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How Important Is Exercise For A Diabetic?

Exercise And Diabetes: Why It Is Important To Keep Your Body Healthy

Exercise And Diabetes: Why It Is Important To Keep Your Body Healthy

Diabetes and exercise are two words that should naturally go together. When someone is diagnosed with diabetes, physicians will often suggest that they take steps to living a healthier life. One of the best known ways to improve your overall health is to exercise. When exercise is recommended, it doesn’t mean that you need to go from not exercising at all to running a marathon. Instead, is is best to gradually work your way up to a healthy exercise routine. Exercise is not only good for the body, but it helps clear your mind and relieves stress. A healthy diet, along with moderate exercise can be the key to a healthy and enjoyable life for people living with diabetes. BistroMD's founding physician, Caroline J. Cederquist, M.D., has helped hundreds of patients with diabetes through her medical practice, and through the healthy meal delivery provided by BistroMD. Being diagnosed with diabetes doesn’t mean that you have to passively accept the complications it can bring. Rather, it is often possible for diabetics to help control their diabetes by changing their diet and incorporating exercise into their daily lives. Dr. Cederquist has proven that eating a carefully balanced diet can improve your quality of life you are a diabetic. Develop a healthy diabetes and exercise routine, and you will be feeling better than ever. Dr. Cederquist has over 10 years of experience working with patients, and knows what they need to control their diabetes and simultaneously improve their health. Dr. Cederquist’s plan of eating a well balanced diet and incorporating exercise into one's daily life is not only medically sound - it's proven to work. If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, and are looking for a meal plan that will help you control your blood sugar, but help you lose wei Continue reading >>

Which One's More Important: Diet Or Exercise?

Which One's More Important: Diet Or Exercise?

A proper diet and regular exercise are the two pillars of a healthy lifestyle. But that doesn't mean they're equally important when it comes to your weight, your disease risk, or how long you'll live. In a head-to-head battle, research shows what you eat trumps how much you move. "Even if you don't exercise, if you ate really well you could probably look like an athlete and be fairly healthy," says Todd Astorino, PhD, an exercise scientist at the University of California, San Marcos. But if your diet is poor, no amount of exercise will make up for that, Astorino adds. (Join Prevention's 21-Day Challenge to lose weight and feel amazing by summer!) A new editorial appearing in the journal BMJ doubles down on Astorino's comments. The belief that exercise can offset a crummy diet is one of the biggest mistakes people make when it comes to their health and disease risk, the editorial's authors say. "The idea that you can eat what you like as long as you exercise is misleading and unscientific," says Aseem Malhotra, MD, a London-based cardiologist and coauthor of the editorial. "You cannot outrun a bad diet." Malhotra's editorial points out that, during the past 30 years, physical activity rates haven't changed even as obesity and diabetes rates have skyrocketed. Sugar and refined carbohydrates—not too little exercise—are the biggest drivers of poor health and obesity, he says. (Check out these 25 simple ways to beat a sugar craving.) Ironically, many athletes suck down sports drinks and other sugary, carb-heavy snacks because they believe their bodies need these energy sources in order to perform. This kind of "carbohydrate loading" can put athletes—even marathon runners and triathletes—at risk for insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, the editorial argues. More ev Continue reading >>

15 Exercise Tips For People With Type 2 Diabetes

15 Exercise Tips For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Get a move on Exercise is safe—and highly recommended—for most people with type 2 diabetes, including those with complications. Along with diet and medication, exercise will help you lower blood sugar and lose weight. However, the prospect of diving into a workout routine may be intimidating. If you're like many newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics, you may not have exercised in years. If that's the case, don't worry: It's fine to start slow and work up. These tips will help you ease back into exercise and find a workout plan that works for you. Try quick workouts As long as you're totaling 30 minutes of exercise each day, several brief workouts are fine, says George Griffing, MD, professor of endocrinology at the Saint Louis University School of Medicine in St. Louis. "We need people with diabetes up and moving," Dr. Griffing says. "If you can do your exercise in one 30 minute stretch, fine. But if not, break it up into increments you can manage that add up to at least 30 minutes each day." Focus on overall activity Increase activity in general—such as walking or climbing stairs—rather than a particular type of exercise. However, don't rely on housework or other daily activity as your sole exercise. Too often, people overestimate the amount of exercise they get and underestimate the amount of calories they consume. (A step-counting pedometer can help.) Get a pedometer Stanford University researchers conducted a review of 26 studies looking at the use of pedometers as motivation for physical activity. Published in 2007, the review found that people who used a pedometer increased their activity by 27%. Having a goal of 10,000 steps a day (about five miles) was important, even if the goal wasn't reached. Pedometer users lost more weight, had a greater drop in blood pr Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Benefits Of Exercise

