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How Does Diabetes Affect Your Teeth

Type 2 Diabetes And Oral Health

Type 2 Diabetes And Oral Health

Diabetes affects your body’s ability to utilize glucose, or blood sugar, for energy. Diabetes can cause many complications. These include nerve damage, heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, and even blindness. Another common health complication is gum disease and other oral health problems. According to the American Diabetes Association, people with diabetes are at higher risk for gingivitis, gum disease, and periodontitis (severe gum infection with bone destruction). Diabetes affects your ability to fight off bacteria that can cause gum infections. Gum disease can also affect the body’s blood sugar control. Diabetes is associated with increased risk for thrush, a type of fungal infection. Additionally, people with diabetes are likely to have a dry mouth. This has been associated with increased risk for mouth ulcers, soreness, cavities, and dental infections. What the research says A 2013 study published in the journal BMC Oral Health looked at 125 people with type 2 diabetes. Researchers measured factors including missing teeth, the incidence of periodontal disease, and the amount of reported dental bleeding. The study found that a combination of the longer people had diabetes, the higher their fasting blood glucose, and the higher their hemoglobin A1C (a measurement of a person’s average blood sugar over three months), the more likely they were to have periodontal disease and dental bleeding. Those who did not report careful self-management of their condition were more likely to have missing teeth than those who did work to control their blood sugar levels. Some people with diabetes are at greater risk for oral health problems than others. For example, people who don’t maintain tight control over their blood sugar levels are more likely to get gum disease. Al Continue reading >>

How To Keep Your Mouth Healthy

How To Keep Your Mouth Healthy

If you have diabetes, you’re more likely to have oral health problems like cavities and gum disease. If you have diabetes and you're over 50, your risk is even higher. That's because dental problems and age go hand in hand, whether or not you have diabetes. The good news is that controlling your diabetes will go a long way toward protecting your teeth and gums. And that, in turn, will also help you manage your diabetes. If you have diabetes, keep an eye out for these oral health conditions -- especially if you've already reached the half-century mark. Gingivitis Gum disease is the most common oral health problem among people with diabetes. The first stage of gum disease is called gingivitis. This is when bacteria cause your gums to bleed, turn red, and feel sore. Bacteria love to feast on sugar, turning it into tooth-damaging acid. Uncontrolled diabetes means more sugar in your saliva, and that means a free banquet for bacteria. As bacteria gather, they combine with saliva and pieces of leftover food to form plaque. When it builds up, it leads to tooth decay and gum disease. Regular brushing and flossing, as well as rinsing with antiseptic mouthwash will get rid of it and stop gingivitis in its tracks. Periodontitis If left untreated, gingivitis can turn into periodontitis, a more serious type of gum disease that erodes the bone and tissues that support your teeth. In the worst case, you might lose your teeth. If you don’t floss and brush regularly, bacteria and plaque can build up on your teeth. That causes your gums to pull away from them. It creates pockets where bacteria dig in and wage war on more and more parts of your mouth, including bones. Periodontitis can't be reversed and can't be treated with brushing and flossing alone. Your dentist will have to get in Continue reading >>

Diet, Diabetes And Tooth Decay

Diet, Diabetes And Tooth Decay

If you are one of the 16 million Americans with diabetes, you're probably aware that the disease can cause problems with your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart and other parts of your body. What you may not know is that diabetics are more susceptible to developing oral infections and gum (periodontal) disease than those who do not have diabetes. Diet and tooth decay Your teeth are covered with plaque, a sticky film of bacteria. After you have a meal, snack or beverage that contains sugars or starches, the bacteria release acids that attack tooth enamel. Repeated attacks can cause the enamel to break down and may eventually result in cavities. When diabetes is not controlled properly, high glucose levels in saliva may help bacteria and plaque thrive. Plaque that is not removed can eventually harden into tartar. When tartar collects on your teeth, it makes a thorough cleaning of your teeth more difficult. This can create conditions that lead to chronic inflammation and infection in the mouth. Diabetes lowers your resistance to infection and can slow the healing process. What you can do Reduce or eliminate sugars and starches from your diet, eat healthy foods and exercise regularly. Brush twice a day with fluoride toothpaste and clean once a day between your teeth with floss or an interdental cleaner to remove decay-causing plaque. Keep teeth and gums strong by keeping track of blood sugar levels. Also, have your triglycerides and cholesterol levels monitored. Treat dental infections immediately. Diabetics who combine good dental care with insulin control typically have a better chance of avoiding gum disease. Provide your medical and oral health histories to both your medical and dental care providers. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Dental Health

