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How Does Fat Affect Insulin

Why/how Does Fat Increase Blood Glucose?

Why/how Does Fat Increase Blood Glucose?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community hey Again I stumbled over an article explaining in what way fat can raise blood glucose... maybe most relevant for type 1 diabetic or insuline users of type 2 ... I was a Little puzzled to find that fat in any ways could be able to raise blood glucose as I have been taught that fat is the only thing that never raises blood glucose besides from pure alcohol . If youll take the time and read the article , I like to hear what you think of it.. "First, Fettuccine Alfredo, garlic bread and tiramisu are, for the most part, a mixture of carbohydrate and fat. But its the fat in the meal that is contributing to the elevated readings." What utter cobblers.. the carb causes the elevated readings... the fat delays the spike and maybe slows it down. Take your blood before and after a bulletproof coffee or fat bomb and you'll see minimal changes. From my basic understanding fat doesnt necessarily raise your levels. It acts as more of a hindrance as it takes longer for the body to break down the fat and get what it needs. Hence when i havena takeaway my levels can be good when i go to bed but higher in the morning. Did you read all of the first article? It was purely focused on T1 and was pretty reasonable in what it said @bulkbiker The second article seems to say that if you have ketones you will develop ketoacidosis whatever happens which I'm afraid is also wrong. Did you read all of the first article? It was purely focused on T1 and was pretty reasonable in what it said @bulkbiker It doesn't mention type 1 at all though does it? Just says you need have your insulin dose or your oral meds? do Type 1's take oral meds?..unclear at best surely. The second article see Continue reading >>

Fat Vs Sugar In The War On Insulin Resistance

Fat Vs Sugar In The War On Insulin Resistance

Fat vs Sugar in the war on insulin resistance Insulin resistance and the incidence of type 2 diabetes are on the rise. Dietary choices are implicated in increasing risk, but sometimes it is hard to know where to look when seeking advice on what to eat! But is it fat or sugar we should be more concerned about? Or both?It seems the answer to that question is a little complex. First, lets look at the action of insulin. Insulin impacts the synthesis and storage of glucose, fat and amino acids. It is primarily recognised for its regulation of blood glucose levels, and maintains balance of levels of sugar in the blood by: moving glucose from the blood into muscle cells or adipose (fat) tissue, and; inhibiting the formation of glucose from non-carbs, i.e. fats and proteins (a process called gluconeogenesis that takes place in the liver when blood glucose runs low).1 It then gathers excess glucose in the blood and stores it as fat. It also acts as an appetite regulator, and whilst its role is not well defined, once insulin acts to deposits fat into fat cells, leptin the hunger suppressant hormone is stimulated to release.1 In insulin resistance, it has been observed that glucose and free fatty acids are persistently high in the blood, likely due to resistant cells not heeding to insulins call, meaning less glucose uptake by muscle cells, and adipose cells no longer inhibiting free fatty acid release.1 This then results in higher levels of insulin being produced, and chronically high insulin is known as hyperinsulinemia. Liver and kidney cells do not become resistant to insulin-like the muscle and fat cells, and instead are hyper-stimulated to produce triglycerides and retain sodium respectively. This results in high levels of TGL in the blood, and high blood pressure.1Neither Continue reading >>

