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How Does Sleep Affect Insulin?

Lack Of Sleep And Its Effect On Blood Sugar Levels

Lack Of Sleep And Its Effect On Blood Sugar Levels

More than 29 million Americans suffer from diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, with millions more falling into the “prediabetes” range. Keeping blood glucose levels under control is essential to good health, both for people with diabetes and those who do not have the disease. Although most people know that dietary choices and exercise affect blood sugar levels, many do not realize that sleep can also have a dramatic effect on glycemic control. Failing to get enough sleep or getting poor quality sleep can have serious effects on your blood sugar. This is unhealthy for all individuals but particularly dangerous for those with diabetes or prediabetes. How the Body Regulates Blood Sugar Levels Glucose, a type of sugar, is the body’s primary energy source. Cells throughout your body depend on glucose to continue operating. When you eat a meal, your stomach breaks carbohydrates down into glucose molecules. This glucose is absorbed into the bloodstream, where it circulates throughout your body. The body prefers for blood sugar levels to be kept within a tight range. To achieve this, a hormone called insulin is released by the pancreas into the bloodstream. Insulin tells your body’s cells to increase their uptake of glucose from the blood, resulting in lower blood sugar levels. If blood sugar levels dip too low -- such as after an intense bout of exercise -- another hormone signals the liver to release its excess glucose stores to restore balance. People with diabetes have a difficult time responding properly to insulin. Those with type 1 diabetes are unable to produce insulin, making them unable to keep their glucose levels under control. Individuals with type 2 diabetes gradually become insensitive to insulin over time, making it dif Continue reading >>

How Blood Sugar Levels Affect Your Sleep

How Blood Sugar Levels Affect Your Sleep

Dr. Doni discusses why eating too much, too late can make it hard to sleep (it’s all about blood sugar). She offers some simple tips to help you take control. In the introduction to this series of articles I gave an overview of 12 things that can disrupt our sleep. This week, we’ll focus on blood sugar – and how eating too much of the wrong things can pull us into a vicious cycle of over-eating and blood sugar fluctuations that can have a serious impact on our ability to sleep. Did you notice that you felt sleepy after your Thanksgiving meal last week? This lull in energy is often attributed to tryptophan, an essential amino acid found in turkey meat that is known to make us feel sleepy. However that sleepiness is also due to a rise in your blood sugar levels as the carbs from your meal make their way into your blood stream. Then, the day after Thanksgiving, did you notice that you felt hungrier or that you craved sweets? This is because, once your blood sugar goes high (the technical term for this is hyperglycemia) for even just one meal, it will always be followed by a dip in blood sugar (hypoglycemia) a few hours later. This dip will make you to want to eat more and repeat the pattern of eating a large amount of carbohydrates. In fact, some people end up eating more the day after Thanksgiving than they did on Thanksgiving itself. As you might imagine, once this pattern starts, it is difficult to get it to stop. The more often you consume large, Thanksgiving-sized meals, the more likely your body is to send the signals that lead you to have another large meal. This is because a rise in blood sugar is followed by a rise in insulin, the hormone which causes the sugar to move into your cells to be used to make energy. Then, when your blood sugar is low again, you a Continue reading >>

Link Between Sleep & Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

Link Between Sleep & Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

According to National Sleep Foundation, 63% of American population do not get enough daily sleep. Do you also know that most people who suffer from diabetes often have poor sleeping habits? This includes irregular sleeping schedule, difficulty falling asleep and staying asleep. And although little has been mentioned about caregivers and parents of diabetes patients, they are more likely to acquire poor sleeping habits and have a higher tendency to suffer from sleeping problems and consequently develop Type 2 diabetes themselves. So if you have diabetes or are currently caring for someone who has diabetes, this article will educate you more about how sleeping disorders can affect your health and how you can get better sleep. This article will cover the following topics: Relationship Between Sleep and Diabetes Your health and sleep go hand in hand. When you do not sleep enough, your body does not get the needed time to repair. As a result, you tend to be unfocused and irritable, and you suddenly have the urge to eat. If this scenario sounds too familiar to you, maybe you should rethink about the relationship between sleep and your diabetes. The Missing Link — Hormones Sleep plays a crucial role in restoring our body cells. Under healthy conditions, after eating, the pancreas secretes insulin to signal fat cells and muscles to absorb the glucose from food to be used for energy creation and prevents the body from using fat as energy source. This chain of reaction causes the blood glucose levels to resume normal. And to prevent the individual from feeling hungry, the body produces the hormone leptin to depresses the appetite. However, when it comes to diabetes individuals, the muscle and fat cells fails to respond to insulin. This causes a high glucose level in the bloodst Continue reading >>

