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How Does Diabetes Cause Oral Health Problems

Diabetes & Oral Health

Diabetes & Oral Health

The most common oral health problems affecting people with diabetes are Gum disease Dry mouth Tooth decay Thrush Mouth ulcers Taste disturbances Gum abscesses (an infection of the tooth and or gums) Why do people with diabetes have a greater risk of oral health problems? Poor blood glucose control leads to bacteria growth (bacteria loves the sweet environment) and increases the risk of infections. Dry mouth can also occur when blood glucose levels are high. Medications for diabetes, blood pressure, heart problems and anti-depressants may cause dry mouth and taste disturbance, such as a metallic taste. Smokers have a much higher risk of gum disease and may also contribute to having a dry mouth. Hypo treatments such as sweetened fizzy drinks and lollies can lead to tooth decay. Important tips to help prevent oral health problems Keep blood glucose levels within target (if you are unsure of what your target levels should be, talk to your diabetes educator, diabetes specialist or GP) Follow a healthy diet (if you need help with this, see your local Accredited Practicing Dietitian) Clean your teeth and gums twice a day with tooth paste that contains fluoride. It is also a good idea to gently brush your tongue each day to remove bacteria and keep your mouth fresh and healthy. Use dental floss or interdental cleaners every day to clean between your teeth. Avoid a dry mouth by drinking plenty of water and chewing sugar-free gum to stimulate saliva production. Biotene has a range of dry mouth products that may help Don't smoke. If you treat a hypo, it is important to brush your teeth half an hour later to remove sugar from your teeth and prevent decay and cavities See your dentist every six months (even if you wear dentures, you are still at risk of gum disease). Publication/Sou Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Oral Health Problems

Diabetes And Oral Health Problems

Is There an Association Between Gum Disease and Diabetes? For the nearly 21 million Americans that have diabetes, many may be surprised to learn about an unexpected complication associated with this condition. Research shows that there is an increased prevalence of gum disease among those with diabetes, adding serious gum disease to the list of other complications associated with diabetes, such as heart disease, stroke and kidney disease. Is There a Two-Way Street? Emerging research also suggests that the relationship between serious gum disease and diabetes is two-way. Not only are people with diabetes more susceptible to serious gum disease, but serious gum disease may have the potential to affect blood glucose control and contribute to the progression of diabetes. Research suggests that people with diabetes are at higher risk for oral health problems, such as gingivitis (an early stage of gum disease) and periodontitis (serious gum disease). People with diabetes are at an increased risk for serious gum disease because they are generally more susceptible to bacterial infection, and have a decreased ability to fight bacteria that invade the gums. The Surgeon General's Report on Oral Health states that good oral health is integral to general health. So be sure to brush and floss properly and see your dentist for regular checkups. If I Have Diabetes, am I at Risk for Dental Problems? If your blood glucose levels are poorly controlled, you are more likely to develop serious gum disease and lose more teeth than non-diabetics. Like all infections, serious gum disease may be a factor in causing blood sugar to rise and may make diabetes harder to control. Other oral problems associated to diabetes include: thrush, an infection caused by fungus that grows in the mouth, and dry Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Oral Health

