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How Does Novolog Insulin Work?

When Do Humalog And Novolog Insulins Really Work?

When Do Humalog And Novolog Insulins Really Work?

When do Humalog and Novolog insulins really work? See also: Humalog & Heat and User's Reports A problem associated with the use of rapid insulins is that situations occur that cause people to perceive them as faster than they really are. For example, a person may feel perfectly normal at 70 mg/dl (3.9 mmol), take a bolus of rapid insulin for a meal, and a few minutes later begin to shake, sweat and have trouble thinking. Though the timing of the symptoms gives the impression that rapid insulin is responsible and acts very quickly, the symptoms are unlikely to be caused by the rapid insulin just given. More likely, another insulin given earlier is causing the blood sugar to drop. A drop of only a few mg/dl causes a person to go from feeling normal to feeling low. Because the meal bolus was just given, it often receives the blame for a low caused by an insulin that was given earlier. The kinetics of an insulin are when that insulin can be measured in the bloodstream, whereas an insulin's dynamics are when it actually affects the blood sugar. After an injection, peak levels of Humalog and Novolog insulins are seen in the bloodstream about 45 minutes later, as shown by the dashed kinetic line to the right. However, the effect on your blood sugar is not nearly this quick. The solid dynamic line to the right shows when these insulins are actually lowering the blood sugar. The maximum effect on lowering the glucose level is not seen until 2 hours after an injection and continues for over 4 hours. Another situation often seems to confirm for many the false impression that a rapid insulin is really rapid. This occurs when a carb or correction bolus is given and a low blood sugar begins only an hour or two later. Here, the rapid insulin is likely at fault, but again the low bloo Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin And How They Work

Types Of Insulin And How They Work

Insulin is a hormone the body makes to control the level of glucose (sugar) in the blood. It lowers blood sugar by allowing glucose to leave the bloodstream and enter body cells. Without enough insulin, the level of glucose in the bloodstream can become too high. Everyone needs insulin to use food properly. People without diabetes make enough of their own insulin to keep their blood sugar at healthy levels all the time. People with type 1 diabetes no longer make insulin of their own. Instead, they need to take shots of one or more types of insulin to keep their blood sugars close to normal. Between 75 and 90 percent of people with type 2 diabetes need to take insulin shots to help them get the best control of their blood sugar levels. Deciding How Much Insulin to Take The amount of insulin a person needs depends on: Body weight Percentage of body fat Activity level Diet Other medicines Emotions and stress General health Type of insulin When you first start taking insulin shots, your doctor might ask you to change the amount you take or the time you take it several times. You and your doctor will base these changes on the results of your blood sugar tests. You'll need to make adjustments until you find the dose and schedule that work best for you. Each person's need for insulin is different: Some people can control their blood sugar with one shot of insulin a day. Most people need more than three shots every day. Many people need more than one type of insulin. If you take several insulin shots a day or use more than one type of insulin, it doesn't mean your diabetes isn't in good control. Your blood sugar, not the amount or type of insulin you take, is the best way to judge how well you are doing. If you take three shots a day and your blood sugar is near normal, that's Continue reading >>

Novolog Patient Information Including Side Effects

Novolog Patient Information Including Side Effects

Brand Names: NovoLog, NovoLog FlexPen, NovoLog PenFill Generic Name: insulin aspart (Pronunciation: IN su lin AS part) What are the possible side effects of insulin aspart (NovoLog, NovoLog FlexPen, NovoLog PenFill)? What is the most important information I should know about insulin aspart (NovoLog, NovoLog FlexPen, NovoLog PenFill)? What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using insulin aspart (NovoLog, NovoLog FlexPen, NovoLog PenFill)? What is insulin aspart (NovoLog, NovoLog FlexPen, NovoLog PenFill)? Insulin is a hormone that is produced in the body. It works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin aspart is a fast-acting form of insulin. Insulin aspart is used to treat type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes in adults and children who are at least 2 years old. Insulin aspart is usually given together with another long-acting insulin. Insulin aspart may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide. What are the possible side effects of insulin aspart (NovoLog, NovoLog FlexPen, NovoLog PenFill)? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of insulin allergy: itching skin rash over the entire body, wheezing, trouble breathing, fast heart rate, sweating, or feeling like you might pass out. Call your doctor if you have a serious side effect such as: swelling in your hands or feet; or low potassium (confusion, uneven heart rate, extreme thirst, increased urination, leg discomfort, muscle weakness or limp feeling). Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is the most common side effect of insulin aspart. Symptoms of low blood sugar may include headache, nausea, hunger, confusion, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, blurred vision, fast heartbeat, sweating, tremor, trouble concentrating, confusion, or seizure (con Continue reading >>

The Newest Fast-acting Insulins How Fast Is Fast?

