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How Does Diabetes Cause Cataracts

Cataracts, Blindness, And Diabetic Dogs

Cataracts, Blindness, And Diabetic Dogs

Diabetic dogs can live healthy lives. Unfortunately, a common complication of diabetes in dogs is cataracts (cloudy lenses). In fact, 75% of dogs develop cataracts and blindness in both eyes within 9 months of being diagnosed with diabetes. The cataracts develop very quickly—sometimes overnight! If untreated, the cataracts cause intraocular inflammation called Lens-Induced Uveitis (LIU) that harms the eyes by causing glaucoma (increased intraocular pressure). If the LIU is uncontrolled and glaucoma develops, cataract surgery might not be possible. Glaucoma causes a chronic headache (similar to a migraine). In worst case scenarios, cataracts form rapidly in both eyes, the lens capsules split/rupture, severe LIU occurs resulting in glaucoma and severe painful intraocular inflammation (phacoclastic uveitis), and both eyes need to be surgically removed. This is a tragic outcome, and one to be avoided if possible. Thus, DO NOT WAIT until your dog’s diabetes is controlled, before seeing an ophthalmologist!! Another very important recommendation is that if your diabetic dog is started on a special canine antioxidant vision supplement BEFORE they develop cataracts, blindness can be prevented in many of these dogs. A 2012 clinical study in Great Britain found that diabetic dogs supplemented daily with this vision supplement did not develop blinding cataracts over a one-year period. This has also been Dr. McCalla’s clinical experience in diabetic dogs, as long as the diabetes remains well-controlled. If cataracts are developing in your diabetic dog, this is an ophthalmic emergency; you must have your pet examined by a veterinary ophthalmologist as soon as possible. To locate a veterinary ophthalmologist near you, please ask your family veterinarian or visit the ACVO website Continue reading >>

5 Ways Diabetes Can Affect Your Eyes & Vision

5 Ways Diabetes Can Affect Your Eyes & Vision

Treatment can include medicine and special eye drops. Surgery and laser treatments can help with drainage. If you have diabetes, youre also more likely to get a rare condition called neovascular glaucoma. This makes new blood vessels grow on the iris, the colored part of your eye. They block the normal flow of fluid and raise eye pressure. It's difficult to treat. Your doctor might try laser surgery to cut back on the vessels. Or he could use implants to help drain the fluid. The retina is a group of cells on the back of your eye that take in light. They turn it into images that the optic nerve sends to your brain . Damage to small blood vessels in your retina causes diabetic retinopathy . It's related to high blood sugar levels . If you dont find and treat it early, you could go blind. The longer you have diabetes, the more likely you are to get it. If you keep your blood sugar under control, you lower your chances. People with type 1 diabetes rarely develop the condition before puberty . In adults, it's rare to see unless you've had type 1 diabetes for at least 5 years. If you keep tight control of your blood sugar with either an insulin pump or multiple daily insulin injections, youre far less likely to get this condition. If you have type 2 diabetes, you may have signs of eye problems when youre diagnosed. Control your blood sugar, blood pressure , and cholesterol to slow or prevent the disease. If you smoke, try to quit. Itll improve your eyes and your overall health. Background retinopathy. Your blood vessels are damaged, but you can still see OK. It can get worse if you don't manage your diabetes well. Maculopathy. This is damage to the macula, a critical area of your retina. It can greatly affect your vision. Proliferative retinopathy. It happens when cells at Continue reading >>

Cataracts: 3 Common Types, Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Cataracts: 3 Common Types, Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

By Gretchyn Bailey ; reviewed by Vance Thompson, MD On This Page: Cataract symptoms and signs What causes cataracts? Cataract prevention Cataract treatment Eyewear after cataract surgery Cataract Surgery: About Cataract Surgery Laser Cataract Surgery Cataract Surgery Recovery Cataract Surgery Q&A Video: How Cataract Surgery Works Cataract Surgery Cost A Surgeon Gets Cataract Surgery Choosing a Cataract Surgeon Cataract Surgery Complications A cataract is a clouding of the eye's natural lens, which lies behind the iris and the pupil . Cataracts are the most common cause of vision loss in people over age 40 and is the principal cause of blindness in the world. In fact, there are more cases of cataracts worldwide than there are of glaucoma , macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy combined, according to Prevent Blindness America (PBA). Today, cataracts affect more than 22 million Americans age 40 and older. And as the U.S. population ages, more than 30 million Americans are expected to have cataracts by the year 2020, PBA says. A subcapsular cataract occurs at the back of the lens. People with diabetes or those taking high doses of steroid medications have a greater risk of developing a subcapsular cataract. A nuclear cataract forms deep in the central zone (nucleus) of the lens. Nuclear cataracts usually are associated with aging. A cortical cataract is characterized by white, wedge-like opacities that start in the periphery of the lens and work their way to the center in a spoke-like fashion. This type of cataract occurs in the lens cortex, which is the part of the lens that surrounds the central nucleus. A cataract starts out small and at first has little effect on your vision. You may notice that your vision is blurred a little, like looking through a cloudy pie Continue reading >>

