diabetestalk.net

How Does Diabetes Affect Your Daily Life?

How Do I Manage Diabetes In Daily Life? Diabetacare India, Know More On Diabetes

How Do I Manage Diabetes In Daily Life? Diabetacare India, Know More On Diabetes

The first step to successful treatment is knowledge, By learning more about diabetes, how it affects you and what you can do to improve your life, you take control. Continue reading >>

'how Diabetes Affects My Daily Life'

'how Diabetes Affects My Daily Life'

Brian Hunte was born in Trinidad and now lives in London. He was diagnosed with diabetes around 34 years ago, when he was 43. He talks about living with the condition. "When I was diagnosed with diabetes, it was a surprise. I didn't feel unwell, but I had been losing weight and felt thirsty all the time. "I was drinking lots of water and going to the loo more often. I had to get up twice in the night to urinate, which wasn't normal for me." Seeing the doctor "When I described my symptoms to the GP, he said it sounded like diabetes symptoms. Blood tests confirmed I had type 1, which usually develops earlier than 43, but can develop in older people. "I was worried because I didn't know anything about diabetes. I didn't like the idea of giving myself injections. "At first, I was given tablets to stimulate the pancreas to produce insulin. I also had to change my diet. "I needed to avoid sugar, so I gave up cakes, chocolates, sweets, and sugar in my tea and coffee. It wasn't as difficult as I'd expected, but I confess I still eat cakes every now and then." Fried and sugary food "The doctors also recommended a healthy diet with no fatty foods, so no chips or anything else fried. I loved sausages, eggs, bacon and black pudding, but it wasn't too hard to give them up. "I ate more fibre and fruit (but fruit is sugary, so I don't have more than three portions a day), steamed or boiled vegetables and grilled meat. It was a normal diet, really. I could go to a restaurant with friends and order from the menu easily. "I never ate too much Trinidadian food because my wife is Irish. Growing up with three sisters in Trinidad meant I was never allowed in the kitchen. It was only when I emigrated to Dublin in 1959 that I learned to cook for myself. "I taught my wife some Trinidadian dishe Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetes Affect The Body?

How Does Diabetes Affect The Body?

Tweet Knowing how diabetes affects your body can help you look after your body and prevent diabetic complications from developing. Many of the effects of diabetes stem from the same guilty parties; namely high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels and a lack of blood glucose control. Signs of diabetes When undiagnosed or uncontrolled, the effects of diabetes on the body can be noticed by the classic symptoms of diabetes, namely: Increased thirst Frequent need to urinate Fatigue Blurred vision and Tingling or pain in the hands, feet and/or legs Long term effects of diabetes on the body In addition to the symptoms, diabetes can cause long term damage to our body. The long term damage is commonly referred to as diabetic complications. Diabetes affects our blood vessels and nerves and therefore can affect any part of the body. However, certain parts of our body are affected more than other parts. Diabetic complications will usually take a number of years of poorly controlled diabetes to develop. Complications are not a certainty and can be kept at bay and prevented by maintaining a strong level of control on your diabetes, your blood pressure and cholesterol. These can all be helped by keeping to a healthy diet, avoiding cigarettes and alcohol, and incorporating regular activity into your daily regime in order to keep blood sugar levels within recommended blood glucose level guidelines. The effect of diabetes on the heart Diabetes and coronary heart disease are closely related. Diabetes contributes to high blood pressure and is linked with high cholesterol which significantly increases the risk of heart attacks and cardiovascular disease. Diabetes and strokes Similar to how diabetes affects the heart, high blood pressure and cholesterol raises the risk of strokes. How dia Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Constantly Affects Daily Life

