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How Does Exercise Help Type 2 Diabetes?

Diabetes And Exercise: When To Monitor Your Blood Sugar

Diabetes And Exercise: When To Monitor Your Blood Sugar

Exercise is an important part of any diabetes treatment plan. To avoid potential problems, check your blood sugar before, during and after exercise. Diabetes and exercise go hand in hand, at least when it comes to managing your diabetes. Exercise can help you improve your blood sugar control, boost your overall fitness, and reduce your risk of heart disease and stroke. But diabetes and exercise pose unique challenges, too. To exercise safely, it's crucial to track your blood sugar before, during and after physical activity. You'll learn how your body responds to exercise, which can help you prevent potentially dangerous blood sugar fluctuations. Before exercise: Check your blood sugar before your workout Before jumping into a fitness program, get your doctor's OK to exercise — especially if you've been inactive. Talk to your doctor about any activities you're contemplating, the best time to exercise and the potential impact of medications on your blood sugar as you become more active. For the best health benefits, experts recommend at least 150 minutes a week of moderately intense physical activities such as: Fast walking Lap swimming Bicycling If you're taking insulin or medications that can cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), test your blood sugar 30 minutes before exercising. Consider these general guidelines relative to your blood sugar level — measured in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Lower than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L). Your blood sugar may be too low to exercise safely. Eat a small snack containing 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrates, such as fruit juice, fruit, crackers or even glucose tablets before you begin your workout. 100 to 250 mg/dL (5.6 to 13.9 mmol/L). You're good to go. For most people, this is a safe pre-exercise Continue reading >>

Exercise Therapy In Type 2 Diabetes: Part 1 - The Benefits

Exercise Therapy In Type 2 Diabetes: Part 1 - The Benefits

Medical Editor: William C. Shiel, Jr., MD, FACP, FACR A 52 year old woman came into my office last week with recently diagnosed diabetes . She works as an administrative assistant and admitted to having arather non-active lifestyle. We discussed medications and basic nutritionalchanges. We also talked about the importance of exercise in patients with diabetes . Physical exercise is important for all of us. Physical conditioning is one of the mostimportant quality of life factors that we can actually improve, thuscontributing to a longer and healthier life. Even better, exercise is empowering since each person can control the amount of activity they do to achieve the maximum benefit. Exercise presents a specialchallenge in patients with type 1 diabetes , and I will address this topic inanother article. In this discussion, I will focus on exercise in type 2 diabetes . What are the benefits of exercise in people with type 2 diabetes? For the person with type 2 diabetes , or the high-risk individual who is trying toprevent the development of diabetes, there is an enormous body of researchliterature documenting the benefits of exercise . Unfortunately, there is littledata on how to motivate patients to maintain a long term healthy regimen. A major benefit of exercise is its effect on the heart and the associatedreduction in death from heart disease . In addition to lowering the risk of heartdisease in type 2 diabetes , exercise helps to decrease the chances of developingdiabetes. This can be especially important for those with borderline diabetes. In one study, the risk of developing diabetes was reduced by 24% (basedon an energy expenditure of 2000calories per week through exercise). This protective effect of exercise was seenthe most in the group at highest risk for devel Continue reading >>

11 Exercise Tips For Type 2 Diabetes

11 Exercise Tips For Type 2 Diabetes

Exercise is sure to be on your to-do list if you have diabetes. Get started with these go-to tips: 1. Make a list of fun activities. You have lots of options, and you don't have to go to a gym. What sounds good? Think about something you've always wanted to try or something you enjoyed in the past. Sports, dancing, yoga, walking, and swimming are a few ideas. Anything that raises your heart rate counts. 2. Get your doctor's OK. Let them know what you want to do. They can make sure you're ready for it. They'll also check to see if you need to change your meals, insulin, or diabetes medicines. Your doctor can also let you know if the time of day you exercise matters. 3. Check your blood sugar. Ask your doctor if you should check it before exercise. If you plan to work out for more than an hour, check your blood sugar levels regularly during your workout, so you’ll know if you need a snack. Check your blood sugar after every workout, so that you can adjust if needed. 4. Carry carbs. Always keep a small carbohydrate snack, like fruit or a fruit drink, on hand in case your blood sugar gets low. 5. Ease into it. If you're not active now, start with 10 minutes of exercise at a time. Gradually work up to 30 minutes a day. 6. Strength train at least twice a week. It can improve blood sugar control. You can lift weights or work with resistance bands. Or you can do moves like push-ups, lunges, and squats, which use your own body weight. 7. Make it a habit. Exercise, eat, and take your medicines at the same time each day to prevent low blood sugar, also called hypoglycemia. 8. Go public. Work out with someone who knows you have diabetes and knows what to do if your blood sugar gets too low. It's more fun, too. Also wear a medical identification tag, or carry a card that says you Continue reading >>