Diabetes And Dental Health

Tweet Problems with teeth and gums can be more common for people with diabetes, so good dental health is important to prevent dental complications developing. Looking after your teeth and gums is an essential part of learning to live with both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. You should inform your dentist if you have either new-onset or long-standing diabetes as this might affect your dental treatment and how often they must review your teeth and gums. Diabetes and dental hygiene People with diabetes who have poor control of their blood glucose levels are more likely to develop dental health problems. Therefore keeping your blood sugar within a normal range will reduce this risk. Eating a balanced diet, getting regular exercise and giving up smoking is also advised to lessen the risk of oral health problems. Making sure that you visit a dentist every six months ensures that any infection will be treated as early as possible. Minor dental problems can quickly escalate, and a routine visit to the dentist will pick up on these. In the UK, although people with diabetes are more prone to dental problems, they do not receive any extra financial help for dental treatment. What are the symptoms of dental health problems? Sore or swollen gums Bleeding gums Receding gums Loose teeth Bad breath You should visit your dentist if you experience any of these symptoms; urgent treatment might be required to prevent a problem from worsening. Diabetes and gum diseases Having prolonged high blood glucose levels can increase the risk of oral health problems, such as gum disease. Gum disease, also known as periodontitis, is the sixth most common disease in the world. It occurs when bacteria within the mouth begins to form into a sticky plaque which sits on the surface of the tooth. Gum Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetes Affect Oral Health?

How Does Diabetes Affect Oral Health?

It is estimated that up to 20 million people have diabetes, but only two-thirds of these individuals are diagnosed. Studies have shown that diabetics are more susceptible to the development of oral infections and periodontal (gum) disease than those who do not have diabetes. Oral infections tend to be more severe in diabetic patients than non-diabetic patients. And, diabetics who do not have good control over their blood sugar levels tend to have more oral health problems. These infections occur more often after puberty and in aging patients. How are gum disease and diabetes related? Because diabetes reduces the body's resistance to infection, the gums are at risk for gingivitis, an inflammation usually caused by the presence of bacteria in plaque. Plaque is the sticky film that accumulates on teeth both above and below the gum line. Without regular dental check-ups, gum disease may result if gingivitis is left untreated. It also can cause inflammation and destruction of tissues surrounding and supporting teeth, gums, bone and fibers that hold the gums to the teeth. What other types of problems could I experience? Diabetics may experience burning mouth syndrome and fungal infections, such as thrush and oral candidiasis. Dry mouth (xerostomia) also may develop, causing an increased incidence of decay. To prevent problems with bacterial infections in the mouth, your dentist may prescribe antibiotics, medicated mouth rinses and more frequent cleanings. How can I stay healthy? Make sure to take extra good care of your mouth and have dental infections treated immediately. Diabetics who receive good dental care and have good insulin control typically have a better chance at avoiding gum disease. Diet and exercise may be the most important changes that diabetics can make to im Continue reading >>

What Is Type 1 Diabetes?

What Is Type 1 Diabetes?

What is type 1 diabetes? It's a disease in which the pancreas is unable to produce insulin. Insulin is a hormone that controls the amount of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and adolescents and is a lifelong (chronic) disease. In type 1 diabetes, there is no insulin to let glucose get into the cells, so sugar builds up in the bloodstream where it can cause life-threatening complications. Diabetes lowers the body's ability to fight infection and slows healing. People with type 1 diabetes must take insulin injections every day. In type 2 diabetes, the body may not be producing enough insulin or the insulin is not working adequately (insulin resistance). The pancreas initially makes extra insulin to compensate, but with time fails to produce enough to regulate blood glucose levels. This type of diabetes usually develops in adulthood and is more common. According to the American Diabetes Association, only 5 percent of people with diabetes have the type 1 form of the disease. People who suffer from diabetes are at high risk for tooth decay and other oral health problems. Symptoms Exhibited by Children with Diabetes According to JDRF, children with diabetes may exhibit the following symptoms: Thirst. Fatigue. Weight loss. Frequent urination. Vision changes. Fruity, sweet-smelling breath. Good blood sugar control requires a balance of food, exercise and medication. A diet rich in calcium and vitamin D helps to ensure strong bones and teeth. Proper blood sugar control is key to controlling and preventing oral health problems. Diabetes can contribute to bacteria growth in the mouth, plaque buildup and gum disease while also weakening the body's ability to fight back. Other Oral Complications According to the American Dental Associati Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetes Affect Your Oral Health?