How Insulin Really Works: It Causes Fat Storage…but Doesn’t Make You Fat

How Insulin Really Works: It Causes Fat Storage…but Doesn’t Make You Fat

Many people believe that insulin is to blame for the obesity epidemic. When you understand how it actually works, you’ll know why this is a lie. Insulin has been taking quite a beating these days. If we’re to listen to some “experts,” it’s an evil hormone whose sole goal is making us fat, type 2 diabetics. Furthermore, we’re told that carbohydrates also are in on the conspiracy. By eating carbs, we open the insulin floodgates and wreak havoc in our bodies. How true are these claims, though? Does it really make sense that our bodies would come with an insidious mechanism to punish carbohydrate intake? Let’s find out. What is Insulin, Anyway? Insulin is a hormone, which means it’s a substance the body produces to affect the functions of organs or tissues, and it’s made and released into the blood by the pancreas. Insulin’s job is a very important one: when you eat food, it’s broken down into basic nutrients (protein breaks down into amino acids; dietary fats into fatty acids; and carbohydrates into glucose), which make their way into the bloodstream. These nutrients must then be moved from the blood into muscle and fat cells for use or storage, and that’s where insulin comes into play: it helps shuttle the nutrients into cells by “telling” the cells to open up and absorb them. So, whenever you eat food, your pancreas releases insulin into the blood. As the nutrients are slowly absorbed into cells, insulin levels drop, until finally all the nutrients are absorbed, and insulin levels then remain steady at a low, “baseline” level. This cycle occurs every time you eat food: amino acids, fatty acids, and/or glucose find their way into your blood, and they’re joined by additional insulin, which ushers them into cells. Once the job is done, insu Continue reading >>

Dietary Fat And Hyperinsulinemia

Dietary Fat And Hyperinsulinemia

I’ve often recommended switching to a diet higher in natural fats and lower in refined carbohydrates. What’s the deal with dietary fat? Simply put, dietary fat does not raise insulin. And hyperinsulinemia is the main driver of obesity. Hyperinsulinemia means literally, high insulin in the blood (hyper means high, and -emia means blood levels). So, logically, switching refined carbohydrates (raises insulin) for dietary fat, can lower insulin levels significantly even if you take the same total number of calories. But what is so different about dietary fat compared to both protein and carbohydrates that makes this true? It all comes down to the different ways that proteins and fats are metabolized. This also illustrates the difference between the insulin hypothesis and the carbohydrate-insulin hypothesis( CIH). The carbohydrate-insulin hypothesis holds that insulin is the main driver of obesity, and that the main driver of insulin is carbohydrates. Therefore, if one simply reduces carbohydrates, insulin is reduced as well. I think this is not entirely true. Animal protein, for example, is highly insulinogenic (provokes an insulin response), even to the same degree as many refined carbohydrates. If you eat according to this hypothesis, you should be able to eat as much protein as you like without problems. But this is not true. The insulin hypothesis, or the Hormonal Obesity Theory (HOT), is a more complete, nuanced version of the CIH. Insulin is still the main driver of obesity, but there are many different ways that insulin can be raised or lowered. For example, insulin resistance, fructose, animal proteins, incretins, vinegar, and fiber can all be incorporated into this more complete model of obesity, which still holds insulin at the center of the web. In this case Continue reading >>

Nih Study Shows How Insulin Stimulates Fat Cells To Take In Glucose

Nih Study Shows How Insulin Stimulates Fat Cells To Take In Glucose

Findings could aid in understanding diabetes, related conditions. Using high-resolution microscopy, researchers at the National Institutes of Health have shown how insulin prompts fat cells to take in glucose in a rat model. The findings were reported in the Sept. 8 issue of the journal Cell Metabolism. By studying the surface of healthy, live fat cells in rats, researchers were able to understand the process by which cells take in glucose. Next, they plan to observe the fat cells of people with varying degrees of insulin sensitivity, including insulin resistance — considered a precursor to type 2 diabetes (These observations may help identify the interval when someone becomes at risk for developing diabetes. "What we're doing here is actually trying to understand how glucose transporter proteins called GLUT4 work in normal, insulin-sensitive cells," said Karin G. Stenkula, Ph.D., a researcher at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) and a lead author of the paper. "With an understanding of how these transporters in fat cells respond to insulin, we could detect the differences between an insulin-sensitive cell and an insulin-resistant cell, to learn how the response becomes impaired. We hope to identify when a person becomes pre-diabetic, before they go on to develop diabetes." Glucose, a simple sugar, provides energy for cell functions. After food is digested, glucose is released into the bloodstream. In response, the pancreas secretes insulin, which directs the muscle and fat cells to take in glucose. Cells obtain energy from glucose or convert it to fat for long-term storage. Like a key fits into a lock, insulin binds to receptors on the cell's surface, causing GLUT4 molecules to come to the cell's surface. As their name impli Continue reading >>