Type 1 Diabetes Constantly Affects Daily Life

Although more than one million Americans have type 1 diabetes, most people don't understand the toll it can take on daily living. "It would be easier to tell you how diabetes doesn't affect my life," said Meri Schuhmacher-Jackson, a mother of four sons -- three with type 1 diabetes. "Type 1 diabetes affects every aspect of our lives. It looks invisible from the outside. But, it's anything but invisible for us. There's a hamster running on a wheel in your brain all the time," she explained. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that occurs when the body's immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys the body's insulin-producing cells. Insulin is a hormone that helps the body use the sugar in foods as fuel for the body and brain. Because the body can no longer make enough insulin, people with type 1 diabetes have to replace that lost insulin. This can be accomplished with insulin injections -- about four to six shots a day -- or from a tiny tube inserted under the skin that's attached to an insulin pump. The tubing has to be changed and reinserted in a new place under the skin approximately every three days. People with type 1 diabetes have to make a number of potentially life-challenging decisions about their care throughout the day. They need to check their blood sugar levels by lancing their fingers to draw a small drop of blood at least four times a day, and often more, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). And, unfortunately, insulin dosing is not a precise science. "Eating, exercising, stress, illness and more can all impact blood sugar levels," said Mark Heyman, director of the Center for Diabetes and Mental Health in Solana Beach, Calif. Heyman has type 1 diabetes. All of those factors make getting the right amount of insulin a difficult balanc Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And A Healthy Family Lifestyle

Type 2 Diabetes And A Healthy Family Lifestyle

When You’re Living With Type 2 Diabetes, Your Family Lives With It As Well Diabetes affects 29.1 million Americans, or 9.3% of the U.S. population — and of all people with diabetes, about 95% have Type 2. When you live with Type 2 diabetes, you quickly realize that your immediate family lives with it, too. Family support is essential when it comes to day-to-day management of diabetes and avoiding serious health issues related to the disease. Diabetes can affect the entire family in several ways. In particular, your blood relatives should be aware that a family history of Type 2 diabetes puts them at higher risk for developing both Type 2 and prediabetes. Prediabetes is diagnosed when blood glucose is higher than normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes; it’s a risk factor for the development of Type 2 diabetes. Family ties that bind It is well documented that Type 2 diabetes runs in families. If you have it, your family members — especially close relatives such as siblings and children — have a strong genetic tendency to develop the disease. Your children’s risk of developing diabetes correlates with the age at which you were diagnosed. If you were diagnosed before age 50, your offspring have a one in seven chance of developing Type 2 diabetes; if you were diagnosed after age 50, the possibility drops to one in 13. Some research suggests that a child’s risk for developing Type 2 diabetes increases if the parent with Type 2 is the mother, and that the risk goes up to about 50% if both parents have it. If you’re an identical twin with Type 2 diabetes, your twin’s risk is almost three in four. In fact, if you have Type 2 diabetes but can’t think of any relatives who have it, chances are that some do have it but don’t know it yet. Current Continue reading >>

Alzheimer's Disease: Coping With Changes In Daily Life

Alzheimer's Disease: Coping With Changes In Daily Life

Alzheimer's disease will bring significant changes in your day-to-day experiences. Things you once did easily will become increasingly difficult. The following suggestions from the Alzheimer's Association may help you cope with changes in your daily life and plan for changes that will occur in the future. Doing difficult tasks You may find familiar activities such as balancing your checkbook, preparing a meal, or doing household chores more difficult. Try the following tips: Do difficult tasks during the times of the day when you normally feel best. Give yourself time to accomplish a task, and don't let others rush you. Take a break if something is too difficult. Arrange for others to help you with tasks that are too difficult. Communicating with others You may begin to experience difficulty understanding what people are saying or finding the right words to express your thoughts. The following tips are important in communicating: Take your time. Ask the person to repeat a statement, speak slowly, or write down words if you do not understand. Find a quiet place if there is too much distracting noise. Driving Understand that at some point it may no longer be safe for you to drive. Discuss with your family and physician about how and when you will make decisions about driving. Make plans for other transportation options, such as family members, friends, or community services. Contact your local chapter of the Alzheimer's Association to learn what local transportation services are available. Dealing with memory changes Post a schedule of the things you do every day, such as meal times, regular exercise, a medication schedule, and bed time. Have someone call to remind you of meal times, appointments, or your medication schedule. Keep a book containing important notes, such a Continue reading >>

