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How Does Diabetes Affect The Respiratory System

The Effects Of Leucine, Zinc, And Chromium Supplements On Inflammatory Events Of The Respiratory System In Type 2 Diabetic Rats

The Effects Of Leucine, Zinc, And Chromium Supplements On Inflammatory Events Of The Respiratory System In Type 2 Diabetic Rats

Abstract Diabetes mellitus is a major cause of serious micro- and macrovascular diseases that affect nearly every system in the body, including the respiratory system. Non-enzymatic protein glycation due to hyperglycaemic stress has fundamental implications due to the large capillary network and amount of connective tissue in the lung. The current study was designed to determine whether leucine, zinc, and chromium supplementations influence the function and histological structure of the respiratory tract in a rat model of type 2 diabetes. Seventy-seven rats were divided into eleven groups, consisting of 7 animals each. One group served as negative control and insulin and glibenclamide were used as positive control drugs. Thus, eight groups received the nutritional supplements alone or in combination with each other. Nutritional supplements and glibenclamide were added to the drinking water and neutral protamine Hagedorn insulin was subcutaneously injected during the 4 weeks of treatment period. The induction of type 2 diabetes in the rats caused an infiltration of mononuclear cells and edema in the submucosa of the trachea and lung, severe fibrosis around the vessels and airways, and perivascular and peribronchial infiltration of inflammatory cells and fibrin. In the diabetic group, the total inflammation score and Reid index significantly increased. Diabetes induction significantly reduced the total antioxidant status and elevated the lipid peroxidation products in the serum, lung lavage and lung tissue of the diabetic animals. Treatment with nutritional supplements significantly decreased the histopathological changes and inflammatory indices in the diabetic animals. Supplementation of diabetic rats with leucine, zinc, and chromium, alone and in combination, significa Continue reading >>

Diseases Of Respiratory System In Diabetes Mellitus

Diseases Of Respiratory System In Diabetes Mellitus

Skin Respiratory Cardiovascular Angiopathy There are no special respiratory infections that are pertained especially only to diabetics. It is important to remember that all infections, which are also found in other people, for diabetics are manifested severer cases and they cause increasing of blood sugar level. This is the reason why diabetics should be extremely careful, take care of themselves, avoid hypothermia in order to escape appearance of any complications. If a diabetic got sick with acute pneumonia or bronchitis, then it is necessary to go through the full course of treatment, it means that there is no need to stop it upon some improvements. In case if doctor prescribed a course of antibiotics for two weeks, then it is the exact period of treatment that should be completed and not less than that. It is a very important factor! Simultaneous and constant control of blood sugar level is required in order to compensate the diabetes. If diabetic has some other chronic diseases of the respiratory system like, for example, tonsillitis, chronic bronchitis, maxillary sinusitis or bronchial asthma, then it is necessary to pass physical examination even when there are no signs of any complications. This is a part of measures of diabetes compensation. Microangiopathy This disorder affects lung blood vessels, which is a sort of fertile grounds for pneumonia or anything like that. In this case diabetics have a weakened immunity, therefore, the disease stays longer and recovery is harder, which adds to probability of complications and diabetes mellitus may get transformed into a more dangerous form because of the inflammatory process in the respiratory system. Bronchial asthma In Greek literal meaning of word 'asthma' means difficulty in breathing, which is exactly what hap Continue reading >>

Top 30 Doctor Insights On: How Does Diabetes Affect The Respiratory System

Top 30 Doctor Insights On: How Does Diabetes Affect The Respiratory System

1 Surfactant deficienc: One of the final stages in lung maturity is the production of a soapy material called surfactant it lines the inside of air sacs & prevents the sacs from deflating after air breathing starts. Infants that are not making enough surfactant to keep air sacs open so many will deflate leading to distress. Infants of diabetics often have delayed surfactant ...Read more 6 17 20 23 24 26 27 Continue reading >>

