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How Does Weight Affect Diabetes

The Dilemma Of Weight Loss In Diabetes

The Dilemma Of Weight Loss In Diabetes

People with diabetes receive mixed messages about weight loss from magazines, newspapers, friends, family, and, yes, even health professionals. Few subjects have accumulated as much misleading and potentially dangerous folklore as the subject of obesity. A common message is that losing weight is just a matter of willpower, and if you have been losing weight and reach a plateau, it's because you've lost your willpower and are no longer following your diet. Furthermore, for people with type 2 diabetes, the message often is that weight loss is the answer to improving glucose control: “If you just lose 20 lb, you won't need insulin.” What does research tell us about these issues, and what should our messages as health professionals be to people with diabetes? Obesity is a serious worldwide problem and is associated with the risk of developing diabetes. Today, more than 1.1 billion adults worldwide are overweight, and 312 million of them are obese.1 In the past 20 years, the rates of obesity have tripled in developing countries that have adopted a Western lifestyle, with the Middle East, Pacific Islands, Southeast Asia, India, and China facing the greatest increase. Consequently, the number of people with diabetes in these countries is expected to increase from 84 million in 2000 to 228 million by 2030. Thus, preventing obesity is a high priority for the prevention of diabetes and other chronic diseases. According to some obesity researchers, it may not be possible to decrease the current numbers of overweight and obese people in the United States, but we need to try to slow or prevent the increase that has been occurring at an alarming rate.2 The hope is that slowing the rising prevalence of obesity will also slow the diabetes epidemic. Can this be accomplished? Thus fa Continue reading >>

Losing Weight Can Have Big Impact On Those With Diabetes

Losing Weight Can Have Big Impact On Those With Diabetes

Losing Weight Can Have Big Impact on Those with Diabetes December 14, 2012 Dear Mayo Clinic: Can type 2 diabetes be cured just by losing weight? Answer: Losing weight can have a big impact on diabetes. Although it might not cure type 2 diabetes in every case, getting to a healthy body weight does have that potential for many people. Even if it doesn't completely cure the disease, losing weight may make it possible for people with diabetes to take less medication. It often helps manage or prevent some of the health problems that can come with diabetes, too. People who have diabetes have too much sugar in their blood. This happens because of a problem with the hormone called insulin. Insulin is made in the pancreas — a gland located just behind the stomach. When you eat, the pancreas releases insulin into your bloodstream. The insulin allows sugar to enter your cells, lowering the amount of sugar in your blood. If you have type 2 diabetes, the pancreas does not make enough insulin or your body cannot use insulin as well as it should. So sugar cannot move into your cells. Instead, it builds up in your blood. The reason why type 2 diabetes develops is not completely clear. But being overweight plays a role. In people who are overweight, the body sometimes needs as much as two to three times more insulin than it would if it was at a healthy weight. In those who develop diabetes, that is more insulin than the pancreas is able to produce. When the pancreas tries to make that much insulin, it is pushed beyond its capacity and insulin-producing cells start to die. That makes the situation worse because the pancreas then has even fewer cells with which to make insulin. Compounding the problem, research also has shown that fat cells of people who are obese and who have more abdo Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: 8 Steps To Weight-loss Success

Type 2 Diabetes: 8 Steps To Weight-loss Success

Losing weight is at the top of many people's to-do lists. But for those with type 2 diabetes, weight control is especially important. “Carrying excess body fat increases the body's resistence to insulin, making blood glucose management more challenging,” says Sue McLaughlin, RD, CDE, past 2009 national president of health care and education for the American Diabetes Association. "According to the World Health Organization, 90 percent of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese." In fact, research indicates that the longer someone has a high body mass index or BMI (a common measure of being overweight or obese), the greater their risk of developing type 2 diabetes. It’s no secret that losing weight — and keeping it off — isn’t easy. But it is possible, and the benefits for those with diabetes are great. So how do you get started? Experts say the right way to lose weight is to incorporate a healthful diet into your overall diabetes management plan. Diabetes Diet Control: Steps to Success Here's how to get started on the path to weight-loss success: Get physical. Exercise can help keep off the weight. “Research shows that people who increase physical activity along with reducing calorie intake will lose more body fat than people who only diet,” says McLaughlin, now a certified diabetes educator at Nebraska Medicine, Children's Hospital and Endocrine Clinics, in Omaha and Lincoln, Nebraska. For confirmation, look at the National Weight Control Registry (NWCR), a database of 10,000 men and women who have lost a significant amount of weight and kept it off. Only 10 percent reached and maintained their weight-loss goal without exercise. Most people in the register chose walking as their form of exercise. Eat breakfast. The most effective diabetes die Continue reading >>

