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How Does Diabetes Cause Periodontal Disease?

Gum Disease

Gum Disease

Research has come forth that suggests that the relationship between periodontal disease and diabetes goes both ways-periodontal disease can make it more difficult for diabetics to control their blood sugar. Those who have diabetes are more likely to have periodontal disease than those who do not which makes it vital for diabetics to maintain their blood sugar and seek treatment for periodontal disease. Diabetes Increases Chances of Periodontal Disease Diabetics, as a result of their increased susceptibility to infection, are at greater risk of developing periodontal disease than those without diabetes. Those who do not have their diabetes under control are at an even greater risk for periodontal disease. Uncontrolled diabetes impairs white blood cells, which are the body’s main defense against bacterial infection that can occur in the mouth. Allowing diabetes to be left uncontrolled greatly increases a diabetic’s risk of moderate to severe periodontal disease. Those who have diabetes will often experience dry mouth, gum inflammation, and poor healing in the oral tissues. All of these complications of diabetes can put a patient at greater risk for periodontal disease, but the inflammation of the gums is by far the most threatening. Besides impairing white blood cells, diabetes also causes blood vessels to thicken. Thickened blood vessels slow the flow of nutrients and waste products from the tissues of the mouth. This inflammation greatly reduces the body’s ability to fight infections, such as the bacterial infection that causes periodontitis or gum disease. Additionally, the damage that periodontal disease can do is far greater in a diabetic patient than one without diabetes because healing in diabetics may be impaired, allowing the periodontal disease to cause fa Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Oral Health

Diabetes And Oral Health

Resize font A- A A+ Diabetes and Oral Health During the past 10 years, much research has been undertaken on the link between diabetes and periodontal disease. Periodontal disease is the sixth leading complication of diabetes. If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, you are 3 to 4 times more likely to develop periodontal disease, with a higher rate of more severe levels of bone loss and gum infection.1 What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is a serious disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin, a hormone needed to convert sugar, starches, and other foods into energy. Normally, insulin helps get sugar from the blood to the body's cells, where it is used for energy. When you have diabetes, your body has trouble making and/or using insulin, so your body does not get the fuel it needs and your blood sugar stays too high. High blood sugar sets off processes that can lead to complications, such as heart, kidney, and eye disease, or other serious problems.2,3 If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, you are 3 to 4 times more likely to develop periodontal disease. Are There Different Types of Diabetes? It is estimated that more than 20 million adults and children in the United States have some form of diabetes–14 million having been diagnosed with the disease and 6 million being unaware they have it. There are different types of the disease: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes, as well as prediabetes. Most Americans (around 90%) who are diagnosed with diabetes have type 2 diabetes.2,3 What Is Periodontal Disease? Periodontal disease, or gum disease, is a bacterial infection of the gums, ligaments, and bone that support your teeth and hold them in the jaw. If left untreated, you may experience tooth loss. The main cause of periodontal disease is bacterial Continue reading >>

Gum Disease Signals Diabetes Risk

Gum Disease Signals Diabetes Risk

It’s long been known that oral health is an important indicator for the body’s overall health. Now new research suggests gum disease may predict whether you develop diabetes. The finding, published in the July issue of Diabetes Care, is the latest report to link poor gum health with a variety of other serious health worries. Last year, Harvard researchers found a surprising link between poor gum health and pancreatic cancer. Other studies have linked periodontal health to heart disease, stroke and pregnancy problems. Among the estimated 35 percent of adults who have some form of gum disease, about one in three has a worrisome level of infection. Gum disease is linked with tobacco use but medication side effects, such as dry mouth, can also contribute to oral health problems. Genetics also play a role. Although people with diabetes are known to be at risk for gum disease, it hasn’t been clear which comes first. Researchers at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health studied a representative sample of 9,000 people who didn’t have diabetes, although 817 of them went on to develop the disease. The researchers found that individuals with elevated levels of periodontal disease were nearly twice as likely to become diabetic within 20 years, even after adjusting for age, smoking, obesity and diet. “These data add a new twist to the association and suggest that periodontal disease may be there before diabetes,” said Ryan T. Demmer, associate research scientist in the Department of Epidemiology at the Mailman School of Public Health and lead author. “We found that over two decades of follow-up, individuals who had periodontal disease were more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes later in life when compared to individuals without periodontal disease.” Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Gum Disease, & Other Dental Problems