Smoking And Diabetes: 4 Smoking-related Problems

Smoking And Diabetes: 4 Smoking-related Problems

What are the risks of smoking? You’ve probably heard the grim statistics a million times over. Even if you don’t know all the numbers, you likely know that smoking is bad for your health. It has a negative effect on every organ in your body. It raises your risk of potentially fatal diseases, such as heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and many types of cancer. As bad as smoking is for the average person, it’s even worse if you have diabetes. You already have a condition that affects many parts of your body. When you add smoking to the mix, it raises your risk of health complications even more. If you have diabetes, you have to work hard enough already to keep your blood sugar in check. Smoking can make that task even more difficult. Smoking may make your body more resistant to insulin, which can lead to higher blood sugar levels. Uncontrolled blood sugar can lead to serious complications from diabetes, including problems with your kidneys, heart, and blood vessels. Like diabetes, smoking also damages your cardiovascular system. This double-burden can be lethal. At least 68 percent of adults age 65 and older with diabetes die from heart disease, reports the American Heart Association. Another 16 percent die from stroke. If you have diabetes, you’re two to four times more likely to develop heart disease or have a stroke than people without the condition. Smoking directly affects your lungs and can lead to chronic bronchitis, emphysema, and other respiratory diseases. People with these diseases are at higher risk of developing lung infections, such as pneumonia. These infections can be especially dangerous when you have diabetes. You might get sicker than you otherwise would and have a harder time recovering. Being sick also raises blood su Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Diabetes And Pregnancy

What is diabetes? Diabetes is a condition in which the body can't produce enough insulin, or it can't use it properly. Insulin is the hormone that allows glucose (sugar) to enter the cells to be used as fuel. When glucose cannot enter the cells, it builds up in the blood. This is called hyperglycemia or high blood sugar. Damage from diabetes comes from the effects of hyperglycemia on other organ systems including the eyes, kidneys, heart, blood vessels, and nerves. In early pregnancy, hyperglycemia can result in birth defects. What are the different types of diabetes? There are three basic types of diabetes including: Type 1 diabetes. Also called insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder in which the body's immune system destroys, or attempts to destroy, the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Type 1 diabetes usually develops in children or young adults, but can start at any age. Type 2 diabetes. A metabolic disorder resulting from the body's inability to make enough, or properly use, insulin. It used to be called noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Gestational diabetes. A condition in which the blood glucose level is elevated and other diabetic symptoms appear during pregnancy in a woman who has not previously been diagnosed with diabetes. Diabetes is a serious disease, which, if not controlled, can be life-threatening. It is often associated with long-term complications that can affect every system and part of the body. Diabetes can contribute to eye disorders and blindness, heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, amputation, and nerve damage. What happens with diabetes and pregnancy? During pregnancy, the placenta supplies a growing fetus with nutrients and water. The placenta also makes a variety of horm Continue reading >>

Respiratory Complications Of Diabetes.

Respiratory Complications Of Diabetes.

It is a well-known fact that diabetes has ill effects on the heart and kidney of a person. But is the respiratory system free from the effect of diabetes? The most important organ of our body that we use every second during our lifetime - our lungs, can be affected by diabetes. A person affected by diabetes may have certain lung conditions that impact its functioning and how well he/she breathes. “A person affected by diabetes may have certain lung conditions that impact its functioning and how well he/she breathes.” Lung Condition Research conducted on diabetic patients have revealed that they are vulnerable to respiratory troubles such as asthma, COPD, pneumonia and pulmonary fibrosis. They are more likely to develop infection than non-diabetics and the risk is as high as twenty to fifty per cent more than non- diabetics. Lung Function People with type 2 diabetes suffer decreased lung function, which is a measure of how well a person can breathe. The lung function also measures how well it delivers oxygen to other parts of the body. People affected by diabetes have a lower lung volume than those without. A reduced lung function aggravates respiratory problems if the person is obese or has other lung disorders. Smoking also adds to the problem. But not every diabetes affected person, will develop lung disorders even though some studies have shown a correlation between increasing blood glucose level and decreased lung function. So, the more your blood sugar is out of control, the worse your lung function may be. While some researchers are still trying to understand the co-relation between diabetes and lung disorders, it is believed to be caused by lung inflammation. A person afflicted with diabetes has a higher level of inflammatory molecules such as C-reactive prot Continue reading >>

