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How Does Lasix Increase Blood Sugar

Lasix: Indications, Side Effects, Warnings - Drugs.com

Lasix: Indications, Side Effects, Warnings - Drugs.com

Generic Name: Furosemide Tablets (fure OH se mide) This medicine is a strong fluid-lowering drug (diuretic). Sometimes too much water and major elements (potassium) in the blood may be lost. This can lead to serious health problems. Your doctor will follow you closely to change the dose to match your body's needs. It is used to treat high blood pressure . What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE I take Lasix? If you have an allergy to furosemide or any other part of Lasix (furosemide tablets). If you are allergic to any drugs like this one, any other drugs, foods, or other substances. Tell your doctor about the allergy and what signs you had, like rash; hives ; itching; shortness of breath; wheezing ; cough; swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat; or any other signs. If you are taking any of these drugs: Chloral hydrate , ethacrynic acid , or lithium . This is not a list of all drugs or health problems that interact with Lasix (furosemide tablets). Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all of your drugs (prescription or OTC, natural products, vitamins ) and health problems. You must check to make sure that it is safe for you to take Lasix (furosemide tablets) with all of your drugs and health problems. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any drug without checking with your doctor. What are some things I need to know or do while I take Lasix? Tell all of your health care providers that you take Lasix (furosemide tablets). This includes your doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists. Avoid driving and doing other tasks or actions that call for you to be alert until you see how Lasix (furosemide tablets) affects you. To lower the chance of feeling dizzy or passing out, rise slowly if you have been sitting or lying down. Be careful going up and down stairs. If you Continue reading >>

How Water Impacts Blood Sugars

How Water Impacts Blood Sugars

This article was originally from the weekly Diabetes Daily Newsletter. To receive your copy, create a free Diabetes Daily account. Picture a glass of water. Mix in a little sugar and stir until it dissolves. Now place it outside on a hot, sunny day. As the water evaporates, the remaining water gets sweeter and sweeter. If you have diabetes, this happens to your blood when you’re dehydrated. Because your blood is 83% water, when you lose water, the volume of blood decreases and the sugar remains the same. More concentrated blood sugar means higher blood sugars. The lesson: stay hydrated to avoid unnecessary high blood sugars. How Much Water Should I Drink? The average person loses about 10 cups of water per day through sweat and urination. At the same time, you gain fluid from drinking liquids and eating food. So how much you need to drink is a tricky question. You may have heard the “drink 8 glass of water a day” rule. Where did this rule come from? As Barbara Rolls, a nutrition research at Pennsylvania State University says: “I can’t even tell you that, and I’ve writen a book on water!” It turns out that there’s no basis for this in the medical literature. The easiest way to tell is looking at your urine. If it’s a little yellow, you’re probably hydrated. If it’s darker, then you need to drink more fluids. You can also go with your own intuition. Are you thirsty? Drink! If you’re busy or stuck at a desk for long periods, make sure you have a water bottle so you can easily answer when your body calls for water. Does Coffee or Tea Count? Yes! Although consuming caffeine can cause your body to shed some water, you still gain more water than you shed. And studies have shown that this effect is partically non-existent for people who drink caffeine re Continue reading >>

390 Drugs That Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels

390 Drugs That Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels

Knowing the drugs that can affect blood glucose levels is essential in properly caring for your diabetes patients. Some medicines raise blood sugar in patients while others might lower their levels. However, not all drugs affect patients the same way. 390 Drugs that Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels is also available for purchase in ebook format. 390 Drugs that can affect blood glucose Level Table of Contents: Drugs that May Cause Hyper- or Hypoglycemia Drugs That May Cause Hyperglycemia (High Blood Sugar) (GENERIC NAME | BRAND NAME) Abacavir | (Ziagen®) Abacavir + lamivudine,zidovudine | (Trizivir®) Abacavir + dolutegravir + lamivudine | (Triumeq®) Abiraterone | (Zytiga®) Acetazolamide | (Diamox®) Acitretin | (Soriatane®) Aletinib | (Alecensa®) Albuterol | (Ventolin®, Proventil®) Albuterol + ipratropium | (Combivent®) Aliskiren + amlodipine + hydrochlorothiazide | (Amturnide®) Aliskiren + amlodipine | (Tekamlo®) Ammonium chloride Amphotericin B | (Amphocin®, Fungizone®) Amphotericin B lipid formulations IV | (Abelcet®) Amprenavir | (Agenerase®) Anidulafungin | (Eraxis®) Aripiprazole | (Abilify®) Arsenic trioxide | (Trisenox®) Asparaginase | (Elspar®, Erwinaze®) Atazanavir | (Reyataz ®) Atazanavir + cobistat | (Evotaz®) Atenolol + chlorthalidone | (Tenoretic®) Atorvastatin | (Lipitor®) Atovaquone | (Mepron®) Baclofen | (Lioresal®) Belatacept | (Nulojix®) Benazepril + hydrochlorothiazide | (Lotension®) Drugs That May Cause Hyperglycemia (High Blood Sugar) – Continued (GENERIC NAME | BRAND NAME) Betamethasone topical | (Alphatrex®, Betatrex®, Beta-Val®, Diprolene®, Diprolene® AF, Diprolene® Lotion, Luxiq®, Maxivate®) Betamethasone +clotrimazole | (Lotrisone® topical) Betaxolol Betoptic® eyedrops, | (Kerlone® oral) Bexarotene | (Targ Continue reading >>

