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How Does Water Affect Glucose Tolerance Test

Diagnosing Diabetes

Diagnosing Diabetes

In diagnosing diabetes, physicians primarily depend upon the results of specific glucose tests. However, test results are just part of the information that goes into the diagnosis of type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Doctors also take into account your physical exam, presence or absence of symptoms, and medical history. Some people who are significantly ill will have transient problems with elevated blood sugars, which will then return to normal after the illness has resolved. Also, some medications may alter your blood glucose levels (most commonly steroids and certain diuretics, such as water pills). The 2 main tests used to measure the presence of blood sugar problems are the direct measurement of glucose levels in the blood during an overnight fast and measurement of the body's ability to appropriately handle the excess sugar presented after drinking a high glucose drink. Fasting Blood Glucose (Blood Sugar) Level A value above 126 mg/dL on at least 2 occasions typically means a person has diabetes. The Oral Glucose Tolerance Test An oral glucose tolerance test is one that can be performed in a doctor's office or a lab. The person being tested starts the test in a fasting state (having no food or drink except water for at least 10 hours but not greater than 16 hours). An initial blood sugar is drawn and then the person is given a "glucola" bottle with a high amount of sugar in it (75 grams of glucose or 100 grams for pregnant women). The person then has their blood tested again 30 minutes, 1 hour, 2 hours, and 3 hours after drinking the high glucose drink. For the test to give reliable results, you must be in good health (not have any other illnesses, not even a cold). Also, you should be normally active (for example, not lying down or confined to a bed like a patient in a Continue reading >>

Glucose Screening Tests During Pregnancy

Glucose Screening Tests During Pregnancy

TWO-STEP TESTING During the first step, you will have a glucose screening test: You DO NOT need to prepare or change your diet in any way. You will be asked to drink a liquid that contains glucose. Your blood will be drawn 1 hour after you drink the glucose solution to check your blood glucose level. If your blood glucose from the first step is too high, you will need to come back for a 3-hour glucose tolerance test. For this test: DO NOT eat or drink anything (other than sips of water) for 8 to 14 hours before your test. (You also cannot eat during the test.) You will be asked to drink a liquid that contains glucose, 100 grams (g) . You will have blood drawn before you drink the liquid, and again 3 more times every 60 minutes after you drink it. Each time, your blood glucose level will be checked. Allow at least 3 hours for this test. ONE-STEP TESTING You need to go to the lab one time for a 2-hour glucose tolerance test. For this test: DO NOT eat or drink anything (other than sips of water) for 8 to 14 hours before your test. (You also cannot eat during the test.) You will be asked to drink a liquid that contains glucose (75 g). You will have blood drawn before you drink the liquid, and again 2 more times every 60 minutes after you drink it. Each time, your blood glucose level will be checked. Allow at least 2 hours for this test. Continue reading >>

One Hour Glucose Test Instructions

One Hour Glucose Test Instructions

Your one hour glucose test (also called “28 week labs”) can be done at any time of day. Drink all of the glucola beverage within a five minute period. Do not eat or drink other fluids after drinking the glucola. (A small amount of water is okay.) Arrive at the lab (with your lab) slip 40 minutes after you finished drinking your glucola to allow time for check in. Your blood needs to be drawn 1 hour after you have finished drinking the glucola. Bring a high-protein snack (such as crackers and cheese or peanut butter) to eat after your lab is drawn. Please note that although you may eat prior to drinking the glucola it is important not to have eaten sugary foods. This may alter your test results. We will have your test results available at your next scheduled office visit. If your results are abnormal, additional testing will be ordered and we will call you to schedule those tests. Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Tests: What Exactly Do They Involve?

Glucose Tolerance Tests: What Exactly Do They Involve?

Oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) are used to measure how well the body can process a larger amount of sugar. If the blood sugar measured in the test is above a certain level, this could be a sign that sugar is not being absorbed enough by the body’s cells. Diabetes or gestational diabetes might be at the root of this problem. In gestational diabetes, blood sugar levels are often higher due to changes in the metabolism during pregnancy – but they usually come back down again after the child is born. What types of glucose tolerance tests are there? There are two types of glucose tolerance tests: a short version called the glucose challenge test, and a full glucose tolerance test. The short version is easier to do and serves as a preliminal test to determine someone's risk of diabetes or gestational diabetes. Glucose challenge test The glucose challenge test is the short version of the glucose tolerance test. The test can be done at any time of the day. It involves drinking a glass of concentrated glucose solution (50 g of glucose dissolved in 250 to 300 ml of water). After one hour has passed, a blood sample is taken to determine the blood sugar level. Glucose tolerance test For this test, you should not eat anything before going to the doctor in the morning. In other words, you should not have breakfast, and you should eat your last meal the evening before. This also applies to all drinks with the exception of water. First of all, blood is taken to determine your baseline blood sugar level. The blood is drawn from a vein or your fingertip or earlobe. After that you drink a large glass of concentrated sugar solution. In the glucose tolerance test, 75 g of glucose are dissolved in 250 to 300 ml of water. The amount given to children is based on their body weight. If Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test - And What The Results Mean