Diabetes, Gum Disease, & Other Dental Problems

How can diabetes affect my mouth? Too much glucose, also called sugar, in your blood from diabetes can cause pain, infection, and other problems in your mouth. Your mouth includes your teeth your gums your jaw tissues such as your tongue, the roof and bottom of your mouth, and the inside of your cheeks Glucose is present in your saliva—the fluid in your mouth that makes it wet. When diabetes is not controlled, high glucose levels in your saliva help harmful bacteria grow. These bacteria combine with food to form a soft, sticky film called plaque. Plaque also comes from eating foods that contain sugars or starches. Some types of plaque cause tooth decay or cavities. Other types of plaque cause gum disease and bad breath. Gum disease can be more severe and take longer to heal if you have diabetes. In turn, having gum disease can make your blood glucose hard to control. What happens if I have plaque? Plaque that is not removed hardens over time into tartar and collects above your gum line. Tartar makes it more difficult to brush and clean between your teeth. Your gums become red and swollen, and bleed easily—signs of unhealthy or inflamed gums, called gingivitis. When gingivitis is not treated, it can advance to gum disease called periodontitis. In periodontitis, the gums pull away from the teeth and form spaces, called pockets, which slowly become infected. This infection can last a long time. Your body fights the bacteria as the plaque spreads and grows below the gum line. Both the bacteria and your body’s response to this infection start to break down the bone and the tissue that hold the teeth in place. If periodontitis is not treated, the gums, bones, and tissue that support the teeth are destroyed. Teeth may become loose and might need to be removed. If you hav Continue reading >>

Diabetes Increases Chances Of Periodontal Disease

Diabetes Increases Chances Of Periodontal Disease

Diabetes Research has come forth that suggests that the relationship between periodontal disease and diabetes goes both ways-gum disease can make it more difficult for diabetics to control their blood sugar. Those who have diabetes are more likely to have gum disease than those who do not which makes it vital for diabetics to maintain their blood sugar and seek treatment for gum disease. Diabetics, as a result of their increased susceptibility to infection, are at greater risk of developing periodontal disease than those without diabetes. Those who do not have their diabetes under control are at an even greater risk for periodontal disease. Uncontrolled diabetes impairs white blood cells, which are the body’s main defense against bacterial infection that can occur in the mouth. Allowing diabetes to be left uncontrolled greatly increases a diabetic’s risk of moderate to severe periodontal disease. Those who have diabetes will often experience dry mouth, gum inflammation, and poor healing in the oral tissues. All of these complications of diabetes can put a patient at greater risk for periodontal disease, but the inflammation of the gums is by far the most threatening. Besides impairing white blood cells, diabetes also causes blood vessels to thicken. Thickened blood vessels slow the flow of nutrients and waste products from the tissues of the mouth. This inflammation greatly reduces the body’s ability to fight infections, such as the bacterial infection that causes periodontitis. Additionally, the damage that periodontal disease can do is far greater in a diabetic patient than one without diabetes because healing in diabetics may be impaired, allowing the periodontal disease to cause far more destruction at a faster rate. Diabetes and Periodontal Disease: A Two-Way Continue reading >>

Does Treatment For Gum Disease Help People With Diabetes Control Blood Sugar Levels?

Does Treatment For Gum Disease Help People With Diabetes Control Blood Sugar Levels?

Review question The main question addressed by this review is: how effective is gum disease treatment for controlling blood sugar levels (known as glycaemic control) in people with diabetes, compared to no active treatment or usual care? Background Gum disease treatment is used to reduce swelling and infection from gum disease. Keeping blood sugar levels under control is a key issue for people with diabetes, and some clinical research suggests a relationship exists between gum disease treatment and glycaemic control. As a result, it is important to discover if gum disease treatment does improve glycaemic control to encourage better use of clinical resources. There is a broad range of gum disease treatments available for treating patients with diabetes. This review considered two types. 1. Does gum disease treatment improve blood sugar control in people with diabetes? 2. Does one type of gum disease treatment have a bigger effect than another in improving blood sugar control? Study characteristics This review of existing clinical trials was carried out by authors working with the Cochrane Oral Health Group and updates the previous version published in 2010. The evidence is current up to 31 December 2014. In this review there are 35 trials (including 2565 participants), published between 1997 and 2014, where people randomly received a type of gum disease treatment (including scaling and root planing (SRP) and SRP combined with other types of treatment), or usual care/no active treatment. The trials included in this review used SRP with, or without, an additional treatment. Additional treatments included instructions for cleaning teeth properly (known as oral hygiene instruction (OHI)), and other gum treatments (for example, antimicrobials, which are used to treat infectio Continue reading >>