Lung Disease And Respiratory System

Lung Disease And Respiratory System

Pulmonary hypertension is a serious blood pressure issue that affects the right side of the heart and the small arteries within your lungs. It is a critical disorder that usually gets worse over time and can even become deadly. The very small arteries, referred to as pulmonary arteries, become blocked, constricted, or completely damaged. When this occurs, pressure within your arteries becomes elevated because blood can no longer flow freely throughout the lungs. This causes the right ventricle of your heart to work more strenuously to get the blood to flow throughout the lungs. Because your heart has to work so hard, the muscle can become very weak and sometimes stops working altogether. Pulmonary hypertension is generally an incurable disease; however, the symptoms or underlying cause of the disease may be treated so that you can function better on a daily basis. While general hypertension is a concept most people are well aware of, pulmonary hypertension is less familiar. Armin Meyer, M.D., a physician with GHS’ Pulmonary Hypertension Program, offers this explanation: “Wherever there’s blood flow, there has to be pressure to make it flow. Hypertension is when that pressure is elevated because of resistance in the body’s arteries.” He continued, “After blood goes through the body, the heart pushes it through the lungs to pick up more oxygen. When those arteries in the lungs are constricted and the pressure builds, it’s called pulmonary hypertension.” Although pulmonary hypertension was first identified more than 100 years ago, only with the rise of echocardiography -- a non-invasive technology that provides information regarding heart function and lung pressures -- has diagnosis become more feasible. “In the body, we can measure pressure with a blood Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Affects Your Lungs

How Diabetes Affects Your Lungs

Your feet. Your heart. Your kidneys. When you think of the body parts affected by diabetes, these are the ones that likely come to mind. But diabetes also affects another part of your body. And it’s one you use every second of your life: your lungs. If you have diabetes, you are more likely to have certain lung conditions. Diabetes also has an impact on lung function, or how well you breathe. After you receive a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, your doctor will work with you to determine the best method of treatment, be it medication or insulin injections. But, as Dr. Anthony Cardillo explains, the most effective treatment for type 2 diabetes? Proper diet and exercise. 2017 Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced or reprinted without permission from Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. Use of this information is governed by the Healthgrades User Agreement. Lung Conditions A study published in Diabetes Care compared the health records of more than 1.8 million California residents with and without diabetes. The research found that adults with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes are: 8% more likely to have asthma 22% more likely to have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) 54% more likely to have pulmonary fibrosis, a disease in which scarring in the lungs interferes with your ability to breathe Nearly twice as likely to have been hospitalized for pneumonia Lung Function If you have type 2 diabetes, you have decreased lung function compared with people who don’t have diabetes. Lung function is a measure of how well you’re breathing. It also refers to how well your lungs deliver oxygen to your body. If you have type 2 diabetes, you tend to have 3% to 10% lower lung volumes than adults who do not have the disease. Generally, re Continue reading >>

Respiratory System

Respiratory System

What is the respiratory system? It is the body system that is responsible for bringing in oxygen and letting out carbon dioxide into and out of your body, A specific form of respiration is cellular respiration, in which high-energy glucose molecules are broken to release energy the cell can use. What are some organs and parts of this system? Lung. The lungs expand and contract when oxygen is taken into the body. The lungs are located on either side of the heart. It is the necessary respiration organ in many organisms. Nose. The nose is part of the uppermost respiratory tract. It is made up of two bones and cartilage. It filters and moistens air before it moves to other parts of the respiratory tract. Bronchioles. These are the branches of the Bronchi that put air into the lungs. How is this system affected by Type 2 Diabetes? Diabetes can sometimes cause breathing problems. These breathing problems can affect how you take in air and what is happening inside of your respiratory tracts. Visit: Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Affects The Digestive System

