diabetestalk.net

How Does Diabetes Cause High Blood Pressure?

When Blood Pressure Is Too Low

When Blood Pressure Is Too Low

Talk around blood pressure typically centers on what to do if blood pressure is too high. We know that high blood pressure is more common in people with diabetes than people without diabetes. We also know that uncontrolled high blood pressure is a risk factor for stroke, heart disease, and kidney disease. The American Diabetes Association recommends a blood pressure goal of less than 140/80 for most people with diabetes. But what if your blood pressure is too low? Is it cause for concern? And what do you do about it? Low blood pressure defined Low blood pressure is also known as “hypotension.” You might be thinking that low blood pressure is a good thing, especially if yours tends to run on the high side. But the reality is that low blood pressure can be a serious condition for some people. For people without diabetes, the American Heart Association recommends a blood pressure of less than 120 over 80 (written as 120/80). Low blood pressure is generally defined as a blood pressure of less than 90/60. If your blood pressure tends to hover in that area without any symptoms, then there’s likely no cause for concern. But if symptoms occur, that’s a signal that something is amiss. Symptoms of low blood pressure Low blood pressure may be a sign that there’s an underlying medical condition, especially if your blood pressure drops suddenly or if you have the following symptoms: • Dizziness or lightheadedness • Fainting • Fast or irregular heartbeat • Feeling weak • Feeling confused • Lack of concentration • Blurred vision • Cold, clammy skin • Nausea • Rapid, shallow breathing • Depression • Dehydration That’s quite a list. Some of the above symptoms can occur if you have, say, the flu, a stomach bug, or have been outside for a long time in h Continue reading >>

Diabetes & High Blood Pressure: It’s Causes, Symptoms, Treatment & Diet Plan

Diabetes & High Blood Pressure: It’s Causes, Symptoms, Treatment & Diet Plan

It is a known fact that diabetes is a disease which is today affecting a large population of people around the globe. Tackling diabetes often becomes really challenging because of the several other complications that it brings along. One of the varied complications includes hypertension or high blood pressure. Several studies and research fhave established the correlation between the two diseases. While an ideal blood pressure reading for a normal average adult should be 140/90, a person suffering from diabetes is often kept under examination to maintain a blood pressure which is lower than 135/80. This is particularly true of type 2 diabetes. In most of the cases with diabetes patients, this is the first and foremost thing which the doctor would want to ensure. In the following article, we discuss ‘Diabetes and High Blood Pressure: their relation, causes, symptoms, and whether the same can be treated?’ What is the Meaning of Hypertension or High Blood Pressure? Let us first begin by understanding the meaning of hypertension or high blood pressure. Hypertension or high blood pressure refers to a condition in which the flow of blood from the blood vessels and the heart occur with an abnormally high force. Over the period of time, the patient develops a host of complications and cardiovascular diseases. What is the Relation Between Diabetes and Blood Pressure? Let us now understand the relation between diabetes and hypertension or high blood pressure. There is a close relation between the two diseases: diabetes and high blood pressure and if a patient suffers from one of the above diseases, the chances of contracting the other disease are often very high. Studies show that at least 70% of the diabetes patients often suffer from the problem of high blood pressure and p Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Hypertension: What Is The Relationship?

Diabetes And Hypertension: What Is The Relationship?

Hypertension, also known as high blood pressure, often affects people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association reports that from 2000 to 2012, 71 percent of adults with diabetes had a blood pressure of greater or equal to 140/90 or were taking medications to help normalize blood pressure. What are hypertension and diabetes Many people with diabetes also have hypertension, or high blood pressure. Having these conditions together can make them both worse. What is hypertension? Known the "silent killer," hypertension usually has no signs or symptoms and many people are not aware they have it. High blood pressure increases a person's risk of stroke and heart attack. It often occurs with diabetes. Blood pressure is measured in millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) and can be assessed using a blood pressure monitor. Two numbers will be produced. The first refers to the systolic blood pressure, or the highest level of the blood pressure during a heartbeat. The second, the diastolic blood pressure, points to the lowest level. Any blood pressure reading of less than or equal to 119/79 is considered normal. A reading between 120 and 139 for systolic pressure and between 80 and 89 for diastolic pressure is considered prehypertension. This is a sign of possible hypertension if a person does not take preventive steps. A doctor will diagnose a reading of 140/90 mm Hg or higher as high blood pressure. People can control hypertension with healthy lifestyle habits. These can include exercise and a low-fat, low-sodium diet. If necessary, a person with hypertension may reduce their blood pressure using medication. What is diabetes? Diabetes occurs when blood sugar increases because the body cannot use the glucose properly. This happens when there a problem with insulin Continue reading >>