Sleep Longer To Lower Blood Glucose Levels

Sleep Longer To Lower Blood Glucose Levels

Doctors and scientists have known for decades that insufficient sleep affects the body's hormone levels and ability to regulate and metabolize glucose. That means if you're excessively sleepy, you could be at higher risk for weight gain (see "Sleep and Obesity") and even type 2 diabetes. Researchers have tested the relationship between sleep and hormones extensively. In one study, healthy adults were asked to sleep only four hours a night for six nights. After this period of sleep restriction, the subjects' glucose tolerance (their ability to break down glucose) was 40 percent lower on average—reaching levels that are typical of older adults at risk for diabetes, which is characterized by high glucose levels due to insufficient insulin. Additionally, when the sleep-deprived subjects were fed a high-carbohydrate breakfast, their glucose levels stayed significantly higher than when they were well rested—providing further evidence that their bodies were not processing glucose as well. Why would lack of sleep affect hormones and glucose metabolism? Part of the answer may lie in slow wave sleep. When a person enters slow wave, or deep sleep, nervous system activity goes down, the brain uses less glucose, and other changes occur such as an increase in growth hormone and a decrease in the activating hormone cortisol. For this reason, a sufficient amount of deep sleep is thought to be very important to the regulation of glucose in the body. Researchers have seen this in action by manipulating people's sleep stages and looking at the effect it has on their glucose levels. In one experiment, scientists disrupted people's sleep just enough to keep them from entering deep sleep (but not enough to fully wake them). After these nights of deep-sleep deprivation, the subjects' insu Continue reading >>

How Does Sleep Affect Your Insulin Level?

How Does Sleep Affect Your Insulin Level?

How does Sleep Affect your Insulin Level? When diabetic patients enter the doctors office and asked how well they are sleeping, their answer is usually among the lines of not good. Why? This is not because they all happen to have busy schedules, insomnia and a hectic lifestyle. The answer lies in the fact that sleep deprivation triggers the insulin levels to go upwhich impact diabetic sufferers even more negatively. How this happens will be explained further in this article. Diabetes is a sickness which emerges when the cells in your body do not produce enough insulin. A number of cases involve a healthy amount of insulin, but the problem lies in the fact that the cells fail to utilize them as well as they should, resulting in the diabetes. In both these instances, blood sugar levels become higher and higher until it becomes uncontrollable. Upshots that are normally found are: blindness, damages in the kidneys, heart, and the nerves. When we keep our eyes shut and fall asleep, the rest of our body remains to be awake. Our vital organs continue to work as they should to maintain our well-being. When we dont reach the required number of hours intended for sleeping , our bodies encounter a disturbance in the normal supply of insulin. This is aggravated when we dont drink fluids and exercise regularly. Continual lack of sleep makes us feel tired and stressed both physically and mentally. In essence, when you dont follow the eight-hour sleep cycle, your blood sugar will tend to surge. The saying that your body needs less sleep as you get older is nothing but a myth! Reports from the American Association for the Advancement of Science indicate that people are much prone to having glucose levels impaired when they sleep only for six hours for a period of six years consistentl Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sleep