Glucose Tolerance Test - And What The Results Mean

If you've been told you've got to have a GTT, here's what you need to do, what to expect on the day and how this could indicate gestational diabetes The Glucose Tolerance Test (aka the GTT - not to be mixed up with a G&T) is a test carried out during pregnancy to detect whether you may have Gestational Diabetes (GD). No, not everyone who's pregnant has one. You'll only be offered one if your midwife thinks there's a likelihood you could develop Gestational Diabetes during your pregnancy. "Not every hospital routinely carries out glucose tolerance tests," says independent midwife Pam Wild, "but you can ask for one if you are worried and you think you need to be tested." While most tests are carried out between 26 and 28 weeks, sometimes you may be given the test around 16 weeks, depending on your medical history. Main reasons your midwife or GP will recommend you take a Glucose Tolerance Test (GTT) are: you have previously had diabetes in pregnancy you have a history of diabetes in your immediate family if you have previously had a very big baby (4.5kg or heavier) if they have found sugar or ketones in your urine for pregnant women of certain ethnic origins (Black Caribbean, South Asian and Middle Eastern) if your BMI (body mass index) is 30 or above A glucose tolerance test (GTT) or oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) measures your blood glucose levels. In the test, your blood is taken, and you're then given a glucose drink. After 2 hours your blood is taken again to see how quickly your body is able to clear the glucose from your blood. That gives an indication of whether you're showing signs of GD. How do I take a glucose tolerance test? Make sure you have a good meal as you'll have to fast from midnight and won't be able to eat anything until after the test - although Continue reading >>

All You Need To Know About The Glucose Tolerance Test

All You Need To Know About The Glucose Tolerance Test

Most of the food people eat is turned directly into glucose when digested, and the body uses it as energy. The pancreas is responsible for making the hormone insulin which helps to get glucose into the cells of the body. Diabetes is a long-term disease that occurs due to the pancreas not producing enough insulin or the body being unable to use the insulin it produces effectively. The body is unable to process food properly to use for energy. Glucose builds up in the blood, which can lead to severe health problems. There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults and is also known as juvenile diabetes. With type 1 diabetes the body does not produce insulin. According to The American Diabetes Association, only 5 percent of people with diabetes have type 1. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. In people with type 2 diabetes, their body does not use insulin properly, which is known as insulin resistance. The pancreas responds by making more insulin to cover the deficiency but is not able to keep blood glucose at normal levels. As glucose builds up in the blood, the body's cells do not receive the energy they need. Over time, high blood glucose levels can damage the eyes, kidneys, nerves, and heart. Glucose tolerance test: Testing for diabetes A simple blood test can often detect diabetes. If the test produces borderline results, a glucose tolerance test may help with the final diagnosis. In a healthy person, glucose levels will rise after eating a meal and return to normal once the glucose is used or stored by the body. A glucose tolerance test can help to work out the difference between normal glucose levels and the levels seen in diabetes and prediabetes. The glucose tolerance test is used to measure t Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test

Glucose Tolerance Test

What is a glucose tolerance test? A glucose tolerance test measures how well your body’s cells are able to absorb glucose, or sugar, after you ingest a given amount of sugar. Doctors use fasting blood sugar levels and hemoglobin A1c values to diagnose type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and prediabetes. A glucose tolerance test can also be used. Doctors primarily use a glucose tolerance test to diagnose gestational diabetes. Doctors often diagnose type 1 diabetes quickly because it usually develops quickly and involves high blood sugar levels. Type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, often develops over years. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, and it usually develops during adulthood. Gestational diabetes occurs when a pregnant woman who doesn’t have diabetes before pregnancy has high blood sugar levels as a result of the pregnancy. The American Diabetes Association estimates that gestational diabetes occurs in 9.2 percent of pregnancies. Doctors should screen all women for gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes can cause pregnancy complications, so early detection and prompt treatment are important. If you’re pregnant, your doctor will usually recommend this test between the 24th and 28th week of your pregnancy. Your doctor may also recommend that you have this test earlier if you’re having the symptoms of prediabetes or diabetes. Preparing for the glucose tolerance test involves the following: Continue to eat a normal diet in the days leading up to the test. Consult with your doctor about any medications you’re currently taking. Some medications, such as corticosteroids, beta-blockers, diuretics, and antidepressants, can interfere with the results. Abstain from food for at least eight hours before the scheduled test. You may drink water, but avoid Continue reading >>

