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How Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Does Too Much Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Does Too Much Sugar Cause Diabetes?

ANSWER Eating too much sugar does not cause diabetes. Diabetes begins when something disrupts your body's ability to turn the food you eat into energy. Continue reading >>

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Because type 2 diabetes is linked to high levels of sugar in the blood, it may seem logical to assume that eating too much sugar is the cause of the disease. But of course, it’s not that simple. “This has been around for years, this idea that eating too much sugar causes diabetes — but the truth is, type 2 diabetes is a multifactorial disease with many different types of causes,” says Lynn Grieger, RDN, CDE, a nutrition coach in Prescott, Arizona, and a medical reviewer for Everyday Health. “Type 2 diabetes is really complex.” That said, some research does suggest that eating too many sweetened foods can affect type 2 diabetes risk, and with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimating that 30.3 million Americans have the disease — and that millions of more individuals are projected to develop it, too — understanding all the risk factors for the disease, including sugar consumption, is essential to help reverse the diabetes epidemic. The Sugar and Type 2 Diabetes Story: Not So Sweet After the suspicion that sugar was the cause of diabetes, the scientific community pointed its finger at carbohydrates. That makes sense, notes Grieger, explaining that simple and complex carbohydrates are both metabolized as sugar, leading blood sugar levels to fluctuate. Yet carbs are processed differently in the body based on their type: While simple carbs are digested and metabolized quickly, complex carbs take longer to go through this system, resulting in more stable blood sugar. “It comes down to their chemical forms: A simple carbohydrate has a simpler chemical makeup, so it doesn’t take as much for it to be digested, whereas the complex ones take a little longer,” Grieger explains. Sources of complex carbohydrates include whole-wheat bread an Continue reading >>

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Olivia Yang was stunned when she learned she had type 2 diabetes six years ago, when she was 19. Her doctor was shocked, too. In fact, her physician tested her twice to be sure there wasn’t some mistake. Yang was young, had a normal weight for her 5-foot-2-inch frame, and didn’t consider herself a particularly bad eater. She certainly didn’t seem like someone at risk. Now a new study may hint at why some patients end up with type 2 diabetes or prediabetes even when they don’t appear to have all of the typical risk factors such as age, obesity, and an unhealthy diet. Yang learned of her condition sophomore year of college. She’d gone for a physical — a requirement in order to begin working out with a fitness trainer — but her A1C blood test came back abnormally high, indicating diabetes. An A1C test tells a person’s average blood sugar level over the past few months. More specifically, an A1C test measures what percentage of your hemoglobin — a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen — is coated with sugar. It’s used to diagnose type 1 and type 2 diabetes and to keep tabs on how a person is managing their condition over time. Normal readings land below 5.7 percent. The range for someone with prediabetes falls between 5.7 and 6.4 percent and indicates a high risk of developing diabetes. Anything higher is considered diabetes. Unexpected diagnosis Yang, now 25 and an account executive at an advertising agency in Boston, told CBS News, “It was a shock for me. Type 2 runs in my family. But it happened when my parents were older so it was kind of a shock that I would get it at such a young age.” After the diagnosis, though, she realized she’d had symptoms for a while. “Looking back, I fell asleep a lot. I was tired a lot after I ate, a sym Continue reading >>

Does Eating Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Does Eating Sugar Cause Diabetes?

5 Ways to Beat Bad Breath Why Orgasms Feel Good WebMD Expert Answers: Is sugar the enemy? Where does/can it fit in the diet of someone with diabetes? Continue reading >>

Diabetes: What's True And False?

Diabetes: What's True And False?

en espaolLa diabetes: Qu es cierto y qu es falso? If you're like most people with diabetes, you'll get all kinds of advice about it from friends and family or online. Some of this information is wrong. Here's the truth about some of the common things you might hear. Does eating too much sugar cause diabetes? No. Type 1 diabetes happens when cells in the pancreas that make insulin are destroyed. This happens because something goes wrong with the body's immune system . It has nothing to do with how much sugar a person eats. Sugar doesn't cause diabetes. But there is one way that sugar can influence whether a person gets type 2 diabetes. Consuming too much sugar (or sugary foods and drinks) can make people put on weight. Gaining too much weight leads to type 2 diabetes in some people. Of course, eating too much sugar isn't the only cause of weight gain. Weight gain from eating too much of any food can make a person's chance of getting diabetes greater. Yes! You can have your cake and eat it too, just not the whole cake! Like everyone, people with diabetes should put the brakes on eating too many sweets. But you can still enjoy them sometimes. People with type 1 diabetes don't grow out of it. With type 1 diabetes, the pancreas stops making insulin and won't make it again. People with type 1 diabetes will always need to take insulin, at least until scientists find a cure. People with type 2 diabetes will always have a tendency to get high blood sugar levels. But if they take steps to live a healthier life, it can sometimes lower their blood sugar. If people eat healthy foods and exercise enough to get their blood sugar levels back on track, doctors might say they can stop taking insulin or other medicines. Can you catch diabetes from a person who has it? No. Diabetes is not Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Candy Not only do high-sugar foods like candy, cookies, syrup, and soda lack nutritional value, but these low-quality carbohydrates also cause a dramatic spike in blood sugar levels and can contribute to weight gain, both of which can worsen diabetes complications. Learn to satisfy your sweet tooth by snacking on high-quality carbohydrates such as fresh fruit. Apples, berries, pears, grapes, and oranges all have sweet, juicy flavors and are packed with fiber to help slow the absorption of glucose, making them a much better choice for blood sugar control. When snacking on fruit, pair it with a protein food, such as a string cheese, nonfat yogurt, or handful of nuts, to further reduce the impact on your blood sugar. (For more sweet ideas, see my list of 20 Low-Sugar Snack ideas). Continue reading >>