Furosemide - Lasix, Frusol. Hypertension Medicine Side Effects | Patient

Furosemide - Lasix, Frusol. Hypertension Medicine Side Effects | Patient

Furosemide is a 'water tablet' (a diuretic). Any side-effects are usually mild, but can include feeling sick or dizzy. Water retention (oedema); high blood pressure (hypertension) Diumide-K Continus (contains furosemide in combination with potassium); Frumil (contains furosemide in combination with amiloride; this combination is also called co-amilofruse); Frusene (contains furosemide in combination with triamterene); Lasilactone (contains furosemide in combination with spironolactone) Furosemide belongs to a group of medicines called loop diuretics . A diuretic is a medicine which increases the amount of urine that you pass out from your kidneys. They are often referred to as 'water tablets'. Furosemide is used to clear excess fluid from your body in conditions where your body retains more than it needs. This extra fluid causes you to feel breathless and tired, and your feet and ankles to swell - it is called water retention (oedema), and it is commonly caused by heart failure . Diuretics are also a common treatment for high blood pressure (hypertension) . Furosemide is prescribed for high blood pressure when it cannot be sufficiently controlled by other diuretics. Furosemide can be used on its own as a diuretic, or it can be prescribed as a combination tablet alongside other diuretics such as triamterene, amiloride or spironolactone. It is sometimes prescribed as a combination tablet with a mineral salt called potassium. Some medicines are not suitable for people with certain conditions, and sometimes a medicine can only be used if extra care is taken. For these reasons, before you start taking furosemide it is important that your doctor knows: If you have any difficulties passing urine, or if you have prostate problems. If you have gout or sugar diabetes. These cond Continue reading >>

Furosemide | Lasix | Blood_pressure-heart | Medication Monograph | Rx Outreach

Furosemide | Lasix | Blood_pressure-heart | Medication Monograph | Rx Outreach

IMPORTANT: HOW TO USE THIS INFORMATION: This is a summary and does NOT have all possible information about this product. This information does not assure that this product is safe, effective, or appropriate for you. This information is not individual medical advice and does not substitute for the advice of your health care professional. Always ask your health care professional for complete information about this product and your specific health needs. WARNING: Furosemide is a very potent medication. Using too much of this drug can lead to serious water and salt/mineral loss. Therefore, it is important that you are closely monitored by your doctor while taking this medication. Tell your doctor right away if you become very thirsty or confused, or develop muscle cramps/weakness. See also Side Effects section. USES: Furosemide is used to reduce extra fluid in the body (edema) caused by conditions such as heart failure, liver disease, and kidney disease. This can lessen symptoms such as shortness of breath and swelling in your arms, legs, and abdomen. This drug is also used to treat high blood pressure. Lowering high blood pressure helps prevent strokes, heart attacks, and kidney problems. Furosemide is a "water pill" (diuretic) that causes you to make more urine. This helps your body get rid of extra water and salt. OTHER USES: This section contains uses of this drug that are not listed in the approved professional labeling for the drug but that may be prescribed by your health care professional. Use this drug for a condition that is listed in this section only if it has been so prescribed by your health care professional. This medication may also be used to decrease a high level of calcium in the blood (hypercalcemia). HOW TO USE: Read the Patient Information Leaflet if Continue reading >>

Effects Of Loop Diuretics On Carbohydrate Metabolism And Electrolyte Excretion.

Effects Of Loop Diuretics On Carbohydrate Metabolism And Electrolyte Excretion.

