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How Does Novolog Insulin Work?

High-alert Medications - Novolog (insulin Aspart)

High-alert Medications - Novolog (insulin Aspart)

Extra care is needed because NovoLog is a high-alert medicine. High-alert medicines have been proven to be safe and effective. But these medicines can cause serious injury if a mistake happens while taking them. This means that it is very important for you to know about this medicine and take it exactly as directed. Top 10 List of Safety Tips for NovoLog When taking your medicine 1. Know your insulin. NovoLog is a rapid-acting form of insulin that should be injected below the skin 5 to 10 minutes before meals. Have food ready before injection. After injecting the insulin, do not skip a meal or delay eating. 2. Prepare your insulin. An intermediate- or long-acting insulin is often prescribed with NovoLog. NovoLog can be mixed with insulin NPH (intermediate-acting insulin), but always draw NovoLog into the syringe first. Never mix NovoLog with Lantus. Do not mix NovoLog with other insulins if using an insulin pen or external pump. Do not vigorously shake insulin before use. 3. Don't reuse or recycle. Dispose of used syringes/needles, pens, and lancets in a sealable hard plastic or metal container (e.g., empty detergent bottle, special sharps container from your pharmacy). When the container is full, seal the lid before placing it in the trash. Do not reuse or recycle syringes/needles or lancets. 4. Don't share. Even if you change the needle, sharing an insulin pen or syringe may spread diseases carried in the blood, including hepatitis and HIV. To avoid serious side effects 5. Avoid mix-ups. If you use more than one type of insulin, make each vial or pen look different by putting a rubber band around one type of insulin. 6. Check your medicine. NovoLog can be confused with Humalog (another rapid-acting insulin). When you pick up your insulin at the pharmacy, be sure it's Continue reading >>

Rapid Insulins | Diabetesnet.com

Rapid Insulins | Diabetesnet.com

Thu, 11/18/2010 - 15:27 -- Richard Morris See also Kinetics vs. Dynamics , Humalog & Heat and Users' Reports Like Regular, Humalog and Novolog are used to cover meals and snacks. Most meals raise the blood sugar for only 2 to 3 hours afterwards. Once injected, Regular insulin takes 30 minutes to begin working, peaks between 2 and 4 hours and hangs on for 6 to 8 hours, long after the meal stopped raising the blood sugar. Humalog and Novolog, on the other hand, begin working in about 10 minutes, peaks at one to one and a half hours and are gone in about three and a half to four hours. Many people who've tried these faster insulins report that their control is improved and that they feel better. The great advantage of fast insulins are that they match the "action time" for most meals. You can take them as you begin eating, rather than the 30 to 45 minutes prior to eating required of Regular. No longer do you need to accurately anticipate when you (or your young child with diabetes) will begin eating. In addition, Humalog and Novolog leave your body faster so you don't have residual insulin causing low blood sugars in the late afternoon or, even worse, in the middle of the night. For most meals, fast insulins will be lowering the blood sugar at the same time the food is raising it. The rise in the blood sugar seen in the couple of hours after eating is much lower, especially with Novolog, and by the end of three hours the blood sugar is often back to its starting point. With Humalog or Novolog, you're better equipped to prevent spiking blood sugar between meals, while avoiding the lows that result from the combined buildup of Regular and long-acting insulins. The new Lantus insulin is an excellent choice when using these fast insulins to cover meals. The clearly defined ac Continue reading >>

Novolog (insulin Aspart)

Novolog (insulin Aspart)

NovoLog is the brand name for the synthetic analog called insulin aspart. It is designed to help adults and children (at least two years old) with type 1 diabetes to lower their blood sugar levels. Adults with type 2 diabetes may also take NovoLog, but it should never be taken by children with type 2 diabetes of any age. NovoLog is almost identical to regular human insulin, except for one amino acid substitution. It is produced by recombinant DNA technology using baker’s yeast. There is currently no generic insulin aspart available because manufacturing generic NovoLog products in the United States is currently prohibited. How Does NovoLog Work NovoLog is a bolus insulin (also known as a mealtime insulin). Bolus insulin in a body without diabetes would be a burst of insulin released in response to food. It is designed to handle the blood sugar spikes that happen when you eat. NovoLog is one of three fast-acting or rapid-acting insulins approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (the others are Apidra and Humalog). It takes effect very quickly and starts to bring your blood sugars down within five to fifteen minutes. You need to make sure you eat very soon after taking NovoLog so you don’t experience a blood sugar crash (aka hypoglycemia episode). NovoLog’s peak blood sugar lowering action is at about the one hour mark after injection. It’s usually out of the system within two to four hours after injection. Because NovoLog is a fast-acting insulin, it is normally prescribed in conjunction with a longer-acting insulin (also known as basal insulin). This way, your insulin needs are covered between meals and while you sleep by the long-acting variety, and the fast-acting NovoLog controls the mealtime spikes. Insulin pumps use fast-acting insulin only, dispens Continue reading >>