Diabetes And Sleep

Tweet Sleep can affect your blood sugar levels and your blood glucose control can also affect your sleep, which results in trouble sleeping. Difficulty getting a good night's rest could be a result of a number of reasons, from hypos at night, to high blood sugars, sleep apnea, being overweight or signs of neuropathy. If you have blood sugar levels that are either too high or too low overnight, you may find yourself tired through the next day. Lethargy and insomnia can both have their roots in blood sugar control and can be a key in re-establishing a healthy sleep pattern.. Getting a good night’s sleep The following may help to promote better sleep: Keep your blood glucose under control Ensure your bed is large and comfortable enough – and pillows at a comfortable height Ensure your room is cool (around 18 degrees celcius) and well ventilated Ensure your room is dark and free from noise – if this is not possible, you may benefit from a sleeping blindfold or ear plugs Incorporating a period of exercise into each day Stick to a regular bed time Can a lack of sleep be a cause of diabetes? Research has shown that sleep deprivation and insulin resistance may be linked. People who regularly lack sleep are will feel more tired through the day and more likely to eat comfort foods. A good night’s sleep is important for our hormones to regulate a large number of the body’s processes, such as appetite, weight control and the immune system. Trouble sleeping from high sugar levels High blood sugar levels can impact upon your sleep. It could be that the high levels make it less comfortable for you to sleep – it may make you feel too warm or irritable and unsettled. Another factor is if you need to go the toilet during the night. For people with regularly high blood sugar l Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar And Sleep Problems: How Blood Sugar Levels Impact Sleep

Blood Sugar And Sleep Problems: How Blood Sugar Levels Impact Sleep

November is National Diabetes Month and Alaska Sleep Clinic is dedicating this month’s blog posts to raising awareness for diabetic complications and how they correlate with sleep disorders and overall tiredness. SLEEP PROBLEMS AND SNORING MAY PREDICT DIABETES Studies have shown that individuals who consistently have a bad night's sleep are more likely to develop conditions linked to diabetes and heart disease. Loud snoring sleepers (many of whom may have sleep apnea), compared to quiet sleepers, double (2x) their risks of developing certain types of metabolic syndrome(s); including diabetes, obesity, and high blood pressure. This likelihood also increased dramatically to 80% in those who found it difficult to fall asleep and to 70% for those who woke up feeling not as refreshed. Blood Sugar and Sleep Problems Sleep can affect your blood sugar levels, and your blood glucose control can also affect your sleep. It’s a vicious cycle. As the amount of sleep decreases, blood sugar increases, escalating the issue. Lack of sleep has been shown to increase blood sugar levels and the risk of diabetic issues. Higher blood sugar means less long-lasting fat metabolism in the night and even less sleep. Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine found that people who slept less than 6 hours a night had more blood sugar complications compared to those who received 8 hours of sleep. HIGH BLOOD SUGAR - HYPERGLYCEMIA Sleepless and restless nights hurt more than your mood and energy; it is a form of chronic stress on the body. When there is added stress on your body this results in having higher blood sugar levels. When researchers restricted people with type-1 diabetes to just 4 hours of sleep, their sensitivity to insulin was reduced by 20% compared to that after a full nig Continue reading >>

Sleep Disorders And The Development Of Insulin Resistance And Obesity

Sleep Disorders And The Development Of Insulin Resistance And Obesity

Sleep disorders and the development of insulin resistance and obesity Omar Mesarwi , MD,1 Jan Polak ,2 Jonathan Jun ,3 and Vsevolod Y. Polotsky Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 5501 Hopkins Bayview Circle, Baltimore, MD 21224, Phone: +1 (410) 550-6386, Fax: +1 (410) 550-2612 The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am See other articles in PMC that cite the published article. Sleep, which comprises a third of the human lifespan, consists of two major states, non-rapid eye movement (NREM, stages N13) and rapid eye movement (REM). Sleep is a physiologic state of decreased metabolism and likely serves a reparative role, marked by increased glycogen stores and peptide synthesis. Normal sleep is characterized by reduced glucose turnover by the brain and other metabolically active tissues, particularly during NREM sleep. Circadian and sleep-related changes in glucose tolerance occur in normal subjects, but there are conflicting data regarding lipid metabolism during sleep. Sleep duration has decreased over the last several decades, and with this have come cross-sectional and longitudinal data suggesting a link between short sleep duration and the prevalence of type 2 diabetes. Forced decreased sleep duration in healthy individuals has also been linked to impaired glucose homeostasis. Moreover, short sleep duration has been suggested to lead to obesity, although this is less conclusive since psychological and social factors also considerably impact food intake. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a disorder of sleep characterized by diminished or abrogated airflow, which results in intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation. Based on a large body of evidence, t Continue reading >>