How Type 2 Diabetes Affects Life Expectancy

How Type 2 Diabetes Affects Life Expectancy

Type 2 diabetes typically shows up later in life, although the incidence in younger people is increasing. The disease, which is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar), or hyperglycemia, usually results from a combination of unhealthy lifestyle habits, obesity, and genes. Over time, untreated hyperglycemia can lead to serious, life-threatening complications. Type 2 diabetes also puts you at risk for certain health conditions that can reduce your life expectancy. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, diabetes is the 7th most common cause of death in the United States. However, there is no defining statistic to tell you how long you’ll live with type 2 diabetes. The better you have your diabetes under control, the lower your risk for developing associated conditions that may shorten your lifespan. The top cause of death for people with type 2 diabetes is cardiovascular disease. This is due to the fact that high blood sugar levels can damage blood vessels, and also because people with type 2 diabetes often have high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, and other factors that increase the risk of heart disease. When you have type 2 diabetes, there are many factors that can increase your risk of complications, and these complications can impact your life expectancy. They include: High blood sugar levels: Uncontrolled high blood sugar levels affect many organs and contribute to the development of complications. High blood pressure: According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), 71 percent of people with diabetes have high blood pressure. High blood pressure increases the risk of kidney disease, stroke, cardiovascular disease, and other complications. Lipid disorders: According to the ADA, 65 percent of those with diabetes have high low- Continue reading >>

6 Lifestyle Changes To Control Your Diabetes

6 Lifestyle Changes To Control Your Diabetes

Working closely with your doctor, you can manage your diabetes by focusing on six key changes in your daily life. 1. Eat healthy. This is crucial when you have diabetes, because what you eat affects your blood sugar. No foods are strictly off-limits. Focus on eating only as much as your body needs. Get plenty of vegetables, fruits, and whole grains. Choose nonfat dairy and lean meats. Limit foods that are high in sugar and fat. Remember that carbohydrates turn into sugar, so watch your carb intake. Try to keep it about the same from meal to meal. This is even more important if you take insulin or drugs to control your blood sugars. 2. Exercise. If you're not active now, it’s time to start. You don't have to join a gym and do cross-training. Just walk, ride a bike, or play active video games. Your goal should be 30 minutes of activity that makes you sweat and breathe a little harder most days of the week. An active lifestyle helps you control your diabetes by bringing down your blood sugar. It also lowers your chances of getting heart disease. Plus, it can help you lose extra pounds and ease stress. 3. Get checkups. See your doctor at least twice a year. Diabetes raises your odds of heart disease. So learn your numbers: cholesterol, blood pressure, and A1c (average blood sugar over 3 months). Get a full eye exam every year. Visit a foot doctor to check for problems like foot ulcers and nerve damage. 4. Manage stress. When you're stressed, your blood sugar levels go up. And when you're anxious, you may not manage your diabetes well. You may forget to exercise, eat right, or take your medicines. Find ways to relieve stress -- through deep breathing, yoga, or hobbies that relax you. 5. Stop smoking. Diabetes makes you more likely to have health problems like heart disease Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Can Affect Your Nerves

How Diabetes Can Affect Your Nerves

According to the International Diabetes Federation diabetics run the risk of developing serious health problems affecting the nerves, eyes, kidneys, heart and blood vessels. They also have a higher risk of developing infections. It is important that diabetics maintain cholesterol, blood pressure and blood glucose at normal or close to normal levels in order to avoid the above problems. Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to lower limb amputation, kidney failure, blindness and cardiovascular disease. Diabetic neuropathy Nerve damage as a result of diabetes is referred to as diabetic neuropathy and is a common complication of the disease. Neuropathy means damage to the nerves, something that prevents one from feeling sensations like pain. Consistently high blood sugar levels can damage the nerves in a number of ways, but the damage is mostly experienced as numbness, pain and weakness in the arms, hands, feet and legs. Read: Eric Clapton: Nerve pain like 'electric shocks' The pain caused by diabetes-related nerve damage usually isn’t severe and may be overlooked by the patient. There are four types of diabetic neuropathy: Peripheral neuropathy causes pain or loss of feeling in the hands, arms, feet, and legs. Autonomic neuropathy can cause changes in digestion, bowel and bladder control, and erectile dysfunction. It can also affect the nerves that serve the heart and control blood pressure. Proximal neuropathy causes pain in the thighs and hips and weakness in the legs. Focal neuropathy can affect any nerve in the body, leading to pain or weakness. How does it happen? Endocrine Web explains that there is still a lot uncertainty about exactly how elevated blood glucose levels affect the nerves. A long-term study published in 1993 clearly showed that neuropathy (and other compl Continue reading >>