Understanding Excess Weight And Its Role In Type 2 Diabetes Brochure

Understanding Excess Weight And Its Role In Type 2 Diabetes Brochure

To view a PDF version of this brochure, please click here. To view a digital version of this brochure, click here. Please Note: Throughout this brochure, the words “glucose” and “sugar” are used interchangeably. This brochure is designed to help you better understand the impact of excess weight and its role in type 2 diabetes. Excess weight, obesity and severe obesity are all risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes. Often times, individuals are not aware of the health risk of excess weight until they are diagnosed with pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes. Through this educational brochure, we hope to provide you with the information needed to improve your quality of health. We will cover various topics, such as: Type 2 diabetes Complications of high blood sugar levels Risk factors for type 2 diabetes and much more What is type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes is a chronic, potentially debilitating and often fatal medical condition requiring regular monitoring of an individual’s blood sugar level and treatment. In type 2 diabetes, the body either does not properly produce or use insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas that helps move sugar into cells. Therefore, the body becomes resistant to insulin. This resistance causes high blood sugar levels. What are the complications of high blood sugar levels? Excess sugar in the blood causes many health-related problems. The cells cannot get enough of the sugar they need, and when sugar levels in the blood become too high, it causes damage to nerves and blood vessels, usually in the heart, feet, hands, kidneys and eyes. Other complications of high sugar and insulin resistance include: Increased risk of heart disease and stroke Neuropathy (nerve damage, especially in extremities) Nephropathy (renal impairment, kidney fai Continue reading >>

Why Does Obesity Cause Diabetes?

Why Does Obesity Cause Diabetes?

Being overweight or obese increases the chances of developing the common type of diabetes, type 2 diabetes. In this disease, the body makes enough insulin but the cells in the body have become resistant to the salutary action of insulin. Why does this happen? New Research: A report this week in Science proposes that being overweight stresses the insides of individual cells. Specifically, overeating stresses the membranous network inside of cells called endoplasmic reticulum (ER). When the ER has more nutrients to process than it can handle, it sends out an alarm signal telling the cell to dampen down the insulin receptors on the cell surface. This translates to insulin resistance and to persistently high concentrations of the sugar glucose in the blood -- one of the sure signs of diabetes. Comment: Research into diabetes today is far ranging. It ranges from the environment to the deep dark recesses of the single cell. It is much easier to look at the environment, for example, "Super Size Me" in a fast-food culture, than it is to sort out what is going on inside the workings of an individual cell. Barbara K. Hecht, Ph.D. Frederick Hecht, M.D. Medical Editors, MedicineNet.com Study Suggests How Obesity Causes Diabetes HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDayNews) -- Scientists know that obesity is a key player in the development of type 2 diabetes, but exactly how excess weight causes the disease isn't clear. While trying to answer that question, Harvard University researchers have discovered a new pathway that sets in motion a series of reactions that leads to the development of insulin resistance, a precursor of type 2 diabetes, a new study reports. The researchers found that obesity causes stress in a system of cellular membranes called endoplasmic reticulum (ER Continue reading >>

Managing Type 2 Diabetes: Does Bmi Matter?

Managing Type 2 Diabetes: Does Bmi Matter?

Managing Type 2 Diabetes: Does BMI Matter? Content in this special section was created or selected by the Everyday Health editorial team and is funded by an advertising sponsor. The content is subject to Everyday Healths editorial standards for accuracy, objectivity, and balance. The sponsor does not edit or influence the content but may suggest the general topic area. Managing Type 2 Diabetes: Does BMI Matter? Your body mass index can be an important measurement to know for diabetes and weight management. However, there are some downsides to the calculation. Sign Up for Our Living with Diabetes Newsletter Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . Obesity and type 2 diabetes are closely related. Having a higher amount of body fat increases your chances of developing diabetes. And, if you have diabetes, extra weight means youre at higher risk for complications like a heart attack or stroke. When youre talking about diabetes and weight , your doctor will likely refer to your body mass index (BMI), which is a measure of how much body fat you have. Its an important measurement for diabetes and weight management, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), but it does have its limitations. Heres what you need to know about your BMI and how it fits into your weight management program with diabetes. You can calculate your own BMI by dividing your weight in pounds by your height in inches squared. Then multiply that number by 703. If you dont want to do the math, you can plug your information into an online BMI calculator, like the one available on the website of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In general, a BMI of 18.5 to 24.9 is considered a normal, or healthy, weight. A BMI that ranges from 25 to 29.9 is considered overweight. And a Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Obesity