U Of A Research Suggests Drinking Water Affects Glucose Regulation

U Of A Research Suggests Drinking Water Affects Glucose Regulation

If you have Type 2 diabetes, does the amount of water you drink affect the way your body regulates glucose? That's the research question that faculty and students in Hydration Science Lab at the University of Arkansas explored for a paper recently published by the Nutrition Research journal. The lab, directed by Stavros Kavouras, a professor of exercise science, conducts research into many aspects of hydration and its effect on health and performance. The project described in Nutrition Research suggested the answer was yes, water intake does affect glucose regulation. The bottom line was that hydration status should be considered when patients with Type 2 diabetes take oral glucose tolerance tests, the researchers said. "What is interesting is that the majority of people do not meet the dietary guidelines for water both in the United States and around the world," Kavouras said. "Data from American kids indicate that most of them are underhydrated while one in every four do not drink plain water. It would be interesting to see how this behavior could influence their ability to regulate glucose." Nine men between the ages of 44 and 62 who had previously been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes and were considered sedentary completed the study. Type 2 diabetes can develop at any age but most commonly becomes apparent during adulthood. People with Type 2 diabetes cannot use insulin effectively. Type 1 diabetes is less common and was formerly called juvenile-onset diabetes. People with Type 1 diabetes either completely lack insulin or have too little of it. Insulin is a hormone that helps the body's cells use sugar, or glucose, for energy. Each man came to the Hydration Science Lab facilities in the HPER building to take two identical two-hour oral glucose tolerance tests in whic Continue reading >>

What Is The Fasting Blood Sugar Test?

What Is The Fasting Blood Sugar Test?

The fasting blood sugar test (FBS) measures the amount of glucose (sugar) in your blood when you have not had anything to eat or drink for several hours. This test is also called a fasting plasma glucose test (FBS). Why is this test done? The most common use of this test is to check for diabetes. How do I prepare for this test? The simplest way to check for diabetes is to check your blood sugar before you've had anything to eat or drink in the morning. In most cases you will fast overnight, eating nothing and drinking nothing but water after your evening meal and in the morning before your blood is drawn. If you do shift work, it's best to have your blood checked after your usual sleeping time (after at least 6 hours of sleep) and before you start your active day. When you wake up, you should have nothing to eat and nothing to drink except water before your blood is drawn. You may need to avoid taking certain medicines before the test because they might affect the test result. Make sure your healthcare provider knows about any medicines, herbs, or supplements that you are taking. Don't stop any of your regular medicines without first consulting with your healthcare provider. Talk to your healthcare provider if you have any questions. How is the test done? Your healthcare provider may poke your finger with a lancet and fill a small tube with the blood. Or a small amount of blood may be taken from your arm with a needle. The blood is sent to a lab. Having this test will take just a few minutes. Ask your healthcare provider when and how you will get the result of your test. What does the test result mean? The normal fasting blood sugar range in most labs is 70 to 99 milligrams per deciliter (3.9 to 5.5 millimoles per liter). A fasting blood sugar level of 100 to 125 mg/dL Continue reading >>