Cataracts And Diabetes

Cataracts And Diabetes

Cataracts are cloudy opacifications of the lens of the eye Cataracts are one of the sight-related complications of diabetes that can cause misting or blurring of vision. Attending regular eye checks as part of your annual diabetic review will help your health team to identify any signs of cataracts at an early stage and advise on treatment. Cataracts are cloudy opacifications of the lens of the eye which can lead to cloudy or blurred vision. This interferes with your vision, in some cases considerably. Early stage cataract symptoms may barely influence the vision, and a cataract diagnosis may come as a genuine surprise. Challenging visual situations such as driving at night and bright sunlight may cause your sight to become hazy. Attending regular eye checks and screenings will make it easier for your health team to diagnose cataracts at an early stage. The lens of the eye is made up of fluids that contain protein . Over time this fluid may begin to cloud over, causing cataracts. Age is one of the factors and other factors include: Does diabetes increase the risk of cataracts? Diabetes is one of the key factors that result in the development of cataracts. Although the reasons why are still not fully understood, people with diabetes mellitus statistically face a 60% greater risk of developing cataracts. As with most complications of diabetes, maintaining good control of your blood sugar levels will help to reduce your risk. In addition, research has shown that people with type 2 diabetes who lower their HbA1c level by just 1% can reduce their risk of cataracts by 19%. [1] Cataracts treatment has advanced considerably in recent years. Surgery is often prescribed, with the lens removed and replaced with an artificial one. Cataract surgery is widely recommended and is comm Continue reading >>

Diabetic Cataractpathogenesis, Epidemiology And Treatment

Diabetic Cataractpathogenesis, Epidemiology And Treatment

Diabetic CataractPathogenesis, Epidemiology and Treatment Department of Ophthalmology and Optometry, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna, Austria Received 2009 Dec 11; Accepted 2010 Apr 2. Copyright 2010 A. Pollreisz and U. Schmidt-Erfurth. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Cataract in diabetic patients is a major cause of blindness in developed and developing countries. The pathogenesis of diabetic cataract development is still not fully understood. Recent basic research studies have emphasized the role of the polyol pathway in the initiation of the disease process. Population-based studies have greatly increased our knowledge concerning the association between diabetes and cataract formation and have defined risk factors for the development of cataract. Diabetic patients also have a higher risk of complications after phacoemulsification cataract surgery compared to nondiabetics. Aldose-reductase inhibitors and antioxidants have been proven beneficial in the prevention or treatment of this sightthreatening condition in in vitro and in vivo experimental studies. This paper provides an overview of the pathogenesis of diabetic cataract, clinical studies investigating the association between diabetes and cataract development, and current treatment of cataract in diabetics. Worldwide more than 285 million people are affected by diabetes mellitus. This number is expected to increase to 439 million by 2030 according to the International Diabetes Federation. A frequent complication of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes Continue reading >>

Cataract - Diabetes Self-management

Cataract - Diabetes Self-management

A cloudy lens in the eye that may cause vision problems. The lens is the part of the eye that focuses light on the retina, which in turn translates the light into the impulses transmitted to the brain. Cataract is a painless condition. Some signs of a cataract include impaired distance vision, blurring of vision, decreased night vision, sensitivity to glare and bright light, a frequent need for new eyeglasses prescriptions, seeing halos around lights, needing brighter lights to read, and monocular diplopia, or double vision in one eye. A certain type of cataract is associated with a phenomenon some call gaining second sight, in which a person with farsightedness is able to see close objects again for a time. -- Keep an eye on your vision! Learn about preventive steps and treatments for diabetic retinopathy from retinal specialist Dr. Charles Wykoff. >> Over 70% of Americans over 65 have at least some clouding of the lens, and 18% to 50% have full-blown cataracts. People with diabetes have a higher risk of developing cataracts in their 30s or 40s. Cataracts usually develop slowly with age, possibly due to the effects of free radicals, damaging molecules that can sometimes overwhelm the bodys natural ability to neutralize them. Cataracts may also be present at birth in some cases. They may affect one or both eyes. Besides age and damage caused by free radicals, additional factors that may contribute to cataracts include diabetes, smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, overexposure to the sun, radiation, long-term use of certain steroids, previous eye injuries, and a family history of cataracts. Most people with cataracts do not have any vision difficulties. But when cataracts interfere with daily living, the recommended treatment is surgery, often a technique called pha Continue reading >>