Diabetes And Obesity

The number of obese people in the UK is forecast to rise by 73% over the next 2 decades The UK currently ranks as the country with the highest level of obesity in Europe, with more than 1 in 4 (28.1%) adults obese and nearly two out of three (63.4%) overweight. Over the next 20 years, the number of obese adults in the country is forecast to soar to 26 million people. According to health experts, such a rise would result in more than a million extra cases of type 2 diabetes , heart disease and cancer . [10] Obesity is also no longer a condition that just affects older people, although the likelihood does increase with age, and increasing numbers of young people have been diagnosed with obesity. Data from Public Health England suggests that nearly a third (31.2%) of children aged 2 to 15 years old are obese. Links between obesity and type 2 diabetes While the exact causes of diabetes are still not fully understood, it is known that factors up the risk of developing different types of diabetes mellitus. For type 2 diabetes, this includes being overweight or obese (having a body mass index - BMI - of 30 or greater). In fact, obesity is believed to account for 80-85% of the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, while recent research suggests that obese people are up to 80 times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those with a BMI of less than 22 . It is a well-known fact that if you are overweight or obese, you are at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes, particularly if you have excess weight around your tummy (abdomen). Studies suggest that abdominal fat causes fat cells to release pro-inflammatory chemicals, which can make the body less sensitive to the insulin it produces by disrupting the function of insulin responsive cells and their ability to respond to Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: How To Lose Weight

Type 2 Diabetes: How To Lose Weight

Weight loss is a common recommendation for treatment for type 2 diabetes. Many people are overweight when they’re first diagnosed, and that extra fat actually increases their insulin resistance (when their bodies can’t properly use the hormone insulin). By losing weight, people with type 2 diabetes can become less insulin resistant, and they’re able to use insulin better. (To learn more about how the hormone insulin works, read our article on how insulin regulates blood glucose levels.) If you’ve recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and you're overweight, you should get started as soon as possible on a weight loss plan. It is important to work with a registered dietitian to help you figure out a plan that will work for you—a healthy meal plan, physical activity, and realistic goals will help you reach a healthy weight. There are many advantages to losing weight (and not just diabetes-related ones): Boost your energy level Lower your cholesterol levels (especially important for people with type 2 diabetes) Protect your heart (also important for people with diabetes, since heart-related complications are very common) Make it easier to control your blood glucose level As you may already know, losing weight can be a challenge, but don’t let that stop you. Do whatever you need to in order to stay motivated. It is the amount of calories we eat that contributes to weight gain. Make small changes. Learn portion sizes and reduce the amount of snacks in your day to reduce the total amount of calories you consume each day. Find cookbooks with healthier recipes using low-fat options. For a little fun, take our carb counting quiz to see how well you know the carb content of certain foods; this can help you make healthier choices. Work with a registered dietitian Continue reading >>

Will Weight Loss Help Your Diabetes?

Will Weight Loss Help Your Diabetes?

There's no question about it. If you're overweight and have type 2 diabetes, you will lower your blood sugar, improve your health, and feel better if you lose some of your extra pounds. You'll want to work closely with your doctor or diabetes educator, because your blood sugar, insulin, and medications will need special attention while you're losing weight. If you drop even 10 or 15 pounds, that has health perks, such as: Lower blood sugar Lower blood pressure Better cholesterol levels Less stress on your hips, knees, ankles, and feet More energy Brighter mood The Right Balance for Diabetes and Weight Loss Keep tight control over your blood sugar levels while you lose weight. You don't want to get high or low levels while you change your eating habits. It’s generally safe for someone with diabetes to cut 500 calories a day. Trim from protein, carbohydrates, and fat. The USDA says that calories for adults should come from: 45% to 55% carbs 25% to 35% fat 10% to 35% protein Carbs have the biggest effect on blood sugar. Those that have fiber (whole-grain bread and vegetables, for example) are much better than eating sugary or starchy carbs, because they’re less likely to spike your blood sugar and quickly make it crash. How Exercise Helps One of the many benefits of working out is that it helps keep your blood sugar in balance. You're also more likely to keep the pounds off if you're active. If you're not active now, check in with your doctor first. She can let you know if there are any limits on what you can do. Aim to get at least 2.5 hours a week of moderate aerobic exercise, like brisk walking, to improve your health. You can split up the time any way you choose. To help yourself lose weight you’ll need to do more physical activity. You should also do strength tr Continue reading >>