3 Hr Gtt- No Water?!

3 Hr Gtt- No Water?!

Home > Groups > February 2011 Babies > 3 Hr GTT- No Water?! See active discussions on February 2011 Babies I failed my 1 hr glucose test by only 5 points (145) and I'm scheduled for a 3 hr test in a few days and I have to fast after midnight without even drinking water! My appointment is a 8:15am. I'm worried that not even being allowed to drink water will cause me to be dehydrated and pass out. How safe can that be? I'm already worried about not eating for that long but no water seems ridiculous. Anyone else go through this? How did you deal? @AveryInFebruary I did it. It wasn't that horrible. I was a little nauseous but otherwise ok. I passed!! And I ran right out to Tim Hortons and ate/drank a ton! Good luck I hope you pass too! @AveryInFebruary Really? I was allowed water. I guess different doctors and labs...different opinions. @AveryInFebruary I also was so confused on how this could possibly be good for me and the baby, my test didn't start till 9am! It wasn't that bad though! Before I left I walked down to the hospital cafeteria and bought a water bottle and granola bar and ate it in the car the second they released me!! Then I went to tim hortons as well! Hahaha! @AveryInFebruary I had to fast for 12 hours. I was told only sips of water. I will admit I did cheat and chew some sugar free gum around midnight. Good luck. @AveryInFebruary Oh, they told me water was fine. They even let me fill up my bottle at their cooler. @AveryInFebruary My dr told me to fast. Didn't say anything about water. I drank a protein shake with no sugar added right before I went to bed. Sipped water throughout the night and sipped water in the morning. My appt. was at 7:30 am. The lab let me lay down and sleep the whole time. I set my phone alarm to wake me up for every blood draw, so i Continue reading >>

Water And Diabetes

Water And Diabetes

Tweet As water contains no carbohydrate or calories, it is the perfect drink for people with diabetes. Studies have also shown that drinking water could help control blood glucose levels. Lowering blood glucose levels The bodies of people with diabetes require more fluid when blood glucose levels are high. This can lead to the kidneys attempting to excrete excess sugar through urine. Water will not raise blood glucose levels, which is why it is so beneficial to drink when people with diabetes have high blood sugar, as it enables more glucose to be flushed out of the blood. Dehydration and diabetes Having high blood glucose levels can also increase the risk of dehydration, which is a risk for people with diabetes mellitus. People with diabetes insipidus also have a heightened dehydration risk, but this is not linked to high blood glucose levels. Diabetes mellitus Drinking water helps to rehydrate the blood when the body tries to remove excess glucose through urine. Otherwise, the body may draw on other sources of available water, such as saliva and tears. If water access is limited, glucose may not be passed out of the urine, leading to further dehydration. Diabetes insipidus Diabetes inspidus is not associated with high blood glucose levels, but leads to the body producing a large amount of urine. This can leave people regularly feeling thirsty, and at a higher risk of dehydration. Increasing how much water you drink can ease these symptoms, and you may be advised to drink a specific amount of water a day by your doctor. Read more on dehydration and diabetes How much water should we drink? The European Food Safety Authority advises that we take in the following quantities of water on average each day: Women: 1.6 litres - around eight 200ml glasses per day Men: 2 litres Continue reading >>

Pcos: Preparing For Your Oral Glucose Tolerance Test

Pcos: Preparing For Your Oral Glucose Tolerance Test

If you have PCOS and you’re getting ready to have an oral glucose tolerance test, you may be wondering how to prepare for the test and what the results may mean. The test can help your health care provider figure out whether you have a high risk of developing diabetes and whether lifestyle changes and medications such as Metformin might be helpful in treating your PCOS. What is Glucose? Glucose is a type of sugar and the main source of energy used by your body. The glucose that your body uses for energy comes from many kinds of foods called carbohydrates, such as cereal, bread, rice, pasta, and other grains, not just sugary foods. Dairy products, fruits, and vegetables all contain carbohydrates as well. Your body uses the glucose it needs and then stores the rest as “glycogen” in your liver and muscles. What is an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT)? An OGTT is a way to measure your body’s ability to use glucose. Your pancreas (a gland located behind the stomach) makes a hormone called insulin, which helps your body use the glucose in your blood. If your pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin or if your body is unable to use the insulin it makes, you may have a high blood glucose level. The OGTT involves fasting overnight and then having your blood checked early in the morning. You will then drink a special glucose drink and have your blood tested again after 2 hours. Sometimes blood sugar levels are also checked at other times such as 1 hour, 3 hours, or 4 hours after the glucose drink. What if my blood glucose level is high? If the OGTT shows that your blood glucose levels are higher than normal, your health care provider may tell you that you have “impaired glucose tolerance”. This often means that you are at risk for developing diabetes. Rarely, diabetes Continue reading >>

Do I Need An Oral Glucose Tolerance Test?

Do I Need An Oral Glucose Tolerance Test?