Exercise And Type 2 Diabetes

Exercise And Type 2 Diabetes

Ann Albright, Ph.D., R.D.; Marion Franz, M.S., R.D., C.D.E.; Guyton Hornsby, Ph.D., C.D.E.; Andrea Kriska, Ph.D., FACSM; David Marrero, Ph.D.; Irma Ullrich, M.D.; Larry S. Verity, Ph.D., FACSM Physical activity, including appropriate endurance and resistance training, is a major therapeutic modality for type 2 diabetes. Unfortunately, too often physical activity is an underutilized therapy. Favorable changes in glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity usually deteriorate within 72 h of the last exercise session; consequently, regular physical activity is imperative to sustain glucose-lowering effects and improved insulin sensitivity. Individuals with type 2 diabetes should strive to achieve a minimum cumulative total of 1000 kcalwk-1 from physical activities. Those with type 2 diabetes generally have a lower level of fitness (VO2max) than nondiabetic individuals, and therefore exercise intensity should be at a comfortable level (RPE 1012) in the initial periods of training and should progress cautiously as tolerance for activity improves. Resistance training has the potential to improve muscle strength and endurance, enhance flexibility and body composition, decrease risk factors for cardiovascular disease, and result in improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Modifications to exercise type and/or intensity may be necessary for those who have complications of diabetes. Individuals with type 2 diabetes may develop autonomic neuropathy, which affects the heart rate response to exercise, and as a result, ratings of perceived exertion rather than heart rate may need to be used for moderating intensity of physical activity. Although walking may be the most convenient low-impact mode, some persons, because of peripheral neuropathy and/or foot problems, may need Continue reading >>

The How, What, And Why Of Exercise And Type-2 Diabetes

The How, What, And Why Of Exercise And Type-2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a common problem among the American population and worldwide. Aside from the impacted life span and quality of life, diabetes is associated with an increased burden on society in relation to medical costs which has a great economic impact. The most influential factors that have been found to be related to diabetes include genetic factors and environmental influences. While you may not be able to change your genetics you can make a change on environmental risk factors. Risk factors Obesity and inactivity are two of the main risk factors of acquiring diabetes. Environmental factors may be mostly modifiable which means that many people that acquire diabetes may have been able to avoid this condition and may also be able to reverse this condition with lifestyle changes. Diet is a crucial aspect of the overall management of diabetes as well as exercise and physical activity. Type 1 versus Type 2 Type 2-diabetes can be difficult to treat and can be expensive to manage and that is why avoiding this diagnosis is imperative. Diabetes occurs because the body does not produce or does not properly use insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is produced by the pancreases that allows glucose or sugar to enter the cells. If the pancreas is unable to produce enough insulin or when muscle, fat, and liver cells do not properly respond to the insulin that is there then glucose builds up in the blood which can become toxic. Hyperglycemia is a condition that occurs when there is too much glucose in the blood. Type 1-diabetes is not related to diet and inactivity but is the type of diabetes that occurs in children and young adults and is the result of the immune system destroying the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas. This article will focus now on how to reduce the risk of type Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

When you have type 2 diabetes, physical activity is an important component of your treatment plan. It’s also important to have a healthy meal plan and maintain your blood glucose level through medications or insulin, if necessary. If you stay fit and active throughout your life, you’ll be able to better control your diabetes and keep your blood glucose level in the correct range. Controlling your blood glucose level is essential to preventing long-term complications, such as nerve pain and kidney disease. Exercise has so many benefits, but the biggest one is that it makes it easier to control your blood glucose (blood sugar) level. People with type 2 diabetes have too much glucose in their blood, either because their body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process it, or because their body doesn’t use insulin properly (insulin resistant). In either case, exercise can reduce the glucose in your blood. Muscles can use glucose without insulin when you’re exercising. In other words, it doesn’t matter if you’re insulin resistant or if you don’t have enough insulin: when you exercise, your muscles get the glucose they need, and in turn, your blood glucose level goes down. If you’re insulin resistant, exercise actually makes your insulin more effective. That is—your insulin resistance goes down when you exercise, and your cells can use the glucose more effectively. Exercise can also help people with type 2 diabetes avoid long-term complications, especially heart problems. People with diabetes are susceptible to developing blocked arteries (arteriosclerosis), which can lead to a heart attack. Exercise helps keep your heart healthy and strong. Plus, exercise helps you maintain good cholesterol—and that helps you avoid arteriosclerosis. Additionally, there ar Continue reading >>