Weight And Diabetes

Weight And Diabetes

A balanced diet and an active lifestyle can help all kids maintain a healthy weight. For kids with diabetes, diet and exercise are even more important because weight can affect diabetes and diabetes can affect weight. This is true for kids and teens with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes. In diabetes, the body doesn't use glucose properly. Glucose, a sugar, is the main source of energy for the body. Glucose levels are controlled by a hormone called insulin , which is made in the pancreas. In type 1 diabetes , the pancreas does not make enough insulin. Undiagnosed or untreated type 1 diabetes can cause weight loss. Glucose builds up in the bloodstream if insulin isn't available to move it into the body's cells. When glucose levels become high, the kidneys work to get rid of unused sugar through urine (pee). This causes weight loss due to dehydration and loss of calories from the sugar that wasn't used as energy. Kids who develop type 1 diabetes often lose weight even though they have a normal or increased appetite. Once kids are diagnosed and treated for type 1 diabetes, weight usually returns to normal. Developing type 1 diabetes isn't related to being overweight, but keeping a healthy weight is important. Too much fat tissue can make it hard for insulin to work properly, leading to both higher insulin needs and trouble controlling blood sugar. In type 2 diabetes , the pancreas still makes insulin, but the insulin doesn't work in the body like it should and blood sugar levels get too high. Most kids and teens are overweight when they're diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese increases a person's risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Also, weight gain in people with type 2 diabetes makes blood sugar levels even harder to control. People with type 2 di Continue reading >>

Digestive Weight Loss Center

Digestive Weight Loss Center

Diabetes is a very serious disease that causes high blood sugar levels (elevated blood glucose). The American Diabetes Association estimates that about eight percent of Americans suffer from diabetes. Diabetes: What You Need to Know People with diabetes have an increased risk of strokes, heart attacks, high-blood pressure, kidney disease and blindness. If you are obese, you can reduce your risk of developing diabetes by eating a low-fat, low-sugar diet and exercising regularly. If you can lose 5-10 percent of your body weight, you will lower your risk of developing diabetes by 58 percent. Johns Hopkins can help you lose this weight with our weight loss services, including behavior modification, nutritional counseling and a new, special endoscopic procedure. Learn more about our weight loss services. Types of Diabetes There are three types of diabetes: Type 1, Type 2 and gestational (diabetes that occurs during pregnancy). Type 1 typically occurs during childhood. Type 2 diabetes is the most common type and is linked to obesity. See a table that explains blood sugar values and types of diabetes. How diabetes is harmful Most people don’t really understand the way diabetes works, but a firm grasp of how it affects your body chemistry will help you better control the disease. Your body is made up of millions of cells, and these cells use glucose as their energy source. Your body gets glucose from the food that you eat. After a meal, your body secrets a hormone called insulin into your blood; insulin works as a signal to let your cells know that glucose is on the way to feed your cells. But, for people with diabetes, the signals that tell the cells to absorb the sugar are defective, or the body does not make enough insulin. As a result, high levels of glucose remain in the Continue reading >>

Why It Pays To Lose Weight If You Have Type 2 Diabetes

Why It Pays To Lose Weight If You Have Type 2 Diabetes

The point is not to get skinny. The point is to gain the benefits of exercise.(ISTOCKPHOTO) About eight out of every 10 people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese, and excess weight—particularly around the bellyis a major cause of type 2 diabetes. Some people can even "cure" the disease with massive weight loss (including bariatric surgery). However, the relationship between weight and type 2 diabetes is a tricky one. Complex relationship between genes, weight, and diabetes An unexplained weight loss is sometimes a sign that's something wrong. So when you are finally diagnosed and treated you may actually gain weight. In addition, it's not clear if extra weight causes diabetes, or if some underlying genetic component contributes to both. "A lot of folks who are overweight and who are sedentary won't get diabetes. So there's an important genetic contribution to developing diabetes that's out of people's control," says William Bornstein, MD, an endocrinologist at the Emory Clinic in Atlanta. "Secondly, it may be actually harder for folks with diabetes to lose weight, that that may be part of the disease as well." Certain diabetes drugs, such as sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones, meglitinides, and insulin, are associated with weight gain, too. However, the blood-sugar-lowering benefits of these drugs outweigh the risks of gaining weight. (Others, such as Byetta and metformin, may result in weight loss). While it may feel like the deck is stacked against youparticularly if you've lost and regained weight in the pastyou should still make an all-out effort to shed excess pounds. Now that you have type 2 diabetes, the goal isn't to get back into your high school jeans, but to prevent heart attacks, save your vision, and avoid amputations. Trying to lose weight is im Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: 7 Surprising Things That Affect Weight