How Sugar Affects Your Health - Does Sugar Cause Diabetes

How Sugar Affects Your Health - Does Sugar Cause Diabetes

The Bitter Truth Behind Our National Sweet Tooth A fitness expertand prediabeticexposes how America's love for sugar helped lead to a national epidemic. Tall and lean and a regular in the weight room, Jeff O'Connell didn't seem a likely candidate for diabetes. Still, in 2006, just after starting a new job as a writer for Men's Health, he began feeling lethargic and headachy, and "popping Advil like popcorn," so he went for a checkup. In an ironic twist of fate, while O'Connell was waiting for his blood work results, his father lost a leg to type 2 diabetes*. Then came O'Connell's own unnerving news: His test results revealed that he was prediabetic, genetically predisposed to the same disease that was devastating his father. In his new book, Sugar Nation , O'Connell investigates the roots of type 2 diabetes, exposing a history of misinformation stretching from the dining room to the doctor's office. He talked to O about the bitter truth behind our sweetest indulgences. Q: You learned you were prediabetic at age 43. Were you eating right? I was eating a lot of junk food. It was wreaking havoc on my energy levels, but I never gained any weight, so I assumed I was fit. That's why I didn't do cardio at the gym. I only pumped iron. I'd always equated being thin with being healthy, but it turns out that, if you're predisposed to diabetes, size isn't the only thing that matters. Q: In the United States, one in ten adults has diabetes and some 79 million are prediabetic. All together, that's more than a third of the population. How did we get here? The average American consumes more than 150 pounds of sugar a yearand that's a diet our bodies weren't designed to handle. Food technology moves much faster than human evolution. If we were still foraging for food as our ancestors d Continue reading >>

Can You Get Diabetes From Eating Too Much Sugar?

Can You Get Diabetes From Eating Too Much Sugar?

Sugar is irresistible to most people. So irresistible, in fact, that sugar cravings might be rooted in evolution. Craving sugary foods, or so the theory goes, could help prevent starvation. In a modern world, however, where food is often plentiful, sugar consumption is linked to diabetes, obesity, and other health problems. Research into the connection between sugar consumption and diabetes is ongoing. Most doctors argue that sugar alone does not trigger diabetes. But some emerging research suggests a closer link between sugar consumption and diabetes than was previously thought. Can people get diabetes from eating too much sugar? Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes affect the body's ability to regulate blood glucose levels. But eating sugar will not cause type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition, which causes the body to attack cells that produce insulin. Damage to these cells undermines the body's ability to manage blood glucose. Type 2 diabetes is more complex. Sugar consumption will not directly cause diabetes. However, excess sugar consumption can cause weight gain. Obesity increases the risk of diabetes. Once a person has diabetes, eating too much sugar can make symptoms worse, since diabetes makes it more difficult for the body to manage blood sugar levels. Understanding the link between sugar and diabetes Although eating sugar is not directly linked to developing diabetes, some evidence suggests that increased overall availability of sugar makes diabetes more common. A 2013 study that looked at 175 different countries found that more sugar in the food supply increased diabetes rates. Specifically, for every additional 150 calories of sugar available per day per person, diabetes levels rose 1 percent. This change continued even when researchers con Continue reading >>

Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

For many decades, folk "wisdom" claimed that diabetes was caused by eating too much sugar. There have always been curious ideas in the diabetic world. For instance, people with advanced diabetes excrete a lot of sugar in their urine, so one early diabetic diet prescribed eating nothing but candy, on the theory that because the patients were losing so much sugar in their urine, they should replace it with sugar in their diet. Shortly after I was diagnosed, I had an idea of why people might think that eating sugar caused diabetes. For about 6 months previously, I had craved sugar. I think it was because my cells had trouble taking up sugar, so they made me want to eat more sugar. But in fact, I think it was the diabetes that made me want more sugar rather than eating more sugar that gave me diabetes. If this were true, it’s unlikely that friends and relatives would analyze the situation. They’d see someone eating a lot of sugar and then getting diabetes and they’d assume that the sugar had caused the diabetes. One day the former owner of my house dropped in to visit and offered me a big bag of peaches. I explained that I wasn’t eating a lot of fruit because I had diabetes, and she said, "But you didn’t eat a lot of sugar." An odd comment as she had no idea what I ate, but it confirmed that many people think that sugar causes diabetes. Studies done in the 1980s in animals and humans showed that sugar had no effect on obesity, metabolism, or the development of diabetes in genetically prone individuals, according to one author of many of these studies, Richard S. Surwit. He said that it was only sugar in combination with fat that caused problems. But now a new study suggests that sugar (either sucrose, "table sugar" or high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), which has app Continue reading >>

Sugar Does Not Cause Diabetes: Did The Film What The Health Get Itright?

Sugar Does Not Cause Diabetes: Did The Film What The Health Get Itright?

Professor of Cardiology, Summa cum Laude grad, Kahn Center for Longevity and GreenSpace Cafe. www.drjoelkahn.com @drjkahn. Author The Plant Based Solution NEW Sugar Does Not Cause Diabetes: Did the Film What the Health Get itRight? The documentary What the Health is receiving a huge amount of attention and most of it is positive. Many reports of people attempting to eat better are filling social media. I discussed the film on a local TV station in Detroit after two reporters indicated that the movie had made a big impact on their diets. There have even been reports that restaurants serving healthier fare have seen an uptick in customers attributing the change to the film. I have seen this in my own plant-based restaurant and have a What The Health Happy Hour that has been very popular. Naturally, there have been critics of the movie defending their viewpoint that meat based diets are healthy, but most have rallied around a statement in the film by Neal Barnard, MD that sugar does not cause diabetes. As the answer to this question may be important to you, I have done some research and share it here but this is in NO way an endorsement to add back soda and candy bars to your diet. In a world stressed by growing obesity and its medical consequences, limiting sugar is a universal recommendation from all health experts. 1) Type 1 diabetes is not caused by sugar. All agree on this as type 1 diabetes is considered an autoimmune disease leading to destruction of the insulin producing cells in the pancreas. However, patients with type 1 diabetes can develop and reverse insulin resistance (IR) in their muscles and liver so understanding the origin of IR is important. 2) Who is Neal Barnard, MD? Dr. Barnard is a graduate of the George Washington University School of Medicine and Continue reading >>

Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

The recent film What the Health raised the question as to whether sugar or other carbohydrates cause diabetes. The notion is understandable. Blood sugar levels are high in diabetes, so a common idea has held that eating sugar somehow triggers the disease process. However, the major diabetes organizations take a different view. The American Diabetes Association1 and Diabetes UK2 have labelled this notion a “myth,” as has the Joslin Diabetes Center,3 which wrote, “Diabetes is not caused by eating too much sugar.” These and other organizations have worked to educate people about the causes of diabetes and the role that foods play in the disease process. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. Type 2 diabetes—the most common form of the disease—is caused by insulin resistance and pancreatic failure. Here is what you need to know: Sugar Is the Body’s Fuel The human body runs on glucose, a simple sugar. Just as gasoline powers your car, glucose powers your muscles, your brain, and the rest of your body. Glucose comes from fruit and from starchy foods, such as grains, beans, and potatoes, and your body can also produce it when needed. Without it you would die. Diabetes means having higher-than-normal blood glucose values. It comes in three common forms: Type 1 diabetes is caused by the destruction of the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas, usually through an autoimmune process. The triggers for this process are under investigation and may include dairy proteins, viruses, or other factors. Type 2 diabetes typically starts with insulin resistance. That is, the cells of the body resist insulin’s efforts to escort glucose into the cells. What causes insulin resistance? It appears to be caused by an accumulation of microscopic fat particles within muscle and Continue reading >>

Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

The recent film What the Health raised the question as to whether sugar or other carbohydrates cause diabetes. Because blood sugar levels are high in diabetes, a common notion has held that eating sugar somehow triggers the disease process. The American Diabetes Association and Diabetes UK have labeled this notion a “myth,” as has the Joslin Diabetes Center, which wrote, “Diabetes is not caused by eating too much sugar.” These and other organizations have worked to educate people about the causes of diabetes and the role that foods play in the disease process. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. Type 2 diabetes—the most common form of the disease—is caused by insulin resistance and pancreatic failure. Sugar can play an aiding and abetting role in diabetes, but the idea that “eating sugar causes diabetes” is simplistic and interferes with efforts to help the public understand the actual causes of the disease and how to protect themselves and their families. Here is what you need to know: The human body runs on glucose, a simple sugar. Just as gasoline powers your car, glucose powers your muscles, your brain, and the rest of your body. Glucose comes from fruit and from starchy foods, such as grains, beans, and potatoes, and your body can also produce it when needed. Without it, you would die. Diabetes means having higher-than-normal blood glucose values. It comes in three common forms: Type 1 diabetes is caused by the destruction of the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas, usually through an autoimmune process. The triggers for this process are under investigation and may include dairy proteins, viruses, or other factors. Type 2 diabetes typically starts with insulin resistance. That is, the cells of the body resist insulin’s efforts to escort Continue reading >>