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure (hypertension) can lead to many complications of diabetes, including diabetic eye disease and kidney disease, or make them worse. Most people with diabetes will eventually have high blood pressure, along with other heart and circulation problems. Diabetes damages arteries and makes them targets for hardening, called atherosclerosis. That can cause high blood pressure, which if not treated, can lead to trouble including blood vessel damage, heart attack, and kidney failure. Compared to those with normal blood pressure readings, people with hypertension more often have: Peripheral vascular disease, hardening of the arteries in the legs and feet Even blood pressure that's at the higher end of normal (120/80 to 129/80), called elevated, impacts your health. Studies show that you have a two to three times greater chance of getting heart disease over 10 years. Readings vary, but most people with diabetes should have a blood pressure of no more than 130/80. The first, or top, number is the "systolic pressure," or the pressure in your arteries when your heart squeezes and fills the vessels with blood. The second, or bottom, number is the "diastolic pressure," or the pressure in your arteries when your heart rests between beats, filling itself with blood for the next contraction. When it comes to preventing diabetes complications, normal blood pressure is as important as good control of your blood sugar levels. Usually, high blood pressure has no symptoms. That's why you need to check your blood pressure regularly. Your doctor will probably measure it at every visit, and you may need to check it at home, too. Many of the things you do for your diabetes will also help with high blood pressure: Control your blood sugar. Don't drink a lot of alcohol. Limit how m Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure: Does It Lead To Diabetes?

High Blood Pressure: Does It Lead To Diabetes?

"Study gives strongest link yet between blood pressure and diabetes," says The Guardian. At first glance these might be considered two unconnected conditions, but research over the years has led to diabetes being classified as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Researchers looked at data on more than 4 million people in the UK who were free of any vascular disease or diabetes. They then analysed these people's medical records for around seven years and recorded new cases of diabetes and changes in blood pressure. People with high blood pressure were found to have around a 50% increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The researchers then backed up their findings by looking at previous research and found a risk of more than 70%. While these types of studies can't prove increased blood pressure causes diabetes, they lend weight to the advice to take steps to lower your blood pressure if it's high to reduce your risk of diabetes. Read our advice on how to look after your heart and circulation. Where did the story come from? The study was carried out by researchers from the University of Oxford and was funded by the UK National Institute for Health Research. It was published in the peer-reviewed Journal of the American College of Cardiology. This story has been reported widely in the media. Both The Guardian and The Independent have responsibly provided quotes from one of the researchers, who explained the findings tell us a link exists, but we don't know whether high blood pressure is a cause of diabetes or whether it's a risk factor. What kind of research was this? This was a large cohort study and systematic review with meta-analysis to determine whether there is an association between blood pressure and type 2 diabetes. While the cohort study cannot prove cau Continue reading >>

What Are The Symptoms Of High Blood Pressure?

What Are The Symptoms Of High Blood Pressure?

If you are looking for a list of symptoms and signs of high blood pressure (HBP or hypertension), you won’t find them here. This is because most of the time, there are none. Myth: People with high blood pressure will experience symptoms, like nervousness, sweating, difficulty sleeping or facial flushing. Truth: High blood pressure is a largely symptomless “silent killer.” If you ignore your blood pressure because you think a certain symptom or sign will alert you to the problem, you are taking a dangerous chance with your life. DO NOT attempt to diagnose yourself. Clinical diagnosis should only be made by a healthcare professional. Know your blood pressure numbers and make changes that matter to protect your health. In most cases, high blood pressure does not cause headaches or nosebleeds The best evidence indicates that high blood pressure does not cause headaches or nosebleeds, except in the case of hypertensive crisis, a medical emergency when blood pressure is 180/120 mm Hg or higher. If your blood pressure is unusually high AND you have headache or nosebleed and are feeling unwell, wait five minutes and retest. If your reading remains at 180/120 mm Hg or higher, call 9-1-1. If you are experiencing severe headaches or nosebleeds and are otherwise unwell, contact your doctor as they could be symptoms of other health conditions. Other inconclusively related symptoms A variety of symptoms may be indirectly related to, but are not always caused by, high blood pressure, such as: Blood spots in the eyes Blood spots in the eyes (subconjunctival hemorrhage) are more common in people with diabetes or high blood pressure, but neither condition causes the blood spots. Floaters in the eyes are also not related to high blood pressure. However, an eye doctor (ophthalmologis Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure / Hypertension Signs And Symptoms