Diabetic Cataract—pathogenesis, Epidemiology And Treatment

Diabetic Cataract—pathogenesis, Epidemiology And Treatment

Journal of Ophthalmology Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 608751, 8 pages Department of Ophthalmology and Optometry, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna, Austria Academic Editor: Mark Petrash Copyright © 2010 Andreas Pollreisz and Ursula Schmidt-Erfurth. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract Cataract in diabetic patients is a major cause of blindness in developed and developing countries. The pathogenesis of diabetic cataract development is still not fully understood. Recent basic research studies have emphasized the role of the polyol pathway in the initiation of the disease process. Population-based studies have greatly increased our knowledge concerning the association between diabetes and cataract formation and have defined risk factors for the development of cataract. Diabetic patients also have a higher risk of complications after phacoemulsification cataract surgery compared to nondiabetics. Aldose-reductase inhibitors and antioxidants have been proven beneficial in the prevention or treatment of this sightthreatening condition in in vitro and in vivo experimental studies. This paper provides an overview of the pathogenesis of diabetic cataract, clinical studies investigating the association between diabetes and cataract development, and current treatment of cataract in diabetics. 1. Introduction Worldwide more than 285 million people are affected by diabetes mellitus. This number is expected to increase to 439 million by 2030 according to the International Diabetes Federation. A frequent complication of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes is diabetic re Continue reading >>

Cataracts In Diabetes

Cataracts In Diabetes

What you can do Controlling diabetes The operation Bupa factsheet macula oedema higher risk of infections Cataracts Normally light enters the eye from the front, passes through a clear lens, and reaches the back of the eye so you can see. If the lens becomes cloudy like frosted glass, light cannot pass through, and you cannot see properly. 'Cataract' is the name of the 'cloudy' human lens. Think of a camera, with a lens that bends the light so that the light 'focuses' onto the film at the back. If this lens becomes scratched or greasy, it cannot bend the light in the correct direction, and the light is scattered in all directions. You may notice blurred or mis ty sight, see double, or notice colours appear much duller than they did previously. bottom: a cloudy lens = a cataract. Light entering the eye is scattered What you can do A cataract will not damage your eye in any way. It can be operated on safely at any time, thick or thin. A cataract may change the focusing in the eye, and you may need new spectacles now and again. If you think you do, ask your optician or the doctor in the hospital eye clinic. But glasses themselves do not help you see better if you have a cataract. Some cataracts get worse quickly, others slowly: most do get worse over months or years. If your sight gets worse very slowly, the cataract is only slowly becoming thick. The thicker or cloudier the cataract becomes, the worse the sight. A doctor cannot predict with certainty. Reading Large print is naturally much easier to read, and a magnifying glass may help (see Coping with poor vision). A good light may help, particularly an anglepoise light behind the shoulder. Stronger glasses that mean you can bring books closer to your eye to make reading easier, and an optician (optometrist) can advise y Continue reading >>

Cataracts In Diabetic Patients: A Review Article

Cataracts In Diabetic Patients: A Review Article

Cataracts in Diabetic Patients: A Review Article Mohammad-Ali Javadi , MD and Siamak Zarei-Ghanavati , MD Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran Correspondence to:Mohammad-Ali Javadi, MD. Professor of Ophthalmology; Ophthalmic Research Center, No. 5, Boostan 9 St., Amir Ebrahimi Ave., Pasdaran, Tehran 16666, Iran; Tel: +98 21 22585952, Fax: +98 21 22590607; e-mail: [email protected]_am Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright 2008 Ophthalmic Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License which allows users to read, copy, distribute and make derivative works for non-commercial purposes from the material, as long as the author of the original work is cited properly. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. The number of people with diabetes mellitus is increasing and cataracts are one of the most common causes of visual impairment in these subjects. Advances in cataract surgical techniques and instrumentation have generally improved the outcomes; however,surgery may not be safe and effective in certain individuals with pre-existing retinal pathology or limited visual potential. This review article aims to address different aspects surrounding cataracts in diabetic patients. In a computerized MEDLINE search,relevant studies were selected by two authors using the keywords diabetes mellitus, cataract, diabetic retinopathy and diabetic maculopathy. Population growth, ageing, urbanization, sedentary lifestyles and an increasing prevalence of obesity are increasing the number of people with diabetes mellitus. The global prevalence of diabetes was estimated to be 2.8% in 2000 and is expected to reach 4. Continue reading >>