The Newest Fast-acting Insulins How Fast Is Fast?

The Newest Fast-Acting Insulins How Fast Is Fast? By Jeremy Pettus, MD on April 20, 2018 / Blood Sugar Control , CGM , Fast-Acting Insulin , Inhaled Insulin , Insulin , Type 1 / 4 Comments I think its time for me to send out an update on the new ultra-rapid acting insulins, but before I jump into whats new, let me back up a minute and talk about whats old. Most of us use a rapid-acting insulin of some kind- mostly either Humalog or NovoLog . But we all know that these insulins are a FAR cry from rapid acting. In fact, they are quite the opposite. How many times have you been high, taken a dose of rapid acting insulin, then looked at your CGM 30 minutes later (or tested) and your blood sugar hadnt moved at all- or even gone UP. WTF?! Super frustrating and the number one cause of rage boluses in my personal situation. Oh, 5 units didnt budge me at all? Nothing a 10 unit rage bolus cant handle. Annnnnnnndddd now Im grumpily eating crackers with an apple juice chaser. And peanut butter for some reason. Unfortunately the myth of rapid-acting insulin perpetuates our mentality- for both people with diabetes and physicians, that we still think we can take the insulin and eat right away. This might work if you have significant gastroparesis, but otherwise, you will be WAY behind the eight ball. Thats one reason Steve and I always push the pre-bolus or bolusing a minimum 20-30 minutes before you eat, and longer if the glucose level is really high and/or with trend arrows shooting upward. This was actually one of my most vivid memories when I was first diagnosed and in the hospital. They brought me my food and gave me my insulin but made me sit there staring at my food for 20 minutes before they would let me eat! Nothing like not being able to eat to let a 15 year old kid know th Continue reading >>

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Aspart (novolog, Novolog Flexpen, Novolog Penfill)?

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Aspart (novolog, Novolog Flexpen, Novolog Penfill)?

NOVOLOG (insulin aspart) Injection DESCRIPTION NOVOLOG (insulin aspart injection) is a rapid-acting human insulin analog used to lower blood glucose. NOVOLOG is homologous with regular human insulin with the exception of a single substitution of the amino acid proline by aspartic acid in position B28, and is produced by recombinant DNA technology utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast). Insulin aspart has the empirical formula C256H381N65O79S6 and a molecular weight of 5825.8. Figure 1: Structural formula of insulin aspart NOVOLOG is a sterile, aqueous, clear, and colorless solution, that contains insulin aspart 100 Units/mL, glycerin 16 mg/mL, phenol 1.50 mg/mL, metacresol 1.72 mg/mL, zinc 19.6 mcg/mL, disodium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate 1.25 mg/mL, sodium chloride 0.58 mg/mL and water for injection. NOVOLOG has a pH of 7.2-7.6. Hydrochloric acid 10% and/or sodium hydroxide 10% may be added to adjust pH. font size A A A 1 2 3 4 5 Next What is Type 2 Diabetes? The most common form of diabetes is type 2 diabetes, formerly called non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus or "adult onset" diabetes, so-called because it typically develops in adults over age 35, though it can develop at any age. Type 2 diabetes is diagnosed more often in people who are overweight or obese, and who are not physically active. Type 2 diabetes is an illness in which the body does not process ingested sugars (glucose) properly. In type 2, the body usually produces some insulin, but not enough to allow the glucose into the cells for the body to use as energy. In addition, there can be insulin resistance, where it becomes difficult for the body to use the insulin produced. Type 2 diabetes is seen both in men and in women, though men have a slightly higher incidence of developing the dise Continue reading >>