Diabetes And The Benefits Of Exercise

People can rattle off a lot of reasons why they don't exercise, but most are just excuses. I don't have the time. It hurts too much. It takes too much effort. I don't see the point. I don't enjoy it. On the other hand, one could also rattle off a bunch of reasons why we could all benefit from regular physical activity. Not only can exercise help to prevent type 2 diabetes, it also helps to strengthen bone, improve energy, reduce stress, and support brain function. And exercise specifically targets three areas of great concern for those with diabetes: It's good for the heart. Cardiovascular disease complications can be blamed for up to 80% of deaths of people with diabetes. When we exercise, the muscles of the heart contract and boost blood flow through arteries, which triggers positive changes to resting heart rate and blood pressure. Regular exercise also helps to keep good and bad cholesterol at healthy levels. Good blood cholesterol and blood pressure levels lead to a decreased risk of heart and blood vessel disease. It helps us reach and maintain a healthy weight. At least 8 out of 10 people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese. Further, 1 in 5 overweight people are at risk of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of health problems that include high "bad" triglycerides, low "good" cholesterol, and high blood pressure. Combined together, these individual problems lead to an increased risk of health problems such as diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. Exercise is one of the most effective ways to lose excess weight. It helps us control our blood glucose levels. Insulin resistance refers to the body not responding to the insulin that is being made by the pancreas. Regular exercise helps to improve the body's sensitivity to insulin and helps to manage Continue reading >>

What Diet Works Best To Manage Diabetes?

What Diet Works Best To Manage Diabetes?

Imagine having endless energy that doesn't seem to fade over the course of a day. More and more, research is demonstrating that our blood sugar levels are vitally important in maintaining high levels of energy and supporting a number of important functions in the body. Fortunately, through diet and exercise, you can control blood sugar levels - avoiding unwanted blood sugar spikes, reducing energy level crashes, and lowering your risk for diabetes. Blood sugar, or blood glucose, is the sugar that travels in the blood and provides energy to the body; this sugar comes directly from the food we eat. Typically, a normal, non-diabetic’s healthy blood sugar level is between 70 and 120; it is common for blood sugar to rise after eating, returning to normal levels in an hour or two. If you have diabetes, the American Diabetes Association (ADA)[1] advises keeping your blood sugar levels before meals from 80–130 mg/dl and your levels 1–2 hours after meals under 180. Many people with diabetes and doctors shoot for levels closer to those of people without diabetes, because they are more protective against complications. Lower numbers require more careful diet and more frequent monitoring to prevent lows, but they are doable for many people. As we consume carbohydrates, they are broken down into glucose, the body’s main source of energy; glucose goes right into the bloodstream. At nearly the same time, the pancreas releases a substance called insulin. Insulin carries glucose from the blood into the cells. glucose needs insulin in order to enter cells; think of insulin as key that unlocks each cell’s front door. Once in a cell, glucose is used to make adenosine triphosphate (ATP), also known as energy. The body stores excess glucose in the liver and in the muscles. As it is Continue reading >>

New Studies Suggest Benefits Of Exercise For People With Type 2 Diabetes

New Studies Suggest Benefits Of Exercise For People With Type 2 Diabetes

New studies that took a deeper look at the role of exercise in treating people with Type 2 diabetes determined that both the timing and quantity of exercise can have an impact on people with the disease. Nearly 10 percent of the U.S. population has Type 2 diabetes and more than one in three people are pre-diabetic, putting them at high risk for developing the metabolic disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). A small study conducted by researchers in New Zealand found that walking 10 minutes after meals, and dinner in particular, proved to be more effective in controlling blood sugar levels for Type 2 diabetics than doing 30 minutes of exercise all at once during the day. The study, published Monday in Diabetologia, found that walking post-dinner brought post-meal blood sugar levels down by 22 percent. Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disease that causes sugar to collect in the blood, according to the National Institutes of Health. Type 2 diabetes can be treated with diet, exercise and medication, including insulin. Type 1 diabetes, which more commonly occurs in childhood and young adulthood, is a result of a damaged pancreas that produces little to no insulin. People with Type 1 diabetes must self-administer insulin for the rest of their lives. In a separate study, researchers from the U.K. combined results from 28 smaller studies and found that the more exercise people did, the lower their risk of Type 2 diabetes. The studies found that exercise helps insulin work better on cells and helps muscles use sugar more effectively. The research, also published in Diabetologia, found that people who doubled their amount of exercise to about 300 minutes per week, instead of the recommended 150 minutes per week, reduced their risk of Type 2 diabetes by 36 perc Continue reading >>