Your blood sugar level can give your doctor important clues about your health, and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) shows how well your body handles sugar from foods. It can tell whether you are at risk for diabetes or if you already have it. A shorter version of an OGTT checks for diabetes during pregnancy. Normally when you eat, your blood sugar rises. Your pancreas, a long gland deep in the belly, releases a hormone called insulin. It helps move sugar from your blood into your cells for energy and storage. Then your blood sugar goes back down to normal. If you have type 2 diabetes, your body uses insulin poorly. Glucose builds up in your blood. This excess sugar can damage blood vessels around your body. Diabetes can lead to heart disease, nerve damage, eye disease, and kidney damage. You might need an oral glucose tolerance test if you: Have a close family member with diabetes Have high triglycerides (a type of fat in your blood) Have polycystic ovarian syndrome (which causes menstrual problems) Delivered a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds A shorter version of this test is done between the 24th and 28th week of pregnancy to see whether you have gestational diabetes. It's called the oral glucose challenge test. To get an accurate result on the OGTT, eat about 150 grams of carbohydrates each day for 3 days before the test. Don't eat or drink anything except water after about 10 o’clock the night before. You don't need to do any special prep before the pregnancy glucose challenge test. You can eat in the morning. Just avoid foods with a lot of sugar, such as doughnuts or orange juice. You'll get the OGTT at your doctor's office, a clinic, hospital, or lab. Here’s what happens: A nurse or doctor will take a blood sample from a vein in your arm to test your s Continue reading >>

Water Before/during Gtt?

Water Before/during Gtt?

is it ok to drink plain water during the fasting period before the glucose tolerance test? Anybody know? I actually googled this one during my gtt, I drank a little before my gtt, but maybe just have a few sips just to be safe! The lady told me that when i wake up before my test to have some mouthfulls of water to get my veins pumping to make it easier. They told me I couldn't before hand. But when I got there they said I was able to and not sure why I had been told otherwise my advice - drink. You can't have too much so sipping is ok but despite everyone refusing to acknowledge it - hydration does have an effect (I've noticed in my glucose monitoring since that if I'm dehydrated my glucose levels are higher ) Before is fine but once you have the glucose drink you cannot drink water during the testing period as it will dilute your blood sugar levels and impact the test...contact your local pathology centre for more detail! Before is fine but once you have the glucose drink you cannot drink water during the testing period as it will dilute your blood sugar levels and impact the test...contact your local pathology centre for more detail! I work at a medical centre and it's recommended to drink before hand as ithelp with hydration and get the veins going. It's much harder to get blood when you haven't had water. Also, I have done the test 5 times now (3x in 1st pregnancy (i had GD) and 2x this pregnancy (no GD)) and i drank water with all 5! It shouldn't effect the results at all, unless you guzzle a whole litre or two in an hour! Yeah I was allowed to drink water before. And also during the test I was allowed half a cup (small plastic disposable) - do not much, just enough to get the taste out of my mouth Yes however I was told to continue drinking water during the test Continue reading >>

Things That Impact A Fasting Glucose Blood Test

Things That Impact A Fasting Glucose Blood Test

A fasting blood sugar level is usually ordered by a physician either to check for a new diagnosis of diabetes or to monitor a person who is known to have diabetes. Ideally fasting blood sugar is tested shortly after you get up in the morning, 8 to 12 hours after eating or drinking anything other than water. The normal range is from 70 to 99 mg/dL. Levels above 100 mg/dL may indicate impaired glucose metabolism. Various factors can affect fasting blood sugar levels. Any foods eaten within 8 hours of the test may cause glucose levels to be elevated. After food is digested, higher levels of glucose remain in the blood for some time. Alcoholic beverages consumed even the night before the test may cause a drop in blood sugar. Medications such as corticosteroids, estrogen -- present in birth control pills, some diuretics, certain antidepressants, anti-seizure medication and even plain aspirin can increase glucose levels. Glucose levels can be decreased by medications that include insulin, oral hypoglycemic agents, anabolic steroids and even acetaminophen. Exercise can cause an increase or a decrease in blood sugar levels. During exercise, insulin becomes more efficient. This effect can persist, lowering blood sugar levels for hours afterward. An hour of afternoon exercise may lower glucose levels until the next morning, affecting the fasting blood sugar test. Exercise can also affect glucose levels by releasing adrenaline. This raises blood sugar temporarily. Physical exertion or other activities that cause excitement may increase fasting sugar levels if performed shortly before the test. Many medical conditions can affect blood sugar levels, such as liver disease, disorders of the pancreas and disorders of the thyroid gland. Acute and severe trauma -- such as major surgery, Continue reading >>

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