Q: Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Q: Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Q: Can eating too much sugar cause diabetes? Not in the same smoking-gun way that cigarettes cause cancer, but research shows that sugar may play a part--and it's smart to limit your intake. First and foremost, being overweight does increase your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, and consuming too much sugar (especially when coupled with little to no physical activity) can contribute to weight gain. Excess body fat seems to trigger the release of certain proteins from fat cells that mess with the secretion of insulin (a hormone that metabolizes blood sugar and keeps it at healthy levels), according to a 2009 Cell Metabolism study. This may eventually overwork the pancreas and increase blood sugar, leading to type 2 diabetes. But some emerging research suggests that excess sugar intake can increase diabetes risk regardless of weight. A landmark JAMA study found that women nearly doubled their diabetes risk when they increased the number of sugar-added drinks they consumed from 1 or fewer a week to 1 or more per day over a 4-year period. Rapidly absorbed sugars--like those in colas--may damage the pancreas cells that secrete insulin. In contrast, real-fruit drinks were not associated with increased diabetes risk, perhaps because of the other nutrients absorbed along with the sugar. Bottom line: To be safe, keep your weight at a healthy level; eat plenty of high-fiber foods (like veggies and whole grains), which keep blood sugar and insulin levels steady; and choose water or tea instead of sugary soft drinks whenever possible. --Stephanie Woodard Source: Frank B. Hu, MD, PhD, professor of nutrition and epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health Continue reading >>

Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Sign up to our newsletter Receive the latest newsletter with research on sugar. Plus insights from scientific experts. The idea that eating sugar causes diabetes persists despite an increased understanding of the complex and multi-factorial aetiology of type 2 diabetes. We asked one of the nutrition community’s wise elders, Professor Paul Nestel for his words of wisdom on the topic. Professor Paul Nestel AO MD FRACP FCSANZ FTSE Professor Nestel is on the Senior Faculty at the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, and was previously Chief of CSIRO Division of Human Nutrition. When did the notion that eating sugar causes diabetes come about? On an academic level, possible associations between diabetes and the consumption of sugar have been around for decades. The fascination is cyclical having had a strong press in mid last century and resurfacing again in the last couple of decades. We certainly have better information now so that some conclusions can be made, although cautiously because associations do not establish causality. What are the links between sugar and diabetes? Obesity and type 2 diabetes (the usual form of diabetes) are closely linked. Whether sugar consumption plays an independent role in developing diabetes, or becoming fat, is less certain. From a dietary intake perspective excess energy intake from discretionary foods is far greater than energy intake from added sugar, including that from sugar sweetened beverages (SSBs). Is there evidence that eating sugar increases the risk of type 2 diabetes? The Harvard School of Public Health has published extensively from their huge database of tens of thousands of nurses and health professionals followed now for nearly 30 years. They have found significant associations-independent of body weight- betwe Continue reading >>

Symptoms & Causes Of Diabetes

Symptoms & Causes Of Diabetes

What are the symptoms of diabetes? Symptoms of diabetes include increased thirst and urination increased hunger fatigue blurred vision numbness or tingling in the feet or hands sores that do not heal unexplained weight loss Symptoms of type 1 diabetes can start quickly, in a matter of weeks. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly—over the course of several years—and can be so mild that you might not even notice them. Many people with type 2 diabetes have no symptoms. Some people do not find out they have the disease until they have diabetes-related health problems, such as blurred vision or heart trouble. What causes type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes occurs when your immune system, the body’s system for fighting infection, attacks and destroys the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. Scientists think type 1 diabetes is caused by genes and environmental factors, such as viruses, that might trigger the disease. Studies such as TrialNet are working to pinpoint causes of type 1 diabetes and possible ways to prevent or slow the disease. What causes type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes—the most common form of diabetes—is caused by several factors, including lifestyle factors and genes. Overweight, obesity, and physical inactivity You are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes if you are not physically active and are overweight or obese. Extra weight sometimes causes insulin resistance and is common in people with type 2 diabetes. The location of body fat also makes a difference. Extra belly fat is linked to insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and heart and blood vessel disease. To see if your weight puts you at risk for type 2 diabetes, check out these Body Mass Index (BMI) charts. Insulin resistance Type 2 diabetes usually begins with insulin resista Continue reading >>

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