J Clin Pharmacol. 1981 Nov-Dec;21(11-12 Pt 2):637-46. Effects of loop diuretics on carbohydrate metabolism and electrolyte excretion. Robinson DS , Nilsson CM , Leonard RF , Horton ES . The effects of two loop diuretics, bumetanide and furosemide, on carbohydrate metabolism and electrolyte balance were assessed in 11 normal male subjects in a double-blind manner. Glucose, insulin, glucagon, and growth hormone responses to 5-hour glucose tolerance test and arginine infusion were measured during the control and drug treatment periods. Three other non-insulin-dependent diabetic subjects, receiving diuretic drug for six weeks, underwent a similar protocol. Kaliuresis and natriuresis due to diuretic administration were significant only on day 1 of treatment. There were no significant changes in total body potassium by 40K counting; net potassium loss by balance study was minimal in both the acutely treated subjects and the chronically treated patients. Effects of bumetanide and furosemide on water and electrolyte excretion did not differ. Glucose tolerance was significantly improved with bumetanide but not with furosemide. Plasma insulin, glucagon, and growth hormone levels during the oral glucose tolerance test were unaffected by either drug. Insulin levels with arginine infusion were significantly increased, and growth hormone levels decreased with bumetanide but not with furosemide. No evidence of impaired carbohydrate metabolism in the three chronically treated diabetic subjects was seen. It is concluded that the effects of bumetanide and furosemide on potassium balance and glucose utilization were minimal in this experimental setting. Continue reading >>

Does Furosemide Affect The Blood Sugar Level Of Patients With Diabetes?

Does Furosemide Affect The Blood Sugar Level Of Patients With Diabetes?

Does Furosemide affect the blood sugar level of patients with diabetes? Furosemide (also known as Lasix)may be associated with anincrease in blood sugar levels. This is not a problem for most patients, but a different diuretic may begiven todiabetic patient. Your doctor will monitor this closely. Chemical Toxins Relationship Abuse Diabetes Complications Body Contouring Your Lifestyle The Five Senses Stages Of Colon Cancer Patient Education For Improving Rx Drug Adherence Your Mind Male Reproductive System Parts Parenting Teens Morning Sickness & Pregnancy Mental Health Therapies Sharecare Bladder Cancer Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Digestive Diseases Schizophrenia Hydrocephalus Conception Achieved (Pregnancy) Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs. Continue reading >>

Drugs That Can Worsen Diabetes Control

Drugs That Can Worsen Diabetes Control

One of the main goals of any diabetes control regimen is keeping blood glucose levels in the near-normal range. The cornerstones of most plans to achieve that goal include following a healthy diet, getting regular exercise, and taking insulin or other medicines as necessary. However, it’s not uncommon for people with diabetes to have other medical conditions that also require taking medicines, and sometimes these drugs can interfere with efforts to control blood glucose. A few medicines, including some commonly prescribed to treat high blood pressure and heart disease, have even been implicated as the cause of some cases of diabetes. This article lists some of the medicines that can worsen blood glucose control, the reasons they have that effect, the usual magnitude of the blood glucose changes, as well as the pros and cons of using these drugs in people who have diabetes. Where the problems occur To understand how various medicines can worsen blood glucose control, it helps to understand how insulin, the hormone responsible for lowering blood glucose, works in the body. Insulin is released from the beta cells of the pancreas in response to rising levels of glucose in the bloodstream, rising levels of a hormone called GLP-1 (which is released from the intestines in response to glucose), and signals from the nerve connections to the pancreas. The secretion of insulin occurs in two phases: a rapid first phase and a delayed second phase. Both of these phases are dependent on levels of potassium and calcium in the pancreas. Insulin acts on three major organs: the liver, the muscles, and fat tissue. In the liver, insulin enhances the uptake of glucose and prevents the liver from forming new glucose, which it normally does to maintain fasting glucose levels. In muscle and f Continue reading >>

Did Drugs (furosemide & Metoprolol) Trigger Diabetes?

Did Drugs (furosemide & Metoprolol) Trigger Diabetes?

Did Drugs (Furosemide & Metoprolol) Trigger Diabetes? Q. I take furosemide and metoprolol for high blood pressure. After several years on this regimen I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Now I need to take metformin for elevated blood sugar. Everything I read says it is not good to take metformin with furosemide. What can you tell me about side effects of furosemide, metoprolol and metformin? I often have muscle cramps and wonder whether they might be due to my medicine. A. Furosemide (Lasix) is a fairly powerful diuretic that can deplete your body of essential minerals like potassium and magnesium. When such electrolytes are depleted from the body, muscles cramps are not unusual. More disturbing, though, a diuretic like furosemide can raise blood sugar and might contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes. Beta blockers such as atenolol and metoprolol might also contribute to this problem. Diuretics like Lasix may also increase uric acid levels which could trigger a gout attack. Here is an overview of side effects of the three medications you are taking: Lactic acidosis (symptoms may include irregular heart rate, nausea, stomach pain, lethargy, anxiety, low blood pressure and rapid heart rate) Please discuss your medications with your MD. If the furosemide and the metoprolol are contributing to your diabetes, you may want to ask if there are other medications that would be appropriate. NEVER stop beta blockers like metoprolol or diuretics like furosemide suddenly or without medical supervision as this could lead to serious complications. To help you with this conversation you may wish to consider our book, . We have a very thorough chapter on blood pressure control, diabetes management and medications. It will explain why beta blockers such as atenolol and meto Continue reading >>