Diabetes And Oral Health

Resize font A- A A+ Diabetes and Oral Health During the past 10 years, much research has been undertaken on the link between diabetes and periodontal disease. Periodontal disease is the sixth leading complication of diabetes. If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, you are 3 to 4 times more likely to develop periodontal disease, with a higher rate of more severe levels of bone loss and gum infection.1 What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is a serious disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin, a hormone needed to convert sugar, starches, and other foods into energy. Normally, insulin helps get sugar from the blood to the body's cells, where it is used for energy. When you have diabetes, your body has trouble making and/or using insulin, so your body does not get the fuel it needs and your blood sugar stays too high. High blood sugar sets off processes that can lead to complications, such as heart, kidney, and eye disease, or other serious problems.2,3 If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, you are 3 to 4 times more likely to develop periodontal disease. Are There Different Types of Diabetes? It is estimated that more than 20 million adults and children in the United States have some form of diabetes–14 million having been diagnosed with the disease and 6 million being unaware they have it. There are different types of the disease: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes, as well as prediabetes. Most Americans (around 90%) who are diagnosed with diabetes have type 2 diabetes.2,3 What Is Periodontal Disease? Periodontal disease, or gum disease, is a bacterial infection of the gums, ligaments, and bone that support your teeth and hold them in the jaw. If left untreated, you may experience tooth loss. The main cause of periodontal disease is bacterial Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases that lead to high levels of blood glucose (hyperglycemia), which is caused when the body does not make any or enough insulin, or does not use insulin well. Because diabetes is a relatively common condition, practicing dentists are likely to encounter it frequently. Type 1 diabetes is a chronic autoimmune disease in which the beta cells in the pancreas create little to no insulin, and accounts for 5% to 10% of all diabetes cases. In contrast, Type 2 diabetes accounts for 85% to 90% or more of diabetes cases and is one of the commonest chronic diseases, characterized by decreased response of target tissues to insulin, dysregulation of insulin production, or a combination of both. As with any patient, the dentist should review the patients medical history, take vital signs, and evaluate for oral signs and symptoms of inadequately controlled diabetes, which may be common. Oral manifestations of uncontrolled diabetes can include: xerostomia; burning sensation in the mouth; impaired/delayed wound healing; increased incidence and severity of infections; secondary infection with candidiasis; parotid salivary gland enlargement; gingivitis; and/or periodontitis. Although patients with diabetes usually recognize signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia and self-intervene before changes in or loss of consciousness occurs, staff should be trained to recognize the signs and treat patients who have hypoglycemia. In such cases, a glucometer should be used to test patient blood glucose levels, and every dental office should have a protocol for managing hypoglycemia in both conscious and unconscious patients. Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases that leads to high levels of blood glucose and is caused when the body does not make Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Periodontal Disease

Diabetes And Periodontal Disease

If you have diabetes, you know the disease can harm your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart and other important systems in the body. Did you know it can also cause problems in your mouth? People with diabetes have a higher than normal risk of periodontal diseases. Periodontal diseases are infections of the gum and bone that hold the teeth in place. In advanced stages, they lead to painful chewing problems and even tooth loss. Like any infection, gum disease can make it hard to keep your blood sugar under control. Diabetic Control. Like other complications of diabetes, gum disease is linked to diabetic control. People with poor blood sugar control get gum disease more often and more severely, and they lose more teeth than do persons with good control. In fact, people whose diabetes is well controlled have no more periodontal disease than persons without diabetes. Children with IDDM (insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus) are also at risk for gum problems. Good diabetic control is the best protection against periodontal disease. Studies show that controlling blood sugar levels lowers the risk of some complications of diabetes, such as eye and heart disease and nerve damage. Scientists believe many complications, including gum disease, can be prevented with good diabetic control. Blood Vessel Changes. Thickening of blood vessels is a complication of diabetes that may increase risk for gum disease. Blood vessels deliver oxygen and nourishment to body tissues, including the mouth, and carry away the tissues' waste products. Diabetes causes blood vessels to thicken, which slows the flow of nutrients and the removal of harmful wastes. This can weaken the resistance of gum and bone tissue to infection. Bacteria. Many kinds of bacteria (germs) thrive on sugars, including glucose -- the Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Gum Disease, & Other Dental Problems

Diabetes, Gum Disease, & Other Dental Problems

How can diabetes affect my mouth? Too much glucose, also called sugar, in your blood from diabetes can cause pain, infection, and other problems in your mouth. Your mouth includes your teeth your gums your jaw tissues such as your tongue, the roof and bottom of your mouth, and the inside of your cheeks Glucose is present in your saliva—the fluid in your mouth that makes it wet. When diabetes is not controlled, high glucose levels in your saliva help harmful bacteria grow. These bacteria combine with food to form a soft, sticky film called plaque. Plaque also comes from eating foods that contain sugars or starches. Some types of plaque cause tooth decay or cavities. Other types of plaque cause gum disease and bad breath. Gum disease can be more severe and take longer to heal if you have diabetes. In turn, having gum disease can make your blood glucose hard to control. What happens if I have plaque? Plaque that is not removed hardens over time into tartar and collects above your gum line. Tartar makes it more difficult to brush and clean between your teeth. Your gums become red and swollen, and bleed easily—signs of unhealthy or inflamed gums, called gingivitis. When gingivitis is not treated, it can advance to gum disease called periodontitis. In periodontitis, the gums pull away from the teeth and form spaces, called pockets, which slowly become infected. This infection can last a long time. Your body fights the bacteria as the plaque spreads and grows below the gum line. Both the bacteria and your body’s response to this infection start to break down the bone and the tissue that hold the teeth in place. If periodontitis is not treated, the gums, bones, and tissue that support the teeth are destroyed. Teeth may become loose and might need to be removed. If you hav Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Dental Care: Guide To A Healthy Mouth