Facts About Diabetic Eye Disease

Facts About Diabetic Eye Disease

Points to Remember Diabetic eye disease comprises a group of eye conditions that affect people with diabetes. These conditions include diabetic retinopathy, diabetic macular edema (DME), cataract, and glaucoma. All forms of diabetic eye disease have the potential to cause severe vision loss and blindness. Diabetic retinopathy involves changes to retinal blood vessels that can cause them to bleed or leak fluid, distorting vision. Diabetic retinopathy is the most common cause of vision loss among people with diabetes and a leading cause of blindness among working-age adults. DME is a consequence of diabetic retinopathy that causes swelling in the area of the retina called the macula. Controlling diabetes—by taking medications as prescribed, staying physically active, and maintaining a healthy diet—can prevent or delay vision loss. Because diabetic retinopathy often goes unnoticed until vision loss occurs, people with diabetes should get a comprehensive dilated eye exam at least once a year. Early detection, timely treatment, and appropriate follow-up care of diabetic eye disease can protect against vision loss. Diabetic retinopathy can be treated with several therapies, used alone or in combination. NEI supports research to develop new therapies for diabetic retinopathy, and to compare the effectiveness of existing therapies for different patient groups. What is diabetic eye disease? Diabetic eye disease can affect many parts of the eye, including the retina, macula, lens and the optic nerve. Diabetic eye disease is a group of eye conditions that can affect people with diabetes. Diabetic retinopathy affects blood vessels in the light-sensitive tissue called the retina that lines the back of the eye. It is the most common cause of vision loss among people with diabetes Continue reading >>

Cataract Surgery In Patients With Diabetes And Age-related Macular Degeneration

Cataract Surgery In Patients With Diabetes And Age-related Macular Degeneration

Diabetes, hypertension, and body mass index have been implicated as risk factors for various types of lens opacities. Diabetes itself has been associated with both age-related cataract and cortical cataract.[ 1 , 2 ] Both the Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (HANES) and the Framingham study demonstrated an increased risk of age-related cataract development in diabetics less than 65 years old. Other epidemiological studies indicate an even greater relative risk (RR=5.04) associated with diabetes between the ages of 50 and 79 years.[ 3 ] Diabetes mellitus appears to shift the prevalence of cataract toward a younger age and toward cortical and posterior subcapsular cataracts. The main indication for cataract surgery is to improve visual function and to provide adequate visualization of the retina to assess for diabetic retinopathy. Pre-existing maculopathy is strongly associated with a poor visual outcome.[ 4 , 5 ] Consequent to this, macular edema should be adequately treated prior to surgery. Early surgical removal of cataract is therefore advisable and will facilitate panretinal photocoagulation to stop progression of retinopathy and enable adequate identification and treatment of underlying macular edema (Figure 1). Patients with more advanced diabetic retinopathy are more likely to progress quickly, and therefore cataract surgery needs to be expedited so that treatment can be initiated if necessary without delay.[ 6 ] A: Fundus showing mild clinically significant macular edema in a young patient without cataract. B: Fundus of an older patient with some lens opacification and significant macular edema, which may require laser treatment and cataract surgery. Prior to surgery, patients should have good diabetic control with no evidence of ocular infection. The us Continue reading >>

Diabetes Eye Complications - Cataracts And Glaucoma

Diabetes Eye Complications - Cataracts And Glaucoma

Diabetes Eye Complications Cataracts and Glaucoma Cataracts and glaucoma also are more common in people with diabetes. A cataract is a clouding of the lens of the eye that impairs vision. Cataract formation associated with diabetes often occurs because of excess levels of sorbitol (a sugar formed from glucose), which form deposits within the lens. If a cataract begins to interfere with your vision, you may need surgery to remove the affected lens and replace it with a lens implant. In glaucoma, abnormally high pressure within the eyeball damages the optic nerve, which carries visual information from the retina to the brain. Your ophthalmologist can easily measure the pressure in your eye (called intraocular pressure) during a routine eye exam. It's important to have your eye pressure tested regularly, since irreversible eye damage from glaucoma may occur before any symptoms appear. Treatment with medicated eyedrops often helps to reduce the intraocular pressure, but some people also need laser treatment to prevent severe loss of vision. Publication Review By: Written by: Christopher D. Saudek, M.D.; Simeon Margolis, M.D., Ph.D. Last Modified: 11 Sep 2015 Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cataracts