Fat Vs Sugar In The War On Insulin Resistance

Fat Vs Sugar In The War On Insulin Resistance

Dietary choices are implicated in increasing risk, but sometimes it is hard to know where to look when seeking advice on what to eat! But is it fat or sugar we should be more concerned about? Or both? It seems the answer to that question is a little complex. First, let’s look at the action of insulin. When insulin gets high Insulin impacts the synthesis and storage of glucose, fat and amino acids. It is primarily recognised for its regulation of blood glucose levels, and maintains balance of levels of sugar in the blood by: moving glucose from the blood into muscle cells or adipose (fat) tissue, and; inhibiting the formation of glucose from non-carbs, i.e. fats and proteins (a process called gluconeogenesis that takes place in the liver when blood glucose runs low).1 It then gathers excess glucose in the blood and stores it as fat. It also acts as an appetite regulator, and whilst its role is not well defined, once insulin acts to deposits fat into fat cells, leptin – the hunger suppressant hormone – is stimulated to release.1 In insulin resistance, it has been observed that glucose and free fatty acids are persistently high in the blood, likely due to ‘resistant’ cells not heeding to insulin’s call, meaning less glucose uptake by muscle cells, and adipose cells no longer inhibiting free fatty acid release.1 This then results in higher levels of insulin being produced, and chronically high insulin is known as hyperinsulinemia. Liver and kidney cells do not become resistant to insulin-like the muscle and fat cells, and instead are hyper-stimulated to produce triglycerides and retain sodium respectively. This results in high levels of TGL in the blood, and high blood pressure.1 Neither situation is great, especially for your heart. So, considering insulin is i Continue reading >>

Does Eating Fat Raise Insulin?

Does Eating Fat Raise Insulin?

Insulin, a hormone secreted by the pancreas after you eat a meal, causes cells throughout the body -- primarily the liver, muscles and fat tissue -- to absorb glucose. Carbohydrate foods, which are broken down into sugar, cause the most rapid rise in blood sugar and therefore, insulin. However, the fats in your diet influence insulin levels through a complex range of effects on insulin production and the way cells respond to this hormone. Certain dietary fats, such as trans fats and some saturated fats, may alter the structures of cell membranes to inhibit insulin binding and lead to increased insulin levels, according to Leszek Szablewski, author of the book "Glucose Homeostasis and Insulin Resistance." Fats also affect cell membrane permeability, or the ability of cells to absorb nutrients, which is a factor that can influence glucose absorption. Polyunsaturated fats may have a beneficial affect by activating genes that control carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism to improve insulin sensitivity, while other types of fats have the opposite effect. Omega-6 and Omega-3 Effects The omega-6 polyunsaturated fat linoleic acid, an essential fatty acid found in safflower, sunflower, corn and soybean oils lowers insulin levels by improving insulin sensitivity, according to a study published in the 2009 issue of the journal "Lipid Research." By contrast, omega-3 essential fatty acids, found in flaxseed, fish and canola oil and widely touted for their heart and other health benefits, do not improve insulin sensitivity. To obtain the benefits of both of these essential fatty acids, replace saturated animal fats from meats and poultry with polyunsaturated fats from vegetable oils, fish, nuts and seeds. Oleic Acid Oleic acid -- a monounsaturated fat found in olive oil that also Continue reading >>

Does Fat Increase Insulin Levels? So Fat Is Not Fattening?

Does Fat Increase Insulin Levels? So Fat Is Not Fattening?