Everyday Life With Diabetes

Everyday Life With Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes may change your life, but with a few simple tools, you'll learn how to easily manage your condition. Everyday life with diabetes may involve testing your blood glucose levels and monitoring the highs and lows of your diabetes, but you can do this. You can manage your diabetes. Our Daily Living Center will show you how to manage your diabetes in your everyday life, including managing diabetes when you travel, at work, at school, and on vacation, as well as the emotional sides of the condition. With diabetes, daily routines—such as working, eating, and exercising—take special preparation. Learning how to plan for these everyday tasks can help lower your blood glucose levels and drastically reduce your risk of diabetes complications. This article covers everyday life with type 1 diabetes, and everyday life with type 2 diabetes. Everyday Life with Type 1 Diabetes A day in the life of someone with type 1 diabetes involves working toward blood glucose level goals. You can do this by balancing what you eat with the amount of insulin you take. However, exercise is something you can do to boost your overall health and well-being. Check out our Exercise Center, which shows you how to get started, as well as various exercise options. To help you stay on track with your blood glucose level goals, you should work with your diabetes treatment team, which typically involves a doctor, endocrinologist, registered dietitian, and certified diabetes educator. Your treatment team can help you deal with some of the challenges you may encounter with diabetes, such as how to deal with special events and holidays, or how to manage your diabetes on vacation. Everyday Life with Type 2 Diabetes Managing everyday life with type 2 diabetes is somewhat different Continue reading >>

How To Live A Healthy Life As A Diabetic

How To Live A Healthy Life As A Diabetic

Edit Article If you have diabetes, you'll be looking into improving and maintaining your health for the long run. You control your diabetes successfully, by eating well, exercising and keeping informed about developments for better treatment. Your quality of life is also about finding ways to be happy, share with others and have fun in your life. While you've got a condition which will affect you medically, it is possible to start each day afresh and take control of your health rather than let it dictate your routine. 1 Make an appointment to discuss your overall health with your trusted health team. This is important, both so that you understand what will help you and you don't feel alone dealing with this disease. In particular: Always seek medical advice for any questions or concerns you may have. Do not let small things go unnoticed––even little changes can mean something significant and the sooner you bring it to the attention of your doctor, the better. If you have not been following your recommended diet, or taking your medications as directed, you need to see your doctor. 2 Follow your recommended diet with care. Your doctor or dietitian should have given you a diet to follow; diet is key to maintaining wellness when you have diabetes. Every diabetic individual has differing needs, so it's likely that your doctor has tailored the diet suggestion to your specific needs. If you haven't been given a recommended diet, ask for one. Ask questions about what special needs you have and where you can source healthful options from if they're hard to obtain in your area. Remember to drink carefully too––many commercial and homemade drinks contain sugar and other additions that may spoil a carefully followed diet if not accounted for. A food diary can be helpful if Continue reading >>

Managing Your Diabetes

Managing Your Diabetes

Before you developed diabetes your pancreas kept your blood glucose levels within the normal range by producing the right amount of insulin at the right time. There is no cure for diabetes, but it can be managed. Balancing the carbohydrate foods (sugars and starches) you eat with physical activity and medicine (if prescribed) can keep your blood glucose in a healthy range. There are also some other variables, eg illness, that will have an effect on your glucose level and your diabetes nurse specialist will outline these further for you. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Emotional Well-being