High Blood Pressure / Hypertension Signs And Symptoms

High Blood Pressure / Hypertension Signs and Symptoms Hypertension, commonly known as high blood pressure, affects millions of Americans, from children to older adults. High blood pressure can be caused by many factors, but mostly notably are diabetes, obesity, and excessive alcohol consumption. High blood pressure happens when the pressure your blood exerts against the artery walls is too high, leading to life-threatening conditions, such as heart disease and stroke. Despite these severe health consequences, the vast majority of individuals have no symptoms. This is why hypertension is sometimes called a “silent” killer. Learn more about these potential symptoms and what that means for your health below. What is Hypertension? Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is the most common cardiovascular disease in the US. It is a condition where the pressure your blood puts on your artery walls is higher than normal ranges for a sustained period of time. Similar to the pressure needed to send air through a tube; your blood needs pressure to travel through your arteries. Just like too much pressure can damage a tire, high blood pressure can lead to a number of health conditions including potentially life-threatening conditions like stroke. Illnesses or medications that narrow the arteries increase high blood pressure. This is also why high blood pressure is so much more common with older adults. As we age, our arteries narrow meaning the same amount of pressure in a regular sized artery is equivalent to high blood pressure in a narrowed artery. There are two types of hypertension. Essential hypertension is where the underlying cause of the high blood pressure is unknown, which may be as many as 95% of cases in the US. Secondary hypertension is when the direct cause of the Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Cause High Blood Pressure?-stop Diabetes And Lower Your Blood Pressure

Can Diabetes Cause High Blood Pressure?-stop Diabetes And Lower Your Blood Pressure

Can diabetes cause high blood pressure? I’m going to try and not get too technical here, but I think most folks know that it is basically the force of your blood flowing through your blood vessels. Your health care provider or physician takes your blood pressure numbers with a blood pressure monitor which I’m sure everyone has done more than once in their lives. The results are two numbers such as a normal pressure reading 120/80. Each number is very important. There is a connection between high blood pressure and diabetes which I’ll discuss later. The “top” number (in this case 120) represents the pressure at which your heart beats and pushes blood through your vessels. This is otherwise known as “systolic” pressure. The “bottom” number (80) represents the pressure when your vessels begin to relax between heartbeats. This is also referred to as the “diastolic” pressure. So basically, you’re looking for your numbers to be in the 120/80 range. That’s really all you need to know and be comfortable with. Number risks and high blood pressure Healthy blood pressure: 120/80 Beginning of high blood pressure: between 120/80 and 140/90 High blood pressure: Anything over 140/90 Obviously you want your blood pressure lower because that decreases the possibilities of having or preventing a stroke or heart attack. You should always know your blood pressure numbers as well as your blood sugar numbers because both play a very important part of your health. You won’t know if you have high blood pressure unless it’s checked by your doctor or yourself if you have a home monitor to do so. It is a silent issue so don’t ignore having it checked. This is not a good combination to say the least. I have my own blood pressure under control and check it with my ow Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Warning - The Five Factors Which Will Cause Complex Condition

Type 2 Diabetes Warning - The Five Factors Which Will Cause Complex Condition

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or the insulin produced does not work properly. It can reduce life expectancy if it is not managed correctly, and lead to considerable health complications. Around 90 per cent of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes, which is treatable but not easily diagnosed. With thousands of people being diagnosed each week in the UK with diabetes - experts warn it is important to be aware of what causes the condition. According to Diabetes UK the five key factors which can cause the condition are: Your risk increases with age Middle-aged and older adults are still at the highest risk for developing type 2 diabetes. People most at risk of the condition are those who are white and over 40 - or over 25 if you are African-Caribbean, Black African or South Asian. Weight You are more at risk of type 2 diabetes if you are overweight, especially if you are large around the middle. Being overweight can cause type 2 diabetes because people have added pressure on their body’s ability to use insulin properly to control blood sugar levels - and are more likely to develop the condition. It was revealed yesterday that avoiding middle-aged spread dramatically reduces the risk of diabetes. Kotryna Temcinaite from Diabetes UK, said: “We know that being overweight or obese can increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes, as well as other serious health problems including heart and circulatory disease. “Healthy eating and an active lifestyle are really important both for the prevention of Type 2 diabetes and general good health. “It’s also important that people get the support they need to set and achieve healthy lifestyle goals.” High blood pressure High blood pressure - also known as hypertension - can increase the risk o Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure

High Blood Pressure

Blood pressure is a measurement of the force of your blood against the blood vessel walls. There are often no signs of high blood pressure. This means that you may have high blood pressure and not know it. The recommended target for people with diabetes is less than 130/80 mm Hg. The top number is the pressure when your heart contracts and pushes blood out (systolic). The bottom number is the pressure when the heart relaxes between beats (diastolic). Why is controlling blood pressure important for people with diabetes? When blood pressure is high, it puts stress on the body. This can cause damage to the heart, brain, kidneys, and eyes. High blood glucose levels are a risk factor for hypertension (high blood pressure) as it can lead to hardening of the arteries. Compared to people without diabetes, people with diabetes are much more likely to develop heart disease and/or experience a stroke at an earlier age. If you have diabetes, get your blood pressure checked every time you visit your health-care team. Am I doing all that I can to control my blood pressure? Do I have my blood pressure checked every time I visit my health-care team? Am I at a healthy weight? Do I follow a healthy diet that includes vegetables, fruits, low-fat dairy products, and is low in sodium and saturated and trans fats? Am I physically active on a regular basis? Am I a non-smoker? Do I manage stress in a healthy way? Do I limit my alcohol intake? Do I take my medication as prescribed? Strategies to lower blood pressure Try these healthy eating tips: Choose vegetables and fruits more often (fresh or frozen without added salt). Choose low-fat (one per cent or skim) dairy products. Choose legumes (dried beans, peas and lentils) more often. Rinse canned beans with water. Choose whole grains such as wh Continue reading >>

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

Health Information If you have diabetes you should aim to keep your blood pressure well controlled. Having high blood pressure (hypertension) is one of several risk factors that can increase your chance of developing heart disease, a stroke and some other complications. Treatment includes a change in lifestyle risk factors where these can be improved. Many people with diabetes need to take medication to lower their blood pressure. What is blood pressure? Blood pressure is the pressure of blood in your blood vessels (arteries). Blood pressure is measured in millimetres of mercury (mm Hg). Your blood pressure is recorded as two figures - for example, 124/80 mm Hg. This is said as 124 over 80. The top (first) number is the systolic pressure. This is the pressure in the arteries when the heart contracts. The bottom (second) number is the diastolic pressure. This is the pressure in the arteries when the heart rests between each heartbeat. What is high blood pressure? This is not as simple to answer as it may seem. In general, the higher the blood pressure, the greater the risk to health. Depending on various factors, the level at which blood pressure is said to be high (hypertension) can vary from person to person. The cut-off point for blood pressure that is said to be high is 140/80 mm Hg or above for people with diabetes and 130/80 mm Hg for those with diabetes and complications (for example, kidney disease). These are lower than the cut-off point for people who do not have diabetes. Note: high blood pressure actually means that your blood pressure remains above the cut-off point each time it is taken. That is, your blood pressure is sustained at a level higher than it should be and is not just a one-off high reading when you happen to be stressed. High blood pressure can Continue reading >>

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

If you have diabetes you should aim to keep your blood pressure well controlled. Having high blood pressure (hypertension) is one of several risk factors that can increase your chance of developing heart disease, a stroke and some other complications. Treatment includes a change in lifestyle risk factors where these can be improved. Many people with diabetes need to take medication to lower their blood pressure. How common is high blood pressure in people with diabetes? In the UK, about half of all people aged over 65, and about 1 in 4 of all middle-aged adults, have high blood pressure (hypertension). It is less common in younger adults. High blood pressure is more common in people with diabetes. Around 3 in 10 people with type 1 diabetes and around 8 in 10 people with type 2 diabetes develop high blood pressure at some stage. People with diabetes are more at risk of developing high blood pressure if they: Are of African-Caribbean origin. Are from the Indian sub-continent. Have a family history of high blood pressure. Have certain lifestyle factors - for example, those who: Are overweight. Eat a lot of salt. Do not eat much fruit and vegetables. Do not take much exercise. Drink a lot of alcohol. What is high blood pressure? This is not as simple to answer as it may seem. In general, the higher the blood pressure, the greater the risk to health. Depending on various factors, the level at which blood pressure is said to be high (hypertension) can vary from person to person. The cut-off point for blood pressure that is said to be high is 140/80 mm Hg or above for people with diabetes and 130/80 mm Hg for those with diabetes and complications (for example, kidney disease). These are lower than the cut-off point for people who do not have diabetes. Note: high blood pressure Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure In Diabetic Pets