Exercise And Type 2 Diabetes

Exercise And Type 2 Diabetes

Go to: Introduction Diabetes has become a widespread epidemic, primarily because of the increasing prevalence and incidence of type 2 diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in 2007, almost 24 million Americans had diabetes, with one-quarter of those, or six million, undiagnosed (261). Currently, it is estimated that almost 60 million U.S. residents also have prediabetes, a condition in which blood glucose (BG) levels are above normal, thus greatly increasing their risk for type 2 diabetes (261). Lifetime risk estimates suggest that one in three Americans born in 2000 or later will develop diabetes, but in high-risk ethnic populations, closer to 50% may develop it (200). Type 2 diabetes is a significant cause of premature mortality and morbidity related to cardiovascular disease (CVD), blindness, kidney and nerve disease, and amputation (261). Although regular physical activity (PA) may prevent or delay diabetes and its complications (10,46,89,112,176,208,259,294), most people with type 2 diabetes are not active (193). In this article, the broader term “physical activity” (defined as “bodily movement produced by the contraction of skeletal muscle that substantially increases energy expenditure”) is used interchangeably with “exercise,” which is defined as “a subset of PA done with the intention of developing physical fitness (i.e., cardiovascular [CV], strength, and flexibility training).” The intent is to recognize that many types of physical movement may have a positive effect on physical fitness, morbidity, and mortality in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Diagnosis, classification, and etiology of diabetes Currently, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends the use of any of the following four criteria for di Continue reading >>

15 Exercise Tips For People With Type 2 Diabetes

15 Exercise Tips For People With Type 2 Diabetes

15 Exercise Tips for People With Type 2 Diabetes 15 Exercise Tips for People With Type 2 Diabetes These tips will help you ease back into exercise and find a workout plan that works for you. Exercise is safeand highly recommendedfor most people with type 2 diabetes , including those with complications. Along with diet and medication , exercise will help you lower blood sugar and lose weight. However, the prospect of diving into a workout routine may be intimidating. If you're like many newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics, you may not have exercised in years. If that's the case, don't worry: It's fine to start slow and work up. These tips will help you ease back into exercise and find a workout plan that works for you. As long as you're totaling 30 minutes of exercise each day , several brief workouts are fine, says George Griffing, MD, professor of endocrinology at the Saint Louis University School of Medicine in St. Louis. "We need people with diabetes up and moving," Dr. Griffing says. "If you can do your exercise in one 30 minute stretch, fine. But if not, break it up into increments you can manage that add up to at least 30 minutes each day." Increase activity in generalsuch as walking or climbing stairsrather than a particular type of exercise. However, don't rely on housework or other daily activity as your sole exercise. Too often, people overestimate the amount of exercise they get and underestimate the amount of calories they consume. (A step-counting pedometer can help.) Stanford University researchers conducted a review of 26 studies looking at the use of pedometers as motivation for physical activity. Published in 2007, the review found that people who used a pedometer increased their activity by 27%. Having a goal of 10,000 steps a day (about five miles) was Continue reading >>

How Does Exercise Help Diabetes

How Does Exercise Help Diabetes

How Does Exercise Help Diabetes? “How Does Exercise Help Diabetes?” is one of the most common questions among diabetic patients. Exercise is one of the best ways to improve your overall health. Research has repeatedly shown that it can help diabetics bring their diabetes under control through a variety of body mechanisms. There is also a deep connection between exercise and type 2 diabetes prevention as a fit and healthy body isn’t prone to lifestyle disorders like diabetes. Experts agree that to move the needle on diabetes through exercise, you need do either do: Thirty minutes of ‘moderate intensity’ aerobic activity (i.e. “cardio”), five days a week, Or ‘Vigorous intensity’ aerobic activity, 20 minutes or more a day, 3-5 days a week. In addition to this, you should add flexibility and strength training to your routine: Flexibility activities 5-7 days a week. Strength training: 8-10 exercises, 10-15 repetitions of each exercise, 2-3 days a week. Controlling Type 2 Diabetes With Exercise Work with your diabetes educator or your doctor to create a plan that works for you. Here are some ideas of activities that could fall in different categories: Moderately intense physical activity means you are working hard enough to raise your heart rate and break a sweat, but are still able to talk (but not sing). Vigorously intense aerobic activity means you are breathing hard and fast, and your heart rate has increased quite a bit. You won’t be able to say more than a few words without pausing for a breath. Lifestyle activities mean small activities that are part of day-to-day life. They seem small, but can quietly add up to a nice bonus in terms of blood sugar control. Moderately Intense Aerobic Activities Brisk walk: One and three quarter miles in 35 minutes ( Continue reading >>