Diabetes And Emotional Well-being

Diabetes and Emotional Well-Being Diabetes does not only impact on people physically, but also emotionally and mentally. Did you know? Almost one in five Australian adults will be affected by mental illness each year. The risk of depression is doubled in people with diabetes. Teenagers and the elderly with diabetes are at a higher risk of developing depression. Emotional well-being is an essential part of living a healthy life and managing diabetes. The everyday demands of managing diabetes can impact on a person's emotional well-being, which may lead to diabetes related distress, diabetes burnout or depression. How can diabetes affect emotional well-being? Diabetes related distress refers to the emotional burdens and worries that arise from managing diabetes. Areas that people with diabetes have identified as possibly contributing to diabetes related distress include: worrying about complications, feeling anxious and guilty when diabetes management is sub-optimal, being unsure if moods or feelings are related to diabetes, feeling constantly stressed about food and eating, constant concern over potential hypoglycaemia. Diabetes burnout develops when a person grows tired of managing the everyday demands of diabetes which may lead to an individual ignoring or neglecting day to day diabetes management. Depression is a serious and chronic condition that affects a person's physical and mental health, resulting in an inability to enjoy and carry out usual daily activities. Click here to view the fact sheet Depression and Diabetes. Be informed on signs and symptoms of depression and the relationship between diabetes and depression. Stress is experienced by all at some stage, and we all react in different ways. It is important to recognise that stress can have a direct effect o Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management: How Lifestyle, Daily Routine Affect Blood Sugar

Diabetes Management: How Lifestyle, Daily Routine Affect Blood Sugar

Diabetes management requires awareness. Know what makes your blood sugar level rise and fall — And how to control these day-to-day factors. Keeping your blood sugar levels within the range recommended by your doctor can be challenging. That's because many things make your blood sugar levels change, sometimes unexpectedly. Following are some factors that can affect your blood sugar levels. Food Healthy eating is a cornerstone of healthy living — with or without diabetes. But if you have diabetes, you need to know how foods affect your blood sugar levels. It's not only the type of food you eat but also how much you eat and the combinations of food types you eat. What to do: Learn about carbohydrate counting and portion sizes. A key to many diabetes management plans is learning how to count carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are the foods that often have the biggest impact on your blood sugar levels. And for people taking mealtime insulin, it's crucial to know the amount of carbohydrates in your food, so you get the proper insulin dose. Learn what portion size is appropriate for each type of food. Simplify your meal planning by writing down portions for the foods you eat often. Use measuring cups or a scale to ensure proper portion size and an accurate carbohydrate count. Make every meal well-balanced. As much as possible, plan for every meal to have a good mix of starches, fruits and vegetables, proteins and fats. It's especially important to pay attention to the types of carbohydrates you choose. Some carbohydrates, such as fruits, vegetables and whole grains, are better for you than are others. These foods are low in carbohydrates and contain fiber that helps keep your blood sugar levels more stable. Talk to your doctor, nurse or dietitian about the best food choices and Continue reading >>

Biotechnology Solutions For Everyday Life

Biotechnology Solutions For Everyday Life

Since 1982, hundreds of millions of people worldwide have been helped by more than 230 biotechnology drugs and vaccines. There are more than 400 biotech drug products and vaccines currently in clinical trials targeting more than 200 diseases, including various cancers, Alzheimer's disease, heart disease, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, AIDS and arthritis. Biotechnology is responsible for hundreds of medical diagnostic tests that keep the blood supply safe from the AIDS virus and detect other conditions early enough to be successfully treated. Home pregnancy tests are also biotechnology diagnostic products. And there's more to come ó biotechnology is one of the most research-intensive industries in the world, spending $20.4 billion on research and development in 2005. Who benefits? If you are with your family right now, you're looking at people who are benefiting from biotechnology. Give them a hug, and read on. Has a member of your family been vaccinated against hepatitis B, either separately or as part of an infant or child-hood vaccination regimen? If so, you have biotechnology to thank for protection against this sometimes fatal disease that attacks millions of people each year. Because the vaccine prevents infection-related liver damage that can result in liver cancer, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention calls this “the first anti-cancer vaccine.” Do you know someone who has diabetes? Before 1982, there were few options for insulin-dependent diabetics who were allergic to animal-derived insulin. That year, a human version of the drug entered the market ñ the first ever biotechnology medicine to be commercialized. Recombinant insulin is still saving lives today, and the next few years may bring inhaled forms of insulin and other new diabetes drugs Continue reading >>

More in diabetes