Does fat increase insulin levels? So fat is not fattening? Location: Knoxville, Tennessee, United States Does fat increase insulin levels? So fat is not fattening? i have a question. I read an article in this page: about insulin-secretion which stated that fats do not increase insulin-levels and protein and carbohydrates elevate insulin levels (Carbohydrates of course elevate insulin more than protein). "If you?re not insulin sensitive and/or have high insulin secretion, a diet lower in carbs and higher in fat (don?t forget that protein can raise insulin as well) is a better choice. Assuming, again, 40% protein, a good starting place might be 40% protein, 20-30% carbs and 20-30% fat. A further shift to a near ketogenic (or cyclical ketogenic) diet may be necessary, 40% protein, 10-20% carbs and the remainder fat may be the most effective. If protein is set higher, up to 50% protein, carbs woul be set at 10-20% with the remainder (20-30%) coming from dietary fat." So according to this it would be rational for people who are carbohydrate resistant and secrete too much insulin as response to carbs, to follow a higher fat diet, a ketogenic diet. So i am a bit confused though. Does this literally means that fats don't have any effect on insulin at all? Does it literally means that the only macronutrients which increase insulin-levels (The fat storage hormone) are carbohydrates and protein? So by this insulin-secretion theory, fat is not fattening. This means i can drink 3% whole-milk instead of 1% with my whey protein shakes? Well i weight 170 and i take about 160 grams of protein a day, but like this article stated it is better for people with insulin problems to decrease protein and increase fats. (Because protein does have an impact on insulin as well, where as fat doesn Continue reading >>

How Does Fat Affect Insulin Resistance And Diabetes?

How Does Fat Affect Insulin Resistance And Diabetes?

According to the Centers for Disease Control, 29 million people in America have diabetes and 86 million have prediabetes. Insulin resistance is recognized as a predictor of type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and obesity. But what causes insulin resistance? In this NutritionFacts.org video, Dr. Michael Greger talks about how fat affects insulin resistance, and about how the most effective way to reduce insulin sensitivity is to reduce fat intake. We’ve also provided a summary of Dr. Greger’s main points below. Insulin Resistance of People on High-Fat Diets vs. High-Carb Diets In studies performed as early as the 1930s, scientists have noted a connection between diet and insulin intolerance. In one study, healthy young men were split into two groups. Half of the participants were put on a fat-rich diet, and the other half were put on a carb-rich diet. The high-fat group ate olive oil, butter, mayonnaise, and cream. The high-carb group ate pastries, sugar, candy, bread, baked potatoes, syrup, rice, and oatmeal. Within two days, tests showed that the glucose intolerance had skyrocketed in the group eating the high-fat diet. This group had twice the blood sugar levels than the high-carb group. The test results showed that the higher the fat content of the diet, the higher the blood sugar levels would be. What Is Insulin Resistance? It turns out that as the amount of fat in the diet goes up, so does one’s blood sugar spikes. Athletes frequently carb-load before a race because they’re trying to build up fuel in their muscles. We break down starch into glucose in our digestive tract; it circulates as blood glucose (blood sugar); and it is then used by our muscle cells as fuel. Blood sugar, though, is like a vampire. It needs an invitation to enter our cells. And that invit Continue reading >>

Wtf Is Insulin And How Does It Affect Our Health And Fat Loss?

Wtf Is Insulin And How Does It Affect Our Health And Fat Loss?

With so much written about diet versus exercise and exercise versus diet, it’s easy to overlook the role hormones play in our health and wellbeing, but they can make all the difference. That's why we’ve decided to take a closer look at the hormone insulin: What is it, and how does it relate to diabetes? Can we manipulate insulin to help us lose fat and live longer? As it turns out, we can—and pretty easily, too. What Is Insulin and How Does It Relate to Diabetes? Insulin is a super important hormone that helps us absorb nutrients from our food. Whenever we eat carbs (and a little bit when we eat protein), the amount of sugar in our blood increases, and the pancreas releases insulin to help take the sugar out of the bloodstream and into our organs (mostly the liver and muscle cells) where it can be used for energy . Diabetes is a disease that occurs when that insulin response doesn’t work properly and sugar piles up in the blood with nowhere to go. This can result in a whole lot of problems, including vision loss, hearing loss, high blood pressure, and gum disease. There are two main kinds of diabetes: Type 1 occurs when the pancreas produces little or no insulin. Type 2 occurs when insulin is produced, but the body doesn’t respond to it the right way. What causes Type 1 is often hard to pinpoint. Type 2 diabetes is increasingly common—some have estimated that a third of Americans born in 2000 will develop the disease—and a lot of the time, it can be prevented. How? Let’s talk insulin sensitivity. What Is Insulin Sensitivity? Doing a lot of something can make you less sensitive to its effects, right? Drinking coffee all the time can dull the caffeine, regular drinkers find they need more beers to get drunk than they used to, and so on. In kind of the same Continue reading >>