Physical Activity/exercise And Type 2 Diabetes

Physical Activity/exercise And Type 2 Diabetes

A consensus statement from the American Diabetes Association For decades, exercise has been considered a cornerstone of diabetes management, along with diet and medication. However, high-quality evidence on the importance of exercise and fitness in diabetes was lacking until recent years. The present document summarizes the most clinically relevant recent advances related to people with type 2 diabetes and the recommendations that follow from these. Our recently published technical review on physical activity/exercise and type 2 diabetes (1) includes greater detail on individual studies, on prevention of diabetes, and on the physiology of exercise. The present statement focuses on type 2 diabetes. Issues primarily germane to type 1 diabetes will be covered in a subsequent technical review and ADA Statement. The levels of evidence used are defined by the ADA in ref. 2. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND PREVENTION OF TYPE 2 DIABETES Two randomized trials each found that lifestyle interventions including ∼150 min/week of physical activity and diet-induced weight loss of 5–7% reduced the risk of progression from impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) to type 2 diabetes by 58% (3,4). A cluster-randomized trial found that diet alone, exercise alone, and combined diet and exercise were equally effective in reducting the progression from IGT to diabetes (5). Therefore, there is firm and consistent evidence that programs of increased physical activity and modest weight loss reduce the incidence of type 2 diabetes in individuals with IGT. EFFECTS OF STRUCTURED EXERCISE INTERVENTIONS ON GLYCEMIC CONTROL AND BODY WEIGHT IN TYPE 2 DIABETES Boulé et al. (6) undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis on the effects of structured exercise interventions in clinical trials of ≥8 weeks duration Continue reading >>

Exercise Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes

Exercise Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes

Any kind of exercise can help people with type 2 diabetes, reported the news agency Reuters. It said that aerobic and resistance training lowered blood sugar levels in diabetic patients, and a combination of both lowered blood sugar levels even futher. Participants liked the exercise and, contrary to prevailing beliefs, stuck with the programme. It concluded that “doctors should prescribe exercise to every diabetes patient.” This report was based on a trial with reliable results and shows, once again, the benefits of exercise. However, it is likely that people who are not given incentives, as they were in this trial, are less likely to exercise and therefore less likely to see the same benefits. Further research into the best way to motivate and sustain behaviour change in people with diabetes needs to be done. Doctor Ronald Sigal and colleagues from the University of Calgary and the University of Ottawa carried out this research. The Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Canadian Diabetes Association funded the study and it was published in the peer-reviewed medical journal, Annals of Internal Medicine. What kind of scientific study was this? This was a randomised controlled trial that assessed the effects of 6 months’ exercise on blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. The researchers recruited adults (aged 39–70) with type 2 diabetes and asked them to take part in 12 preliminary supervised exercise sessions over four weeks, in order to see whether they would be likely to stick with the exercise programme. The 251 people who attended at least 10 of the 12 sessions were then randomly allocated to one of four groups: aerobic exercise (treadmills and exercise bikes), resistance exercise (seven different exercises on weight machines), combined aerobic Continue reading >>

How Exercise Can Improve Your Diabetes

How Exercise Can Improve Your Diabetes

Exercise can do so much to improve diabetes and ward off its complications that there's just no excuse not to get started. Read more about the benefits of exercise for diabetes. Exercise is recommended for everyone and can help prevent conditions like type 2 diabetes, but even if you already have the condition, it’s not too late to get on the fitness bandwagon and reap the benefits of exercise. In fact, regular exercise can actually slow the progression of diabetes and make it easier to manage. Your muscles use glucose, or blood sugar, for fuel. Exercise causes your muscles to absorb glucose at nearly 20 times the normal rate. So when you exercise, you lower your blood sugar naturally, explains Erica Christ, RD, a certified diabetes educator at the Greenwich Hospital Weight Loss & Diabetes Center in Greenwich, Conn. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that people with type 2 diabetes get at least 150 minutes of exercise a week, or 30 minutes a day on five days of the week. Sound too daunting? Researchers at Canada’s McMaster University found that high-intensity interval training — 10 one-minute bursts of intense aerobic activity (at 90 percent of your maximum heart rate) with 1 minute of rest between each burst — lowered blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes for 24 hours afterwards. Lowering your blood sugar, which is your first concern in managing diabetes, is just one of the many benefits of exercise when you have type 2 diabetes. Here’s more: Exercise improves insulin sensitivity. Insulin is the hormone you need to allow glucose to enter your cells. When you have type 2 diabetes, your body doesn't use insulin properly. Researchers in Italy found that resistance-training exercise can make your body’s insulin receptors more sensitive. Th Continue reading >>