Too Little Sleep May Fuel Insulin Resistance

Too Little Sleep May Fuel Insulin Resistance

By Dr. Mercola If you're sleep deprived for a night or two (or more), you expect to feel groggy and irritable. But losing sleep impacts your body on a far deeper level, too, increasing your risk of obesity and chronic diseases like diabetes. New research has shed some light onto why sleep deprivation may be so damaging to your health, as it linked lack of sleep to serious impairments in the way your body responds to the hormone insulin. Lack of Sleep Impairs Your Body's Insulin Sensitivity Impaired insulin sensitivity, also known as insulin resistance, occurs when your body cannot use insulin properly, allowing your blood sugar levels to get too high. Insulin resistance is a precursor to type 2 diabetes as well as a risk factor in many other chronic diseases. In fact, controlling insulin levels is one of the most powerful ways to reduce your risk of chronic diseases, including high blood pressure, heart disease, and cancer. The increase in insulin-related diseases we're now seeing is largely due to lack of exercise combined with the excessive consumption of fructose and carbohydrate consumption in the average American diet … but it also appears that lack of sleep is likely playing a part in the equation too. According to research published in the Annals of Internal Medicine,1 after four nights of sleep deprivation (sleep time was only 4.5 hours per night), study participants' insulin sensitivity was 16 percent lower, while their fat cells' insulin sensitivity was 30 percent lower, and rivaled levels seen in those with diabetes or obesity. The study's senior author, Matthew Brady, an associate professor of medicine at the University of Chicago, told CNN:2 "This is the equivalent of metabolically aging someone 10 to 20 years just from four nights of partial sleep restri Continue reading >>

Too Little Sleep May Fuel Insulin Resistance

Too Little Sleep May Fuel Insulin Resistance

Too little sleep may fuel insulin resistance Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what's happening in the world as it unfolds. Fat cells become "metabolically groggy" in someone who is sleep-deprived, according to a new study. Sleep deprivation impairs fat cells' ability to respond to insulin, a study shows Insulin regulates metabolism and is involved in diabetes Lack of sleep may trigger the body's stress response The small study needs to be confirmed in different populations, settings People who consistently get too little sleep face bigger concerns than daytime fatigue and crankiness. Over the long term, sleep deprivation also increases the risk of serious health problems including obesity and type II diabetes. Scientists have come up with a number of plausible explanations for this increased risk. Various studies have shown, for instance, that how much we sleep can affect blood sugar levels, hormones that control appetite, and even the brain's perception of high-calorie foods. A small new study , published Monday in the Annals of Internal Medicine, adds a key piece to the puzzle by drilling down to the cellular level: Sleep deprivation, the study found, impairs the ability of fat cells to respond to insulin, a hormone that regulates metabolism and is involved in diabetes. In the study, seven healthy young men and women spent a total of eight days and nights in a sleep lab. They were allowed to sleep normally on four of the nights, and on the other nights they were limited to just 4.5 hours. In order to neutralize the effects of appetite or overeating, the researchers strictly controlled the participants' meals and calorie intake. Health.com: Best and worst foods for sleep After the four nights of sleep deprivation, blood tests revealed that the participants Continue reading >>