Novolog, Novolog Flexpen, Novolog Penfill

Novolog, Novolog Flexpen, Novolog Penfill

What is NovoLog? NovoLog (insulin aspart)is a fast-acting insulin that starts to work about 15 minutes after injection, peaks in about 1 hour, and keeps working for 2 to 4 hours. Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. NovoLog is used to improve blood sugar control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. This medicine is sometimes used together with a long-acting or intermediate-acting insulin. NovoLog is used to treat type 2 diabetes in adults. NovoLog is also used to treat type 1 diabetes in adults and children who are at least 2 years old. Important information NovoLog is a fast-acting insulin that begins to work very quickly. After using it, you should eat a meal within 5 to 10 minutes. Never share an injection pen or cartridge with another person. Sharing injection pens or cartridges can allow disease such as hepatitis or HIV to pass from one person to another. You should not use NovoLog if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Before taking this medicine You should not use NovoLog if you are allergic to insulin aspart, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). NovoLog is not approved for use by anyone younger than 2 years old. This medicine should not be used to treat type 2 diabetes in a child of any age. To make sure NovoLog is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: liver or kidney disease; or low levels of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia). Tell your doctor if you also take pioglitazone or rosiglitazone (sometimes contained in combinations with glimepiride or metformin). Taking certain oral diabetes medicines while you are using insulin may increase your risk of serious heart problems. Follow your doctor's instructions about using insulin if you are pregn Continue reading >>

High-alert Medications - Novolog (insulin Aspart)

High-alert Medications - Novolog (insulin Aspart)

Extra care is needed because NovoLog is a high-alert medicine. High-alert medicines have been proven to be safe and effective. But these medicines can cause serious injury if a mistake happens while taking them. This means that it is very important for you to know about this medicine and take it exactly as directed. Top 10 List of Safety Tips for NovoLog When taking your medicine 1. Know your insulin. NovoLog is a rapid-acting form of insulin that should be injected below the skin 5 to 10 minutes before meals. Have food ready before injection. After injecting the insulin, do not skip a meal or delay eating. 2. Prepare your insulin. An intermediate- or long-acting insulin is often prescribed with NovoLog. NovoLog can be mixed with insulin NPH (intermediate-acting insulin), but always draw NovoLog into the syringe first. Never mix NovoLog with Lantus. Do not mix NovoLog with other insulins if using an insulin pen or external pump. Do not vigorously shake insulin before use. 3. Don't reuse or recycle. Dispose of used syringes/needles, pens, and lancets in a sealable hard plastic or metal container (e.g., empty detergent bottle, special sharps container from your pharmacy). When the container is full, seal the lid before placing it in the trash. Do not reuse or recycle syringes/needles or lancets. 4. Don't share. Even if you change the needle, sharing an insulin pen or syringe may spread diseases carried in the blood, including hepatitis and HIV. To avoid serious side effects 5. Avoid mix-ups. If you use more than one type of insulin, make each vial or pen look different by putting a rubber band around one type of insulin. 6. Check your medicine. NovoLog can be confused with Humalog (another rapid-acting insulin). When you pick up your insulin at the pharmacy, be sure it's Continue reading >>

Faqs About Novolog, Flexpen, And More | Novolog (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml

Faqs About Novolog, Flexpen, And More | Novolog (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml

Selected Important Safety Information for NovoLog Do not share your NovoLogFlexPen, NovoLogFlexTouch, PenFillcartridge or PenFillcartridge compatible insulin delivery device with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. your blood sugar is too low (hypoglycemia) or you are allergic to any of its ingredients. Read the Instructions for Use and take exactly as directed. NovoLog is fast-acting. Eat a meal within 5 to 10 minutes after taking it. Know the type and strength of your insulin. Do not change your insulin type unless your health care provider tells you to. Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should check them. Do not reuse or share your needles with other people. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. What is NovoLog (insulin aspart injection) 100 U/mL? NovoLogis a man-made insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. Important Safety Information for NovoLog Do not share your NovoLogFlexPen, NovoLogFlexTouch, PenFillcartridge or PenFillcartridge compatible insulin delivery device with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. your blood sugar is too low (hypoglycemia) or you are allergic to any of its ingredients. Before taking NovoLog, tell your health care provider about all your medical conditions including, if you are: pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding. taking new prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including supplements. Talk to your health care provider about how to manage low blo Continue reading >>

Novolog U-100 Insulin Aspart Subcutaneous : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing - Webmd

Novolog U-100 Insulin Aspart Subcutaneous : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing - Webmd

Insulin aspart is used with a proper diet and exercise program to control high blood sugar in people with diabetes . Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke . Insulin aspart is a man-made product that is similar to human insulin . It replaces the insulin that your body would normally make. Insulin aspart starts working faster and lasts for a shorter time than regular insulin. It works by helping blood sugar ( glucose ) get into cells so your body can use it for energy. This medication is usually used with a medium- or long-acting insulin product. Read the Patient Information Leaflet provided by your pharmacist before you start using this medication and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor, diabetes educator, or pharmacist. Learn all preparation and usage instructions from your health care professional and the product package. Before using, check this product visually for particles or discoloration. If either is present, do not use the insulin . Insulin aspart should be clear and colorless. Before injecting each dose, clean the injection site with rubbing alcohol. Change the injection site each time to lessen injury under the skin and to avoid developing problems under the skin ( lipodystrophy ). Insulin aspart may be injected in the stomach area, the thigh, or the back of the upper arm. Do not inject into skin that is red, swollen, or itchy. Do not inject cold insulin because this can be painful. The insulin container you are currently using can be kept at room temperature. Inject this medication under the skin as directed by your doctor. Some brands should be injecte Continue reading >>

Humalog Vs. Novolog: What’s The Difference?

