. The days of carrying syringes and vials wherever you went have been replaced with insulin pumps, and slim, barely noticeable, pre-packed and easy-to-set dosage pens that can make giving yourself an injection a private affair, even in the most public of arenas. Continue reading >>

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