Novolog, Novolog Flexpen, Novolog Penfill

Novolog, Novolog Flexpen, Novolog Penfill

What is NovoLog? NovoLog (insulin aspart)is a fast-acting insulin that starts to work about 15 minutes after injection, peaks in about 1 hour, and keeps working for 2 to 4 hours. Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. NovoLog is used to improve blood sugar control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. This medicine is sometimes used together with a long-acting or intermediate-acting insulin. NovoLog is used to treat type 2 diabetes in adults. NovoLog is also used to treat type 1 diabetes in adults and children who are at least 2 years old. Important information NovoLog is a fast-acting insulin that begins to work very quickly. After using it, you should eat a meal within 5 to 10 minutes. Never share an injection pen or cartridge with another person. Sharing injection pens or cartridges can allow disease such as hepatitis or HIV to pass from one person to another. You should not use NovoLog if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Before taking this medicine You should not use NovoLog if you are allergic to insulin aspart, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). NovoLog is not approved for use by anyone younger than 2 years old. This medicine should not be used to treat type 2 diabetes in a child of any age. To make sure NovoLog is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: liver or kidney disease; or low levels of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia). Tell your doctor if you also take pioglitazone or rosiglitazone (sometimes contained in combinations with glimepiride or metformin). Taking certain oral diabetes medicines while you are using insulin may increase your risk of serious heart problems. Follow your doctor's instructions about using insulin if you are pregn Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin For Diabetes Treatment

Types Of Insulin For Diabetes Treatment

Many forms of insulin treat diabetes. They're grouped by how fast they start to work and how long their effects last. The types of insulin include: Rapid-acting Short-acting Intermediate-acting Long-acting Pre-mixed What Type of Insulin Is Best for My Diabetes? Your doctor will work with you to prescribe the type of insulin that's best for you and your diabetes. Making that choice will depend on many things, including: How you respond to insulin. (How long it takes the body to absorb it and how long it remains active varies from person to person.) Lifestyle choices. The type of food you eat, how much alcohol you drink, or how much exercise you get will all affect how your body uses insulin. Your willingness to give yourself multiple injections per day Your age Your goals for managing your blood sugar Afrezza, a rapid-acting inhaled insulin, is FDA-approved for use before meals for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The drug peaks in your blood in about 15-20 minutes and it clears your body in 2-3 hours. It must be used along with long-acting insulin in people with type 1 diabetes. The chart below lists the types of injectable insulin with details about onset (the length of time before insulin reaches the bloodstream and begins to lower blood sugar), peak (the time period when it best lowers blood sugar) and duration (how long insulin continues to work). These three things may vary. The final column offers some insight into the "coverage" provided by the different insulin types in relation to mealtime. Type of Insulin & Brand Names Onset Peak Duration Role in Blood Sugar Management Rapid-Acting Lispro (Humalog) 15-30 min. 30-90 min 3-5 hours Rapid-acting insulin covers insulin needs for meals eaten at the same time as the injection. This type of insulin is often used with Continue reading >>

Humalog Vs. Novolog: Important Differences And More

Humalog Vs. Novolog: Important Differences And More

Humalog and Novolog are two diabetes medications. Humalog is the brand-name version of insulin lispro, and Novolog is the brand-name version of insulin aspart. These drugs both help control blood glucose (sugar) in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Humalog and Novolog are both rapid acting. That means they work more quickly than other types of insulin. There are important distinctions between Humalog and Novolog, however, and the drugs are not directly interchangeable. Check out this comparison so you can work with your doctor to choose a drug that’s right for you. Insulin is injected under your skin fat. It’s the most common type of treatment for type 1 diabetes because it works quickly. It’s also the only type of diabetes medication that’s absorbed into the bloodstream. Humalog and Novolog are both equivalent to the insulin made in your body. Unlike oral diabetes drugs, insulin provides fast relief for changes in your blood sugar. The type of insulin your doctor prescribes depends on how often and how much your blood sugar fluctuates each day. The table below provides quick facts at a glance. Brand name Humalog Novolog What is the generic drug? insulin lispro insulin aspart Is a generic version available? no no What does it treat? type 1 and type 2 diabetes type 1 and type 2 diabetes What form does it come in? solution for injection solution for injection What strengths does it come in? • 3-mL cartridges • 3-mL prefilled KwikPen • 3-mL vials • 10-mL vials • 3-mL FlexPen • 3-mL FlexTouch • 3-mL PenFill cartridges • 10-mL vials What is the typical length of treatment? long-term long-term How do I store it? Refrigerate at 36° to 46°F (2° to 8°C). Do not freeze the drug. Refrigerate at 36° to 46°F (2° to 8°C). Do not freeze the drug. Continue reading >>