Furosemide,nasonex Affect Diabetes,metformin Intake

Furosemide,nasonex Affect Diabetes,metformin Intake

Concern: Do you have to take metformin? What happens to your system if you don't? I don't have any problem with food as such because i check for sugar content. That said if you buy any bread from a supermarket bakery, there is no labeling as to content of sugar or fat? Well this is England, but you can ask for the information sheet on that product, you have to ask because if you don't, you don't get it. I found out bread at asda has appx 28grams of sugar per loaf, when i asked for the content sheet they could not come up with one for loafs of bread they only came up with one sheet for rolls. After eplaining it is esecial for diabetics to know, they sent someone to check on the mix label and came up 28g for the grannary loaf . On the subject of sugar control I found that when my level went down to 4 or 5, as suggested to be ideal, my system just wants to sleep. I just have to lay down and sleep ,so i try to keep it at to at least 6 to 7 then im ok, so called health profeshionls seem to think that one size fits all its plainly not the case . With doctors getting the budget for our health care and the government shutting down the NHS and selling it off you will find that doctors are telling patients that they dont need to monitor their sugar levels as the NHS check it EVERY 3 MONTHS! Of course you could you could be seriously ill or die in 3 MONTHS , I had to insist on getting my test strips on prescription, how else could I have found out that unlabeled products could harm me along with fruit and other unlabeled products. Alba's Recommendations: Hi oobuc5. To be frank, I did not realize what you really wanted; however, I am trying to give some recommendations below based on what I understood. 1. You are asking if to take Metformin whether not. Well, it depends on your he Continue reading >>

What Medicines Can Make Your Blood Sugar Spike?

What Medicines Can Make Your Blood Sugar Spike?

If you have diabetes or high blood sugar, you probably know some of the things that cause your glucose (another name for blood sugar) to go up. Like a meal with too many carbohydrates, or not enough exercise. But other medicines you might take to keep yourself healthy can cause a spike, too. Know Your Meds Medicines you get with a prescription and some that you buy over the counter (OTC) can be a problem for people who need to control their blood sugar. Prescription medicines that can raise your glucose include: Steroids (also called corticosteroids). They treat diseases caused by inflammation, like rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and allergies. Common steroids include hydrocortisone and prednisone. But steroid creams (for a rash) or inhalers (for asthma) aren’t a problem. Drugs that treat high blood pressure, such as beta-blockers and thiazide diuretics High doses of asthma medicines, or drugs that you inject for asthma treatment OTC medicines that can raise your blood sugar include: Cough syrup. Ask your doctor if you should take regular or sugar-free. How Do You Decide What to Take? Even though these medicines can raise your blood sugar, it doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t take them if you need them. The most important thing is to work with your doctor on the right way to use them. If you have diabetes or you’re watching your blood sugar, ask your doctor before you take new medicines or change any medicines, even if it’s just something for a cough or cold. (Remember, just being sick can raise your blood sugar.) Make sure your doctor knows all the medicines you take -- for diabetes or any other reason. If one of them may affect your blood sugar, she may prescribe a lower dose or tell you to take the medicine for a shorter time. You may need to check your blood s Continue reading >>

Lasix - Uses, Side Effects, Interactions - Canoe.com

Lasix - Uses, Side Effects, Interactions - Canoe.com

How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Furosemide belongs to the class of medications called diuretics. It is used to treat edema (fluid retention) that occurs with congestive heart failure and disorders of the liver, kidney, and lung. It is also used to control mild to moderate high blood pressure. It may be used in combination with other medications to treat more severe high blood pressure. Furosemide works by increasing the amount of urine produced and excreted, and by removing excessive water (edema) from the body. The tablet form begins to work within an hour of being taken and usually lasts for 4 to 6 hours. The injectable form begins to work within hour and lasts approximately 2 hours. This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. What form(s) does this medication come in? EachmL of clear, slightly yellowish solution with an orange odour, contains furosemide 10mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: alcohol, butylated hydroxyanisol, butylated hydroxytoluene, glycerin, methylparaben, natural or Continue reading >>