Humalog Vs. Novolog: What’s The Difference?

The two leaders in the fast acting insulin market, Humalog and Novolog, are the most common types of fast acting insulin used by those with diabetes today. Fast Acting, mealtime insulin is a type of insulin that is injected before or right after eating. When you eat your blood glucose begins to rise. Fast acting insulin, Humalog and Novolog work to help manage these rises or spikes to keep your blood glucose levels more within range and balanced. When you use a fast acting insulin like Humalog or Novolog, you typically will continue to take a long acting insulin to help manage your levels between your meals and throughout the night. The question is though, is there really a difference between the two? Endocrinologists and other medical professionals don’t seem to really think there is, stating the two are virtually interchangeable. But that’s not really the full story. Humalog (Insulin Lispro) Insulin Lispro (Humalog) has been on the market since 1996, when it was first introduced by Eli Lily. Humalog is the first insulin analogue that was used clinically. Insulin Lispro received its name due to its structure. The difference between it and regular insulin was the switch between the lysine B28 (an amino acid) and proline B29. The formula consists of a hexametric solution available in vials and pen form. After a subcutaneous injection, the formula converts into a monomeric formula which allows it to have a fast absorption in the body. The one noted negative factor of Humalog is its short term control of glucose levels. Additionally, if it is injected and mealtime happens to be delayed, a hypoglycemic episode may occur. For Humalog to be most effective it is to be injected 15 minutes prior to the start of a meal. I recommend reading the following articles: Humalog is a Continue reading >>

Novolog (insulin Aspart)

Novolog (insulin Aspart)

NovoLog is the brand name for the synthetic analog called insulin aspart. It is designed to help adults and children (at least two years old) with type 1 diabetes to lower their blood sugar levels. Adults with type 2 diabetes may also take NovoLog, but it should never be taken by children with type 2 diabetes of any age. NovoLog is almost identical to regular human insulin, except for one amino acid substitution. It is produced by recombinant DNA technology using baker’s yeast. There is currently no generic insulin aspart available because manufacturing generic NovoLog products in the United States is currently prohibited. How Does NovoLog Work NovoLog is a bolus insulin (also known as a mealtime insulin). Bolus insulin in a body without diabetes would be a burst of insulin released in response to food. It is designed to handle the blood sugar spikes that happen when you eat. NovoLog is one of three fast-acting or rapid-acting insulins approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (the others are Apidra and Humalog). It takes effect very quickly and starts to bring your blood sugars down within five to fifteen minutes. You need to make sure you eat very soon after taking NovoLog so you don’t experience a blood sugar crash (aka hypoglycemia episode). NovoLog’s peak blood sugar lowering action is at about the one hour mark after injection. It’s usually out of the system within two to four hours after injection. Because NovoLog is a fast-acting insulin, it is normally prescribed in conjunction with a longer-acting insulin (also known as basal insulin). This way, your insulin needs are covered between meals and while you sleep by the long-acting variety, and the fast-acting NovoLog controls the mealtime spikes. Insulin pumps use fast-acting insulin only, dispens Continue reading >>