What Is Novolog (insulin Aspart)?

What Is Novolog (insulin Aspart)?

Before you receive DARZALEX®, tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you: have a history of breathing problems have had shingles (herpes zoster) are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. DARZALEX® may harm your unborn baby. Females who are able to become pregnant should use an effective method of birth control during treatment and for at least 3 months after your final dose of DARZALEX®. Talk to your healthcare provider about birth control methods that you can use during this time. are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if DARZALEX® passes into your breast milk. Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. DARZALEX® may be given alone or together with other medicines used to treat multiple myeloma. Your healthcare provider will decide the time between doses as well as how many treatments you will receive. Your healthcare provider will give you medicines before each dose of DARZALEX® and on the first day after each dose of DARZALEX® to help reduce the risk of infusion reactions. If you miss any appointments, call your healthcare provider as soon as possible to reschedule your appointment. Infusion reactions. Infusion reactions are common with DARZALEX® and can be severe. Your healthcare provider may temporarily stop your infusion or completely stop treatment with DARZALEX® if you have infusion reactions. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get any of the following symptoms: shortness of breath or trouble breathing dizziness or lightheadedness (hypotension) cough wheezing throat tightness runny or stuffy nose headache itching nausea vomiting chills fever Changes in blood tests. DARZALEX Continue reading >>

Faqs About Novolog, Flexpen, And More | Novolog (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml

Faqs About Novolog, Flexpen, And More | Novolog (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml

Selected Important Safety Information for NovoLog Do not share your NovoLogFlexPen, NovoLogFlexTouch, PenFillcartridge or PenFillcartridge compatible insulin delivery device with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. your blood sugar is too low (hypoglycemia) or you are allergic to any of its ingredients. Read the Instructions for Use and take exactly as directed. NovoLog is fast-acting. Eat a meal within 5 to 10 minutes after taking it. Know the type and strength of your insulin. Do not change your insulin type unless your health care provider tells you to. Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should check them. Do not reuse or share your needles with other people. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. What is NovoLog (insulin aspart injection) 100 U/mL? NovoLogis a man-made insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. Important Safety Information for NovoLog Do not share your NovoLogFlexPen, NovoLogFlexTouch, PenFillcartridge or PenFillcartridge compatible insulin delivery device with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. your blood sugar is too low (hypoglycemia) or you are allergic to any of its ingredients. Before taking NovoLog, tell your health care provider about all your medical conditions including, if you are: pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding. taking new prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including supplements. Talk to your health care provider about how to manage low blo Continue reading >>

Fast-acting Insulin

Fast-acting Insulin

Even when you think you’re doing everything right with your diabetes care regimen, it can sometimes seem like your blood glucose levels are hard to control. One potential source of difficulty that you may not have thought of is how you time your injections or boluses of rapid-acting insulin with respect to meals. Since the first rapid-acting insulin, insulin lispro (brand name Humalog), came on the market in 1996, most diabetes experts have recommended taking it within 15 minutes of starting a meal (any time between 15 minutes before starting to eat to 15 minutes after starting to eat). This advice is based on the belief that rapid-acting insulin is absorbed quickly and begins lowering blood glucose quickly. However, several years of experience and observation suggest that this advice may not be ideal for everyone who uses rapid-acting insulin. As a result, the advice on when to take it needs updating. Insulin basics The goal of insulin therapy is to match the way that insulin is normally secreted in people without diabetes. Basal insulin. Small amounts of insulin are released by the pancreas 24 hours a day. On average, adults secrete about one unit of insulin per hour regardless of food intake. Bolus insulin. In response to food, larger amounts of insulin are secreted and released in two-phase boluses. The first phase starts within minutes of the first bite of food and lasts about 15 minutes. The second phase of insulin release is more gradual and occurs over the next hour and a half to three hours. The amount of insulin that is released matches the rise in blood glucose from the food that is eaten. In people with normal insulin secretion, insulin production and release is a finely tuned feedback system that maintains blood glucose between about 70 mg/dl and 140 mg/d Continue reading >>

Humalog Vs. Novolog: What’s The Difference?