The Basic Food Groups: The Insulin/fat Connection

The Basic Food Groups: The Insulin/fat Connection

The Insulin/Fat Connection The primary source of body fat for most Americans is not dietary fat but carbohydrate, which is converted to blood sugar and then, with the aid of insulin, to fat by fat cells. Remember, insulin is our main fatbuilding hormone. Eat a plate of pasta. Your blood sugar will rise and your insulin level (if you have type 2 diabetes or are not diabetic) will also rise in order to cover, or prevent, the jump in blood sugar. All the blood sugar that is not burned as energy or stored as glycogen is turned into fat. So you could, in theory, acquire more body fat from eating a high-carbohydrate “fat-free” dessert than you would from eating a tender steak nicely marbled with fat. Even the fat in the steak is more likely to be stored if it is accompanied by bread, potatoes, corn, and so on. The fatty-acid building blocks of fats can be metabolized (burned), stored, or converted by your body into other compounds, depending on what it requires. Consequently, fat is always in flux in the body, being stored, appearing in the blood, and being converted to energy. The amount of triglycerides (the storage form of fat) in your bloodstream at any given time will be determined by your heredity, your level of exercise, your blood sugar levels, your diet, your ratio of visceral (abdominal) fat to lean body mass (muscle), and especially by your recent consumption of carbohydrate. The slim and fit tend to be very sensitive (i.e., responsive) to insulin and have low serum levels not only of triglycerides but insulin as well. But even their triglyceride levels will increase after a high-carbohydrate meal, as excess blood sugar is converted to fat. The higher the ratio of abdominal fat (and, to a lesser degree, total body fat) to lean body mass, the less sensitive to i Continue reading >>

Fat Is The Cause Of Type 2 Diabetes

Fat Is The Cause Of Type 2 Diabetes

ron: I’m glad you asked this question, because it gets at a common issue that many people share. Due to science education in schools and the way media reports on scientific news, the general public is under the impression that each new study sort of wipes out any study that came before. Say that yesterday there was a study or article in favor of say butter, then you would see those headlines and think that the latest and greatest WORD from science is that butter is healthy. And then tomorrow, when another study comes out showing that butter is indeed unhealthy, there is another headline and people think that the latest “word” is that butter is now unhealthy. Another problem is that because people think the latest study is the latest word and since studies are not all going to agree, people think that the science keeps flip flopping and get frustrated with that. The media makes this worse by only reporting studies that they can make appear to be a “flip flop” as the media makes money off of eye catching headlines. . But that’s not how science actually works. When done in good faith, science is about hitting a subject from a whole bunch of different angles and attempting to replicate results multiple times. Understanding that life is messy and it’s extremely difficult (impossible?) to create perfect studies for subjects as complex as nutrition on long term health, we *expect* that not all the studies will agree with each other. However, over time, if we do our job, we can also expect that the *body of scientific evidence* will paint a fairly clear picture. I say all the time, “It’s not about any one study. It’s about the body of evidence.” . Did you know that there are over 100 studies showing that smoking is either neutral or health-promoting? But t Continue reading >>