How Does Diabetes Affect Your Oral Health?

Diabetes is one of the leading causes of disability and death in the United States. Unless it is well-managed, diabetes can cause blindness, kidney disease, nerve damage and other health problems including gum disease and tooth loss. And oral health issues can also raise your risk of developing diabetes, and make it more difficult to control the disease. November is American Diabetes Month, a time to raise awareness about diabetes and encourage people to make healthy changes that can lower their risk of diabetes or help them better control the disease. Positive lifestyle changes include eating well, exercising regularly, and good oral health care. Diabetes and Your Teeth People with diabetes have an increased risk of developing oral health problems, such as gingivitis (early stage gum disease) and periodontitis (serious gum disease). This is because diabetes can cause blood vessels to thicken, reducing their ability to remove waste products and deliver nourishment and oxygen to body tissues, including the gums. The good news is that if your blood glucose levels are well- controlled, your risk of serious oral health complications is similar to those of people without diabetes. And good oral health can also help you manage your diabetes. Serious gum disease may make it more difficult to manage blood glucose levels and can speed the progression of diabetes. It’s important for you to maintain your oral health with careful at-home hygiene routine and regular dental checkups and cleanings. And, according to the American Diabetes Association, research has also suggested that having gum disease may result in a higher chance of developing diabetes. That’s because serious gum disease may have the ability to affect glucose levels in the blood. Avoiding Diabetic Dental Problems Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Oral Health

Diabetes And Oral Health

Resize font A- A A+ Diabetes and Oral Health During the past 10 years, much research has been undertaken on the link between diabetes and periodontal disease. Periodontal disease is the sixth leading complication of diabetes. If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, you are 3 to 4 times more likely to develop periodontal disease, with a higher rate of more severe levels of bone loss and gum infection.1 What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is a serious disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin, a hormone needed to convert sugar, starches, and other foods into energy. Normally, insulin helps get sugar from the blood to the body's cells, where it is used for energy. When you have diabetes, your body has trouble making and/or using insulin, so your body does not get the fuel it needs and your blood sugar stays too high. High blood sugar sets off processes that can lead to complications, such as heart, kidney, and eye disease, or other serious problems.2,3 If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, you are 3 to 4 times more likely to develop periodontal disease. Are There Different Types of Diabetes? It is estimated that more than 20 million adults and children in the United States have some form of diabetes–14 million having been diagnosed with the disease and 6 million being unaware they have it. There are different types of the disease: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes, as well as prediabetes. Most Americans (around 90%) who are diagnosed with diabetes have type 2 diabetes.2,3 What Is Periodontal Disease? Periodontal disease, or gum disease, is a bacterial infection of the gums, ligaments, and bone that support your teeth and hold them in the jaw. If left untreated, you may experience tooth loss. The main cause of periodontal disease is bacterial Continue reading >>

Coast Dental Blog How Diabetes Can Affect Your Teeth And Gums

Coast Dental Blog How Diabetes Can Affect Your Teeth And Gums

Diabetes affects almost 26 million Americans, which is more than 8 percent of the U.S. population. The condition often requires them to make lifestyle changes, including what they eat, how they exercise and the medications they take. It also requires them to change the way they take care of their teeth and gums. About one-third of people with diabetes have severe periodontal disease which is causing the gum tissue and bone around the teeth to break down, according to the National Institutes of Health. People with poorly-controlled diabetes had a 2.9 times increased risk of developing periodontitis than non-diabetics, according to a large study published in 2002. The same study found people with well-controlled diabetes had no significant increase in the risk of periodontitis. There are several reasons why poorly-controlled diabetes can increase your chance of getting periodontal disease, said Dr. Dale Nash, a dentist at Coast Dental Wesley Chapel. In the past decade, Dr. Nash has seen an increase in the number of patients with diabetes. "People with diabetes are generally more susceptible to bacterial infection," Dr. Nash said. "Diabetics have high blood sugar, which basically coats the immune-fighting cells and affects the blood supply to many areas of the body including the patient’s mouth." Here’s how it works: The poor circulation affects the blood vessels that supply oxygen and nutrients to the gums, called the gingiva, and the cells in your mouth that help fight off infection. If the gums can’t get the nutrients they need, then it’s harder to fight infection. Also, poor circulation means the blood can’t carry away bad bacteria effectively. Research shows the functions of immune cells in poorly-controlled diabetics are altered in other ways.(1) One kind o Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Dental Care: Guide To A Healthy Mouth