High Blood Pressure In Diabetic Pets

I’m the first one to admit that I’m not up on pop culture. I’m not as hip as I once was, if I ever was! After 23 years as a veterinarian, it seems there isn’t enough time in the day to learn all we have to know! Medicine is advancing so quickly. So I study. A lot. And the other day I came across a startling statistic: 46% of diabetic dogs have hypertension (high blood pressure). In fact, several hormonal diseases can cause high blood pressure in pets. Of course I had to write an article about it for my loyal ADW followers! In general vets are better about checking blood pressure than we have been in the past. Even so, I know there are a lot of veterinarians who don’t check a pet’s blood pressure unless a pet is under anesthesia. Some veterinarians are superstars and check blood pressure on all senior patients. And some vets check blood pressure for the “high risk” groups like patients with kidney disease, heart disease and liver disease. Well, we can now lump diabetics (and pets with other hormonal diseases like cushings disease or thyroid disease) into the high risk category. I read about pet diabetes all the time and was really surprised that 46% of diabetic dogs have hypertension. Be proactive. Ask your vet to check your diabetic pet’s blood pressure. And do it before the vet’s nursing staff has done anything else like taking temperatures and other such “torture”. We don’t wish to artificially elevate the blood pressure with “white coat syndrome”! As always, step back ten feet and assess the situation. If we wish to control hypertension secondary to diabetes, it makes sense to control the underlying disease process! If you know you can do better, perhaps even feel guilty that you routinely miss doses of insulin or don’t run blood gluco Continue reading >>

Conditions That Increase Risk For High Blood Pressure

Conditions That Increase Risk For High Blood Pressure

Some medical conditions can raise your risk for high blood pressure. If you have one of these conditions, you can take steps to control it and lower your risk. Prehypertension Prehypertension is blood pressure that is slightly higher than normal. Prehypertension increases the risk that you will develop chronic, or long-lasting, high blood pressure in the future. If your blood pressure is between 120/80 mmHg and 139/89 mmHg, you have prehypertension. Learn more about how blood pressure is measured. You can take steps to control your blood pressure and keep it in a healthy range. Blood Pressure Levels Normal Systolic: less than 120 mmHg Diastolic: less than 80 mmHg At Risk (Prehypertension) Systolic: 120–139 mmHg Diastolic: 80–89 mmHg High Systolic: 140 mmHg or higher Diastolic: 90 mmHg or higher Diabetes mellitus also increases the risk for heart disease. Your body needs glucose (sugar) for energy. Insulin is a hormone made in the pancreas that helps move glucose from the food you eat to your body’s cells. If you have diabetes, your body does not make enough insulin, can not use its own insulin as well as it should, or both. This will increase the blood sugar. Diabetes causes sugars to build up in the blood. About 60% of people who have diabetes also have high blood pressure.1 Talk to your doctor about ways to manage diabetes and control other risk factors. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Hypertension

Type 2 Diabetes And Hypertension

High blood pressure, or hypertension, is a condition that’s often present in people with type 2 diabetes. It’s unknown why there’s such a significant correlation between the two diseases. It’s believed that obesity, a diet high in fat and sodium, and inactivity contribute to both conditions. Hypertension is known as a “silent killer” because it has no obvious symptoms and many people are unaware that they have it. A 2013 survey by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) found that fewer than half of people at risk for heart disease or type 2 diabetes reported discussing biomarkers, including blood pressure, with their care providers. If you have hypertension, it means that your blood is pumping through your heart and blood vessels with too much force. Over time, consistently high blood pressure tires the heart muscle and can enlarge it. In 2008, 67 percent of adults aged 20 and over with self-reported diabetes had blood pressure rates of greater than 140/90. In the general population and in people with diabetes, a blood pressure reading of less than or equal to 140/90 is considered normal. What does this mean? The first number (140) is called the systolic pressure. It indicates the highest pressure exerted as blood pushes through your heart. The second number (90) is called the diastolic pressure. This is the pressure maintained by the arteries when the vessels are relaxed between heartbeats. Healthy people should get their blood pressure checked several times a year. People with diabetes need to be even more vigilant. If you have diabetes, you should have your pressure checked at least four times each year. If you have diabetes and high blood pressure, the ADA recommends that you self-monitor at home, record the readings, and share them with your doctor. Ac Continue reading >>

More in diabetes