Type 2 Diabetes: 7 Surprising Things That Affect Weight

Type 2 Diabetes: 7 Surprising Things That Affect Weight Could you be sabotaging your diabetes weight loss plan without knowing it? Learn about the factors that may be standing between you and a healthier weight. Medically Reviewed by Rosalyn Carson-DeWitt, MD Sign Up for Our Living with Diabetes Newsletter Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . It may not surprise you to know that being overweight or obese and having type 2 diabetes can increase your risk of diabetes-related complications. Or that, on the flipside, losing a few pounds through healthy habits like eating well and exercising can help reduce your risk for these complications and other health conditions. But what you might not realize is that even if you think youre doing everything right, you may be sabotaging your own your weight-loss efforts without even knowing it. Here are 7 surprising factors that may be standing between you and a healthier weight and tips to tackle these obstacles and get back on the path to success from two certified diabetes educators (CDEs). Weight Loss Obstacle #1: Youre overwhelmed. Remedy: Commit. Renew the commitment daily in increments, if necessary. If youre overweight or obese, the prospect of losing weight, and then maintaining it, can be daunting. Its a commitment and you need to renew that commitment every day, says Margaret Powers, PhD, RD, CDE, president of Health Care and Education for the American Diabetes Association. To make it less intimidating, she suggests thinking about the commitment as though youre just making it for today. Start by committing to making healthy choices in the morning, she recommends. And then add on. Commit to making healthy choices at lunch, then at snack time, after work, at dinner, and so on. Do this each day and keep working Continue reading >>

The Importance Of Weight Management In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

The Importance Of Weight Management In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Go to: Abstract The obesity epidemic is driving the increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and the vast majority of patients with T2DM are overweight or obese. Excess body weight is associated with the risk of cardiometabolic complications, which are major causes of morbidity and mortality in T2DM. To review evidence about effects of weight loss in pre-diabetes and established T2DM. Results In prediabetes, weight loss has been shown to delay the onset or decrease the risk of T2DM, while in established T2DM weight loss has been shown to improve glycaemic control, with severe calorie restriction even reversing the progression of T2DM. Observational studies support the reduction in cardiovascular risk factors following weight loss in patients with T2DM. However, data from the randomised Look AHEAD trial revealed intensive weight loss interventions did not reduce the rate of cardiovascular events in overweight or obese adults with T2DM, and secondary analyses of other large cardiovascular outcomes trials have also been inconclusive. However, besides cardiovascular risk, other documented benefits of weight loss in T2DM include improvements in quality of life, mobility, and physical and sexual function. Conclusions Physicians should encourage weight loss in all overweight patients with or at risk of T2DM, and should consider the impact on weight when choosing the most appropriate glucose-lowering therapies for these patients. Continue reading >>

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible?

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible?

Type 2 diabetes is a serious, long-term medical condition. It develops mostly in adults but is becoming more common in children as obesity rates rise across all age groups. Several factors contribute to type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese is the biggest risk factor. Type 2 diabetes can be life-threatening. But if treated carefully, it can be managed or even reversed. Your pancreas makes a hormone called insulin. When your blood sugar (glucose) levels rise, the pancreas releases insulin. This causes sugar to move from your blood to your cells, where it can be used as an energy source. As glucose levels in your blood go back down, your pancreas stops releasing insulin. Type 2 diabetes impacts how you metabolize sugar. Either your pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin or your body has become resistant to its effects. This causes glucose to build up in the blood. This is called hyperglycemia. There are several symptoms of untreated type 2 diabetes, including: excessive thirst and urination fatigue increased hunger weight loss, in spite of eating more infections that heal slowly blurry vision dark patches on the skin Treatment for type 2 diabetes includes monitoring your blood sugar levels and using medications or insulin when needed. Doctors also recommend losing weight through diet and exercise. Some diabetes medications have weight loss as a side effect, which can also help reverse diabetes. If you start eating healthier, get more exercise, and lose weight, you can reduce your symptoms. Research shows that these lifestyle changes, especially physical activity, can even reverse the course of the condition. Studies that show the reversal of type 2 diabetes include participants who have lived with the condition for only a few years. Weight loss is the primary fact Continue reading >>

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