Diabetes And Dental Care: Guide To A Healthy Mouth

What do brushing and flossing have to do with diabetes? Plenty. If you have diabetes, here's why dental care matters — and how to take care of your teeth and gums. When you have diabetes, high blood sugar can take a toll on your entire body — including your teeth and gums. The good news? Prevention is in your hands. Learn what you're up against, and then take charge of your dental health. Cavities and gum disease Whether you have type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes, managing your blood sugar level is key. The higher your blood sugar level, the higher your risk of: Tooth decay (cavities). Your mouth naturally contains many types of bacteria. When starches and sugars in food and beverages interact with these bacteria, a sticky film known as plaque forms on your teeth. The acids in plaque attack the surfaces of your teeth (enamel and dentin). This can lead to cavities. The higher your blood sugar level, the greater the supply of sugars and starches — and the more acid wearing away at your teeth. Early gum disease (gingivitis). Diabetes reduces your ability to fight bacteria. If you don't remove plaque with regular brushing and flossing, it'll harden under your gumline into a substance called tartar (calculus). The longer plaque and tartar remain on your teeth, the more they irritate the gingiva — the part of your gums around the base of your teeth. In time, your gums become swollen and bleed easily. This is gingivitis. Advanced gum disease (periodontitis). Left untreated, gingivitis can lead to a more serious infection called periodontitis, which destroys the soft tissue and bone that support your teeth. Eventually, periodontitis causes your gums and jawbone to pull away from your teeth, which in turn causes your teeth to loosen and possibly fall out. Periodontitis Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Gum Disease, & Other Dental Problems

Diabetes, Gum Disease, & Other Dental Problems

How can diabetes affect my mouth? Too much glucose, also called sugar, in your blood from diabetes can cause pain, infection, and other problems in your mouth. Your mouth includes your teeth your gums your jaw tissues such as your tongue, the roof and bottom of your mouth, and the inside of your cheeks Glucose is present in your saliva—the fluid in your mouth that makes it wet. When diabetes is not controlled, high glucose levels in your saliva help harmful bacteria grow. These bacteria combine with food to form a soft, sticky film called plaque. Plaque also comes from eating foods that contain sugars or starches. Some types of plaque cause tooth decay or cavities. Other types of plaque cause gum disease and bad breath. Gum disease can be more severe and take longer to heal if you have diabetes. In turn, having gum disease can make your blood glucose hard to control. What happens if I have plaque? Plaque that is not removed hardens over time into tartar and collects above your gum line. Tartar makes it more difficult to brush and clean between your teeth. Your gums become red and swollen, and bleed easily—signs of unhealthy or inflamed gums, called gingivitis. When gingivitis is not treated, it can advance to gum disease called periodontitis. In periodontitis, the gums pull away from the teeth and form spaces, called pockets, which slowly become infected. This infection can last a long time. Your body fights the bacteria as the plaque spreads and grows below the gum line. Both the bacteria and your body’s response to this infection start to break down the bone and the tissue that hold the teeth in place. If periodontitis is not treated, the gums, bones, and tissue that support the teeth are destroyed. Teeth may become loose and might need to be removed. If you hav Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Causing Tooth Loss?

Is Diabetes Causing Tooth Loss?

Dental health is a real concern for many people with diabetes, but it does not get the attention it deserves. I am glad that you are bringing it up. Diabetes is linked to tooth loss primarily because people with diabetes are more susceptible to periodontal disease. Periodontal diseases are infections, inflammations, and loss of tissue in the gums and other tooth-supporting structures such as bone. Individuals with diabetes, especially those who have poor glucose control, have a blunted defense mechanism against infections. Minor infections in the mouth, therefore, can linger on or worsen, causing chronic inflammation and erosions. Along with poor glucose control, smoking and alcohol use also cause and aggravate periodontal disease. And this isn't just a problem in adults with diabetes. Diabetic children, too, often have extensive periodontal disease by the time they reach adolescence. Keep in mind that periodontal diseases are preventable and can be treated. It is very important to do so not only to prevent tooth loss but also because periodontal disease is linked to heart attacks and strokes. In the past few years, we have come to understand that individuals who experience heart attacks and strokes also tend to have periodontal disease. People with diabetes should maintain normal glucose levels, get regular dental care, floss at least daily, refrain from smoking, and drink in moderation. Learn more in the Everyday Health Type 2 Diabetes Center. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Teeth - American Dental Association