Diabetes And Dental Care: Guide To A Healthy Mouth

What do brushing and flossing have to do with diabetes? Plenty. If you have diabetes, here's why dental care matters — and how to take care of your teeth and gums. When you have diabetes, high blood sugar can take a toll on your entire body — including your teeth and gums. The good news? Prevention is in your hands. Learn what you're up against, and then take charge of your dental health. Cavities and gum disease Whether you have type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes, managing your blood sugar level is key. The higher your blood sugar level, the higher your risk of: Tooth decay (cavities). Your mouth naturally contains many types of bacteria. When starches and sugars in food and beverages interact with these bacteria, a sticky film known as plaque forms on your teeth. The acids in plaque attack the surfaces of your teeth (enamel and dentin). This can lead to cavities. The higher your blood sugar level, the greater the supply of sugars and starches — and the more acid wearing away at your teeth. Early gum disease (gingivitis). Diabetes reduces your ability to fight bacteria. If you don't remove plaque with regular brushing and flossing, it'll harden under your gumline into a substance called tartar (calculus). The longer plaque and tartar remain on your teeth, the more they irritate the gingiva — the part of your gums around the base of your teeth. In time, your gums become swollen and bleed easily. This is gingivitis. Advanced gum disease (periodontitis). Left untreated, gingivitis can lead to a more serious infection called periodontitis, which destroys the soft tissue and bone that support your teeth. Eventually, periodontitis causes your gums and jawbone to pull away from your teeth, which in turn causes your teeth to loosen and possibly fall out. Periodontitis Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Oral Health

Type 2 Diabetes And Oral Health

Diabetes affects your body’s ability to utilize glucose, or blood sugar, for energy. Diabetes can cause many complications. These include nerve damage, heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, and even blindness. Another common health complication is gum disease and other oral health problems. According to the American Diabetes Association, people with diabetes are at higher risk for gingivitis, gum disease, and periodontitis (severe gum infection with bone destruction). Diabetes affects your ability to fight off bacteria that can cause gum infections. Gum disease can also affect the body’s blood sugar control. Diabetes is associated with increased risk for thrush, a type of fungal infection. Additionally, people with diabetes are likely to have a dry mouth. This has been associated with increased risk for mouth ulcers, soreness, cavities, and dental infections. What the research says A 2013 study published in the journal BMC Oral Health looked at 125 people with type 2 diabetes. Researchers measured factors including missing teeth, the incidence of periodontal disease, and the amount of reported dental bleeding. The study found that a combination of the longer people had diabetes, the higher their fasting blood glucose, and the higher their hemoglobin A1C (a measurement of a person’s average blood sugar over three months), the more likely they were to have periodontal disease and dental bleeding. Those who did not report careful self-management of their condition were more likely to have missing teeth than those who did work to control their blood sugar levels. Some people with diabetes are at greater risk for oral health problems than others. For example, people who don’t maintain tight control over their blood sugar levels are more likely to get gum disease. Al Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetes Affect Your Oral Health?

How Does Diabetes Affect Your Oral Health?

Diabetes is one of the leading causes of disability and death in the United States. Unless it is well-managed, diabetes can cause blindness, kidney disease, nerve damage and other health problems including gum disease and tooth loss. And oral health issues can also raise your risk of developing diabetes, and make it more difficult to control the disease. November is American Diabetes Month, a time to raise awareness about diabetes and encourage people to make healthy changes that can lower their risk of diabetes or help them better control the disease. Positive lifestyle changes include eating well, exercising regularly, and good oral health care. Diabetes and Your Teeth People with diabetes have an increased risk of developing oral health problems, such as gingivitis (early stage gum disease) and periodontitis (serious gum disease). This is because diabetes can cause blood vessels to thicken, reducing their ability to remove waste products and deliver nourishment and oxygen to body tissues, including the gums. The good news is that if your blood glucose levels are well- controlled, your risk of serious oral health complications is similar to those of people without diabetes. And good oral health can also help you manage your diabetes. Serious gum disease may make it more difficult to manage blood glucose levels and can speed the progression of diabetes. It’s important for you to maintain your oral health with careful at-home hygiene routine and regular dental checkups and cleanings. And, according to the American Diabetes Association, research has also suggested that having gum disease may result in a higher chance of developing diabetes. That’s because serious gum disease may have the ability to affect glucose levels in the blood. Avoiding Diabetic Dental Problems Continue reading >>