Diabetes Clinic

Diabetes Clinic

Before taking Lasix make sure your doctor or pharmacist knows: if you are pregnant, trying for a baby or breast-feeding if you suffer from any liver or kidney problems if you suffer from hypotension (low blood pressure), porphyria (blood disorder) or diabetes if you suffer from prostate problems or have problems urinating (passing water) if you suffer from hypokalaemia (low blood potassium) if you have ever had an allergic reaction to this or any other medicine if you are taking any other medicines, including those available to buy without a prescription, herbal or complementary medicines Always read the manufacturer's information leaflet, if possible, before beginning treatment. Take Lasix exactly as directed by your doctor or pharmacist. Lasix will make you urinate (pass water) more often, so your doctor or pharmacist will usually advise you to take your dose in the morning so you will not need to get up in the night. If you take more than one dose per day, take the last dose before 6pm in the evening. If you miss a dose of Lasix take it as soon as you remember. However, if it is after 6pm in the evening skip the missed dose and continue taking it at the usual times. Never take two doses at the same time. Lasix is for you. Never give it to others, even if their condition appears to be the same as yours. Never take more than the prescribed dose. If you suspect that you or someone else has taken an overdose of Lasix contact your doctor or go to the accident and emergency department of your local hospital at once. Always take the container with you, if possible, even if it is empty. Before taking any 'over-the-counter' medicines, check with your pharmacist which medicines are safe for you to take alongside Lasix. Keep your regular appointments with your doctor so that y Continue reading >>

Drugs That Raise Your Blood Sugar

Drugs That Raise Your Blood Sugar

If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, you probably know about the different types of food and drink that can increase your blood sugar (glucose). But did you know some prescription medicines can do this as well? This is why you should tell everyone who prescribes medicines for you—doctors, dentists, or nurse practitioners—that you have diabetes. At the same time, it’s important for the doctor or nurse practitioner managing your diabetes treatment to know of any new medicines you may be taking that were prescribed by someone else. There are many medicines that can raise blood sugar and cause hyperglycemia, or blood sugar levels above normal. If you aren’t sure about a medication you’ve been prescribed, ask your doctor or pharmacist if it will affect your blood sugar before you start taking it. Common medicines that raise blood sugar levels include: Steroids Corticosteroids, called steroids for short, are often prescribed to treat conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and asthma, among others. While they can be very effective in managing those types of problems, they can also wreak havoc on your blood sugar levels. Luckily, when the steroid doses decrease or when you're told you can stop taking the medication, usually your sugar levels will return to their previous readings. Some examples of steroids include prednisone and prednisolone. Antipsychotics Patients with certain mental illnesses, like schizophrenia, rely on medications such as antipsychotics to manage their symptoms. While these medicines can be life saving, they are also known to raise blood sugar levels, especially clozapine (Clozaril, FazaClo, Versacloz), olanzapine (Zyprexa, Zyprexa, Zydis), risperidone (Risperdal), aripiprazole (Abilify), quetiapine fumarate (Seroquel), and ziprasidone (Geo Continue reading >>

Important Safety Information - Lasix

Important Safety Information - Lasix

LASIX (furosemide) tablets are a very potent medication. Using too much of this drug can lead to serious water and salt and mineral loss. Therefore, it is important that you are closely monitored by your doctor while taking this medication. Tell your doctor right away if you become very thirsty or confused, or develop muscle cramps or weakness. Lasix tablets are used to reduce extra fluid in the body (known as edema) caused by conditions such as heart failure, liver disease, kidney disease, and from other diseases that might cause fluid retention in adults and children. Lasix tablets are also used to treat high blood pressure in adults. Lasix tablets are a water pill (diuretic) that cause you to increase your urinary output. Lasix tablets help your body get rid of extra water and salt. You should not take Lasix tablets if you are allergic to furosemide, or if you have any other allergies to any of the inactive ingredients in the drug, or if you are allergic to sulfa drugs. You should not use Lasix tablets if you are unable to urinate. If you have diabetes, Lasix tablets may affect your blood sugar level. Check your blood sugar level regularly as directed and share the results with your doctor. Your doctor may need to adjust your diabetes medication or diet. If your doctor detects nitrogen in your blood or if you have urine problems, your doctor may discontinue treatment with Lasix tablets. Lasix tablets may reduce the potassium level in your blood. Your doctor may instruct you to add potassium-rich foods to your diet (such as bananas, orange juice) or prescribe potassium supplements to prevent potassium loss. Before using Lasix tablets, tell your doctor if you have kidney disease, enlarged prostate, urination problems, cirrhosis or other liver disease, an electrolyte i Continue reading >>

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