Rapid Insulins | Diabetesnet.com

Rapid Insulins | Diabetesnet.com

Thu, 11/18/2010 - 15:27 -- Richard Morris See also Kinetics vs. Dynamics , Humalog & Heat and Users' Reports Like Regular, Humalog and Novolog are used to cover meals and snacks. Most meals raise the blood sugar for only 2 to 3 hours afterwards. Once injected, Regular insulin takes 30 minutes to begin working, peaks between 2 and 4 hours and hangs on for 6 to 8 hours, long after the meal stopped raising the blood sugar. Humalog and Novolog, on the other hand, begin working in about 10 minutes, peaks at one to one and a half hours and are gone in about three and a half to four hours. Many people who've tried these faster insulins report that their control is improved and that they feel better. The great advantage of fast insulins are that they match the "action time" for most meals. You can take them as you begin eating, rather than the 30 to 45 minutes prior to eating required of Regular. No longer do you need to accurately anticipate when you (or your young child with diabetes) will begin eating. In addition, Humalog and Novolog leave your body faster so you don't have residual insulin causing low blood sugars in the late afternoon or, even worse, in the middle of the night. For most meals, fast insulins will be lowering the blood sugar at the same time the food is raising it. The rise in the blood sugar seen in the couple of hours after eating is much lower, especially with Novolog, and by the end of three hours the blood sugar is often back to its starting point. With Humalog or Novolog, you're better equipped to prevent spiking blood sugar between meals, while avoiding the lows that result from the combined buildup of Regular and long-acting insulins. The new Lantus insulin is an excellent choice when using these fast insulins to cover meals. The clearly defined ac Continue reading >>

Humalog Vs. Novolog: Important Differences And More

Humalog Vs. Novolog: Important Differences And More

Humalog and Novolog are two diabetes medications. Humalog is the brand-name version of insulin lispro, and Novolog is the brand-name version of insulin aspart. These drugs both help control blood glucose (sugar) in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Humalog and Novolog are both rapid acting. That means they work more quickly than other types of insulin. There are important distinctions between Humalog and Novolog, however, and the drugs are not directly interchangeable. Check out this comparison so you can work with your doctor to choose a drug that’s right for you. Insulin is injected under your skin fat. It’s the most common type of treatment for type 1 diabetes because it works quickly. It’s also the only type of diabetes medication that’s absorbed into the bloodstream. Humalog and Novolog are both equivalent to the insulin made in your body. Unlike oral diabetes drugs, insulin provides fast relief for changes in your blood sugar. The type of insulin your doctor prescribes depends on how often and how much your blood sugar fluctuates each day. The table below provides quick facts at a glance. Brand name Humalog Novolog What is the generic drug? insulin lispro insulin aspart Is a generic version available? no no What does it treat? type 1 and type 2 diabetes type 1 and type 2 diabetes What form does it come in? solution for injection solution for injection What strengths does it come in? • 3-mL cartridges • 3-mL prefilled KwikPen • 3-mL vials • 10-mL vials • 3-mL FlexPen • 3-mL FlexTouch • 3-mL PenFill cartridges • 10-mL vials What is the typical length of treatment? long-term long-term How do I store it? Refrigerate at 36° to 46°F (2° to 8°C). Do not freeze the drug. Refrigerate at 36° to 46°F (2° to 8°C). Do not freeze the drug. Continue reading >>

Novolog® (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml Indications And Usage

Novolog® (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml Indications And Usage

NovoLog® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® or one of its excipients. Never Share a NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill® Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. NovoLog® (insulin aspart injection) 100 U/mL is an insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. NovoLog® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® or one of its excipients. Never Share a NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill® Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse effect of insulin therapy. The timing of hypoglycemia may reflect the time-action profile of the insulin formulation. Glucose monitoring is re Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin For Diabetes Treatment

Types Of Insulin For Diabetes Treatment

Many forms of insulin treat diabetes. They're grouped by how fast they start to work and how long their effects last. The types of insulin include: Rapid-acting Short-acting Intermediate-acting Long-acting Pre-mixed What Type of Insulin Is Best for My Diabetes? Your doctor will work with you to prescribe the type of insulin that's best for you and your diabetes. Making that choice will depend on many things, including: How you respond to insulin. (How long it takes the body to absorb it and how long it remains active varies from person to person.) Lifestyle choices. The type of food you eat, how much alcohol you drink, or how much exercise you get will all affect how your body uses insulin. Your willingness to give yourself multiple injections per day Your age Your goals for managing your blood sugar Afrezza, a rapid-acting inhaled insulin, is FDA-approved for use before meals for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The drug peaks in your blood in about 15-20 minutes and it clears your body in 2-3 hours. It must be used along with long-acting insulin in people with type 1 diabetes. The chart below lists the types of injectable insulin with details about onset (the length of time before insulin reaches the bloodstream and begins to lower blood sugar), peak (the time period when it best lowers blood sugar) and duration (how long insulin continues to work). These three things may vary. The final column offers some insight into the "coverage" provided by the different insulin types in relation to mealtime. Type of Insulin & Brand Names Onset Peak Duration Role in Blood Sugar Management Rapid-Acting Lispro (Humalog) 15-30 min. 30-90 min 3-5 hours Rapid-acting insulin covers insulin needs for meals eaten at the same time as the injection. This type of insulin is often used with Continue reading >>

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