Common Diabetes-related Oral Health Problems

Common Diabetes-related Oral Health Problems

Clinicians' Guide to Diabetes and Oral Health Diabetes, Oral Health, Hygiene and Prevention Common Diabetes-Related Oral Health Problems A healthy oral cavity is essential to overall health. Besides the lips, the oral cavity includes the cheeks, teeth, gums, tongue, floor of the mouth under the tongue, and the hard palate. Similar to a bacterial biofilm, different types of bacteria colonize and coat the oral structures, which have plenty of places to adheresuch as, pits, crevices and papillated surfaces. Common types of oral bacterium include Gemella, Granulicatella, Streptococcus, and Veillonella. In people with diabetes, the balance between healthy and disease-promoting bacterium can be affected by glucose management, meal planning, and good oral hygiene. For example, fermentable carbohydrates (eg, cookies) can affect the pH balance in the oral space leading to bacterial formation (Streptococcus mutans) of dental plaque. A byproduct of plaque is an acid that can demineralize the surface of teeth leading to cavities (caries). Formation of dental plaque can cause periodontal or gum disease too. Left side: Dental plaque formation.Right side: After dental cleaning, plaque gone. Besides tooth decay and periodontal disease, other types of oral health problems are associated with diabetes. A brief discussion of these disorders demonstrates the importance in educating patients about proper habits of oral hygiene to help avoid tooth loss, infection, difficulty chewing, pain, and potential for serious health problems (eg, cardiovascular disease). Salivary gland dysfunction (eg, dry mouth, gland infection) Oral candida (eg, fungal infection). Candida is a fungus/yeast that often grows out of control and is problematic when there is a chronic presence of high-sugar levels in the Continue reading >>

Oral Health Problems And Diabetes

Oral Health Problems And Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease that can affect the whole body — your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart, and other important systems in the body. It can also affect your mouth. People with diabetes face a higher than normal risk of oral health problems. Why are people with diabetes more likely to develop oral health problems? The link between diabetes and oral health problems is high blood sugar. If blood sugar is poorly controlled, oral health problems are more likely to develop. This is because uncontrolled diabetes weakens white blood cells, which are the body’s main defense against bacterial infections that can occur in the mouth. Just as studies have shown that controlling blood sugar levels lowers the risk of major organ complications of diabetes — such as eye, heart, and nerve damage — so to can diabetes control protect against the development of oral health problems. Specifically, what are some of these oral health problems? Dry mouth: Uncontrolled diabetes can decrease saliva flow, resulting in dry mouth. Dry mouth can further lead to soreness, ulcers, infections, and tooth decay. Gum inflammation (gingivitis) and periodontitis: Besides weakening white blood cells, another complication of diabetes is that it causes blood vessels to thicken. This slows the flow of nutrients to and waste products from body tissues, including the mouth. When this combination of events, the body loses its ability to fight infections. Since periodontal disease is a bacterial infection, people with uncontrolled diabetes might experience more frequent and more severe gum disease. Poor healing of oral tissues: People with uncontrolled diabetes do not heal quickly after oral surgery or other dental procedures because blood flow to the treatment site can be damaged. Thrush: People with diabetes Continue reading >>

How To Keep Your Mouth Healthy

How To Keep Your Mouth Healthy

If you have diabetes, you’re more likely to have oral health problems like cavities and gum disease. If you have diabetes and you're over 50, your risk is even higher. That's because dental problems and age go hand in hand, whether or not you have diabetes. The good news is that controlling your diabetes will go a long way toward protecting your teeth and gums. And that, in turn, will also help you manage your diabetes. If you have diabetes, keep an eye out for these oral health conditions -- especially if you've already reached the half-century mark. Gingivitis Gum disease is the most common oral health problem among people with diabetes. The first stage of gum disease is called gingivitis. This is when bacteria cause your gums to bleed, turn red, and feel sore. Bacteria love to feast on sugar, turning it into tooth-damaging acid. Uncontrolled diabetes means more sugar in your saliva, and that means a free banquet for bacteria. As bacteria gather, they combine with saliva and pieces of leftover food to form plaque. When it builds up, it leads to tooth decay and gum disease. Regular brushing and flossing, as well as rinsing with antiseptic mouthwash will get rid of it and stop gingivitis in its tracks. Periodontitis If left untreated, gingivitis can turn into periodontitis, a more serious type of gum disease that erodes the bone and tissues that support your teeth. In the worst case, you might lose your teeth. If you don’t floss and brush regularly, bacteria and plaque can build up on your teeth. That causes your gums to pull away from them. It creates pockets where bacteria dig in and wage war on more and more parts of your mouth, including bones. Periodontitis can't be reversed and can't be treated with brushing and flossing alone. Your dentist will have to get in Continue reading >>