Dietary Fat And Blood Glucose

Dietary Fat And Blood Glucose

When most people with diabetes think about the effects that different foods have on their blood glucose levels, one particular component of foods usually comes to mind: carbohydrates. And rightfully so, since out of the three major macronutrients in the human diet — carbohydrates, proteins, and fats — carbohydrates have the greatest effect on blood glucose levels. But as a recent study makes clear, fats can also have a significant effect on blood glucose levels — both positive and negative. As many people with diabetes have experienced firsthand, eating fats in combination with carbohydrates can affect how quickly the carbohydrates are absorbed in the digestive tract, potentially leading to a slower, more sustained rise in blood glucose levels. But this study looked at a different, often overlooked aspect of dietary fat: what type it is — saturated, monounsaturated, or polyunsaturated — as well as the effect of substituting fat for carbohydrate. Published last month in the journal PLOS Medicine, the study examined 102 different clinical trials in which participants followed different diets and had their blood glucose, insulin, and HbA1c (a measure of long-term blood glucose control) levels recorded. A total of 4,220 adults — some of whom had diabetes — and 239 different diet groups were included in the study. Within each of the clinical trials, participants in each diet group consumed the same number of calories, regardless of the other aspects of their diet. As noted in a HealthDay article on the study, the researchers found that some fats raised blood glucose levels less than others — and that substituting some fats for carbohydrates could also lead to better blood glucose control. When participants switched out 5% of the calories in their diet from ca Continue reading >>

Lipotoxicity: How Saturated Fat Raises Blood Sugar

Lipotoxicity: How Saturated Fat Raises Blood Sugar

You guys should look into the blood viscosity theory of cardiovascular disease. It answers the question why everything seems to be a cofactor in heart disease, but nothing seems to be the single factor. Its because everything alters the viscosity of the blood. Everything IS a cofactor. If you have chronic elevated viscosity, over time the arteries are stressed and toughen up. As to the debate between vegetarian high carb and low carbers. Its obvious at this point that the body can utilize carbs efficiently or fats efficiently, but struggles when fat and carbs are eaten in high amounts together. The blood fills up with fat AND sugar, becomes toxic. But this also seems to be the combination that gives you that High after you eat. Think about it… a baked potato is good by itself. Cheese n butter is ok by itself I guess. But a baked potato doused in cheese n butter? Eyes roll up in the head good. Foodgasm. You get a high from eating it. And in nature, what animal ever eats carbs and animal fat simultaneously? Milk is the only thing I can think of. So is a low carb diet just as good as a vegetarian diet? Nope. Totally unsustainable over the long term. Works great in the short term but lack of fiber n nutrients will eventually destroy you. As to the vegans and vegetarians. Same thing. Occasional animal fat and meat is extremely healthy. And so many lifelong vegans have had to just stop due to the exact same health problems surfacing. And why are any of us still so confused about what we should be eating? The largest ‘study’ in human history has already been done proving what the best diet is. Its called JAPAN. Where they have amazingly low rates of cardiovascular disease, dementia, multiple sclerosis, obesity, skin problems…. you name it. Everything they eat seems to Continue reading >>

Fat Is Not The Cause Of Insulin Resistance

Fat Is Not The Cause Of Insulin Resistance

Fat Is NOT the Cause of Insulin Resistance Our Educational Content is Not Meant or Intended for Medical Advice or Treatment Fat is NOT the Cause of Insulin Resistance There isn't a relationship between eating saturated fats and diabetes. Insulin is a hormone that regulates blood sugars and lowers it. In the presence of insulin, you are not going to burn fat and it causes fat to be stored. Insulin resistance is different. As insulin connects to the cell, the cell does not absorb it anymore it blocks it. On the other side of the cell you have low insulin and the cell is starving of: Which then sends a signal back to produce more insulin. People with insulin resistance have 5 to 7 times more insulin than normal people. So many people have insulin resistance and dont even know it because it takes 10 years for it to develop it. It causes a stubborn belly fat and a fatty liver which cause insulin resistance. It's a huge ugly cycle. Guru's Give False Information About Diabetes There are gurus out there pushing this avoidance of saturated fats. Joslin Diabetes Center have 5 Myths on a section of their website that are bogus information.Some of the things they write as "Myths" are actualy true and what they report as "Facts" are way off. The following is from Joslin Diabete Center website under 'Diabetes and Nutrition': 5 Common Myths with People with Diabetes Debunked 1. People with diabetes have to eat different from their family, right? (Myth) "Fact: People with diabetes can eat the same foods their family eat. The Truth: Of course people with diabetes have to eat differently than their family. What if the family are eating sugar? 2. People with diabetes should never give in to food cravings. (Myth) Facts: If a craving does occur let yourself have a small taste of whatever y Continue reading >>

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