Gum Disease

Gum Disease

Tweet Gum disease, also known as periodontal disease, is the sixth most common disease in the world. People with diabetes are more likely to experience gum disease if they’ve had poor blood sugar levels for a long period of time. What is gum disease? Gum disease affects the gums and bone supporting the teeth and eventually leads to tooth loss. The good news, though, is that gum disease is preventable and can be easily treated in the early stages of the disease. What does gum disease have to do with diabetes? People with diabetes have an increased risk of developing gum disease. Poorly managed blood sugar levels can cause damage to nerves, blood vessels, the heart, the kidneys, the eyes and the feet. In the same way, the gums can too be affected. Because high blood sugar levels lead to damage to blood vessels, this reduces the supply of oxygen and nourishment to the gums, making infections of the gums and bones more likely. Uncontrolled blood sugar levels can cause levels of glucose to rise in the saliva and this creates a breeding ground for bacteria, increasing the risk of gum disease and dental decay. Severe gum disease can negatively affect your blood sugar control and increase your chances of suffering from other common long-term complications of diabetes. The inflammation, which occurs in the gums, escapes into the bloodstream and upsets the body’s defence system which in turn affects blood sugar control. In other words, gum disease and diabetes are linked in both directions. The European Federation of Periodontology recommends that following a diagnosis of diabetes you should inform your dentist and undergo a comprehensive dental check up. People with diabetes should have regular dental check-ups, including a review of gum health. If your dentist or hygienist Continue reading >>

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Pardon Our Interruption...

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Does Periodontal Disease Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Does Periodontal Disease Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Diabetes has long been a risk factor for periodontal disease; new research may point to reverse causation. Diabetes has long been believed to be a risk factor for periodontal disease. Results of a new study show that the reverse might also be true, according to researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. Ryan T. Demmer, PhD, MPH, associate research scientist in the department of epidemiology, said that these findings add a “new twist” to the association, suggesting that periodontal disease may lead to diabetes. “It has been generally accepted that periodontal disease is a consequence of diabetes despite the fact that this association has not been studied with the same methodological rigor applied to coronary and stroke outcomes,” he told Endocrine Today. “We found that over two decades of follow-up, individuals who had periodontal disease were more likely to develop type 2 diabetes later in life when compared to individuals without periodontal disease.” The researchers studied over 9,000 participants without diabetes from a nationally representative sample of the U.S. population, with more than 800 eventually developing diabetes. They then compared the risk of developing diabetes over the next 20 years between people with varying degrees of periodontal disease and found that individuals with elevated levels of periodontal disease were nearly twice as likely to become diabetic in that 20-year timeframe. Demmer said to keep an open mind about the results, however. “They certainly are thought-provoking, biologically plausible and supported by longstanding research regarding periodontal disease and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. While there are no immediate clinical implications that stem from these findings, they do suggest a Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Oral Health – A Two-way Street