Humalog Vs. Novolog: What’s The Difference?

The two leaders in the fast acting insulin market, Humalog and Novolog, are the most common types of fast acting insulin used by those with diabetes today. Fast Acting, mealtime insulin is a type of insulin that is injected before or right after eating. When you eat your blood glucose begins to rise. Fast acting insulin, Humalog and Novolog work to help manage these rises or spikes to keep your blood glucose levels more within range and balanced. When you use a fast acting insulin like Humalog or Novolog, you typically will continue to take a long acting insulin to help manage your levels between your meals and throughout the night. The question is though, is there really a difference between the two? Endocrinologists and other medical professionals don’t seem to really think there is, stating the two are virtually interchangeable. But that’s not really the full story. Humalog (Insulin Lispro) Insulin Lispro (Humalog) has been on the market since 1996, when it was first introduced by Eli Lily. Humalog is the first insulin analogue that was used clinically. Insulin Lispro received its name due to its structure. The difference between it and regular insulin was the switch between the lysine B28 (an amino acid) and proline B29. The formula consists of a hexametric solution available in vials and pen form. After a subcutaneous injection, the formula converts into a monomeric formula which allows it to have a fast absorption in the body. The one noted negative factor of Humalog is its short term control of glucose levels. Additionally, if it is injected and mealtime happens to be delayed, a hypoglycemic episode may occur. For Humalog to be most effective it is to be injected 15 minutes prior to the start of a meal. I recommend reading the following articles: Humalog is a Continue reading >>

When Do Humalog And Novolog Insulins Really Work?

When Do Humalog And Novolog Insulins Really Work?

When do Humalog and Novolog insulins really work? See also: Humalog & Heat and User's Reports A problem associated with the use of rapid insulins is that situations occur that cause people to perceive them as faster than they really are. For example, a person may feel perfectly normal at 70 mg/dl (3.9 mmol), take a bolus of rapid insulin for a meal, and a few minutes later begin to shake, sweat and have trouble thinking. Though the timing of the symptoms gives the impression that rapid insulin is responsible and acts very quickly, the symptoms are unlikely to be caused by the rapid insulin just given. More likely, another insulin given earlier is causing the blood sugar to drop. A drop of only a few mg/dl causes a person to go from feeling normal to feeling low. Because the meal bolus was just given, it often receives the blame for a low caused by an insulin that was given earlier. The kinetics of an insulin are when that insulin can be measured in the bloodstream, whereas an insulin's dynamics are when it actually affects the blood sugar. After an injection, peak levels of Humalog and Novolog insulins are seen in the bloodstream about 45 minutes later, as shown by the dashed kinetic line to the right. However, the effect on your blood sugar is not nearly this quick. The solid dynamic line to the right shows when these insulins are actually lowering the blood sugar. The maximum effect on lowering the glucose level is not seen until 2 hours after an injection and continues for over 4 hours. Another situation often seems to confirm for many the false impression that a rapid insulin is really rapid. This occurs when a carb or correction bolus is given and a low blood sugar begins only an hour or two later. Here, the rapid insulin is likely at fault, but again the low bloo Continue reading >>

Novolog

Novolog

Last reviewed on RxList 11/13/2017 NovoLog (insulin aspart [rDNA origin] injection) is a form of insulin, a hormone that is produced in the body, used to treat type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes in adults and children who are at least 2 years old. NovoLog is usually given together with another long-acting insulin. The most common side effect of NovoLog is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Symptoms of low blood sugar may include headache, nausea, hunger, confusion, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, blurred vision, fast heartbeat, sweating, tremor, trouble concentrating, confusion, or seizure (convulsions). Other common side effects of NovoLog include: injection site reactions (e.g., pain, redness, irritation). Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects of NovoLog including: signs of low potassium level in the blood (such as muscle cramps, weakness, or irregular heartbeat). The dosage of NovoLog is individualized. The total daily insulin requirement may vary and is usually between 0.5 to 1.0 units/kg/day. NovoLog may interact with albuterol, clonidine, reserpine, guanethidine, or beta-blockers. There are many other medicines that can increase or decrease the effects of insulin. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant before using NovoLog. Tell your doctor if you become pregnant. Your doctor may switch the type of insulin you use during pregnancy. This medication does not pass into breast milk. Your insulin needs may change while breastfeeding. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding. Our NovoLog (insulin aspart [rDNA origin] injection) Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehens Continue reading >>