The Sleep-diabetes Connection

The Sleep-diabetes Connection

Whenever diabetes patients enter Lynn Maarouf’s office with out-of-control blood sugar levels, she immediately asks them how they are sleeping at night. All too often, the answer is the same: not well. “Any time your blood sugar is really high, your kidneys try to get rid of it by urinating,” says Maarouf, RD, the diabetes education director of the Stark Diabetes Center at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston. “So you are probably getting up and going to bathroom all night long -- and not sleeping well.” Diabetes and sleep problems often go hand in hand. Diabetes can cause sleep loss, and there’s evidence that not sleeping well can increase your risk of developing diabetes. Maarouf says high blood sugar is a red flag for sleep problems among people with diabetes for another reason. “People who are tired will eat more because they want to get energy from somewhere,” she says. “That can mean consuming sugar or other foods that can spike blood sugar levels.” “I really push people to eat properly throughout the day and get their blood sugars under control so they sleep better at night,” Maarouf says. “If you get your blood sugar under control, you will get a good night sleep and wake up feeling fabulous with lots of energy.” “There is some evidence that sleep deprivation could lead to pre-diabetic state,” says Mark Mahowald, MD, director of the Minnesota Regional Sleep Disorders Center in Hennepin County. According to Mahowald, the body's reaction to sleep loss can resemble insulin resistance, a precursor to diabetes. Insulin’s job is to help the body use glucose for energy. In insulin resistance, cells fail to use the hormone efficiently, resulting in high blood sugar. Diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough in Continue reading >>

Less Sleep, More Insulin Resistance?

Less Sleep, More Insulin Resistance?

Most of us would love more sleep. Sure, good nutrition and exercise can offset some of the effects of sleep deprivation. But chronically inadequate sleep can lead to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Here’s how. And why. Deep thoughts on deep sleep Question: What is sleep? Maharishi: How can you know sleep when you are awake? The answer is to go to sleep to find out what it is. Question: But I cannot know it in this way. Maharishi: This question must be raised in sleep. Question: But I cannot raise the question then. Maharishi: So that is sleep. –Attributed to: Sri Ramana Maharishi Why do humans sleep? If you’re a fan of the Twilight series, you’ll know that the vampires didn’t need to sleep. But their bodies were also transformed into the embodiment of perfection — frozen in time with no need for bodily maintenance. Not so with us mere mortals. We need to sleep or we become pretty dang cranky, have memory lapses, drive sloppily, and increase our risk of developing obesity, high blood pressure, heart disease, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (1). And while you may not have ever put much thought into the functions of sleep, most folks will admit that there’s nothing better than a solid night’s sleep for improving mood and energy levels. Mood, memory, and learning are all more or less controlled by our central nervous system and studies have shown that sleep plays a key role (2). One way to understand the functions of sleep is to compare it to eating. It’s pretty easy to understand why we eat: We need to consume nutrients so that our bodies can grow, repair tissue and function properly. Both sleeping and eating are regulated by powerful internal drives. Go too long without food and your stomach rumbles, your blood sugar drops, and you’re fo Continue reading >>

Sleep Well To Avoid Insulin Resistance, Study Suggests

Sleep Well To Avoid Insulin Resistance, Study Suggests

Sleep Well to Avoid Insulin Resistance, Study Suggests A single night of sleep deprivation can cause as much insulin resistance as six months on a high-fat diet, according to new animal research from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. Insulin resistance is a condition in which the body does not use insulin efficiently to move glucose from the blood into the cells and is a characteristic feature of both Type 2 diabetes and prediabetes. Previous research looking into sleep and diabetes has indicated that short sleep duration can increase levels of the appetite-stimulating hormone ghrelin, can stimulate production of the stress hormone cortisol and decrease glucose tolerance, and may triple the risk of developing impaired fasting glucose. To investigate whether sleep deprivation causes insulin resistance in a similar fashion as a high-fat diet, researchers deprived eight male dogs of a nights sleep, then tested their insulin sensitivity using an intravenous glucose tolerance test, comparing the results to those of dogs who had a normal nights sleep. The dogs were then given a high-fat diet for six months before having their insulin sensitivity tested again. The researchers found that the night of sleep deprivation decreased insulin sensitivity by 33%, while six months of a high-fat diet decreased it by 21%. Our study suggests that one night of total sleep deprivation may be as detrimental to insulin sensitivity as six months on a high-fat diet, said study author Josaine Broussard, PhD. This research demonstrates the importance of adequate sleep in maintaining blood sugar levels and reducing risk for metabolic diseases like obesity and diabetes. Caroline M. Apovian, MD, FACP, FACN, a spokesperson for The Obesity Society, added that Many patients understand the importance of a ba Continue reading >>