How Diabetes Affects The Digestive System

With an increase of glucose in the blood, our digestive systems can experience problems with absorbing necessary nutrients. Diabetes is currently one of the most common health conditions. This illness arises when the body is not capable of producing insulin, something that usually helps regulate the amount of sugar in the blood. Diabetes varies in type and severity, but regardless of these details they all pose health risks. While it continues to be incurable, it is treatable. For this reason, we are about to explain in detail how diabetes affects the digestive system. Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com The functions of the digestive system One of the most important systems in a human being is the digestive system. It is a network of organs including the mouth, the pharynx, and the stomach, which must transform food into something that can be absorbed by parts of the body, mainly cells, so that it can function. The complete digestive cycle is comprised of transportation, secretion, absorption, and excretion in order for the body to function properly. It supplies all of the nutrients our bodies need through this process. It also allows us to clean or dispose of those elements that our bodies no longer need. How diabetes affects the digestive system As we already know, digestion is an automatic process. This means that our body does not require a conscious stimulus to work and digest food. The opposite is actually true, the digestive system operates on its own thanks to the nervous system. Diabetes creates issues with this system that prevent proper functioning of the digestive system. When the blood has an increased amount of glucose, our digestive system can Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis

What is respiratory acidosis? Respiratory acidosis is a condition that occurs when the lungs can’t remove enough of the carbon dioxide (CO2) produced by the body. Excess CO2 causes the pH of blood and other bodily fluids to decrease, making them too acidic. Normally, the body is able to balance the ions that control acidity. This balance is measured on a pH scale from 0 to 14. Acidosis occurs when the pH of the blood falls below 7.35 (normal blood pH is between 7.35 and 7.45). Respiratory acidosis is typically caused by an underlying disease or condition. This is also called respiratory failure or ventilatory failure. Normally, the lungs take in oxygen and exhale CO2. Oxygen passes from the lungs into the blood. CO2 passes from the blood into the lungs. However, sometimes the lungs can’t remove enough CO2. This may be due to a decrease in respiratory rate or decrease in air movement due to an underlying condition such as: There are two forms of respiratory acidosis: acute and chronic. Acute respiratory acidosis occurs quickly. It’s a medical emergency. Left untreated, symptoms will get progressively worse. It can become life-threatening. Chronic respiratory acidosis develops over time. It doesn’t cause symptoms. Instead, the body adapts to the increased acidity. For example, the kidneys produce more bicarbonate to help maintain balance. Chronic respiratory acidosis may not cause symptoms. Developing another illness may cause chronic respiratory acidosis to worsen and become acute respiratory acidosis. Initial signs of acute respiratory acidosis include: headache anxiety blurred vision restlessness confusion Without treatment, other symptoms may occur. These include: sleepiness or fatigue lethargy delirium or confusion shortness of breath coma The chronic form of Continue reading >>

Chronic Complications Of Diabetes Mellitus Related To The Respiratory System.

Chronic Complications Of Diabetes Mellitus Related To The Respiratory System.

Abstract The quality of life in patients with diabetes mellitus is mainly determined by chronic diabetic complications which may affect all organ tissues including respiratory system. Microangiopathy of pulmonary capillaries, autonomic neuropathy, myopathy of respiratory muscles or changes in collagen belong to supposed pathophysiological pathways. This paper brings brief review about reported functional consequences in subjects with diabetes - decreased vital lung capacity and pulmonary volumes, decreased diffuse lung capacity for carbon monoxide, lower basal bronchial tone, lower cough reflex sensitivity, increased incidence of sleep obstructive apnea, increase in respiratory infections, disorders in respiratory muscles or phrenical nerve. Examination of pulmonary functions may serve for early detection of chronic complications in patients with diabetes. Continue reading >>