Diabetes And Oral Health – A Two-way Street

Diabetic living and dental care How does diabetes affect the teeth and gums? Nearly 30 million Americans have diabetes. While many are aware of the condition’s associated risks such as stroke, eye disease and kidney disease, they may be less informed about the important connection between diabetes and oral health. In fact, diabetes and oral health can go hand-in-hand: People with poorly controlled diabetes are more likely to develop oral health complications like gum disease, which in turn can contribute to the progression of diabetes. Ultimately, it’s especially important for those with diabetes and signs of diabetes to keep their mouth, teeth and gums as healthy as possible.1 How does diabetes affect dental health? People with diabetes are generally more prone to bacterial infections like gum disease.1 Experts believe that diabetes can also reduce saliva production, another risk factor of gum disease.4 While everyone has some level of bacteria in the mouth, people with poorly controlled diabetes may experience more rapid bacteria growth due to high blood glucose (sugar). Glucose is present in saliva and bad bacteria in the mouth feeds off of it.4 When bacteria combine with food particles and other substances, it can form plaque, one of the main causes of gum disease.3 How does gum disease impact diabetes health risks? Since diabetes decreases the body’s ability to fight and resist infection, it can cause gum disease can be more severe and take longer to heal. If left untreated, early gum disease (gingivitis) can progress into a serious gum infection called periodontitis. As the disease worsens, it can destroy the tissues and bone that hold the teeth in place, eventually causing tooth loss.3 Periodontitis may impact the body’s ability to control blood glucose ( Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Periodontal (gum) Disease

Diabetes And Periodontal (gum) Disease

This article from our Health Library is for educational purposes. Please contact us with questions specific to the services we provide, to find a doctor or to schedule an appointment. Diabetes that is not properly controlled can lead to periodontal (gum) diseases in both young and old people. Periodontal diseases are infections of the gums and bone that hold the teeth in place. Because of blood vessel changes that occur with diabetes, the efficiency of the flow of nutrients and removal of wastes from body tissues may become impaired. This impaired blood flow can weaken the gums and bone, making them more susceptible to infection. In addition, if diabetes is poorly controlled, higher glucose levels in the mouth fluids will encourage the growth of bacteria that can cause gum disease. On the other hand, uncontrolled periodontal disease may also make it more difficult to control the diabetes. A third factor, smoking, is harmful to oral health even for people without diabetes. However, a person with diabetes who smokes is at a much greater risk for gum disease than a person who does not have diabetes. Paired with poor oral hygiene, diabetes can lead to gingivitis, the first stage of periodontal disease, or to periodontitis, severe gum disease. What are the signs and symptoms of periodontal disease? The following are the most common signs and symptoms of gum disease. However, each individual may experience symptoms differently. Signs and symptoms may include: Red, swollen, tender gums Bleeding while brushing and/or flossing Receding gums Loose or separating teeth Persistent bad breath Dentures that no longer fit Pus between the teeth and gums A change in bite and jaw alignment The signs and symptoms of gum disease may resemble other conditions or medical problems. Consult a d Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Affect Your Teeth And Gums?

Can Diabetes Affect Your Teeth And Gums?

Did you know that trouble keeping your blood sugars in control could lead to an infection? That infection could be in your gums. That’s right. People with diabetes have a higher incidence of gum disease or periodontal disease than people without diabetes. In this article, we will look at the link between diabetes and periodontal disease. We will look at what it is, what are the prevention and treatment options available, some other oral problems that are also linked to diabetes, and more. Just like high blood glucose makes it easier for you to get an infection in other places in your body, high blood glucose levels also make it easier to get a gum infection, or other infection in your mouth. Decaying teeth and poor oral habits contribute to periodontal disease, as does smoking. We will take a look at all of that here. First, let’s see why Martin contacted TheDiabetesCouncil. Martin was interested in learning more about his high blood sugars and their effects on his teeth. He had been trying to get his blood sugar levels down, but nothing he seemed to do with diet, exercise, or medications helped in aiming his target range for blood sugars or in an A1C range that he was comfortable with. He was due to pay a visit to his dentist since his last visit was over a year ago. Martin’s dentist told him that he was at the start of a periodontal disease, and in addition, he had a gum infection. He wondered if the infection in his gums may be a reason for why he was unable to keep his blood glucose in a good range. An infection anywhere in your body could be a reason for unruly blood glucose. Let’s see if we can answer Martin’s question in depth. What is periodontal disease? Periodontal disease is an infection that develops of the gum, and underlying bone, that holds the Continue reading >>