Exercise Benefits Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Exercise Benefits Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Exercise benefits patients with type 2 diabetes Moderate-intensity exercise reduces fat stored around the heart, in the liver and in the abdomen of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus, even in the absence of any changes in diet, according to a new study. Moderate-intensity exercise reduces fat stored around the heart, in the liver and in the abdomen of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus, even in the absence of any changes in diet, according to a new study published online in the journal Radiology. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin, a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into the cells, or when the cells resist the effects of insulin. The disease can lead to a wide range of complications, including damage to the eyes and kidneys and hardening of the arteries. Exercise is recommended for people with diabetes, but its effects on different fat deposits in the body are unclear, according to the study's senior author, Hildo J. Lamb, M.D., Ph.D., from the Department of Radiology at Leiden University Medical Center in the Netherlands. "Based on previous studies, we noticed that different fat deposits in the body show a differential response to dietary or medical intervention," he said. "Metabolic and other effects of exercise are hard to investigate, because usually an exercise program is accompanied by changes in lifestyle and diet." For the new study, Dr. Lamb and colleagues assessed the effects of exercise on organ-specific fat accumulation and cardiac function in type 2 diabetes patients, independent of any other lifestyle or dietary changes. The 12 patients, average age 46 years, underwent MRI examinations before and after six months of moderate-inte Continue reading >>

Benefits Of Exercise

Benefits Of Exercise

Exercising 4–7 times per week for at least 30 minutes: Aerobic exercise, 4 to 7 times per week for at least 30 minutes, has a long list of health benefits. A few examples of aerobic exercise are brisk walking, swimming, cycling and dancing. Some of the benefits of exercise are: Usually lowers your blood sugar. Improves insulin sensitivity, which means your body’s insulin works better. Note: You may need an adjustment in your diabetes medication or insulin dose to help prevent the blood sugar from going too low. Ask your health care provider for advice. Reduces body fat. Helps to build and tone muscles. Lowers your risk for heart disease. Improves circulation. Preserves bone mass. Reduces stress and enhances quality of life. Self-assessment Quiz Self assessment quizzes are available for topics covered in this website. To find out how much you have learned about Diabetes and Exercise, take our self assessment quiz when you have completed this section. The quiz is multiple choice. Please choose the single best answer to each question. At the end of the quiz, your score will display. If your score is over 70% correct, you are doing very well. If your score is less than 70%, you can return to this section and review the information. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Nutrition and physical activity are important parts of a healthy lifestyle when you have diabetes. Along with other benefits, following a healthy meal plan and being active can help you keep your blood glucose level, also called blood sugar, in your target range. To manage your blood glucose, you need to balance what you eat and drink with physical activity and diabetes medicine, if you take any. What you choose to eat, how much you eat, and when you eat are all important in keeping your blood glucose level in the range that your health care team recommends. Becoming more active and making changes in what you eat and drink can seem challenging at first. You may find it easier to start with small changes and get help from your family, friends, and health care team. Eating well and being physically active most days of the week can help you keep your blood glucose level, blood pressure, and cholesterol in your target ranges prevent or delay diabetes problems feel good and have more energy What foods can I eat if I have diabetes? You may worry that having diabetes means going without foods you enjoy. The good news is that you can still eat your favorite foods, but you might need to eat smaller portions or enjoy them less often. Your health care team will help create a diabetes meal plan for you that meets your needs and likes. The key to eating with diabetes is to eat a variety of healthy foods from all food groups, in the amounts your meal plan outlines. The food groups are vegetables nonstarchy: includes broccoli, carrots, greens, peppers, and tomatoes starchy: includes potatoes, corn, and green peas fruits—includes oranges, melon, berries, apples, bananas, and grapes grains—at least half of your grains for the day should be whole grains includes wheat, rice, oats, co Continue reading >>