Diabetes And Teeth - American Dental Association

By Laura Martin, Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine Did you know that 29.1 million people living in the United States have diabetes ? That’s 9.3% of the population. Approximately 1.7 million new cases are diagnosed each year—and 8.1 million people living with diabetes don’t even know they have it. Diabetes affects your body’s ability to process sugar. All food you eat is turned to sugar and used for energy. In Type I diabetes, the body doesn’t make enough insulin, a hormone that carries sugar from your blood to the cells that need it for energy. In Type II diabetes, the body stops responding to insulin. Both cases result in high blood sugar levels, which can cause problems with your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart and other parts of your body. So what does this have to do with that smile of yours — and how can you protect it? First, it’s important to understand the signs of diabetes and the roles they play in your mouth. The warning signs of diabetes affect every part of your body. After a blood test, you may be told by a doctor that you have high blood sugar. You may feel excessively thirsty or have to urinate a lot. Weight loss and fatigue are other common symptoms. Diabetes can also cause you to lose consciousness if your blood sugar falls too low. If diabetes is left untreated, it can take a toll on your mouth as well. Here's how: You may have less saliva, causing your mouth to feel dry. ( Dry mouth is also caused by certain medications.) Because saliva protects your teeth, you’re also at a higher risk of cavities. Gums may become inflamed and bleed often ( gingivitis ). You may experience delayed wound healing. You may be susceptible to infections inside of your mouth. For children with diabetes, teeth may erupt at an age earlie Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Have An Effect On Your Teeth?

Does Diabetes Have An Effect On Your Teeth?

Diabetes is a serious disease that can affect virtually every part of a person’s body. However, the consequences of diabetes for oral health may often be ignored or brushed over. If you have type I or type II diabetes, you need to pay attention to how your condition can impact your mouth. Here is a brief overview of the relationship between diabetes and oral health as well as a look at how you can prevent problems. Cavities The Mayo Clinic explains, “Your mouth naturally contains many types of bacteria. When starches and sugars in food and beverages interact with these bacteria, a sticky film known as plaque forms on your teeth. The acids in plaque attack the surfaces of your teeth … The higher your blood sugar level, the greater the supply of sugars and starches—and the more acid wearing away at your teeth.” Diabetes can also lead to dry mouth. Saliva keeps harmful germs at bay, and a shortage of it can increase your risk for cavities. Gum Disease The risk of gum disease is higher for individuals with diabetes. This is because diabetes can weaken the immune system, reducing your body’s ability to fight off harmful bacteria. This bacteria forms plaque, and the plaque sneaks under your gum line and becomes tartar. In the early stages of gum disease, this results in swollen gums and a tendency to bleed easily. Advanced gum disease may also occur. This adversely affects the structures that support your teeth, including the soft tissue and bone. You teeth could eventually fall out because of advanced gum disease, which is also known as periodontitis. Periodontitis might cause your blood sugar levels to rise. Other Possible Problems Thrush may occur, especially if you have a lot of difficulty keeping your blood glucose levels under control. Thrush, often called o Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Affect Your Teeth And Gums?

Can Diabetes Affect Your Teeth And Gums?

Did you know that trouble keeping your blood sugars in control could lead to an infection? That infection could be in your gums. That’s right. People with diabetes have a higher incidence of gum disease or periodontal disease than people without diabetes. In this article, we will look at the link between diabetes and periodontal disease. We will look at what it is, what are the prevention and treatment options available, some other oral problems that are also linked to diabetes, and more. Just like high blood glucose makes it easier for you to get an infection in other places in your body, high blood glucose levels also make it easier to get a gum infection, or other infection in your mouth. Decaying teeth and poor oral habits contribute to periodontal disease, as does smoking. We will take a look at all of that here. First, let’s see why Martin contacted TheDiabetesCouncil. Martin was interested in learning more about his high blood sugars and their effects on his teeth. He had been trying to get his blood sugar levels down, but nothing he seemed to do with diet, exercise, or medications helped in aiming his target range for blood sugars or in an A1C range that he was comfortable with. He was due to pay a visit to his dentist since his last visit was over a year ago. Martin’s dentist told him that he was at the start of a periodontal disease, and in addition, he had a gum infection. He wondered if the infection in his gums may be a reason for why he was unable to keep his blood glucose in a good range. An infection anywhere in your body could be a reason for unruly blood glucose. Let’s see if we can answer Martin’s question in depth. What is periodontal disease? Periodontal disease is an infection that develops of the gum, and underlying bone, that holds the Continue reading >>

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