Medical Conditions

Medical Conditions

It’s important to realize that your dentist sees much more than just your teeth! Some health-related conditions that show up in the mouth include: temporomandibular disorder (TMD) HIV/AIDS thyroid problems iron deficiency/anemia leukemia eating disorders (bulimia and anorexia) Communication with your dentist is vital. During your visit, talk to your dentist about your ongoing health concerns so that he or she may help you. Your dentist may adjust your treatment if you have certain medical conditions, use certain prescription drugs or are currently undergoing medical treatment, such as radiation or chemotherapy. Diabetes Research shows that gum disease and diabetes may affect one another. For instance, gum disease can intensify the complications associated with diabetes by increasing blood sugar levels. High blood sugar levels over an extended period of time are associated with premature degeneration of eyes, kidneys, nerves and blood vessels. Studies have also shown that people with diabetes face a greater risk of developing oral infections and gum disease than those who do not have diabetes. The good news is that the treatment of either gum disease or diabetes can lead to improvements in the other. Your dentist has the training and experience necessary to assess your oral health, and to determine a course of treatment that is best for you. Some of the most common oral health problems associated with diabetes are: tooth decay gum disease dry mouth fungal infections lesions in the mouth taste impairment infection and delayed healing If you are a diabetic, speak to your dentist about the best course of treatment for you. Make sure to let him or her know: if the diabetes is under control if you take insulin and when your last usual dose of insulin was administered if the Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Oral Health

Diabetes And Oral Health

People with diabetes have a higher risk of tooth and gum problems. It is important to look after your oral health and control your blood glucose levels to prevent gum disease. Visit your dentist regularly for advice about how to keep your teeth and gums healthy. Quit smoking. On this page: People with diabetes who have irregular blood glucose levels have a higher risk of tooth problems and gum disease than people without diabetes. This is because they have lowered resistance to infection and may not heal as easily. If you are living with diabetes, you need to pay particular attention to your oral health and dental care, as well as controlling your blood glucose levels. Visit your dentist regularly for advice about how to keep your teeth and gums healthy. Diabetes is a common disease among Australians, affecting almost 1.5 million people (around 7.6 per cent of the population). The first signs and symptoms of diabetes can occur in the mouth, so paying attention to your oral health can also lead to earlier diagnosis and treatment. The most common oral health problems affecting people with diabetes are: periodontal (gum) disease gum abscesses tooth decay fungal infections such as thrush lichen planus (an inflammatory, autoimmune skin condition) mouth ulcers taste disturbances a dry, burning mouth (low saliva levels). Diabetes and periodontal (gum) disease Periodontal (gum) disease is caused by an infection that destroys the bone surrounding and supporting your teeth. This bone holds your teeth into your jawbone and allows you to chew comfortably. Bacteria and food debris called dental plaque is essential for gum disease. If left on teeth and gums, plaque hardens to form calculus or tartar. The plaque and calculus irritate the gums around teeth so they become red, swollen a Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Teeth - American Dental Association

Diabetes And Teeth - American Dental Association

By Laura Martin, Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine Did you know that 29.1 million people living in the United States have diabetes ? That’s 9.3% of the population. Approximately 1.7 million new cases are diagnosed each year—and 8.1 million people living with diabetes don’t even know they have it. Diabetes affects your body’s ability to process sugar. All food you eat is turned to sugar and used for energy. In Type I diabetes, the body doesn’t make enough insulin, a hormone that carries sugar from your blood to the cells that need it for energy. In Type II diabetes, the body stops responding to insulin. Both cases result in high blood sugar levels, which can cause problems with your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart and other parts of your body. So what does this have to do with that smile of yours — and how can you protect it? First, it’s important to understand the signs of diabetes and the roles they play in your mouth. The warning signs of diabetes affect every part of your body. After a blood test, you may be told by a doctor that you have high blood sugar. You may feel excessively thirsty or have to urinate a lot. Weight loss and fatigue are other common symptoms. Diabetes can also cause you to lose consciousness if your blood sugar falls too low. If diabetes is left untreated, it can take a toll on your mouth as well. Here's how: You may have less saliva, causing your mouth to feel dry. ( Dry mouth is also caused by certain medications.) Because saliva protects your teeth, you’re also at a higher risk of cavities. Gums may become inflamed and bleed often ( gingivitis ). You may experience delayed wound healing. You may be susceptible to infections inside of your mouth. For children with diabetes, teeth may erupt at an age earlie Continue reading >>

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