Exercise

Exercise

Everybody benefits from regular exercise. If you have diabetes, or are at risk of diabetes it plays an important role in keeping you healthy. For a person with diabetes exercise helps: Insulin to work better, which will improve your diabetes management Maintain a healthy weight Lower your blood pressure Reduce your risk of heart disease Reduce stress. Warning- Don’t take part in strenuous physical activity if you are feeling unwell or have ketones present in your blood or urine. Before commencing a regular exercise program see your doctor for a full medical examination. Initially take it slow - you don’t want to start off too hard, if you are not used to the exercise you will be sore the next day and this will not make exercising a fun experience! Over time, you can slowly increase the intensity of the exercise. If you have any diabetes complications like retinopathy, nephropathy, you should talk to your doctor or an accredited exercise physiologist before you start increasing the intensity of your exercise. Anything that gets you moving. Here are some suggestions for you to discuss with your doctor: Walking Swimming Cycling/ exercise bike Dancing Gardening Golfing Weight training Tai Chi Water aerobics Increasing your general physical activity is also helpful, e.g. taking the stairs instead of the lift, getting up to change the TV station instead of using the remote control, housework, and gardening. Avoid watching too much TV or sitting at the computer for a long time. For good health, you should be doing about 30 minutes of exercise every day. If this is not possible, then this time can be divided in 3 x 10 minutes sessions. You can break up exercise throughout the day. If you need to lose weight, 45-60 minutes everyday. You do not need to puff to gain the benefi Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Exercise

Diabetes And Exercise

Exercise has many benefits for people with diabetes, especially when combined with healthy eating. Before you start exercising, make sure you have an individualised diabetes management plan, and a health check with your GP. An exercise physiologist can develop a personalised exercise plan for you. Check your blood glucose levels (BGLs) before, during and after exercise to see how the exercise you are doing affects them. If your BGLs are above the normal range increase your fluids to stay hydrated when you exercise. If you are unwell and your BGLs are high, avoid exercising until your BGLs have returned to the normal range. If you have type 1 diabetes and you are unwell, avoid exercise until you feel better to reduce your risk of ketoacidosis. Always carry portable hypoglycaemia treatment with you if you take insulin or sulphonylurea medication. If you have existing diabetes complications such as eye or kidney problems, check with your diabetes specialist if it is safe to do certain types of activity. On this page: Exercise has benefits for everyone, including people with diabetes, especially when combined with healthy eating. Benefits of exercise According to Australia’s Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines, it’s important to accumulate 2½ to 5 hours per week of moderate exercise or 1¼ to 2½ hours of vigorous exercise to obtain health benefits. This can be broken up throughout the week to suit your needs. Exercise helps to: improve mood and sleep improve muscle strength and bone mass lower blood glucose levels (BGLs) lower cholesterol and blood pressure improve heart and blood vessel health maintain or achieve a healthy body weight reduce stress and tension improve mental health If you are at risk of type 2 diabetes, exercise can be part of a heal Continue reading >>

Physical Activity & Diabetes

Physical Activity & Diabetes

Regular physical activity is one of the most important things you can do to manage and live well with your diabetes. Regular exercise also has special advantages if you have type 2 diabetes. It can also help prevent or delay type 2 diabetes from developing. Regular physical activity improves your body’s sensitivity to insulin and helps manage your blood glucose (sugar) levels. What is physical activity? Physical activity is any form of movement that causes your body to burn calories. This can be as simple as walking, gardening, cleaning and many other activities you may already do. During a physical activity, active muscles use up glucose as a source of energy. Regular physical activity helps to prevent glucose from building up in your blood. Many people do not get enough physical activity to be healthy in today’s society. Technology and modern living have removed many regular forms of physical activity from our daily lives. Cars replace walking and biking. Elevators and escalators replace stairs. Dishwashers replace doing dishes by hand. Computers replace manual labour. Snow blowers and ride-on lawn mowers replace physical yard work. TV and computer games replace fun physical activities for both children and adults. Because of modern living, it is important to think about being physically active each day. Adding more physical activity to your day is one of the most important things you can do to help manage your diabetes and improve your health. Did you know? Low physical fitness is as strong a risk factor for mortality as smoking. Fitness level is one of the strongest predictors of all-cause mortality in people with diabetes. Physical activity can be as powerful as glucose-lowering medication… with fewer side effects. Regular physical activity, in conjunction wi Continue reading >>