Insulin Sensitivity: One Night Of Poor Sleep Could Equal Six Months On A High-fat Diet, Study In Dogs Suggests

Insulin Sensitivity: One Night Of Poor Sleep Could Equal Six Months On A High-fat Diet, Study In Dogs Suggests

New research finds that one night of sleep deprivation and six months on a high-fat diet could both impair insulin sensitivity to a similar degree, demonstrating the importance of a good night's sleep on health. This study used a canine model to examine whether sleep deprivation and a high-fat diet affect insulin sensitivity in similar ways. New research finds that one night of sleep deprivation and six months on a high-fat diet could both impair insulin sensitivity to a similar degree, demonstrating the importance of a good night's sleep on health. (stock image) New research finds that one night of sleep deprivation and six months on a high-fat diet could both impair insulin sensitivity to a similar degree, demonstrating the importance of a good night's sleep on health. (stock image) New research finds that one night of sleep deprivation and six months on a high-fat diet could both impair insulin sensitivity to a similar degree, demonstrating the importance of a good night's sleep on health. This study, conducted by Josiane Broussard, PhD, and colleagues from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, CA, used a canine model to examine whether sleep deprivation and a high-fat diet affect insulin sensitivity in similar ways. The findings will be presented during a poster presentation on Thursday, Nov. 5, at The Obesity Society Annual Meeting at ObesityWeekSM 2015 in Los Angeles, CA. When the body becomes less sensitive to insulin (i.e., "insulin resistant"), it needs to produce more insulin to keep blood sugar stable. This may eventually lead to Type 2 diabetes, a disease where the body's insulin response doesn't work properly and there is too much sugar in the blood. Diabetes is associated with a number of serious complications, including heart disease. Individuals w Continue reading >>

How Sleep Affects Your Blood Sugar

How Sleep Affects Your Blood Sugar

Your sleep habits can affect many things about your health -- your weight, your immune system, even how well your brain works. But it also plays a key role in controlling your blood sugar (or glucose), which affects your chances of getting diabetes. It’s tied to whether the hormone insulin, which removes glucose from the blood, is working the way it’s supposed to. Blood sugar levels surge while you’re sleeping, usually around 4 to 8 a.m. for someone with a normal sleep schedule. (It’s called the dawn effect.) In a healthy person, insulin can handle the surge by telling muscle, fat, and liver cells to absorb the glucose from the blood, which keeps your levels stable. For people who have diabetes or who are likely to get it, insulin can’t do that job very well, so blood sugar levels will rise higher. While diet and obesity are big contributors to your odds of having diabetes, studies have found that sleep habits are, too, probably because over time, they can affect how well your cells respond to insulin. In one study, more than 4,000 people reported the amount of sleep they got each night. Those who got less than 6 hours were twice as likely to have cells that were less sensitive to insulin or to have full-blown diabetes. This was true even after the researchers took other lifestyle habits into account. Other sleep disruptions and disorders, such as sleep apnea, also seem to raise a person’s odds of having diabetes. But the risk goes up at the other end of the spectrum, too. For reasons that aren’t clear, people who sleep too much -- more than 9 hours a night -- might also have higher chances of getting diabetes. It’s hard to know for certain. Many studies have suggested that short sleepers (those who get less than 6 hours per night) have irregular eating Continue reading >>

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