Proximal Diabetic Neuropathy Presenting With Respiratory Weakness

Proximal Diabetic Neuropathy Presenting With Respiratory Weakness

Diabetes mellitus is the most common cause of peripheral neuropathy.1 Most patients develop a symmetric axonal distal neuropathy, but proximal diabetic neuropathy2-4and thoracic radiculopathy5 have also been recognised. Diabetic neuropathy is not among the neuromuscular diseases that result in respiratory failure.6-8 A patient with a diabetic proximal polyradiculoneuropathy and respiratory weakness was studied. His dominant symptoms were dyspnoea and orthopnoea. Case report A 50 year old man with a 47 year history of insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, presented with 2 months of progressive dyspnoea and orthopnea. These symptoms led to a cardiac catheterisation, which showed severe three vessel coronary artery disease and preserved left ventricular function (LVF) with an estimated ejection fraction of 60%. Coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) was performed. Topical cooling with ice slush was not used. Postoperatively, shortness of breath and orthopnea continued to progress. He could not lie flat in bed and slept upright in a chair. He said that this pattern started several months before surgery. He denied diplopia, difficulty chewing, fasciculations, ptosis. For 1 year, he noted paraesthesias in the feet, which was attributed to diabetic neuropathy. He had also had carpal tunnel surgery and an ulnar nerve transposition, with improvement of sensory symptoms on the right. On examination, 9 days after the CABG, he could not lie flat because of severe dyspnoea. Ocular motion was normal without fatiguing weakness. He could count only to 3 on a single breath, before his voice faded out. He had no ptosis, facial or jaw weakness, tongue fasciculations, or atrophy. Strength was normal in the arms. Strength in the hip flexors was MRC 4. Other muscle groups in the legs were full Continue reading >>

Relationship Between Diabetes And Lung Disease

Relationship Between Diabetes And Lung Disease

Diabetes mellitus is an umbrella term for a group of diseases that affects blood sugar, also known as blood glucose, throughout the body. People with diabetes suffer from high amounts of glucose in the blood, which can lead to numerous health complications and unwanted symptoms. Diabetes patients, especially those with type 1 diabetes, have an immune system that responds poorly to fighting infections. This includes fighting lung diseases. Diabetes and Lung Disease As a result of a poorly functioning immune system, people with diabetes are more likely to catch a cold, flu or other illness that will likely require a longer period of time to recover. This can have a significant impact on blood sugar levels and the overall quality of an individual’s health. In fact, several lung diseases can affect diabetes and vice versa. Diabetes can contribute to the development of pneumonia, tuberculosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Pneumonia is caused by an infection and consequential inflammation which puts pressure on the lungs and makes it hard to breath. The most common form of pneumonia is caused by a bacterial infection, named Streptococcus pneumonia. Despite popular belief, pneumonia is not caught because of cold weather. When diabetes goes untreated, it can lead to the occurrence of severe breathing difficulties in extreme temperatures associated with pneumonia. Tuberculosis is caused by a bacterial infection and is very contagious. However, not everyone who gets infected with the bacteria develops tuberculosis. For those of us in the US, tuberculosis is fairly rare, although cases have been steadily increasing in recent years. The infection destroys the cells it comes in contact with, and this often happens in the lungs. Diabetes and pulmonary tuberculos Continue reading >>

The Signs, Diagnosis & Types Of Diabetes Mellitus In Cats

The Signs, Diagnosis & Types Of Diabetes Mellitus In Cats

There are certain signs or symptoms which are commonly seen in cats with diabetes mellitus. Unfortunately, these signs also occur in other diseases and conditions. Therefore, laboratory tests are necessary to diagnose diabetes mellitus in cats. The following article includes a discussion of how this diagnosis is made and the types of diabetes found in cats. What are the signs of diabetes mellitus in cats and why do they occur? Depending on how severely insulin production is impaired, there may be few signs of disease, or the signs may be severe. Dogs with diabetes often develop cataracts; cats do not. The most common signs of diabetes are: Increased thirst (polydipsia) and urination (polyuria) Change in appetite Weight loss Change in gait (walking) Decreased activity, weakness, depression Vomiting Increased Thirst and Urination: Because the glucose cannot enter the cells, the glucose levels in the blood become abnormally high (hyperglycemia). The glucose is filtered out by the kidneys and is found in the urine (glucosuria). When it is filtered out, it carries water with it. The animal, then, is losing more water through the urine than normal and has to make up for it by drinking more. Inappropriate Elimination: The increased urination may result in the cat not always urinating in the litter box. This inappropriate urination may be one of the first signs of diabetes in cats. In addition, cats with diabetes can often develop urinary tract infections, which may also result in inappropriate elimination. Change in Appetite: Some diabetic cats eat less, because frankly, they do not feel well. Other cats may have voracious appetites and eat a lot (polyphagia) because their hypothalamus keeps telling them they are hungry. Weight Loss: Because the cat cannot use the calories he Continue reading >>

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