11 Exercise Tips For Type 2 Diabetes

11 Exercise Tips For Type 2 Diabetes

Exercise is sure to be on your to-do list if you have diabetes. Get started with these go-to tips: 1. Make a list of fun activities. You have lots of options, and you don't have to go to a gym. What sounds good? Think about something you've always wanted to try or something you enjoyed in the past. Sports, dancing, yoga, walking, and swimming are a few ideas. Anything that raises your heart rate counts. 2. Get your doctor's OK. Let them know what you want to do. They can make sure you're ready for it. They'll also check to see if you need to change your meals, insulin, or diabetes medicines. Your doctor can also let you know if the time of day you exercise matters. 3. Check your blood sugar. Ask your doctor if you should check it before exercise. If you plan to work out for more than an hour, check your blood sugar levels regularly during your workout, so you’ll know if you need a snack. Check your blood sugar after every workout, so that you can adjust if needed. 4. Carry carbs. Always keep a small carbohydrate snack, like fruit or a fruit drink, on hand in case your blood sugar gets low. 5. Ease into it. If you're not active now, start with 10 minutes of exercise at a time. Gradually work up to 30 minutes a day. 6. Strength train at least twice a week. It can improve blood sugar control. You can lift weights or work with resistance bands. Or you can do moves like push-ups, lunges, and squats, which use your own body weight. 7. Make it a habit. Exercise, eat, and take your medicines at the same time each day to prevent low blood sugar, also called hypoglycemia. 8. Go public. Work out with someone who knows you have diabetes and knows what to do if your blood sugar gets too low. It's more fun, too. Also wear a medical identification tag, or carry a card that says you Continue reading >>

I Have A Friend Who Is Diabetic. What Kinds Of Fruits/vegetables/breads/dairy Products Can He Have?

I Have A Friend Who Is Diabetic. What Kinds Of Fruits/vegetables/breads/dairy Products Can He Have?

Your food choices matter a lot when you've got diabetes. Some are better than others. Nothing is completely off limits. Even items that you might think of as “the worst" could be occasional treats -- in tiny amounts. But they won’t help you nutrition-wise, and it’s easiest to manage your diabetes if you mainly stick to the “best” options. Starches Your body needs carbs. But you want to choose wisely. Use this list as a guide. Best Choices Worst Choices Processed grains, such as white rice or white flour Cereals with little whole grains and lots of sugar White bread French fries Fried white-flour tortillas Vegetables Load up! You’ll get fiber and very little fat or salt (unless you add them). Remember, potatoes and corn count as carbs. Best Choices Fresh veggies, eaten raw or lightly steamed, roasted, or grilled Plain frozen vegetables, lightly steamed Greens such as kale, spinach, and arugula. Iceberg lettuce is not as great, because it’s low in nutrients. Go for a variety of colors: dark greens, red or orange (think of carrots or red peppers), whites (onions) and even purple (eggplants). The 2015 U.S. guidelines recommend 2.5 cups of veggies per day. Worst Choices Canned vegetables with lots of added sodium Veggies cooked with lots of added butter, cheese, or sauce Pickles, if you need to limit sodium -- otherwise, pickles are okay. Fruits They give you carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Most are naturally low in fat and sodium. But they tend to have more carbs than vegetables do. Best Choices Worst Choices Protein You have lots of choices, including beef, chicken, fish, pork, turkey, seafood, beans, cheese, eggs, nuts, and tofu. Best Choices The American Diabetes Association lists these as the top options: If you eat meat, keep it low in fat. Continue reading >>

Benefits Of Physical Activity — Why Regular Exercise Is One Of The Most Effective Tools In Diabetes Management

Benefits Of Physical Activity — Why Regular Exercise Is One Of The Most Effective Tools In Diabetes Management

Today’s Dietitian Vol. 16 No. 5 P. 12 Clients and patients with diabetes hear about the importance of diet, nutrition, and meal plans all the time. Nutrition often is referred to as the cornerstone of diabetes control. But physical activity is just as beneficial for those who want to live well with the disease since regular exercise improves blood glucose control and has other health benefits. When Jennifer Smith, RD, LD, CDE, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes more than 25 years ago, one of the most beneficial recommendations she and her parents received from her pediatric endocrinologist was to stay active. Her physician emphasized how important daily movement is for diabetes management. Smith says that through the years, she’s continued to remember this recommendation. As an adult, Smith continues to be active. In fact, several years ago, she began participating in triathlons. After several small sprint distance races, she realized she needed to revamp her routine during her races to maintain diabetes control for optimal performance. She attended a camp that catered specifically to athletes with diabetes. As the director of lifestyle and nutrition at Integrated Diabetes Services in Wynnewood, Pennsylvania, Smith found her camp experience beneficial to herself and for the training and education of her clients with diabetes. Smith, who completed her first full marathon this past January, knows firsthand about the advantages of daily movement. “My blood glucose, along with other health measurements like cholesterol and blood pressure, remains most optimal when I move daily,” she says. Exercise and Glucose Regulation It’s common knowledge that regular physical activity improves blood glucose control, reduces cardiovascular risk factors, contributes to weight lo Continue reading >>

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