Diabetes And Cataracts

If you have diabetes mellitus, there are many important reasons to follow your doctor's orders about diet and blood sugar control. One of those reasons: avoiding cataracts. People with diabetes are more likely to develop vision-stealing cataracts compared to non-diabetics. Cataract is a condition where the eye's naturally clear lens becomes cloudy, or opaque. Light doesn't pass through the lens as it should and isn't properly reflected onto the retina (the light-sensitive tissue lining the back of the eye). As a result, vision becomes cloudy, distorted or blurry. Usually, cataracts are associated with age-related changes in the eye, though other factors, such as medication, surgery, sun exposure and disease also play a role in cataract development. In addition to speeding up cataract development in adults, diabetes leads to early cataract formation in younger people as well. So how does diabetes lead to cataract? It's all about the sugar—or glucose. The eye's lens gets its nutrients from aqueous humor, fluid filling the front portion of the eye. Aqueous humor provides oxygen and glucose, a simple sugar energy source for the body's cells. When you don't have good control over your glucose levels (as with unchecked diabetes), sugar levels rise in the aqueous humor and in the lens. High levels of glucose in the lens cause it to swell, affecting clarity of vision. The lens also has an enzyme that converts glucose to a substance called sorbitol. When sorbitol collects in the lens, it can affect cells and naturally-occurring proteins, causing the lens to become less clear and more opaque. This condition eventually leads to cataract formation, making the world around you appear blurry, yellowish or faded, and increasing glare. What can you do to prevent cataracts? If you hav Continue reading >>

Cataracts

Cataracts

On this page: Cataract symptoms and signs • What causes cataracts? • Cataract prevention • Cataract treatment • Eyewear after cataract surgery A cataract is a clouding of the eye's natural lens, which lies behind the iris and the pupil. Cataracts are the most common cause of vision loss in people over age 40 and is the principal cause of blindness in the world. In fact, there are more cases of cataracts worldwide than there are of glaucoma, macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy combined, according to Prevent Blindness America (PBA). Today, cataracts affect more than 22 million Americans age 40 and older. And as the U.S. population ages, more than 30 million Americans are expected to have cataracts by the year 2020, PBA says. Types of cataracts include: A subcapsular cataract occurs at the back of the lens. People with diabetes or those taking high doses of steroid medications have a greater risk of developing a subcapsular cataract. A nuclear cataract forms deep in the central zone (nucleus) of the lens. Nuclear cataracts usually are associated with aging. A cortical cataract is characterized by white, wedge-like opacities that start in the periphery of the lens and work their way to the center in a spoke-like fashion. This type of cataract occurs in the lens cortex, which is the part of the lens that surrounds the central nucleus. Cataract Symptoms and Signs A cataract starts out small and at first has little effect on your vision. You may notice that your vision is blurred a little, like looking through a cloudy piece of glass or viewing an impressionist painting. A cataract may make light from the sun or a lamp seem too bright or glaring. Or you may notice when you drive at night that the oncoming headlights cause more glare than before. Colors may no Continue reading >>

Cataracts - Symptoms And Causes - Mayo Clinic

Cataracts - Symptoms And Causes - Mayo Clinic

A cataract occurs when the lens of your eye becomes cloudy. Eventually, a cataract can advance to the degree of the one shown in this person's right eye. Normal vision (left) becomes blurred as a cataract forms (right). A cataract is a clouding of the normally clear lens of your eye. For people who have cataracts, seeing through cloudy lenses is a bit like looking through a frosty or fogged-up window. Clouded vision caused by cataracts can make it more difficult to read, drive a car (especially at night) or see the expression on a friend's face. Most cataracts develop slowly and don't disturb your eyesight early on. But with time, cataracts will eventually interfere with your vision. At first, stronger lighting and eyeglasses can help you deal with cataracts. But if impaired vision interferes with your usual activities, you might need cataract surgery. Fortunately, cataract surgery is generally a safe, effective procedure. Increasing difficulty with vision at night Need for brighter light for reading and other activities Frequent changes in eyeglass or contact lens prescription At first, the cloudiness in your vision caused by a cataract may affect only a small part of the eye's lens and you may be unaware of any vision loss. As the cataract grows larger, it clouds more of your lens and distorts the light passing through the lens. This may lead to more noticeable symptoms. Make an appointment for an eye exam if you notice any changes in your vision. If you develop sudden vision changes, such as double vision or flashes of light, sudden eye pain, or sudden headache, see your doctor right away. Most cataracts develop when aging or injury changes the tissue that makes up your eye's lens. Some inherited genetic disorders that cause other health problems can increase your r Continue reading >>

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