Diabetes 'cure': Diet & Exercise Work For Some

Diabetes 'cure': Diet & Exercise Work For Some

People with Type 2 diabetes can reverse their condition with diet and exercise, although remission is not very common, according to a new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. After one year of regular counseling sessions to encourage weight loss and physical activity, 11.5 percent of obese adults with Type 2 diabetes saw their condition at least partially reverse — meaning their blood sugar levels decreased to those of a prediabetic, without the need for medication. Just 2 percent of those who did not receive intensive counseling partially reversed their diabetes. After four years, the rate of partial diabetes remission in the counseling group declined slightly, to 7 percent. Full remission — achieving normal blood sugar levels — was rarer, with just 1.3 percent of people in the counseling group and 0.1 percent in the non-counseling group meeting this goal after one year. Type 2 diabetes has traditionally been seen as a progressive disease that is managed rather than cured. Recent studies have suggested it can be reversed with weight loss surgery, or by following an extreme diet that mimics surgery. However, until this study, little was known about the rate of long-term diabetes reversal without surgery or extreme dieting. About 26 million Americans have diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The study confirms that complete Type 2 diabetes remission is rare, but that partial remission is an obtainable goal for some patients, the researchers said. Experts said that, because the definitions of complete or partial diabetes remission are arbitrary, researchers should not focus on these measures. What's more important is that patients improve their weight and blood sugar levels, as people in this study did, said Dr Continue reading >>

Exercise And Diabetes

Exercise And Diabetes

Exercise plays a key role in treating diabetes, particularly in type 2 diabetes (non-insulin dependent diabetes) . Type 2 diabetes is becoming increasingly common and appears to be related to the growing number of people who are overweight . Put simply, if we eat more fuel than our body needs, it's stored as fat. Physical activity burns this energy from food. But compared with 50 years ago, we are pretty inactive: we take cars for journeys of a few hundred yards we spend long periods of the day sat behind desks technology means we spend huge amounts of time watching TV, surfing the Internet, playing computer games, etc, so-called 'couch potatoes'. And for most us, feeding ourselves means a walk along supermarket aisles, not working a plot of land. All this means activity levels have dropped the result is, as a nation, we're getting larger. Exercise reduces the body's need for insulin by keeping weight down. It also increases the body's sensitivity to insulin, so glucose is used more effectively. Insulin is needed to shift glucose from your blood into your muscles. In the absence of insulin, muscles use fat as an alternative energy source. If this goes on too long, it leads to acidosis which can be fatal. As long as you have enough insulin in your body, your muscles burn glucose during exercise, naturally reducing your blood sugar level . Because regular exercise reduces insulin resistance, it tackles the root cause of type 2 diabetes. A 30 to 40 minute brisk walk at least three times a week is enough to improve your fitness level and reduce cardiovascular risk. Because diabetes increases your risk of heart disease and stroke , as does excess weight, you should aim to exercise five days out of seven, if not daily. Some simple ways to increase activity levels are: use st Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: The Fitness You Need

Type 2 Diabetes: The Fitness You Need

Type 2 diabetes is not inevitable. Preventing and even reversing the onset of diabetes is entirely possible, but it takes commitment. Taking charge of your health involves a two-pronged approach: diet and exercise. Both are crucial for long-term success and optimal health. Diet and exercise Diet and exercise are both key components of a successful strategy to beat or manage diabetes. Studies show that diet and exercise can sharply lower the likelihood of diabetes, even in people who are at high risk of developing it. Learn about the risk factors for type 2 diabetes » Other studies also show that lifestyle interventions can improve insulin sensitivity and blood lipid profiles and help lower high blood sugar levels. Diet and exercise help lower body weight — and excess body weight is closely linked to the onset of diabetes. A major clinical study called the Diabetes Prevention Program studied people at risk for diabetes. It showed that lifestyle changes involving 150 minutes of exercise per week decreased the risk of progressing to type 2 diabetes by 58 percent. Keep in mind that diet and exercise should go hand in hand. For instance, even if you regularly exercise, a diet with lots of sugar and fat and very little fiber or phytonutrients (beneficial plant compounds) could more than counteract those efforts. On the other hand, you can eat a healthful diet, but if you never get up and move, your cardiovascular health will almost certainly suffer. Cardiovascular health and diabetes are also intricately linked. Committing to a better diet and daily exercise promotes better blood sugar levels, blood lipid control, and mood. It also leads to higher energy levels, which makes it easier to exercise. Daily exercise helps keep blood vessels healthy, makes you feel better about Continue reading >>

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