Insulin Aspart

Insulin Aspart

Insulin aspart is a fast-acting insulin analog marketed by Novo Nordisk as NovoLog/NovoRapid. It is a manufactured form of human insulin; where a single amino acid has been exchanged. This change helps the fast-acting insulin analog be absorbed quickly into the bloodstream. As a result, it starts working in minutes, which allows one to take insulin and eat right away. Fast-acting insulin analogs are considered to act similarly to the way insulin is released in people without diabetes mellitus. Novolog allows for a flexible dosing schedule, which allows patients to adjust their insulin according to any changes in their eating habits.[1] The safety and efficacy of insulin aspart (NovoLog/NovoRapid) in real-life clinical practice was evaluated in the A1chieve study. It was created through recombinant DNA technology so that the amino acid, B28, which is normally proline, is substituted with an aspartic acid residue. This analog has increased charge repulsion, which prevents the formation of hexamers, to create a faster-acting insulin. The sequence was inserted into the yeast genome, and the yeast expressed the insulin analog, which was then harvested from a bioreactor. According to JDRF, insulin aspart was approved for marketing in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration in June 2000.[citation needed] Chemical properties[edit] The components of insulin aspart are as follows: Metal ion – zinc (19.6 μg/mL) Buffer – disodium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate (1.25 mg/mL) Preservatives – m-cresol (1.72 mg/mL) and phenol (1.50 mg/mL) Isotonicity agents – glycerin (16 mg/mL) and sodium chloride (0.58 mg/mL). The pH of insulin aspart is 7.2–7.6.[2] Action time[edit] The onset of action is approximately 15 minutes, the peak action is reached in 45–90 minutes, Continue reading >>

Insulin Aspart (rdna Origin) Injection

Insulin Aspart (rdna Origin) Injection

Insulin aspart is used to treat type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not produce insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood). It is also used to treat people with type 2 diabetes (condition in which the body does not use insulin normally and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) who need insulin to control their diabetes. In patients with type 1 diabetes, insulin aspart is usually used with another type of insulin, unless it is used in an external insulin pump. In patients with type 2 diabetes, insulin aspart also may be used with another type of insulin or with oral medication(s) for diabetes. Insulin aspart is a short-acting, manmade version of human insulin. Insulin aspart works by replacing the insulin that is normally produced by the body and by helping move sugar from the blood into other body tissues where it is used for energy. It also stops the liver from producing more sugar. Over time, people who have diabetes and high blood sugar can develop serious or life-threatening complications, including heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, nerve damage, and eye problems. Using medication(s), making lifestyle changes (e.g., diet, exercise, quitting smoking), and regularly checking your blood sugar may help to manage your diabetes and improve your health. This therapy may also decrease your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes-related complications such as kidney failure, nerve damage (numb, cold legs or feet; decreased sexual ability in men and women), eye problems, including changes or loss of vision, or gum disease. Your doctor and other healthcare providers will talk to you about the best way to manage your diabetes. Insulin aspart comes as a solution (liquid; Fiasp, NovoLog) and Continue reading >>

How To Take Novolog Mealtime Insulin | Novolog (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml

How To Take Novolog Mealtime Insulin | Novolog (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml

Selected Important Safety Information for NovoLog Do not share your NovoLogFlexPen, NovoLogFlexTouch, PenFillcartridge or PenFillcartridge compatible insulin delivery device with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. your blood sugar is too low (hypoglycemia) or you are allergic to any of its ingredients. Read the Instructions for Use and take exactly as directed. NovoLog is fast-acting. Eat a meal within 5 to 10 minutes after taking it. Know the type and strength of your insulin. Do not change your insulin type unless your health care provider tells you to. Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should check them. Do not reuse or share your needles with other people. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. What is NovoLog (insulin aspart injection) 100 U/mL? NovoLogis a man-made insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. Important Safety Information for NovoLog Do not share your NovoLogFlexPen, NovoLogFlexTouch, PenFillcartridge or PenFillcartridge compatible insulin delivery device with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. your blood sugar is too low (hypoglycemia) or you are allergic to any of its ingredients. Before taking NovoLog, tell your health care provider about all your medical conditions including, if you are: pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding. taking new prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including supplements. Talk to your health care provider about how to manage low blo Continue reading >>

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