Periodontal Disease And Diabetes

Periodontal Disease And Diabetes

It is well documented that people who suffer from diabetes are more susceptible to developing infections than non-diabetes sufferers. It is not widely known that periodontal disease is often considered the sixth complication of diabetes, particularly when the diabetes is not under proper control. Periodontal disease (often called periodontitis and gum disease) is a progressive condition that often leads to tooth loss if treatment is not promptly sought. Periodontal disease begins with a bacterial infection in the gingival tissue which surrounds the teeth. As the bacteria colonize, the gum pockets become deeper, the gums recede as tissue is destroyed and the periodontitis eventually attacks the underlying bone tissue. Diabetes is characterized by too much glucose (or sugar) in the blood. Type II diabetics are unable to regulate insulin levels which means excess glucose stays in the blood. Type I diabetics do not produce any insulin at all. Diabetes is a serious condition which can lead to heart disease and stroke. Reasons for the Connection Experts suggest the relationship between diabetes and periodontal disease can worsen both conditions if either condition is not properly controlled. Here are ways in which diabetes and periodontal disease are linked: Increased blood sugar – Moderate and severe periodontal disease elevates sugar levels in the body, increasing the amount of time the body has to function with high blood sugar. This is why diabetics with periodontitis have difficulty keeping control of their blood sugar. In addition, the higher sugar levels found in the mouth of diabetics provide food for the very bacteria that worsen periodontal infections. Blood vessel thickening – The thickening of the blood vessels is one of the other major concerns for diabetes s Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Gum Disease: Understanding The Link To Protect Your Health

Diabetes And Gum Disease: Understanding The Link To Protect Your Health

Do you know that there is a link between diabetes and gum disease? Diabetics have a higher risk of developing gum disease than people who have healthy blood sugar levels. The relationship appears to go both ways; research indicates that having a serious gum infection can make it more difficult to control blood sugar levels. Taking care of your mouth, whether you have diabetes or not, is more important than you may be aware of. What Causes the Increased Gum Disease Risk? What do high blood glucose levels have to do with your oral health? For a person with diabetes it is more difficult to defend the body from a bacterial infection; high glucose levels make it easier for bacteria to flourish in the mouth. Gum disease is an inflammation of the gums caused by a bacterial infection. The germs in plaque infect the teeth and gums, leading to gingivitis, the first stage of this disease. If left untreated, this oral health condition can result in tissue damage and eventual tooth loss. The more serious stages of gum disease are known as periodontitis and advanced periodontitis. How Does Periodontitis Affect Diabetes? The relationship between diabetes and gum disease becomes even more powerful when you look at the potential effect of an infection on blood glucose levels. Having a serious infection may contribute to rising blood sugar levels. This means that not only does having diabetes make an infection harder to fight, but also having serious gum disease may make diabetes harder to control. What can be done to prevent your health from spiraling out of control? Even if you don't have blood glucose problems or periodontitis, you should still make your oral health and overall priority. Brush twice a day and floss once a day before bedtime. Use a toothpaste like Colgate Total which w Continue reading >>

Gum Disease & Your Health

Gum Disease & Your Health

Gum Disease is also known as Periodontal Disease and can put your health at risk. Research studies have shown that there is a strong association between periodontal disease and other chronic conditions such as diabetes, heart disease and respiratory disease. Periodontal disease is characterized by chronic inflammation of the gum tissue, periodontal infection below the gum line and a presence of disease-causing bacteria in the oral region. Halting the progression of periodontal disease and maintaining excellent standards of oral hygiene will not only reduce the risk of gum disease and bone loss, but also reduce the chances of developing other serious illnesses. Dr. Saba and Dr. Romanin employ four hygienists who have all worked in Periodontists' offices and have specialized training in periodontal treatment. Debbie, Linae and Susan have over 30 years experience and Julee has years experience. All four of these amazing hygienists have worked for Dr. Saba and Romanin 8-13 years. Common co-factors associated with periodontal disease: Diabetes A research study has shown that individuals with pre-existing diabetic conditions are more likely to either have, or be more susceptible to periodontal disease. Periodontal disease can increase blood sugar levels which makes controlling the amount of glucose in the blood difficult. This factor alone can increase the risk of serious diabetic complications. Conversely, diabetes thickens blood vessels and therefore makes it harder for the mouth to rid itself of excess sugar. Excess sugar in the mouth creates a breeding ground for the types of oral bacteria that cause gum disease. Heart Disease There are several theories which explain the link between heart disease and periodontitis. One such theory is that the oral bacteria strains which Continue reading >>

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